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beer-in-food-msg – 3/25/13

 

Period recipes with beer or ales in them.

 

NOTE: See also the files: beer-msg, ale-msg, brewing-msg, soup-msg, bread-msg, cider-msg, wine-msg, wine-cooking-msg, small-beer-msg.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I  have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done  a limited amount  of  editing. Messages having to do  with separate topics  were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the  message IDs  were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make  no claims  as  to the accuracy  of  the information  given  by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time  and  efforts of  those who have written  these messages. The copyright status  of these messages  is  unclear  at this time. If information  is  published  from  these  messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

   Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                         Stefan at florilegium.org

************************************************************************

 

From: jtn at cse.uconn.EDU (J. Terry Nutter)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Cooking with beer

Date: 8 Nov 1994 23:47:46 -0500

 

Hi, all, Angharad ver' Rhuawn here,

 

Angelica Paganelli writes:

> Medieval recipes involving beer?  I haven't made any great study of medieval

> cookery (I have the usual secondary sources--Pleyn Delit, Fabulous Feasts,

> etc.), but I've never seen any.  Could be a social class thing.

> PERHAPS people who cooked with beer didn't write down their recipes.

> Perhaps people didn't cook with beer 'cause they didn't like the taste.

> Perhaps people didn't cook with beer because it was considered a waste of

> beer.

> Perhaps the recipes out there, and I haven't seen them.  Whatever happened to

> the person who was redacting a German cookbook?  Any recipes containing

> beer in there?

I don't know about the _Buch von Guter Speise_, but there are English

recipes that call for ale (although not beer, to the best of my knowledge).

It is not nearly so common as wine, but it is certainly not unknown.

 

Glancing over my records on what recipes contain what, I found the

following:

 

From the last quarter of the 14th Century, I located seventeen recipes that

call for ale, two of which are for braggot (hot spiced ale), but the other

fifteen of which are "ordinary" recipes.  That's about 3-4% of the recipes

I have data on from that time.  These are all from Hieatt and Butler's

_Curye on Inglysch_.  For the curious, the recipes (I have more or less

regularized spellings; if you'd like spellings as they occur in the title

of the recipe, and page number and recipe number citations, write me

separately) calling for ale are, from Diuersa Servicia, Capons in Concy,

Hens in Brouet, Hares in Cive, Hares in Talbots, Numbles, Brinews, Geese in

Hochepot (as an alternative to wine), Soles in Brouet, Oysters in Brouet,

and two recipes for Eels in Brouet; from Utilis Coquinario, Rapes and

Mawmenny (the only mawmenny recipe of which I am aware that calls for ale);

from Forme of Curye, Flaumpoints, Fritters of Parsnips, Skirrits and Apples,

and one of the Braggot recipes; and from Goud Kokery, the other Braggot

recipe.

 

From the fifteenth century, in Hieatt's _An Ordinance of Pottage_, ale

appears slightly more frequently (ten recipes, for about 5% of the

collection), most often as an explicit alternative to wine.  It appears as

such an alternative in Chikeney, Cawdell, Charlet, Boiled Pevorade for

Roasted Veal, Tarts of Flesh, Posset, and Cawdell of Almonds.  Soppes

includes ale without options; Boiled Perch calls optionally for ale, but not

wine.

 

I don't have very good data on Austin's collection (I barely got started

entering it before other matters drew me away from the project; I hope to

get back soon), but based on the first roughly thirty recipes, I found four

(Bursews, Fillets in Galantyne, Ballock Broth, and Soppes Chamberlain) that

call for ale.  In the case of the fillets recipe, it is provided as an

option to broth.  In all other cases, it is simply listed as an ingredient.

 

Wine was far more common than ale as an ingredient; but ale was certainly

known. As for beer, my impression (although I am not expert on the history

of brewing) is that I may be looking too early for grain-based beverages

brewed with hops.

 

-- Angharad/Terry

 

 

Date: Mon, 01 Mar 1999 15:06:21 -0800

From: "James L. Matterer" <jlmatterer at labyrinth.net>

Subject: Re: SC - Recipe Request

 

upsxdls at Okstate.edu wrote:

> All, a brewing friend of mine has moved into a wonderful new manor.  He has

> several crates of beer that need to be used soon.  As a housewarming gift, I'm

> putting together recipes that include beer as an ingredient.  I have several

> bread and soup recipes, but am interested any recipes anyone would like to

> share.  If the recipe is period, I'd appreciate the reference, otherwise, let

> me know where it came from so I can correctly credit the source(s).  Thanks

> in advance.

 

Oyle soppes - (onion & ale soup) from Harleian MS 4016: Oyle soppes.

Take a good quantite of onyons, and myce hem, noyt to smale, & seth hem

in faire water, And take hem vppe; and then take a good quantite of

stale ale, as .iij. galons, And there-to take a pynte of goode oyle that

is fraied, and cast the onyons there-to, And lete al boyle togidre a

grete wile; and caste there-to Saffron and salt, And then put brede, in

maner of brewes, and cast the licour there-on, and serue hit forth hote.

