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naalbinding-msg - 5/27/02

 

A Scandinavian needle art, similar to knitting. Also spelled nalebinding and nalbinding. "Single needle knitting".

 

NOTE: See also the files: knitting-msg, knitting-lnks, p-knitting-bib, Norse-msg, weaving-msg, spinning-msg, lace-msg, linen-msg, textiles-msg.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

    Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                          Stefan at florilegium.org

************************************************************************

 

From: Gunnora Hallakarva <gunnora at bga.com>

To: ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG

Date: Wed, 20 Aug 1997 21:55:46 -0500

Subject: ANST - Naalbinding and Sieves

 

Stephan li Rous asked what naalbinding was.

 

Naalbinding is also known as "single-needle knitting."  The technique

produces a looped fabric, much as true knitting or crochet does.

Naalbinding is an extremely ancient technique and examples can be found in

almost every culture.  Certainly it existed in the Egypt of the pharohs, as

well as the Viking Age.

 

Mistress Alix Tiburga has been working on developing instructions with

step-by-step diagrams for the technique, which is extremely simple to do

but very difficult to explain without a hands-on demonstration.  ideally,

the technique uses a thick needle with a big eye, often made of antler or

bone, but a tapestry needle can be substituted in a pinch.

 

A class in the technique was taught at 3YC.  Baroness Thordis

Hakonarsdatter and Master Ragnar Ulfgarsson brought it back to Ansteorra.

Thordis taught me, I taught Rhiane and Alix, and Alix has gone nuts and is

teaching anyone else she can get to sit still long enough.

 

You can buy expensive $15 needles direct from Iceland on the web

(http://www.dmv.com/~iceland/tools/nale.html, or see

http://www.dmv.com/~iceland/instructions/gloves.html for a photo of the

finished fabric), but I've been making them from antler from fallow deer

and from whitetail deer for no cost other than the labor. The best needles

to work with are curved near the tip.  Mine looks like a finger crooked in

a "come here" gesture.  If you want to make your own needles, soak the

antler two days in cold water, then boil them for about an hour or so.  Use

a sharp knife to shape and smooth the needle.  It doesn't need a sharp

point, and in fact does better with a rounded one.  Leave the butt end

large enough for a hole up to 1/4" in diameter. Drill the hole, and

carefully smooth the edges and inside of the hole.  Sand to finish, and

buff well with beeswax.

 

I notice that Stephan li Rous actually has some information about

naalbinding in his Florilegium files at

http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/rialto/knitting-msg.html

 

Martinson and Hald both have good photos of strainers... they are made of

cow-hair, not horse-hair, to correct my earlier post.

 

Geijir, Agnes.  Birka III: Die Textilfunde aus den Graben. Uppsala: Kungl.

Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akadamien. 1938.

 

Hald, Margrethe.  Ancient Danish Textiles from Bogs and Burials: A

Comparative Study of Costume and Iron Age Textiles.

Archaeological-Historical Series 21. Copenhagen: National Museum of

Denmark.  1980.

 

Hutchinson, Elaine.  Nalebinding: The History, Origins, Construction and

Use of 'Needle-Binding' with Specific Reference to the 'Coppergate Sock'.

http://www.ftech.net/~regia/naalbind.htm

 

Ligon, Linda.  "The Ubiquitous Loop" Piecework. Jan/Feb 1994. pp. 64-66.

 

Martinson, Kate.  "Scandinavian Nalbinding: Needle-Looped Fabric." The

Weaver's Journal. Fall 1987. pp. 12-15.  

 

Nordland, O.  Primitive Scandinavian Textiles in Knotless Netting.  Oslo.

1961.

 

Rutt, Richard.  A History of Handknitting.  Loveland, CO: Interweave Press.

1987.

 

Turnau, Irena.  "The Diffusion of Knitting in Medieval Europe." Cloth and

Clothing in Medieval Europe: Essays in Memory of Professor E.M. Carus

Wilson. Pasold Studies in Textile History 2. eds. B.B. Harte and K. G.

