sewing-msg – 1/12/12

 

Sewing ideas and stitches. Helpful ideas for those new to sewing.

 

NOTE: See also the files: sergers-msg, sewng-machnes-msg, sewing-tables-msg, sewing-tools-msg, washing-msg, linen-msg, velvet-msg, silk-msg, textiles-msg.

 

************************************************************************

NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

    Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                          Stefan at florilegium.org

************************************************************************

 

From: PRIEST at vaxsar.vassar.EDU (THORA SHARPTOOTH)

Date: 2 Dec 91 13:37:00 GMT

Organization: The Internet

 

Unto the Fishyfolk of the Rialto, and especially Joshua, from Thora Sharptooth,

greeting!

 

My specialty is Viking and early (i.e., pre-1066) period, so this may not be of

use to you later period folk, but here's what I know about early period seams

and seam finishings.  Most of this information is drawn from the excavations at

Jorvik and Hedeby, because the findings from them have been carefully analyzed

and comprehensively published in the last decade.  As it happens, this is the

research in which I am presently engaged, so forgive me if I blather....

 

A wide variety of seams and seam finishings were used in the Viking Age.  Most

garments were very carefully and neatly sewn and finished, frequently with

tailoring details that are invisible from the outside.  At Birka many seams

were reinforced at the cut edges by tiny sewn-down braided cords.  But to

answer Joshua's questions more specifically:

 

>1) right-sides-together, sew near the edge, spread apart

 

Yes, with one refinement.  Generally the flat parts would also be sewn down to

the rest of the garment, with either a hem or an overcast stitch.  This

strengthens the garment as well as the seam.

 

>2)French seams

 

Yes. From the site of Hedeby in Denmark we have an example of "French seams"

on wool in the tenth century.  (Right sides together, sew closely to the edge;

turn inside-out and sew farther back from the edge, enclosing the first seam in

a little tube.  Press to one side.)

 

>3)flat-felled seams

 

Yes. From the site of Jorvik (Viking Age York) there is evidence of

flat-felled seams of several varieties, also in the ninth, tenth, and early

eleventh centuries.  Flat-felling is the seam finishing most likely to appear

on linen from this site, leading one researcher to suggest that it was typical

for use on underwear.

 

>4)right-side to wrong-side, overlapping by 3/4" or so

 

Yes; see below.  Both Hedeby and Jorvik yield many sorts of seams wherein the

wrong side of one piece and the right side of another are sewn together.

 

>Same as 4), but then rolled over and sewed down again to form a sort of

flat-fell

 

Again, the raw edges (or selvedges) of seams constructed in this way were

generally sewn down.

 

>6)etc.

 

Generally speaking, running stitch was used for the initial line of sewing on a

finished seam.  I have not yet found documentation for back-stitch, which is

the stitch with which most people are taught to hand-sew seams.  Also, when I

get home I'll look up the eighth century Coptic tunic article I have on file

and see what stitches were used to construct it; if there's anything new or

different there, I'll post it.

 

I'm glad you didn't ask about hems--there are about two dozen variations! ;>

 

I apologize for not being able to footnote this properly, but my sources are at

home. Generally, they are Agnes Geijer's BIRKA II, Inga Hagg's book on the

finds at Hedeby harbour, and Penelope Walton's TEXTILES, CORDAGE, AND RAW FIBRE

FROM 16-22 COPPERGATE (Archaeology of York series).  As always, anyone who

wants sources or who is just generally interested in this is encouraged to drop

me a line.

*****************************************************************************

Carolyn Priest-Dorman                   Thora Sharptooth

Poughkeepsie, NY                        Frosted Hills

priest at vassar.edu                       East Kingdom

*****************************************************************************

 

 

From: PRIEST at vaxsar.vassar.EDU (THORA SHARPTOOTH)

Date: 3 Dec 91 03:25:00 GMT

Organization: The Internet

 

Unto the Fishyfolk of the Rialto from Thora Sharptooth, greeting!