 

My translation: Oil Sops. Take a good quantity of onions, and mince

them, not to small, & boil them in fair water, And take them up; and

then take a good quantity of stale ale, 3 gallons, And take a pint of

good oil that is fried, and cast the onions in it, And let all boil

together a great while; and cast into it Saffron & salt, And then put

bread, in the manner of brews, and cast the liquid on, and serve it

forth hot.

 

Huen

 

 

Date: Tue, 02 Mar 1999 10:09:25 -0500

From: "Nick Sasso" <Njs at mccalla.com>

Subject: SC - Beer/Ale recipe. . . Flathonys

 

This is a glorious recipe for a custard pie made with ale.  We served it as

part of a feast this last weekend and was received exceedingly well.

Cariadoc also has a good version in his cookbook that can be found on-line

at http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/cariadoc/desserts.html#19.

 

Flathonys

(Two 15th Century Cookery Books: Harleian MS. 279)

 

Flathonys. Take mylke, and yolks of egges and ale, and draw hem thorgh a

straynour, with white sugur or black; and melt faire butter, and put thereto

salt, and make faire coffyns, and put hem into a Nowne till flei be a little

hard; flen take a pile, and a dish fastened there-on, and fill fle coffyns

therewith of the seid stuffs and late hem bake while.  And Ven take hem oute

and serue hem forthe, and caste Sugur ynough on hem.

 

5 egg yolks   3 Tbl melted butter

2/3 c. cream   pinch salt

* c. ale    pastry shell (or coffin1)

1/3 c. sugar   sugar to sprinkle on top.

 

Prepare pastry/pie shell before beginning custard.

 

Beat lightly the egg yolks, add milk and ale and whisk together till mixed.

Add sugar, melted butter and salt.  Combine and add to shell.  Bake at 350F

30 minutes until set and crust golden.

 

1Coffins were very tough, almost inedible crusts made of flour and water.

They were intended, it seems to be a holder for the filling rather than a

part of the consumed tart.

 

 

Date: Tue, 2 Mar 1999 13:19:56 -0800

From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Recipe Request

 

Leanna of Sparrowhaven asked for beer recipes; here are a couple, both 15th

c. English:

 

Flathonys

Two Fifteenth Century Cookery Books p. 73/68

 

Take mylke, and yolkes of egges, and ale, and drawe hem thorgh a straynour,

with white sugur or blak; And melt faire butter, and put thereto salt, and

make faire coffyns, and put hem into a Nowne til thei be a litull hard;

then take a pile, and a dissh fastned there-on, and fill the coffyns

therewith of the seid stuffe and late hem bake a while. And then take hem

oute, and serue hem forthe, and caste Sugur ynogh on hem. [end of original]

 

1/2 c milk      1/3 c ale       4 T butter

4 egg yolks     1/4 c sugar     1 t salt

 

Bake a pie shell. Beat together milk, egg yolks, ale, sugar. Melt butter,

add salt, beat into the liquid, trying to keep the butter from separating

out (the hard part). Pour into the pie shell, bake at 350° about 20-30

minutes. Sprinkle on sugar (about 1 T) after the flathon is reasonably

solid.

 

Stwed Mutton

Two Fifteenth Century Cookery Books p. 72

 

Take faire Mutton that hath ben roste, or elles Capons, or suche other

flessh, and mynce it faire; put hit into a possenet, or elles bitwen ii

siluer disshes; caste thereto faire parcely, And oynons small mynced; then

caste there-to wyn, and a litull vynegre or vergeous, pouder of peper,

Canel, salt and saffron, and lete it stue on the faire coles, And then

serue hit forthe; if he have no wyne ne vynegre, take Ale, Mustard, and A

quantite of vergeous, and do this in the stede of vyne or vinegre. [end of

original; thorns replaced by th]

 

Wine Version

1 1/2 lb boned lamb     2 T vinegar     1 t salt

1/4 c parsley   1 t pepper      3 threads saffron

2 medium onions (1 1/4 lb)      1/2 t cinnamon  about 1/2 c water

3/4 c wine

 

Beer Version

Substitute 1 c dark beer and 1/2 t ground mustard for the wine. Substitute

4 T of verjuice for the vinegar if you have it.

 

Roast the lamb (before boning) at 350° for about 1 hour, then chop it into

bite sized pieces. Chop onions fine. Combine all ingredients (and the

juices from roasting the lamb) in a covered stew pot; use enough water so

that there is just enough liquid to boil the meat in. Simmer it about 1/2

hour and serve it forth. It is good over rice.

 

Elizabeth of Dendermonde/Betty Cook

 

 

Date: Wed, 3 Mar 1999 14:24:32 +1100

From: WICKHAM  Raymond <raymond.wickham at customs.gov.au>

Subject: SC - recipes with beer or ale

 

31. Ein spise von bonen (A food of beans)

       Siude grüene bonen, biz daz sie weich werden. so nim denne

schoen brot und ein wenic pfeffers. dristunt als vil kümels mit ezzige

und mit biere. mal daz zu sammene und tu dar zu saffran. und seige abe

daz sode. und giuz dar uf daz gemalne. und saltz ez zu mazzen. und laz

ez erwallen in dem condiment und gibz hin.