Ponting.  London: Pasold.  1983. pp.  368-389.

 

Gunnora Hallakarva

Herskerinde

 

 

Date: Wed, 22 Oct 1997 00:00:24 -0500

From: Gunnora Hallakarva <gunnora at bga.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: naalbinding

 

>Date: Tue, 21 Oct 1997 16:41:22 -0500

>From: L Schmitt <schmitt at mailbag.com>

>To: gunnora at bga.com

>Subject: naalbinding

>

>Just a brief announcement for those having an interest in naalbinding.

>Larry Schmitt's third naalbinding workbook is now available.  It is

>titled "Lessons in Naalbinding: Mittens, Mittens, Mittens!"  This

>workbook is an exploration of the traditional Scandinavian naalbinding

>mittens -- including -- directions for four naalbinding stitches and six

>mitten patterns (each in three sizes).

>

>This is practical manual intended for the craftperson who wants to make

>real, "wearable" mittens, but attention is also given to historical

>background, traditional finishing touches and adornments, as well as

>directions for making naalbinding needles.  A special feature of this

>workbook is a detailed and descriptive list of the more than thirty

>stitches that have been found in Scandinavian naalbinding mittens, with

>specific recommendations for yarn selection for each stitch.

>

>Schmitt's "Lessons in Naalbinding: Mittens, Mittens, Mittens!" (along

>with the two earlier volumes, "Scarves, Wimples and More", and "Edgings

>and Embellishments") is available from Susan's Fiber Shop, N250 Hwy A,

>Columbus, WI 53925 USA (telephone: 920-623-4237).  For more information

>you can reach Susan McFarland by e-mail at susanfiber at internetwis.com.

>Please address wholesale inquiries to schmitt at mailbag.com.

 

Gunnora Hallakarva

Herskerinde

 

 

Date: Wed, 22 Oct 1997 09:16:21 +0930

From: "Melinda Shoop" <mediknit at nwinfo.net>

To: "SCA Arts" <SCA-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu>

Subject: Naalbinding

 

I would like to announce that I am also a source for the Nalbinding

Booklets by Larry Schmitt.  The First two booklets are $5.75 each pp US,

$6.00 Canada, and the Third Booklet, the one about mittens is $13.75 pp US,

$14.00 Canada.

 

My Address:

 

Melinda Shoop

4002 W Arlington St

Yakima WA 98908

1-509-972-0615

mediknit at nwinfo.net

 

 

From: mjbr at tdk.dk (Michael Bradford)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Nalbinding

Date: Mon, 23 Mar 1998 07:34:30 GMT

Organization: Tele Denmark

 

Ron Cupples (artfuldodger at msn.com) wrote:

: Help!! Does anyone know of any good sources on the art of nalbinding

: (Scandinavian needle art). Very period, but hard to find any good

: references on it. My Lady/wife is having trouble tracking down info. She

: does have some info if any are interested.Write or E-Mail to

: needlewitch at msn.com

: Many thanks from Thorbjorn the Berserker

 

A book that is worth looking at is:

 

Ancient Danish Textiles from Bogs and Burials

by Margrethe Hald

 

It contains a chapter on Nalbinding, which includes some good diagrams

demonstrating various stitching techniques. The book also includes

sections on tablet weaving, sewing and patterns.

 

Michael Bradford

Denmark

 

 

Subject: naalbinding

Date: Fri, 27 Mar 1998 07:54:26 -0600

From: L Schmitt <schmitt at mailbag.com>

To: stefan at texas.net

 

Just a brief announcement for those having an interest in naalbinding.

Larry Schmitt's third naalbinding workbook is now available.  It is

titled "Lessons in Naalbinding: Mittens, Mittens, Mittens!"  This

workbook is an exploration of the traditional Scandinavian naalbinding

mitten -- including -- directions for four naalbinding stitches and six

mitten patterns (each in three sizes).