 

Sorry, I caught this mistake too late to correct it before it was posted:

 

>>2)French seams

> 

>Yes. From the site of Hedeby in Denmark we have an example of "French seams"

>on wool in the tenth century.  (Right sides together, sew closely to the edge;

                                 ^^^^^

>turn inside-out and sew farther back from the edge, enclosing the first seam in

>a little tube.  Press to one side.)

 

That should be, "WRONG sides together."

 

While I'm here, here's a report on the Coptic tunic seams from the eighth

century: flat-felled, on a linen tunic with wool trimmings of several sorts.

 

And here are the sources.

 

Geijer, Agnes.  DIE TEXTILFUNDE AUS DEN GRABERN, Vol. II of BIRKA:

        UNTERSUCHUNGEN UND STUDIEN.  Uppsala: Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och

        Antikvitets Akadamien, 1938.

 

Hagg, Inga.  DIE TEXTILFUNDE AUS DEM HAFEN VON HAITHABU, Vol. 20 of BERICHTE

        UBER DIE AUSGRABUNGEN IN HAITHABU. Neumunster:  Karl Wachholz Verlag,

        1984.

 

Marko, Ksynia, and Dobbie, Margaret.  "The Conservation of an Eighth Century

        A.D. Sleeveless Coptic Tunic," STUDIES IN CONSERVATION 27 (1982), pp.

        154-160.

 

Walton, Penelope.  TEXTILES, CORDAGE AND RAW FIBRE FROM 16-22 COPPERGATE, Vol.

        17, Fascicule 5, of THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF YORK.  Dorchester:  The Council

        for British Archaeology and The Dorset Press, 1989.

 

*****************************************************************************

Carolyn Priest-Dorman                   Thora Sharptooth

Poughkeepsie, NY                        Frosted Hills

priest at vassar.edu                       East Kingdom

*****************************************************************************

 

 

From: ck290 at cleveland.Freenet.Edu (Chandra L. Morgan-Henley)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: tablet weaving info needed.

Date: 27 Sep 1993 21:30:06 GMT

Organization: Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio (USA)

 

I don't weave, but I have a comment about Fray-Check...

 

I have attempted to use it on both finely and not-so-finely

woven materials.  It works best on fine, tight weaves such as

satins and (the dreaded OOP) taffeta.  Also, despite claims on

the label, it *does* wash out after a few washings -- and dry

cleaning will remove it on the first go-round.

 

OTOH, it *does* prevent satin, etc., from fraying while you

are working on it.  But be sure to lay the fabric on several

layers of newspaper when applying the stuff, and expect color

to leach from the fabric into the newspaper (the fabric will

also stick to the newspaper when the Fray-Check dries, but can

be pulled off easily with no transference of newspaper or ink

to the fabric) -- the dye in the fabric will also color your

hands if you handle it while the Fray-Check is wet.

 

In Service, even when it's distinctly OOP,

 

Cara The Unbalanced

--

Chandra L. Morgan-Henley

ck290 at Cleveland.Freenet.Edu

 

 

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: garb sewn with sergers

From: una at bregeuf.stonemarche.org (Honur Horne-Jaruk)

Date: Thu, 30 Dec 93 20:11:41 EST

 

Unto Amethysta(and anybody else with the same question

about sergers and garb)Alizaunde sends greetings (and congratulations on

your new toy!)

       -Only two suggestions:

       1: how fast it goes can cause BIG problems. Buy

old sheets at Goodwill and practice. LOTS. My sisters were full-time, pro

seamstresses for years, using sergers daily; they said it took about one full

set of cones of thread to adjust to a new serger well enough to produce

quality results.

       2:Don't use it for ANTHING that shows. I use a machine (straight

stitch- I'm poor) for anything I can, partly because some period things,

like seamstresses' neuropathy, should not be re-created; and partly because

Life Is Too Short For Handstitching Straight Seams. But on the insides of

cuffs, and on necklines and hems, Serging is Serging and looks like serging.