       Boil green beans (This probably refers to something like fava

beans. These are not string beans. String beans are a New World food.)

until they become soft. So take then fine bread and a little pepper.

(Take) three times as much caraway with vinegar and with beer. Grind

that together and add saffron thereto. And strain the broth and pour the

color thereon and salt it to mass and let it boil in the condiment and

give out.

This recipe is from Ein Buch von guter spise

And was translated by Alia Atlas akatlas at mit.edu

 

Damocles Truhart

 

 

Date: Wed, 3 Mar 1999 13:17:21 -0800 (PST)

From: Huette von <ahrenshav at yahoo.com>

Subject: SC - Salmon recipe with beer

 

Here is a recipe that I have used many times that

covers two requests!

 

>From Gervase Markham's The English Huswife:

 

To seeth fresh Salmon.

 

Take a little water, and as much Beere and Salt,

and put thereto Parsley, Time, and Rosemarie, and

let all thes boyle together; then put in your

Salmon, and make your broth sharpe with some

Vinigar.

 

My redaction:

 

2 pounds salmon (either steaks or filets)

2 tbsp olive oil

1 can or 2 cups beer

salt and pepper to taste

1/4 cup chopped parsley

2 tbsp thyme

2 tbsp rosemary

1 tbsp vinegar

 

Put olive oil in heavy skillet and add salmon

(cover both sides of salmon with olive oil).

Add beer, then sprinkle on seasonings.  Simmer

for 10-15 min. (depending on thickness of the

salmon). Add vinegar and simmer for 1 min. longer.

 

For a feast, you can eliminate the skillet and

use instead jelly-roll baking sheets (i.e.

cookie sheets with a one inch high side all around).

Place in the oven for 10-15 min. and you will get

just the same effect.

 

Huette

 

 

Date: Wed, 3 Mar 1999 16:17:05 -0600 (CST)

From: "Michael F. Gunter" <michael.gunter at fnc.fujitsu.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Salmon recipe with beer

 

> From Gervase Markham's The English Huswife:

> To seeth fresh Salmon.

> Take a little water, and as much Beere and Salt,

> and put thereto Parsley, Time, and Rosemarie, and

> let all thes boyle together; then put in your

> Salmon, and make your broth sharpe with some

> Vinigar.

> My redaction:

 

<snipped>

 

It's a lovely period recipe but I do wonder about your

redaction. Basically the period recipe is calling for

making a rich broth of beer, herbs, salt and vinegar

then poaching the fish.

 

There's no oil or pepper mentioned and I do wonder about

the use of even a high sided jelly roll pan to poach

fish in.

 

Please believe that I'm not flaming or attacking you

but this is one of the simpler period recipes and do

wonder how you came about with this redaction. Did you

try it following Markham's recipe and find it lacking?

 

> Huette

 

Gunthar

 

 

Date: Mon, 27 Sep 1999 22:18:30 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: Let them eat fish! was Re: SC - Can medieval food beheart-smart?

 

LrdRas at aol.com wrote:

> ChannonM at aol.com writes:

> << What do you think about a beer based batter for cod?  >>

> I think it's great but I am unaware of any references to beer batter outside

> of the current century.

> Ras

 

At least not for fish. There are, I believe, fritter batters made with

ale in period sources. Most fish appears from the recipes to have been

fried uncoated, although a recipe in le Viandier says to fry (cuttlefish

or squid? I forget) without any coating of flour, which suggests it was

sometimes done.

 

If you really want to be technical, fresh cod seems like a fairly

unlikely choice, because most cod would have been caught in waters

pretty far from the European mainland. Not all, but most. Much of the

cod referred to in period sources would seem to be either salt or air-dried.

 

On the other hand, it's (relatively) cheap, firm, white, and not too

bony, so a fairly good choice for food nerds to have a go at if you're

trying to get the piscophagially (is that a word?) challenged to eat

something different.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Fri, 19 Nov 1999 00:44:33 -0500 (EST)

From: cclark at vicon.net

Subject: Re: SC - Recipes with Beer and Ale?

 

There are several of these in _Elinor Fettiplace's Receipt Book_. One is

"court sops" (p. 62), made with slices of toast and a mixture of ale, sugar,

and nutmeg. The toast is put in the liquid, and then it is cooked until dry.

(I suppose that means until the cooking vessel is dry, not the toast.)

Sprinkle with more sugar and nutmeg and let cool before serving. Looks

almost like French toast. :-)

 

Other recipes with ale include: fritters and pancakes (p. 74), a hot posset

(p. 88), poached carp or trout (p. 110), and a big currant cake (p. 137). I

recommend the cake, though it could do with a little salt in the dough

(perhaps just omitted by accident), and will have to be scaled down for most

ovens (for a modern oven, try using a large pizza pan). I haven't yet tried

the others.