 

This is practical manual intended for the craftperson who wants to make

real, "wearable" mittens, but attention is also given to historical

background, traditional finishing touches and adornments, as well as

directions for making nŒlbinding needles.  A special feature of this

workbook is a detailed and descriptive list of the more than thirty

stitches that have been found in Scandinavian naalbinding mittens, with

specific recommendations for yarn selection for each stitch.

 

Schmitt's "Lessons in Naalbinding: Mittens, Mittens, Mittens!" (along

with the two earlier volumes, "Scarves, Wimples and More", and "Edgings

and Embellishments") is available from Susan's Fiber Shop, N250 Hwy A,

Columbus, WI 53925 USA (telephone: 920-623-4237).  For more information

you can reach Susan McFarland by e-mail at susanfiber at internetwis.com.

 

 

From: Sharon Palmer <palmer.74 at osu.edu>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Lucets and Nalebinding

Date: Sat, 28 Mar 1998 06:17:21 -0500

Organization: WOSU

 

Dick Eney wrote:

> Sarah Smith <ogre68 at iquest.net> wrote:

> >       I am very interested in learning the techniques of Lucet and

> >Nalebinding weaving.  I have been able to find a few articles on the

 

>   Nalebinding, also spelled nalbinding and naalbinding, ....

>   Since there are so many identified historic patterns, I defy anyone to

> say you're doing it "wrong" as long as it makes a fabric that does what

> you want - close to keep out cold, or loose to make a milk strainer.

 

It is better to stay with what is likely, than what cannot be proven

to be "wrong".

 

Naalbinding was (and is) most often used for the things we use

knitting, socks, mittens, etc.  It can be hard to tell from

knitting.  Usually (but not always) it looks like twisted-stitch

knitting.  Thing of trying to mend socks with a needle, and you

get the idea.  Nalbinding is upside down compared to knitting,

That is, the top of knitting has loops, but the loops are on the

bottom of nalbinding.  A sock was often started from a single

loop at the toe.  By all means, do some research before beginning

a major project.

 

Ranvaig the Weaver

Sharon Palmer               palmer.74 at osu.edu

 

 

Subject: naalbinding references

Date: Mon, 27 Apr 1998 18:57:57 -0700

From: "Wanda Pease" <wandapease at bigfoot.com>

To: <stefan at texas.net>

 

I am in the SCA.  I'm known as either Vigdis the Stout, or Fiametta La

Ghianda.  I have taught knitting at an Ithra that was down there a

couple of years ago.

 

I'm pleased that you are interested in the nalbinding booklets.  I do

have all of them available for shipping, and also some handmade wooden

nalbinding needles.  Larry's first two booklets, "Edgings and Embellishments"

and "Scarves, Wimples, and More" are each $5.75 pp, and the newest, being

3 times longer than the first ones, is "Mittens! Mittens! Mittens!" and

is $13.75 pp  

 

The nalbinding needle is $5.00 pp, and is made of cocobolo wood,

very smooth and flat with an eye at one end, about 3-1/2 inches long.

I also publish a little newsletter, The Ravel'd Sleeve, about medieval

knitting.  You may have seen it.

 

Please let me know if I can send you anything that I have.

 

Thanks again,

Melinda Shoop

 

4002 W Arlington St

Yakima WA 98908

1-509-972-0615

 

 

Date: Mon, 30 Nov 1998 23:14:19 -0500

From: Karen at stierbach.atlantia.sca.org (Larsdatter, Karen )

To: khkeeler <kkeeler at unlinfo.unl.edu>

Cc: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Documentation difficulties

 

But, by the same token ... let's say we have someone who's

researching nalebinding for socks.  There are two good places to

go for information on this particular artifact:

 

http://www.yorkarch.demon.co.uk/secrets/vikindrs.htm

  which has a really kickin' picture of a sock worked in this style

 

and

 

http://www.ftech.net/~regia/naalbind.htm

  which is an article by an English lady who does work in this style

for her English reenacting group

 