Even a regular machine's zigzag looks more like handwork- and that's saying

plenty. (If it will never show WHEN WORN and you don't enter competitions,

Don't Sweat the Small Stuff.) If the speed of a serger gives you more time

to research and design better quality, more authentic garb, it's done you

and the Society a favor; if its speed becomes an excuse for cranking out

endless stacks of `they'll do for fighters', it hasn't.

Good luck.

 

                              Alizaunde, Demoiselle de Bregeuf

 

 

From: hrjones at uclink.berkeley.edu (Heather Rose Jones)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: viking sewing stitches?

Date: 20 Jun 1994 06:11:01 GMT

Organization: University of California, Berkeley

 

:      Again I, Tarrach Alfson, send greetings and beg answers to a

: question.  I am in the middle of an attempt to make a viking shirt

: similar to the one found in Viborg (and recently the subject of an

: artical in the Early Period).  The information I have on this find does

: not mention what type of stitching was used to sew the arm sleeves

: together, or to finish hems, or how they finished the raw edges of the

: inner seams since it is said that all raw edges are finished.  I am

: currently waiting on an inter-library loan for Arheological Textiles in

: Northern Europe (Coppenhagen 1992) which I hope to help answer these and

: other questions.  However, faster answers from any knowledgable

: individuals would be greatly appreciated, as I hope to have it finished

: for an upcoming event (two weeks from now).  Thanks in advance!

 

Margrethe Hald's book "Ancient Danish Textiles from Bogs and Burials"

notes seams done in running stitch, herringbone stitch, and twisted

buttonhole stitch. There are also viking-era items with a decorative

seam-joining done in "raised fishbone stitch" (a more heavily overlapped

version of herringbone). Edge-finishes include overcast (whip) stitch and

buttonhole.

 

Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn

 

 

From: bloodthorn at sloth.equinox.gen.nz (Jennifer Geard)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: viking sewing stitches?

Date: Tue, 21 Jun 94 21:13:39 GMT

Organization: Lethargy Inc.

 

Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn wrote:

>There are also viking-era items with a decorative seam-joining done in

>"raised fishbone stitch" (a more heavily overlapped version of herringbone).

 

This is my stitch of choice for quick sewing, since it binds the edges at the

same time as making the structural join.  Looks good too.

 

  Pagan

==/==\==/==\==/==\==/==\==/==\==/==\==/==\==/==\==/==\==/==\==/==\==/==\==

  Jennifer Geard                         bloodthorn at sloth.equinox.gen.nz

  Christchurch, New Zealand

 

 

From: parkerd at mcmail.cis.mcmaster.CA (Diana Parker)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Cloaks

Date: 15 Nov 1994 08:37:19 -0500

Organization: The Internet

 

>I need help in finding a place in Ohio that can get me a pattern for a cloak.

>Before, I had always had someone else make my garb, but I have decided to do

>this myself.

 

        A wonderful starting project, because it is done with long

straight seams, no complicated sewing tricks, and is fairly easy to make

the pattern.

        If you are set on buying a commercial pattern, I can't help you because

I don't know who would carry such a thing.  If you would like to make

your own pattern (following my easy directions - _easy_ honest :), send

me an email, and I will dig up the pattern I have on disk at home &

forward it to you.

 

>I even went out and bought a used sewing machine, though it is

>missing the needle.  The lady who I bought it off of said that a missing

>needle

>would not be a problem--that I could go and get it replaced for minimal cost.

 

Needles are a consumable on sewing machines, something like thread only

not quite as fast.  I have a small box I keep different sizes of needles

in. The usual sizes are:

         9 - very fine sheer cloth

        11 - light weight cloth

        14 - practically everything

        16 - heavier weight (your cloak!)

        18 - sewing a tent

 

Then there are specialty needles of varying usefulness that are sold for

leather, for silks, or sewing with multiple threads at once.