 

There are also ale-batter fritters in earlier English sources (perhaps Forme

of Curye?).

 

Alex Clark/Henry of Maldon

 

 

Date: Fri, 19 Nov 1999 08:55:35 EST

From: RuddR at aol.com

Subject: SC - Re: Recipes with Beer and Ale?

 

CHYKONYS IN BRUETTE

Chicken in Ale Sauce

 

Take [an] Sethe Chykonys, & smyte hem to gobettys;  (th)an take Pepir,

Gyngere, an Brede y-grounde, & temper it vppe wyth (th)e self brothe, an with

Ale; an coloure it with Safroun, an sethe an serue forth.

Harleian MS 279

 

3 or 4 pounds chicken, cut into serving pieces.

2 T butter

3/4 C ale or beer

3/4 C broth from boiled chicken

1/2 tsp each pepper and powdered ginger

1/4 tsp saffron

1 C white bread crumbs

Salt to taste

 

1. In a large pot or heavy frying pan, over medium heat, melt butter and

brown the chicken well on all sides.

 

2. Add water to the pot, just covering the chicken, bring to a boil, reduce

heat, and simmer, covered, for thirty minutes, or until chicken is cooked

through and tender.  Remove from heat.

 

3. With a basting nozzle or ladle, draw off 3/4 cup of the broth in the pot.

 

4. In a saucepan, over medium heat, combine broth, ale, and spices.  Stir in

bread crumbs, bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer, stirring

occasionally, for about five minutes.

 

5. Arrange chicken pieces on a serving platter, and pour the sauce over them.

 

Serves four to six.

 

Rudd Rayfield

 

 

From: "Decker, Terry D." <TerryD at Health.State.OK.US>

To: "'sca-cooks at ansteorra.org'" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

Subject: RE: [Sca-cooks] Reference to 'stale' ale.

Date: Thu, 24 May 2001 08:21:06 -0500

 

I think it may show up in To The King's Taste, but I'm far away from my

copy.

 

However, in Middle English, "stale" can mean settled or clear, probably from

the Germanic "estal" meaning stand or standing place.  So a "stale ale" is

probably one which has been left standing to let the particles settle out.

 

Bear

 

> My group is having a small cooking session this weekend and

> we're going for onion soup (orig. recipe from Harleian MS

> 4016) among other things.  The recipe calls for stale ale.

> I remember reading that 'stale' often referred to old, mature

> ale and not 'flat' as in modern english.  (the ale would

> probably have been flat anyway).  However, I can't remember

> where I read this and I've checked Heiatt's 'Curuye on

> Inglysch' (sp?), Hagen's 'Anglo-Saxon Food...' and Renfrow's

> 'A Sip Through Time' but not found it anywhere.

> Anyone out there who can provide a ref.?

> /Angus MacIomhair, out of lurking once more.

 

 

Date: Mon, 28 May 2001 10:45:55 -0700 (PDT)

From: Angus <angus at iamawitch.com>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: [Sca-cooks] onion soup result

 

Thanks to all who offered comments on the onion soup or references to 'stale' ale.

 

We ended up cooking the soup with 'Falcon Bayersk 2,8%' a lightly hopped beer.  I don't know the exact BU value but 15-20 is probably a good guess.  It was cooked for approx. 90 minutes and the result was good but a little salty since the person who salted the soup added salt by the teaspoons and didn't stir enough before tasting (she dumped the salt at one side of the pot and tasted from the opposite side).

 

Two people who aren't members of the group attended and they seemed to like what was served.

 

The main course was grilled fish with roasted chickpeas and various sauces. A few who had chicken instead of fish due to allergies made the allium ex amygdala sauce which was liked by everyone.

 

/Angus MacIomhair

 

 

Date: Tue, 29 May 2001 09:41:48 +0200

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

From: "Cindy M. Renfrow" <cindy at thousandeggs.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Reference to 'stale' ale.

 

<snip> However, I can't remember where I read this and I've checked

<snip>.' and Renfrow's 'A Sip Through Time' but not found it anywhere.

>/Angus MacIomhair,

 

Hi! Right author, wrong book, if this is what you're thinking of.  This is

from Take a Thousand Eggs or More (vol 2, 2nd edition).

 

Footnote:

"The words stale and fryed can be interpreted in two different ways.  The

word stale, in conjunction with the word ale, can mean either clear

(settled and clarified), or stale (no longer fresh).  Fraid or fryid either

means fried as in 'already used,' or cold, from Fr. froid.