Now, neither of these are Crowfoot's "Textiles," but if our artisan is

having a hard time envisioning what the sock looks like from the

drawings, they really should check out the sock at the York

Archaeological Trust's website; the other article will be excellent for

pointers on how the technique works.  But both of 'em are certainly

better than a "brag page" of pretty baby-socks all done up in

nalebinding.  ;)

 

Karen Larsdatter

 

 

Date: Wed, 26 May 1999 08:38:39 -0500

From: "C.L. Ward" <gunnora at bga.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Naalbinding

 

Gniewomir z Suraza (ex-Gren Fredbosson) mka Jerzy A. Brzozowski asked:

>Is there any Web page that teaches nailbinding (nalebinding) _in detail_? If

>the answer is no, could someone manage to teach me?

 

Naalbinding is also known as "single-needle knitting." The technique

produces a looped fabric, much as true knitting or crochet does.

Naalbinding is an extremely ancient technique and examples can be found in

almost every culture.  Certainly it existed in the Egypt of the pharohs, as

well as the Viking Age.=20

 

Naalbinding cannot be taught via illustrations alone.  You will absolutely

have to sit down with someone who knows how it's done and learn. The good

news is that it's simple to do and easy to learn.  The hardest part is

getting the item started to begin with.  Once you have the piece started,

then the rest is really easy.

 

I recommend using a large antler needle.  You can buy expensive $15 needles

direct from Iceland on the web

(http://www.dmv.com/~iceland/tools/nale.html, or see

http://www.dmv.com/~iceland/instructions/gloves.html for a photo of the

finished fabric), but I've been making them from antler from fallow deer

and from whitetail deer for no cost other than the labor. The best needles

to work with are curved near the tip.  Mine looks like a finger crooked in

a "come here" gesture.  If you want to make your own needles, soak the

antler two days in cold water, then boil them for about an hour or so.  Use

a sharp knife to shape and smooth the needle.  It doesn't need a sharp

point, and in fact does better with a rounded one.  Leave the butt end

large enough for a hole up to 1/4" in diameter. Drill the hole, and

carefully smooth the edges and inside of the hole.  Sand to finish, and

buff well with beeswax.  (In a pinch you can use a large-eyed tapestry

needle instead).

 

If you come to Ansteorra, there are several folks here who can get you

started.  There was also a lady at Pennsic last year who showed naalbinding

in the A&S Display who taught everyone who slowed down long enough about

the art of naalbinding.

 

SOURCES:

 

Geijir, Agnes.  Birka III: Die Textilfunde aus den Graben. Uppsala: Kungl.

Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akadamien. 1938.

 

Hald, Margrethe.  Ancient Danish Textiles from Bogs and Burials: A

Comparative Study of Costume and Iron Age Textiles.

Archaeological-Historical Series 21. Copenhagen: National Museum of

Denmark.  1980.

 

Hutchinson, Elaine.  Nalebinding: The History, Origins, Construction and

Use of 'Needle-Binding' with Specific Reference to the 'Coppergate Sock'.

http://www.ftech.net/~regia/naalbind.htm

 

Ligon, Linda.  "The Ubiquitous Loop" Piecework. Jan/Feb 1994. pp. 64-66.

 

Martinson, Kate.  "Scandinavian Nalbinding: Needle-Looped Fabric." The

Weaver's Journal. Fall 1987. pp. 12-15. =20

 

Nordland, O.  Primitive Scandinavian Textiles in Knotless Netting.  Oslo.

1961.

 

Rutt, Richard.  A History of Handknitting.  Loveland, CO: Interweave Press.

1987.

 

Turnau, Irena.  "The Diffusion of Knitting in Medieval Europe." Cloth and

Clothing in Medieval Europe: Essays in Memory of Professor E.M. Carus

Wilson. Pasold Studies in Textile History 2. eds. B.B. Harte and K. G.

Ponting.  London: Pasold.  1983. pp.  368-389.