 

Needles are quite cheap and can be bought at fabric stores, department

stores, and even some grocery stores.

 

>In any case, I think I got ripped off.

 

Well that would depend on what kind of machine you got and how much you

paid. Some of the older (ie 15-25 year old) machines are going to live

forever. My Mother has an ancient Singer that will sew through anything

you put in it's way.  I know of many people sewing with older machines

that they wouldn't give up.  If the motor on your machine still runs, you

probably didn't get ripped off.

 

        I'm glad you have a sewing machine and the ambition to sew for

yourself. I think it is a great skill that is relatively easily

mastered, and I'd like to see more people getting into it.

 

cheers

Tabitha

----------------------------------------------

Diana Parker    <parkerd at mcmail.mcmaster.ca>

Security Services       CUC - 201      

McMaster University     (905) 525-9140 (x24282)

 

 

From: dickeney at access1.digex.net (Dick Eney)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: hand stitching documentation

Date: 14 Dec 1995 10:06:11 -0500

Organization: Express Access Online Communications, Greenbelt, MD USA

 

In article <4ap5gn$54k at jaxnet.jaxnet.com>,

Tracy Watson <tewkes at jaxnet.com> wrote:

>     Does anyone know of some illustations of hand stitched seams?  I'd like

>to enter a piece into an Arts/Sci competition, but i'd rather use hand

>stitching instead of by machine.  I also need a picture of those seams, it

>would be easier to copy.  If anyone knows of such documentation, let me know

>the title and ISBN number, so I can access it by inter library loan, if

>neccessary. Thank you,

> 

>                           Kathryn of Tewkesbury

 

Probably not what you're looking for, but one of the Unicorn tapestries

in the Cloisters shows a peasant with what looks like large topstitching

around the neck of his shirt (black thread on white shirt).

 

There's a photograph in a book about The Unicorn Tapestries; sorry, it's

packed in a box and not readily available.

 

-- Tamar the Gypsy (sharing account dickeney at access.digex.net)

 

 

From: hrjones at uclink.berkeley.edu (Heather Rose Jones)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: hand stitching documentation

Date: 14 Dec 1995 17:07:05 GMT

Organization: University of California, Berkeley

 

Tracy Watson (tewkes at jaxnet.com) wrote:

:      Does anyone know of some illustations of hand stitched seams?  I'd like

: to enter a piece into an Arts/Sci competition, but i'd rather use hand

: stitching instead of by machine.  I also need a picture of those seams, it

: would be easier to copy.  If anyone knows of such documentation, let me know

: the title and ISBN number, so I can access it by inter library loan, if

: neccessary.  Thank you,

 

The appropriate documentation will differ depending on the precise period

and location of the item in question, but the best source I know for

"high medieval" English sewing is the Museum of London textiles book.

Nice clear diagrams and explanations of the use to which various

stitching techniques were put. ISBN 0-11-290445-9.

 

Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn

 

 

From: Kimberly <kim at inna.net>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Sewing Garb tips for newbies

Date: Sun, 5 May 1996 17:06:22 -0700

 

Greetings!

 

        Just a few thoughts for some of our newer members from someone

who's been there, done that <grin>...

 

        Making garb for the first time can be hectic... especially if you

have an event you've >just heard about< and you absolutely >have< to be

there! And you've only two days to come up with something.

 

        Good news!  With only a simple sewing machine, a steaming iron and

Elmer's glue, you can whip out a great t-tunic that will last all season

(and beyond) ----> In About 2 Hours <----!

 

        Yes, those of you who sew constantly are probably groaning at the

mention of Elmer's glue, but honest, it's the best way to hold a seam

without the time consuming bother of pining!  Just pre-crease your seams

with the iron, add a thin line of glue, then quick-dry it with the iron

again, and vola!  A seam that will hold long enough to get from the

ironing board to the sewing machine... and unlike the conventional

straight pins, it holds the seams perfectly in place!  No sliding or

gathering of material (which is caused by clumsy pining, like mine

<sigh>).