If we accept the definitions 'fried' oil and 'stale' ale, Oyle Soppys

becomes a barely edible concoction of stale ale, re-used oil, and boiled

onions - a dish fit for servants rather than for the high table.  However,

we cannot entirely dismiss this interpretation since it is quite evident,

based on the many recipes for entrails and leftover bits and scraps in our

collection, that our authors were frugal people.  The hopless ale of this

era, typically brewed in batches of a hogshead or more, spoiled quickly

(hops acts as a preservative as well as a flavoring agent; see note Vol. 1,

p. 155), and a soup that uses up stale ale and fried oil does make some

sense in this context.  Nonetheless, a soup which calls for clear ale would

be much more pleasant, and would also explain the presence of expensive

spices in this recipe."

 

Harleian MS. 279 - Potage Dyvers

xxxiij. Oyle Soppys. Take a gode quantyte of Oynonys, and mynse hem not to

smale, an sethe in fayre Water:  [th]an take hem vp, an take a gode

quantite of Stale Ale, as .iij. galouns, an [th]er-to take a pynte of Oyle

fryid, an caste [th]e Oynonys [th]er-to, an let boyle alle to-gederys a

gode whyle; then caste [th]er-to Safroune, powder Pepyr, Sugre, an Salt, an

serue forth alle hote as tostes, as in [th]e same maner for a Mawlard & of

a capon, & hoc qu=E6re.

 

33. Oil Sops.  Take a good quantity of Onions, and mince them not too

small, and seethe in fair Water:  then take them up, and take a good

quantity of Stale  Ale, as 3 gallons, and thereto take a pint of Oil fryed,

and cast the Onions thereto, and let boil all together a good while; then

cast thereto Saffron, powdered Pepper, Sugar, and Salt, and serve forth all

hot as toasts, as in the same manner for a Mallard & of a capon, & see this=

 

 

Harleian MS. 4016

 

130 Oyle soppes.  Take a good quantite of oynons, and myce hem, no[3]t to

smale, & seth hem in faire water, And take hem vppe; and then take a good

quantite of stale ale, as .iij. galons, And there-to take a pynte of goode

oyle that is fraied, and cast the oynons there-to, And lete al boyle

togidre a grete [while];  and caste there-to Saffron and salt, And [th]en

put brede, in maner of brewes, and cast the licour there-on, and serue hit

forth hote.

 

130. Oil sops.  Take a good quantity of onions, and mince them, not too

small, & seethe them in fair water, And take them up; and then take a good

quantity of stale ale, as three gallons, And thereto take a pint of good

oil that is fraied,  and cast the onions thereto, And let all boil together

a great [while]; and cast thereto Saffron and salt, And then put bread, in

maner of [sops for] broth, and cast the liquor thereon, and serve it forth

hot.

 

Cindy Renfrow/Sincgiefu

cindy at thousandeggs.com

Author & Publisher of "Take a Thousand Eggs or More, A Collection of 15th

Century Recipes" and "A Sip Through Time, A Collection of Old Brewing

Recipes" http://www.thousandeggs.com

 

 

Date: Sun, 22 Aug 2004 16:00:25 -0400

From: Jadwiga Zajaczkwa / Jenne Heise <jenne at fiedlerfamily.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Boiling in Beer

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> Also sprach PatrickLevesque:

>> I was wondering, as I see a lot of recipes asking us to boil stuff in water,

>> vinegar, wine, milk, whatever... But never in beer.

>> 

>> So how early can we document recipes asking the reader to boil food in

>> beer?

>> 

>> Petru

 

From Rufina's handout on Pennsic without a Cooler:

 

Chykonys in Bruette

 

(Harleian MS. 279 (Potage Dyvers), .lxxxxvj)

"Take [an]Sethe Chykonys, & smyte hem to gobettys; than take Pepir,

Gyngere, and Brede y-grounde, & tempere it vppe wyth the selfe brothe,

an ith Ale; an coloure it with Safroun, and sethe an serue forth."

 

-- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa

 

 

Date: Fri, 13 Aug 2004 23:11:53 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re: Ale broth was  Boiling in Beer

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> Also sprach Patrick Levesque:

>> I was wondering, as I see a lot of recipes asking us to boil stuff in

>> water, vinegar, wine, milk, whatever... But never in beer.

>> 

>> So how early can we document recipes asking the reader to boil food

>> in beer?

>> 

>> Petru

> Off the top of my head, I can't quote anything, but I'm pretty sure

> there are some 14th century English recipes that speak of boiling in

> fine wort (mashed but unfermented ale) and in ale.

> Adamantius

 

There's this of course in the Liber  Cure Cocurum

  a Translation with Notes, by Cindy Renfrow...

ale bre = aleberry (alebrey, alebery, alebrue, alemeat) =

ale broth, a type of warm caudle. 132....

For sick men. <http://www.pbm.com/%7Elindahl/lcc/parallel.html#f122> Ale

broth thus make you shall,

With groats and saffron and good ale.

Take boiled water with honey, I know,

http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/lcc/parallel.html

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Fri, 13 Aug 2004 23:50:43 -0700 (PDT)

From: Huette von Ahrens <ahrenshav at yahoo.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Boiling in Beer

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Here is a recipe that is great and simple to

make.