 

Walton, Penelope. 1989. Textiles, Cordage and Fiber from 16-22 Coppergate.

The Archaeology of York 17: The Small Finds, Fascicule 5. Dorchester: The

Council for British Archaeology and The Dorset Press.=20

 

Some Web resources for naalbinding include:

 

Stefan li Rous's Floregium files

http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/rialto/knitting-msg.html

 

http://www.ftech.net/~regia/naalbind.htm

        (A good introduction to the technique, but the diagram is useless.)

 

http://www.dmv.com/~iceland/

        (Information on Icelandic wool yarns,rovings and naalbinding

        needles. I make

        my own needles myself for free, it's really easy. Or you can use a

        commercial tapestry needle)

 

Gunnora Hallakarva

Baroness to the Court of Ansteorra

 

 

Date: Wed, 26 May 1999 16:19:46 +0200

From: Anna Troy <Anna.Troy at bibks.uu.se>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Naalbinding

 

Hi. Naal binding hung around for quite some time here in Sweden and as a

lot of other crafts had a resurgance in the 70's. As for needles, reindeer

antler is good, though I didn't process mine in quite the same way. I just

sawed it out, sanded and then polished it. It's about 4 inches long and

it's fairly blunt. Reindeer antler also often comes with the right curve as

well. You can also use bone and hard wood like Juniper. Basicly you want

that needle to be SMOOTH. The curve is a good thing to have bit it's not

absolutly necessary. Unfortuantly I've only found some pages in Swedish

that describe the technique and this http://www.duke.edu/~scg3/naal.html in

English. Simpler Naalbinding techniques (there are over 20 different types

at least) can be learned from illustrations but it is darn hard.

 

 

Date: Tue, 29 Feb 2000 10:51:05 -0600

From: Schmitt <schmitt at mailbag.com>

Subject: Naalbinding Mittens Workshop

 

If you are interested in naalbinding, read on!

 

NŒlbinding Mittens at North House,

with Larry Schmitt – April 7-9 20000

 

Nalbinding Mitten workshop: Learn the ancient craft of Naalbinding –

April 7-9, 2000 at North House Folk School, on the harbor at beautiful

Grand Marais, Minnesota.

 

These mittens were once an essential for rural Scandinavians for more

than a thousand years.  You will quickly discover why these mittens are

better than knitted mittens!  Naalbinding is a way to make a looped

structure fabric using one needle.  Though somewhat similar to knitting,

this craft is much older.

 

In this workshop, students will learn at least one of the traditional

naalbinding mitten stitches, as well as the basics of shaping a mitten.

A variety of finishing techniques will also be demonstrated.  Students

will have an opportunity to make their own needles.

 

While this workshop is a must for anyone interested in prehistoric

textiles, you will find that naalbinding mittens are eminently practical

for the 21st century.

 

Larry Schmitt, our teacher, is the author of the "Lessons in

Naalbinding" series of books.  The mitten book from the series –

"Mittens, mittens, mittens!" – was recently reviewed in Spin Off

magazine.

 

Tuition $125.00, plus $12.00 materials fee.  One needle, lesson

materials and a small amount of yarn will be provided.  Additional

supplies will be available for purchase.

 

North House Folk School was created to promote and preserve knowledge,

skills, and crafts of the past and present, and through them, to better

understand the future and our role in it.  The learning that is

emphasized is inspired by the Scandinavian "folkhšgskolar" where

learning is valued for its own sake.  The focus is on traditional

methods and technologies and their application in a variety of areas.

 

This course will be held at North House Folk School, located on Lake

Superior in Grand Marais, Minnesota at the foot of the Gunflint Trail.

Grand Marais is located 110 miles from Duluth and is reached by

following Highway 61 north.  A detailed map will be provided on

registration.