 

        And unlike using tapes and permanent glues, Elmer's will wash out

and leave your seams soft and pliable.  Now, granted, unless you double

roll your inside seams like I do, you will get fraying!  But for a first

time attempt that is only going to get you through one event, it's one of

the best ways I know to get a tunic done quick!

 

        I won't waste space here by going through all the gory details

unless someone asks me to.  I've been told there are several EXCELLENT

sewing FAQ's on the internet, but most of the ones I've read are a little

too technical for newbies and >no one< has mentioned the use of glue as a

temporary holding method vs. pining.

 

        If you'd like a complete, detailed run-down (including a nifty

collar pattern), e-mail me at: kim at inna.net and mention "Newbie sewing".

I'll be more than happy to give you a list there!

 

        Welcome and good luck!

 

        Yours In Service,

        Kimberly

 

 

From: jeffebear1 at aol.com (JeffEBear1)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Sewing Garb tips for newbies

Date: 8 May 1996 04:06:02 -0400

 

Don't forget to pre-shrink your fabric!

 

 

From: Doni Leamon <doeadeer at utc.campus.mci.net>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Sewing Garb tips for newbies

Date: Wed, 08 May 1996 20:25:57 -0400

 

If you are really pressed for time, nerves, etc. a fun alternative is

called Unique Stitch.  It is a permanent (no, really!) fabric glue that

you apply and let cure for a few hours.  My shot nerves would not allow

me to fight with my sewing machine one night before an event, but I

learned how to glue in *kindergarten* so I gave it a whirl.  I even went

swimming in it (a chiton) the next day with no problems!

 

Just a thought when the sewing machine gremlins plague you.

 

In service,

Daine un Cerf

Kingdom of Meridies

 

 

From: aceia at onr.com (Aceia)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Sewing Garb tips for newbies

Date: Wed, 08 May 1996 19:13:16 +0100

 

Kimberly <kim at inna.net> wrote:

>        Yes, those of you who sew constantly are probably groaning at the

>mention of Elmer's glue, but honest, it's the best way to hold a seam

>without the time consuming bother of pining!  Just pre-crease your seams

>with the iron, add a thin line of glue, then quick-dry it with the iron

>again, and vola!  A seam that will hold long enough to get from the

>ironing board to the sewing machine... and unlike the conventional

>straight pins, it holds the seams perfectly in place!  No sliding or

>gathering of material (which is caused by clumsy pining, like mine

><sigh>).

> 

>        And unlike using tapes and permanent glues, Elmer's will wash out

>and leave your seams soft and pliable.  Now, granted, unless you double

>roll your inside seams like I do, you will get fraying!  But for a first

>time attempt that is only going to get you through one event, it's one of

>the best ways I know to get a tunic done quick!

 

WOW! what a wonderful idea!!  I have been sewing awhile and never thought

of it.  I HATE pinning and usually I just don't bother which sometimes

leads to uneven seams....I wonder if this would work with

applique...sometimes I just hate wonder-under, always seems to end up all

over my iron.  Of course glue probably will to...but it should just peel

off. Or for stabilizing the fabric....or for attaching thick trim that

has to be hand sewn (takes me days to do...)

 

THANKS for sharing this with me!!

Sewing is fun if you know all the shortcuts!

 

Robin Anderson of Ross

Ansteorra

Barony of Bryn Gwlad

 

 

From: parkerd at mcmail.cis.McMaster.CA (Diana Parker)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Sewing Garb tips for newbies

Date: 8 May 1996 23:28:42 -0400

Organization: McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

 

        When you're planning your cutting layout... is your fabric wide

enough for the selvedge (finished edges at the side) to be your bottom

hem? or at least to cut your sleeves so the bottom of them has a finished

edge? Makes it easier to turn up your fabric once instead of twice for

hemming - and saves the day if you've left the garb til the last minute

and have to choose between hemming & sleep.