 

Huette

 

 

From Gervase Markham's The English Huswife:

 

To seeth fresh Salmon.

 

Take a little water, and as much Beere and Salt,

and put thereto Parsley, Time, and Rosemarie, and

let all thes boyle together; then put in your

Salmon, and make your broth sharpe with some

Vinigar.

 

 

Date: Thu, 25 Nov 2004 17:35:45 +0100 (MET)

From: "Kai D. Kalix" <kdkalix at gmx.de>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Period gifts in jarsTo: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

Lord Stefan wrote:

> http://www.florilegium.org/files/FOOD/beer-in-food-msg.html

> Of course I'd love to have any additinal ones if folks see that their

> favorite period one is not listed in there.

 

I do have redactions for the following (of cause, in german; I'll try to

translate them asap) which I think are missing from the beer-in-food-msg

(after glancing over it):

 

Take and shell oysters, and keep the water that cometh of them and strain

it, and put it in a pot, and ale thereto, and a little bread thereto; put

ginger, canel, powder of pepper thereo, saffron and salt; and when it is

enough almost, put on thine oysters: look that they been well y-washed for

the shells: and then serve forth.

Two Fifteenth Century Cookery-books, p. 23/56

 

Sooglagh Tullog

Rissoles in Lent

Take Figs & seethe them up i Ale; then take when they are tender, & bray

them small in a Mortar; then take almonds, & shred them therto smal; take

pears, & shred them thereto ; take dates, & shred them thereto & Haddock or

Ling, that is well soaked & tease therto then make thine tuffing, & roll

lehthwise in thisne hand& lay them in flour, then make thine batter with ale

& Flour, & fry them up brown in Oil; right so, make round-like Fritters in

the manner beforesaid, & fry them up, & that is called Ragons, & then serve

them foth.

Take a Thousand Eggs or More, a Collection of 15th Century Recipes, by Cindy

Renfrow, pg. 71

 

Gebratene Quitten from Philippine Welserin

 

Playce Ysod

Madeleine Pelner, Fabulous Feasts

 

To Stewe Stekes of Mutton

Take a legge of mutton and cot it in small slices, and put it in a chafer,

and put therto a pottell of ale, and scome it cleane then putte therto seven

or eyghte onions thyn slyced, and after they have boyled one hour, putte

therto a dyshe of swete butter, and so lette them boyle tyll they be tender,

and then put therto a lyttel peper and salte.

A Proper Newe Book of Cokerye, 1572

 

xvj. Fylettys en Galentyne

Take fayre porke, þe fore quarter, an take of þe skyne; an put þe porke on a

fayre spete, an rost it half y-now; þan take it of, an smye it in fayre

pecys, & caste it on a fayre potte; þan take oynonys, and schrede hem, an

pele hem (an pyle hem nowt to smale), an frye in a panne of fayre grece; þan

caste hem in þe potte to þe porke; þan take gode broth of moton or of beef,

an caste þe-to, an þan caste þer-to pouder pepyr, canel, clowys, an macys,

an let hem boyle wyl to-gederys; þan tak fayre brede, an vynegre, an stepe

þe brede with þe same brothe, an strayne it on blode, with ale, or ellys

sawnderys, & salt, an lat hym boyle y-now an serue it forth.

Harleian ms 279; Austin, Two Fifteenth Century Cookbooks.

 

kai

 

 

Date: Thu, 14 Apr 2005 09:31:09 -0400 (GMT-04:00)

From: Robin Carroll-Mann <rcmann4 at earthlink.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Rotten meat and spices... (a few excerpts

      from  Apicius)

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

-----Original Message-----

From: David Friedman <ddfr at daviddfriedman.com>

 

For the "overspicing"  version, the earliest source I know is the introduction to _Two Fifteenth Century Cookery Books_, written at the end of the

nineteenth century. It's clear from context that the author is

reacting not to the amount of spices, which he has no information on,

but to the unfamiliar use of particular spices--I think to putting

cinnamon in soup in the example he mentions.

 

Anyone know of an earlier example?

--

David/Cariadoc

www.daviddfriedman.com

_______________________________________________

 

Not an earlier example, but here is the relevant portion of the  

introduction you mentioned, which was written in 1888.

 

"Many of the Recipes that are given here would astonish a modern Cook.  

Our forefathers, possibly from having stronger stomachs, fortified by  

outdoor life, evidently liked their dishes strongly seasoned and  

piquant, as the Cinnamon Soup on p. 59 shews. Pepper, Ginger, Cloves,  

Garlic, Cinnamon, Galingale, Vinegar, Verjuice, and Wine, appear  

constantly in dishes where we should little expect them; and even Ale  

was frequently used in Cookery. Wine is used in the recipe for Roast  

Partridge, on p. 78, and also, as seems more natural to us, in the  

Partridge Stews on pages 9 and 78: it is also used for Brawn in  

Poivrade on p. 71. Ale is introduced in the Bowres on p. 8, in the Sops  

Chamberlain on p. 11, and in the Mortrews de Chairon p. 71, and is even  

used in the Charlette on p. 17, though Milk is also one of the  

ingredients: both Ale and Wine appear in the Maumenny Royal, on p. 22.  

