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Picts-msg - 10/25/09

 

Info. on the Picts. Name sources.

 

NOTE: See also the files: tattoos-msg, woad-msg, Celts-msg, Scotland-msg, Ireland-msg, Gaul-art, Roman-Wales-bib, Wales-msg.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

    Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                          Stefan at florilegium.org

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From: dnb105 at psu.edu (Ferret)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Those colorful picts

Date: Thu, 7 Apr 1994 18:32:47 GMT

Organization: Penn State University

 

In attempting to learn about woad I discover some interesting items that

have led me (for now) to believe that the Picts (not Celts) were tatooed  

not painted. I found that the "painted with woad" idea comes from Julius

Caesar's description of the Briton's and that most other description refer

specifically to tatoos, recent archaelogical evidence suppports that

tatooing was a very ancient (late stone age) custom. It is possible that

both painting and tatooing were present but the evidence currently is

in favor of tatooing. The following excerpt clarify:

 

From: "the Problem of the Picts"  F.T. Wainwright

 

Is the name Picti no more than the Roman's descriptive   term for a painted people ?  Or does it

represent a Latinized version of a native name, perhaps the Pict's own name

for themselves ?  Isidore of Seville, writing soon after A.D.  600 tells us

that the Picts  take their name from the fact that their bodies bear designs

pricked into their skin by needles.

 

There was a tradition, over six hundred years old, that the inhabitants of

Britain specialized  in the practice of applying pigments to their skins.

Julius Caesar had written " All the Britanni paint themselves with woad

which produces a bluish colouring."

And after Caesar there  is no break in the series of writers - Ovid,

Martial, Solinus, Herodian, Claudian, Jordans - who mention this colourful

practice. It may be significant that the later writers refer specifically to

tatooing, puncturing as distinct from painting, and that they refer to the

inhabitants of the northern parts of Britain.

 

From: "The Picts" Isabel Henderson

 

Classical writers were struck by their  habit of personal tatooing.

There is also the older name of Priteni to consider. It means "people of the

designs" and presumably refers to tatooing or painting, a habit aquired from

an older population.

 

Archeological Find:

 

In Sept. 1991 a very well preserved body was discovered in the  Alps near

the Austrian-Italian border. This 5,000 year old body had tatoos of stripes

nd a cross on his body. This is solid evidence that tatooing was practiced

in Europe in 3000 B.C.

 

It may also lend credibility to the practice of tatooing in Britania as

early (or late) as 400 A.D.

 

-Frettchen von Rheinpfalz-

 

 

From: limbo7 at aol.com (Limbo7)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Those colorful picts

Date: 17 Apr 1994 23:52:05 -0400

Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364)

 

To add to what you have written about the Picts allow me to throw in a few

tidbits. In Ireland they were called the Cruthni by the Gaels. Their culture

was basically overwhelmend and absorbed by the Gael. But there are some

interesting bits that one can find. Cuchullain before he was given that name

was known as Setanta "He who knows the way". Setanta was the eponymous here of

the Setantii who resided near Teamhair (Tara).  The name Tristan is believed to

have originally come from the name of a Pict named Drust. There are early

versions of the Tristan story in which he is named Drystan and Drustan. So they

did indeed leave behind an impact on the Celtic world among others.

 

 

From: dnb105 at psu.edu (Ferret)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Those colorful picts

Date: Mon, 18 Apr 1994 06:18:23 GMT

Organization: Penn State University

 

In article <2ot055$t8l at search01.news.aol.com> limbo7 at aol.com (Limbo7) writes:

 

>To add to what you have written about the Picts allow me to throw in a few

>tidbits. In Ireland they were called the Cruthni by the Gaels. Their culture

>was basically overwhelmend and absorbed by the Gael. But there are some

>interesting bits that one can find. Cuchullain before he was given that name

>was known as Setanta "He who knows the way". Setanta was the eponymous here of

>the Setantii who resided near Teamhair (Tara).  The name Tristan is believed to

>have originally come from the name of a Pict named Drust. There are early

>versions of the Tristan story in which he is named Drystan and Drustan. So they

>did indeed leave behind an impact on the Celtic world among others.

 

The earliest Roman records refer to the PRITANI which may have later become

BRITANI or Britons as we would say. The later term PICTI refers to the

northern part of the island, where as PRITANI seems to refer to all the

inhabitants. Ceasar's remark implies that ALL the inhabitants were decorated

but he is in the minority refering to the decorations as "painted with woad"

and his comment is suspect as second hand and his information jumbled. The

Romans do not seem to make tribal distinctions. Also note that the Romans

were aware of the Celts via their own and Greek writings (KELTOI) yet DO NOT

apply the terms to the inhabitants of the British Isles. This would

indicate that the difference between Continental and British "Celts" was so

great that no comparison was made. This would put the cultural division of

the Island Celts at earlier than 400 A.D.

Unfortunately I have yet to obtain the descriptions in the original Latin.

 

-Frettchen von Rheinpfalz-

 

 

From: Scott White <swhite at onr.com>

To: Mark Harris

Date: Tue, 29 Oct 1996 16:55:49 -0600

Subject: Re: Names, Meanings, and th

 

Hey Stefan:

 

Saw your recent posting regarding lists of names on the Rialto. Here's a

reference on Pictish names that was written by the heralds of Academy of St.

Gabriel following my begging for Pictish naming resources.

 

The URL is:

 

       http://www.itd.umich.edu/~ximenez/s.gabriel/docs/pictnames.html

 

Gnith

<swhite at onr.com>

 

 

From: "Susan Harmon" <sca.brighit at gmail.com>

Date: August 6, 2008 7:42:56 PM CDT

To: trimaris-temp at yahoogroups.com

Subject: [tri-temp] Interseting new information

 

Thought some might be interseted in this information.


http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/the-truth-about-the-picts-886098.html&#8232;


 

Brighit of the MacGregor

 

 

Subject:      [SCA Newcomers] Digest Number 2153

Date: Tue Jun 23, 2009 6:08 am ((PDT))

To:    scanewcomers at yahoogroups.com

Re: PIcts

 

fionnseachdelochielle at gmail.com fionnseachdulochielle

sinyra wrote:

[...]

<<< I have noticed however that there aren't very many picts in the SCA and was wondering if anyone had any tips on how to go about playing a PIct. I know there is not much information on them and I have done extensive research I'm just hoping for some tips from the pros. :D >>>

 

Well, I am far from a pro and not in your Kingdom, but Mistress Eithni

(Northshield) received her Laurel for her Pictish studies. She also 'owns' a

yahoo group called SCA-Pictish <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SCA-Pictish/>; (I'm

just a student of hers).

 

Anyway, if you join that group, you can take a gander through the files she's

uploaded there. It includes a basic pattern for a Pictish gown - which has a

wonderful silhouette, is quite conservative in material use, and fairly easy to

make. :) I need to make myself another one or four soon. ;)

 

Do you know what period your Pictish persona is? In my shire of Dernehealde, we

have Picts from the 4th, 5th, 6th & 7th centuries. How close to the end of the

Roman era do you want to play? What part of Caledonia (Pictish Scotland) does

your persona hail from (this helps in determining how much Roman influence you

have - or Anglo-Saxon, or Breton, or... you get the idea. ;)

 

Finnseach de Locheil (12th century name 'cause it was registered years before I

settled on being a Pict)

5th-7th century Pict depending on what I'm focusing on at the time - main focus

of research currently is Pictish textile production techniques and the fibers

they used.

 

<the end>



Formatting copyright © Mark S. Harris (THLord Stefan li Rous).
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Comments to the Editor: stefan at florilegium.org