 

Tabitha

--

Diana Parker                parkerd at mcmaster.ca   (905) 525-9140 (x24282)

CUC - 201               Security Services       McMaster University

 

 

From: IVANOR at delphi.com

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Sewing Garb tips for newbies

Date: 11 May 1996 03:28:30 GMT

 

Quoting aceia from a message in rec.org.sca

   >>        And unlike using tapes and permanent glues, Elmer's will wash

   >out >and leave your seams soft and pliable.  Now, granted, unless you

   >double >roll your inside seams like I do, you will get fraying!  But

   >for a first >time attempt that is only going to get you through one

   >event, it's one of >the best ways I know to get a tunic done quick!

   >WOW! what a wonderful idea!!  I have been sewing awhile and never

   >thought of it.  I HATE pinning and usually I just don't bother which

   >sometimes leads to uneven seams....I wonder if this would work with

   >applique...sometimes I just hate wonder-under, always seems to end up

 

Of course it will. In fact, the sewing/crafts tips programs recommend this

sort of thing, though they mostly seem to be pushing things like Aleene's

Tacky Glue.... But Elmer's is cheaper and definitely soluble.

 

   >all over my iron.  Of course glue probably will to...but it should

   >just peel off.  Or for stabilizing the fabric....or for attaching

   >thick trim that has to be hand sewn (takes me days to do...)

 

Yup, it'll work for that, too.  Just don't use it for anything that isn't

washable, or you'll have to leave it in even after stitching.

 

Carolyn Boselli   ivanor at delphi.com   Host of CF35..SCAdians on Delphi

ivanor at localnet.com                                                  

 

 

From: Kim Pollard <kim at inna.net>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Sewing Garb tips for newbies

Date: Sun, 19 May 1996 09:21:16 -0400

 

On Sat, 18 May 1996, Cennydd wrote:

> Could anyone please help me with tips on how to do dagging so all the

> edges don't fray--were the edges finished in any way?  And were the

> edges of fabric in slashed sleeves, etc. finished?

__________

 

I don't know how those of the middle ages delt with frayed edges, but

I've found the best way to "dagg" is to:

        a)  draw out your pattern first on the fabric leaving roughly

            1/2" between the daggs for the thread to hold onto once

            they are cut and flipped.

        b)  pin (or glue) another piece of fabric behind the first

        c)  carefully sew along your lines... leave "points" in the

            ends of your daggs so they will flip easier     V    V

                                                        |   ||   ||

                if this realy confuses you, wait       |   ||   ||

                until I get my newbie sewing site up   \___/\___/\

        d)  once all the sewing is done, cut out the daggs leaving

            at least 1/4" trim to leave the thread something to hold

            hold onto once it's been washed.

        e)  flip the fabric right-side out and iron flat.  You may wish

            to re-sew along the edge again to keep it flat permanently,

            but that is not really necessary. Just sew the end of the

            backing shut (flipping that over as well to keep >it< from

            fraying) and volia!  You have daggs!

 

Kimberly

 

 

From: brettwi at ix.netcom.com(Brett Williams)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Sewing Garb tips for newbies

Date: 19 May 1996 15:50:15 GMT

 

Cennydd <mite1 at aloha.net> writes:

>Could anyone please help me with tips on how to do dagging so all the

>edges don't fray--were the edges finished in any way?  And were the

>edges of fabric in slashed sleeves, etc. finished?

 

In period, dagged fabric was more tightly beaten in the weaving process

than what is done by machine these days and didn't need edge finishes

when pinked or dagged (see the fragment of dagging in HMSO "Medieval

Textiles". I've finished dagged edges in three different ways, none of

which are (so far in my searchings) documentably period techniques*:

 

1. Fray Check. This stuff is a chemical preparation found on the

notion wall in any decent sewing shop that, when dribbled on the cut

edge of a fabric, will prevent fraying of any kind. It is poisonous,

nasty to breathe and will stain the edge of the fabric a tad darker in

hue than what it originally was. Since you're talking as if your

fraying is after the fact, this might be a way to save your present

garment.