Ale is also used with the Tench in Bruet."

 

http://www.hti.umich.edu/cgi/c/cme/cme-idx?

type=HTML&rgn=DIV1&byte=3361621

 

Brighid ni Chiarain

Barony of Settmour Swamp, East Kingdom

 

 

Date: Wed, 26 Apr 2006 13:06:22 -0700 (PDT)

From: Huette von Ahrens <ahrenshav at yahoo.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] A pleasant Italian Fish recipe

To: TomRVincent at yahoo.com, Cooks within the SCA

      <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Here is a period recipe that I have made at a banquet for 300.  Even  

people who professed to hate salmon and fish said they liked this:

 

From Gervase Markham's The English Huswife:

 

To seeth fresh Salmon.

 

Take a little water, and as much Beere and Salt,

and put thereto Parsley, Time, and Rosemarie, and

let all thes boyle together; then put in your

Salmon, and make your broth sharpe with some

Vinigar.

 

I also make this for my family, although I simplify it down  

considerably.

 

For them, I pour a can of beer into a deep frying pan and add the spices.

When boiling, I put in the salmon, either steaks or fillets and then

sprinkle with balsamic vinegar.  It usually takes about 10 to 12 minutes

to poach the salmon.

 

Huette

 

 

Date: Wed, 06 Sep 2006 15:41:13 -0700

From: Maggie MacDonald <maggie5 at cox.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] period oion soups

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

At 02:27 PM 9/6/2006,Gretchen Beck said something like:

 

> Why not try the oyle sops from the two-15th C cookery books; it can be

> interpreted as an onion soup in a beer base:

> .xxxiij. Oyle Soppys.?Take a gode quantyte of Oynonys, an mynse hem not to

> smale, an sethe in fayre Water: ?an take hem vp, an take a gode quantite of

> Stale Ale, as .iij. galouns, an ?er-to take a pynte of Oyle fryid, an caste

> ?e Oynonys ?er-to, an let boyle alle to-gederys a gode whyle; then caste

> ?er-to Safroune, powder Pepyr, Sugre, an Salt, an serue forth alle hote as

> tostes, [leaf 11.] as in ?e same maner for a Mawlard & of a capon, & hoc

> qu?re.*

 

I did that particular oil soppys for Caid 12th night 2006.  It went over

very very well.  My biggest tip would be to seriously brown the onions in

batches if you're making very large quantities. I had attempted to brown

them by baking since I was doing a 20 lb bag of onions at one time, and it

was less than successful.

 

On the upside, this gives your local brewers a chance to shine by making

you a brew to use in the soup.  We used a very light ale, and it was just

fantastic. This was also done on a very small scale with Guinness, and that

was also pretty nice (though not every one appreciated the slight

bitterness of guinness).

 

Maggie MacD.

 

 

Date: Tue, 06 Mar 2012 08:04:21 -0700

From: "Daniel Myers" <dmyers at medievalcookery.com>

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Cooking with Beer

 

Here are the recipes using beer that I found on a quick search:

 

- Doc

 

====

 

How to seeth Shrimps. Take halfe water and halfe beere or Ale, and some

salt good and savery, and set it on the fire and faire scum it, and when

it seetheth a full wallop, put in your Shrimpes faire washed, and seethe

them with a quick fire, scum them very clean, and let them have but two

walmes, then take them up with a scummer, and lay them upon a fair white

cloth, and sprinkle a little white salt upon them.

 

[A Book of Cookrye, (England, 1591)]

 

====

 

To bake Venison of Fallow Deere. Lay it in water and wash it very clean,

then perboile it, if it be of the side, raise the skin of it: if it be

of the haunch, presse it: season it with pepper and salt, take good

store of Dre Suet, and mince it very fine, when you have minced it, beat

it, then take flowre, butter and Egges and make your paste stiffe, then

drive it out, and then put in your suet and Venison and close it, then

take the yolk of an egge and a little beere, and wet it over, and let it

bake foure houres, and then serve it in.

 

[A Book of Cookrye, (England, 1591)]

 

====

 

How to make sops of Almain. Take white wine with Beere or Ale, and put

crums of white bread, yolks of Egs sugar and sinamon, with Salt and

saffron, strain these and boile them a little togither then cut white

bread into your dishe, and put the pottage to it, and so serve it

foorth.

 

[A Book of Cookrye, (England, 1591)]

 

====

 

31. Ein spise von bonen (A food of beans). Siude gr?ene bonen, biz daz

sie weich werden. so nim denne schoen brot und ein wenic pfeffers.

dristunt als vil k?mels mit ezzige und mit biere. mal daz zu sammene

und tu dar zu saffran. und seige abe daz sode. und giuz dar uf daz

gemalne. und saltz ez zu mazzen. und laz ez erwallen in dem condiment

und gibz hin.