 

Contact: North House Folk School, P.O. Box 759, Grand Marais, MN   55604

 

218-387-9762 or toll free at 888-387-9762

www.northhouse.org

 

 

Date: Fri, 29 Sep 2000 08:03:20 -0500

From: Schmitt <schmitt at mailbag.com>

To: stefan at texas.net

Subject: Naalbinding

 

Just a brief announcement for those with an interest in naalbinding. Larry

SchmittÕs fourth naalbinding workbook is now available.  It is titled "Lessons

in Naalbinding: Lots of Socks."  This workbook is an exploration of the

traditional naalbound socks -- including -- directions for ten naalbinding

stitches appropriate for socks and seven sock patterns based on traditional

examples -- with numerous variations.

 

This is practical manual intended for the craftperson who wants to make real,

"wearable" socks, but attention is also given to historical background and

traditional finishes.  The work book also contains a survey of naalbinding

scholarship and directions for making your own needles.

 

SchmittÕs "Lessons in Naalbinding: Lots of Socks" is available from SusanÕs

Fiber Shop, N250 Hwy A, Columbus, WI 53925 USA, phone 920-623-4237

(susanfiber at internetwis.com, or http://www.handspinning.com/susansfiber/).

 

 

From: gunnora at my-deja.com

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: naal binding

Date: Fri, 03 Nov 2000 14:41:56 GMT

 

Roxanne Greenstreet <ghelena661 at aol.com> asked:

>How did the early Scandinavian peoples get naal binding  and not

>knitting till later.

 

Naalbinding arises naturally out of activities such as repairing

fishing nets. It's ancient -- examples exist at least as early as the

Bronze Age, and there are examples from all over the world.

Barber's "Women's Work" cites (I think) a naalbinding linen bag from

Isarel, ca. 6500 BC.

 

Naalbinding is, literally, "single-needle knotting".  The fabric

produced by this method resembles in some ways crochet or knitting, but

because the weave is knotted it's much less likely to ravel if cut.

 

>Did these early Scandinavians have knitting too and I just don't

>know about it?

 

Nope.  They didn't get knitting until post Viking Age, sometime in the

Middle Ages if I recall correctly.  Thirteenth century seems to be the

date I recall, but I don't have the materials here in front of me.

 

This is all discussed in detail in the excellent article I already

cited:

 

Turnau, Irena. "The Diffusion of Knitting in Medieval Europe." Cloth

and Clothing in  Medieval Europe: Essays in Memory of Professor E.M.

Carus Wilson. Pasold Studies in Textile  History 2. eds. B.B. Harte and

K. G. Ponting. London: Pasold. 1983. pp. 368-389.

 

Also see this excellent bibliography on early knitting and the

diffusion/spread of knitting:

http://www.florilegium.org/files/TEXTILES/p-knitting-bib.html

 

>I have some documentation for knitted items that are definitly

>knitted and very, very old

 

But "very, very old" is not documentation -- it's folklore. *How*

old?  And exactly where?  Actually, "where" is almost more important in

this case than "when" because new technologies do not appear in a big

*poof* of flame everywhere simultaneously, nor do people readily give

up their old ways of doing things quickly.  New technologies spread

gradually, and can be traced.

 

A parallel example is the game of chess.  It existed very early in

India -- but didn't get to Scandinavia until relatively late.

 

> I guess what I really want to know is why naal binding manage to

> travel far and wide and not knitting till much, much later.

 

Naalbinding seems to have been developed independently in several

places Egypt, among the Andean Indians, etc.  It's idiot-simple to do,

and derives from knotting.  Knitting, on the other hand, is not

intuitively obvious to this naalbinder, and I suspect that that is why

it wasn't spontaneously developed all over the place.

 

>Is it possible to put in a Dutch heel in a naal-bound sock?

 

In naalbinding you add loops or decrease loops wherever you need them,

from what I understand much easier than you can in knitting.  My

naalbinding socks look like modern sports "anklet" type socks, because

I worked in the shape as I went.