 

But, in the future:

 

2. Before cutting the dag pattern, travel over the proposed edge of

the dags with two journeys of dense zig-zag stitching with your

machine, either in matching or contrasting thread. Fray Check is a nice

reinforcement here.

 

3. Line your dagged edges with a contrasting color: e.g., if your

houppelande is black velveteen and your cotehardie underneath is white,

how about a nice deep red for a sleeve lining?

 

Hope this helps.

 

ciorstan

*who would love to hear otherwise concerning method number three. :)

 

 

From: jeffebear1 at aol.com (JeffEBear1)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Sewing Garb tips for newbies

Date: 23 May 1996 13:50:37 -0400

 

Cennydd <mite1 at aloha.net> writes:

>Could anyone please help me with tips on how to do dagging so all the

>edges don't fray--were the edges finished in any way?  And were the

>edges of fabric in slashed sleeves, etc. finished?

 

I roll or line all my dagging.   I either line my slashes or  (i know it's

not so period ) use a LOOOOOOG button hole stich cut it open and WALAH

finished edges. just use buttons or ties where you want them to close.  

Fake puffs are easier then tring to keep your shirt pulled out evenly all

day!     Lady M

 

 

From: Deloris Booker <dbooker at freenet.calgary.ab.ca>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Sewing Garb tips for newbies

Date: Thu, 23 May 1996 15:35:29 -0600

Organization: Calgary Free-Net

 

My Lord/Lady : re dags and frays

 

2 possible sollutions are :

        for dags : line them with a contrasting fabric - to do this, place

the flat sleeeve ( unsewn) on the lining fabric, right sides to gether, ;

pin the peices firmly and frequently.  Then using a tailors pencil, draw

the outline of the dags on one or the other piece.  Then sew the pieces

together on the line.  THEN and only then, cut out the design.  Turn, Iron

, attach lining to the top edge, and proceed.

 

        for dags or slashes, use a fairly firm, closely woven fabric  and

cut the dags or slashes using pinking shears (period to at least the

elizabethans.) - this works really well on felt-type fabrics, etc.

 

Aldreada of the Lakes

 

 

From: excmairi at aol.com (EXCMairi)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Sewing Garb tips for newbies

Date: 24 May 1996 12:41:30 -0400

 

1. If you are going to line dags, remember to use the highest number of

stitches per inch (smallest stitch length on your machine) that you can --

it helps especially if you are doing a dag with any kind of special shape,

like an oak leaf (sound like an answer from experience??).

 

2. For simple patterns like a monk's robe, don't forget the costume

section of the mainline pattern companies, like Simplicity and McCalls.

Both have a nativity pattern that is a simple tunic-like garment.

 

3. If you're new to the idea of a sewing machine and are getting

frustrated with it, don't be intimidated by hand-sewing the garment

together (wait, come back, don't be scared!!).  A long, simple running

stitch - - - - - - - will hold a garment together surprisingly well.  If

you can't get it straight, mark it with chalk or a pencil and a ruler,

then pick up a needle and thread (it doesn't even have to be a fine

needle). And you can do it on a train on the way to your mundane job -

other riders tend to stay our of your way if you stab the needle in and

out with a Sense of Purpose!  Besides, it tends to impress people who

think that making it by hand automatically makes it "period"...

 

Baroness Mairi ni Raghaillaigh.

 

 

From: gunnora at bga.com (Gunnora Hallakarva)

To: ansteorra at eden.com

Date: Fri, 4 Oct 1996 10:24:12 -0500

Subject: Computer Programs for Costume Designers

 

Here's another of those interesting tidbits from the Historical Costuming

newsgroup.