 

Boil green beans (This probably refers to something like fava beans.

These are not string beans. String beans are a New World food.) until

they become soft. So take then fine bread and a little pepper. (Take)

three times as much caraway with vinegar and with beer. Grind that

together and add saffron thereto. And strain the broth and pour the

color thereon and salt it to mass and let it boil in the condiment and

give out.

 

[Ein Buch von guter spise, (Germany, ca. 1345 - Alia Atlas, trans.)]

 

====

 

XCIIX - A good broth from salmon, sturgeon, pig's game or other. Take

apples, red onion and sweet beer that doesn't taste of hops. Let it

seethe with each other, so the apples and onion become soft. Take

toasted bread, grate it with the apples and onion, put it through the

sieve and give herbs thereto.

 

[Koge Bog, (Denmark, 1616 - Martin Forest, trans.)]

 

====

 

174 What to do to beer, so that it can be kept for a long time without

becoming sour. First, broach the cask, let two pints or more drain off

into a glazed pot. Take a handful of coriander seeds, make a small

bundle out of them in a clean white cloth, but not too big, so that you

will be able to put it into the top of the beer keg at the bunghole. Tie

it closed with a string, leaving a long piece. After that lay the bundle

with the coriander in the pot, set it on the fire, let it boil together

for about as long as a hard-boiled egg, do not let it run over.

Afterwards set the pot with the beer aside and let it fully cool. You

should not cover it. After that bring clay from a potter which should

not have been worked, knead salt into it and work them together, then it

will be nice and soft. Next take three freshly laid eggs and throw them

unopened into the beer from the top. After that hang the small bundle

with the coriander seeds in it, also pour the beer from the pot into it,

take a good handful of hops from a beer brewer and close up the top of

the bunghole by spreading it with the hops. Afterwards set a small

unglazed pot over it on top and plaster it up well along the rim.

 

[Das Kuchbuch der Sabina Welserin, (Germany, 16th century - V.

Armstrong, trans.)]

 

====

 

BOUCHET. To make six sixths of bouchet, take six pints of fine sweet

honey, and put it in a cauldron on the fire and boil it, and stir

continually until it starts to grow, and you see that it is producing

bubbles like small globules which burst, and as they burst emit a little

smoke which is sort of dark: and then stir, and then add seven sixths of

water and boil until it reduces to six sixths again, and keep stirring.

And then put it in a tub to cool until it is just warm; and then strain

it through a cloth bag, and then put it in a cask and add one chopine

(half-litre) of beer-yeast, for it is this which makes it the most

piquant, (and if you use bread yeast, however much you like the taste,

the colour will be insipid), and cover it well and warmly to work. And

if you want to make it very good, add an ounce of ginger, long pepper,

grains of Paradise and cloves in equal amounts, except for the cloves of

which there should be less, and put them in a cloth bag and throw in.

And after two or three days, if the bouchet smells spicy enough and is

strong enough, take out the spice-bag and squeeze it and put it in the

next barrel you make. And thus you will be able to use these same spices

three or four times.

 

[Le Menagier de Paris, (France, 1393 - Janet Hinson, trans.)]

 

====

 

For the fillets of a Veale, smoored in a Frying-panne. CUt them as for

Oliues: hacke them with the backe of a Knife: then cut Larde fine, and

larde them, then put them in a Frying-pan with strong Beere or Ale, and

frye them somewhat browne: then put them into a pinte of Claret Wine,

and boyle them with a little Sinamon, Sugar and Ginger.

 

[A NEVV BOOKE of Cookerie, (England, 1615)]

 

====

 

Carp in pottage. Take a carp well scaled & wash it, & cut it in four

pieces, & take onions fried in butter, a salted lemon cut into slices, a

nutmeg, a little ginger, marjoram & mint finely chopped, then put wine

or verjuice & butter, & put it to stew well also with a little beer.

 

[Ouverture de Cuisine, (France, 1604 - Daniel Myers, trans.)]

 

 

Date: Wed, 7 Mar 2012 19:5:22 -0800

From: "David Friedman"  <ddfr at daviddfriedman.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA  <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Cooking with Beer

 

At Tue, 06 Mar 2012 08:04:21 -0700, "Daniel Myers" wrote:

> Here are the recipes using beer that I found on a quick search:

 

You don't include flathonys--are you distinguishing between ale and beer?

 

Flathonys

Two Fifteenth Century p. 73

Take mylke, and yolkes of egges, and ale, and

drawe hem thorgh a straynour, with white sugur

or blak; And melt faire butter, and put thereto

salt, and make faire coffyns, and put hem into a

Nowne til thei be a litull hard; then take a pile,

and a dissh fastned there-on, and fill the coffyns

therewith of the seid stuffe and late hem bake a

while. And then take hem oute, and serue hem

forthe, and caste Sugur ynogh on hem.

 

David/Cariadoc

www.daviddfriedman.com

daviddfriedman.blogspot.com/

 

<the end>



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