 

Rutt, Richard. A History of Handknitting (Loveland, CO: Interweave

Press. 1987) has a couple of drawings which explain the

differences/similarities between increase/decrease techniques in

knitting vs. naalbinding, which are labelled as follows: "(a)

Nailbinding decrease, which cannot be simulated in knitting; (b)

nailbinding increase, which can be simulated by knitting, but only with

difficulty."

 

Regia Angelorum has a really good drawing of the Coppergate naalbinding

socks (the kind that I usually make) you should look at, it's located

at:

 

http://www.regia.org/naalbind.htm

 

As a note, don't expect to be able to learn naalbinding from the

explanation on this page or usually in any written source.  It's easy

to do, but I've yet to see a good printed explanation, even one with

good diagrams.

 

> Why did knitting supercede naal binding as a way to make socks,

> mittens, ect.?

 

Check the Turnau article.

 

Other sources:

 

Hald, Margrethe. Ancient Danish Textiles from Bogs and Burials, trans.

Jean Olsen. Copenhagen: National Museum of Denmark. 1980.

[Hald has a lot of information about naalbinding, and is quite good for

documentation.  I found it of no help in initially learning

naalbinding.]

 

Schmitt, Larry. Lessons in Nalbinding, Mittens, Mittens, Mittens: A

Nalbinding Workbook. Author can be reached at: Larry Schmitt, 154 W.

Reynolds St., P.O. Box 219, Cottage Grove, WI  53527.  Or order from:

Susan‰s Fiber Shop, N250 Hwy A, Columbus, WI 53925 USA, 920-623-4237,

http://www.handspinning.com/susansfiber/

 

Schmitt, Larry. Lessons in Naalbinding: Lots of Socks. (Same contact

info as above).

 

Naalbinding Mail List at eGroups

nalbinding-owner at egroups.com

[Lots of really good info.  Larry Schmidt and many others are on this

list, which can make it very helpful.]

 

Phialia's String Pages: Naalbinding

http://www.duke.edu/~scg3/string.html#naal

 

Morganna McGlachlen's Naalbinding Page

http://technetdesign.hypermart.net/naalbinding.html

 

Mistress Þ—ra Sharptooth posted the following sources on the Norsefolk

eGroups list a while back.  I have some additional articles that she

doesn't list, which I will try and dig up this weekend.  All biblio

below is from Þ—ra:

 

Bayerisches Nationalmuseum.  _Sakrale GewŠnder des Mittelalters:

Ausstellung im Bayerischen Nationalmuseum Munchen, 8. Juli bis 25.

September 1955_, ed. Sigrid MŲller- Christensen. Munchen: Hirmer,

1955.

[Catalogue entry for a mid-12th century nalebinding linen glove from

Germany.]

 

Burnham, Dorothy.  "Coptic Knitting:  An Ancient Technique," _Textile

History_ 3 (December 1972), pp. 116-124.

[General techniques of nalebinding used on Coptic socks.  Some nice

photos.]

 

Hansen, Egon.  "Nalebinding:  definition and description," _Textiles in

Northern Archaeology: NESAT III Textile Symposium in York 6-9 May 1987_,

ed. Penelope Walton and John-Peter Wild.  London:  Archetype

Publications, 1990.

[Typology and notation system for the different interlacements.  The

intellectual equivalent of Collingwood's sprang and tablet weaving

typologies; highly recommended.]

 

MŲller-Christensen, Sigrid, et al. "Die GrŠber im Kšnigschor," pp. 923-

1023 in Hans Erich Kubach and Walter Haas, eds., _Der Dom zu Speyer_,

Vol. 2 (Textband). MŲnich: Deutscher Kunstverlag, 1972.

[Catalogue entry for a fragmentary 11th century nalebinding silk glove

from Germany.]

 

Nordland, Odd.  _Primitive Scandinavian Textiles in Knotless Netting_.

Oslo University Press, 1961.

[He combed museums in Scandinavia for examples; well worth a look, even

though he's not very clear on the techniques themselves.]

 

Schmedding, Brigitta.  _Mittelalterliche Textilien in Kirchen und

Klostern der Schweiz_.  Schriften der Abegg-Stiftung. Bern: Verlag

StŠmpfli & Cie., 1978.

[Some 12th century linen episcopal stockings from Switzerland.]

 

Walton, Penelope.  _Textiles, Cordage and Raw Fibre from 16-22

Coppergate_. The Archaeology of York, Volume 17, Fascicule 5. York:

York Archaeological Trust and the Council for British Archaeology,

1989.

[Has a write-up on the Coppergate shoe liner / sock from the 10th

century, plus some succinct comparative information on nalebinding

stockings.  The "Coppergate stitch" isn't covered in Schmitt.]

 

And *still* more on naalbinding:

 

Bennett, Wendell and Junius Bird. Andean Culture History. The Natural

History Press. 1964.

[Has a brief description of naalbinding in the Andes, see pg. 221.]

 

Nylen, Anna-Maja. Swedish Handcraft. Translation 1977?  ISBN:

0517365537. see pp. 96-97, 315-318.

[Shows historical examples and a common technique. Various local terms

were used for needle looping, variously nalbindning (sewing with a

needle), binda med nal (to sew with a needle), nata (to needle), and

somma (to seam). Nalbindning (noun) and binda med nal (verb) are the

generally accepted terms in Sweden today for needle looping.]

 

Davidson, D. S.; "Knotless netting in America and Oceania?"

American Anthropologist, New Series, 37; 1935.

 

Martinson, Kate; "Scandinavian NÎlbinding; Needle Looped Fabric?" in

Weaver's Journal XII, No. 2, Issue 46; Fall 1987.

 

Westman, Berit; NÎlbindning; 12 varianter; Andersson & Kagardt,

VŠsterÎs, 1983; ISBN 91-970550-0-X.

[Good instructions, in Swedish.]

 

Ligon, Linda. "The Ubiquitous Loop" Piecework (Jan/Feb 1994) pp. 64-66.

 

Martinson, Kate. "Scandinavian Nalbinding: Needle-Looped Fabric." The

Weaver's Journal. Fall 1987. pp. 12-15.

 

::GUNNORA::

 

 

Subject: [MR] Nalbinding article

Date: Fri, 4 May 2001 21:37:52 EDT

From: EXCMairi at aol.com

To: sca-east at indra.com

CC: atlantia at atlantia.sca.org

 

For the nalbinding fanatics out there (I'm married to one), there is a very  nice article in the most recent (May/June 2001) Piecework, written by Nancy  Bush (who wrote Folk Socks and Folk Knitting in Estonia). The article is a  good introduction, with both ancient (read Dura-Europa and viking age) as  well as modern Estonian examples. There are really nice color photos of the  Coppergate sock (before and after restoration) as well as the nicest photo of  teh Mammen pieces I have ever seen (actually shows almost all of one of the  pennants/banners instead of just a close up).

 

The issue also has a piece entitled "A Mobius Scarf to Nalbind" with  instructions for making the scarf by Rudy Amann. She doesn't use the usual  black and white drawings of nalbinding stitches, but photos of someone  actually doing it (a bit harder to see, since they are not close up enough  for my taste, but it's a different way of approaching the problem of  illustrating how to do it on paper).

 

A note says that Mr. Amann will be teaching "Spinning Thicker Yarns and  Nalbinding" at SOAR (Spin-Off's Autumn Retreat) in Snowbird, Utah Sept.  16-23, 2001. He lives in Maine, in case anybody want to try and find him.  ; )

 

Also gives a source for wooden nalbinding needles - Woodchuck Products, PO  Box 1138, Taos, NM 87571; (505) 776-4180.

 

Mairi

 

 

From: "james rich" <7152 at cableone.net>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Magazine article on naalbinding

Date: Wed, 30 May 2001 14:06:49 -0500

 

If anyone is interested, the current (May-June) issue of Piecework Magazine

has a nice article on naalbinding.

AElfwenna

 

<the end>



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