 

===================================

Date:    Thu, 3 Oct 1996 09:49:07 -0500

From:    Sheryl Nance-Durst <P_SHERYL at KCPL.LIB.MO.US>

Subject: Re: "Costume Design for Dummies"

 

>I am a theatre tech student majoring in costuming, and have a question no

>one has been able to give me a clear answer on.  Sometime back I heard a

>rumour that there was an IBM program out there that could be used for

>designing costume.

 

Sharon,

 

There are a number of software packages designed for the home sewer that

might work.  Check out http://www.hk.super.net/~rlowe/sew.html

It's a page listing most of these packages with comments on them & links

to places where you can download free demos of them.  If you are specifically

looking for something designed for the theatre, then I only know of one

software package.  It's called "B Famous on Stage".  The web page for it is

http://www.newstuff.com/

I haven't used any of them myself, but I imagine that at least one of these

programs would be useful to you.

 

To the person who mentioned "Fittingly Sew": I was under the impression that

the company that developed this is no longer selling it.  Did another company

pick it up? I was thinking about buying it, but they discontinued it before

I could make up my mind.  :(

 

Sheryl J. Nance-Durst

Kansas City MO Public Library

p_sheryl at kcpl.lib.mo.us

 

Gunnora Hallakarva

Herskerinde

 

 

Date: Mon, 12 May 1997 19:53:42 -0700

From: Tom & Sara  Moore <tnsmoore at wolfenet.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Basic Sewing Book

 

Hi there!  My husband, Tom, and I have been lurking for a while now,

enjoying all the great info and references on this list.  Although we have

aspirations to make some really complicated garb, there's a great book I

just discovered at the Seattle Public Library called, "The Illustrated

Hassle-Free Make Your Own Clothes Book."

 

I'm not kidding about the title.  It's by Sharon Rosenberg and Joan Wiener,

written by a couple of self-styled "hippie chicks" and published in 1971.

There are some great, clear directions for simple t-tunics to t-dresses,

skirts, pants, waistcoats, floor-length waistcoats (surcoats to us) as well

as many easy neckline, collar and sleeve variations.  This is from a duo

that says "We think clothes should be fairly inexpensive and groovy to look

at."

 

I'm going to see if I can find a copy of this book to buy. I'm sure it's

out of print.  It was published by Avenel Books, a division of Crown

Publishers, Inc.  Anyway, if you can find a copy, it's a great resource,

especially for beginners. Thought I'd pass it on.

 

Guiliana and Sandro

Barony of Madrone, An Tir

(Sara and Tom - Seattle, WA)

tnsmoore at wolfenet.com

 

 

Date: Mon, 16 Jun 1997 09:11:32 -0700

From: Brett and Karen Williams <brettwi at ix.netcom.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Help!  Cartridge pleating...

 

Jennifer E. Jobst wrote:

> A friend of mine is interested in making a cartridge pleated skirt.

> Unfortunately, my persona is 1300 and thus I know absolutely nothing on

> how to go about doing this.  Could someone send me an explanation?  I'd

> really appreciate it!

>

> Jennifer Jobst

 

I'd always thought that cartridge pleating was a sewing technique best

explained 'in the cloth', so to speak, but I'll try nonetheless. O, for

a way to transmit a simple graphic other than bad ASCII art! Cartridge

pleating is a period technique for firmly gathering gazillions of

yardage to a smaller dimension that must be performed by hand.

 

For making a cartridge-pleated skirt, for example:

 

Make a strong waistband, fully finished, in final measurement. Prepare

one's skirt pieces by stitching together. Leave upper skirt edge

unfinished for now (I've heard that 4-1 width to waistband ratio is

good, but more is better); finish seams and closure edges.

 

Fold over a heading on the waistband edge of the skirt pieces, raw edge

to the inside and unexposed; the header should be at least an inch wide

to provide some stiffness. Press into place; whipstitch edge to skirt

body. One wants an invisible header-to-skirt-body join here.

 

Using waxed, strong thread (carpet thread is good!), run a parallel set

of gathering threads along the length of the header, several sets will

be necessary. Each stitch needs to be exactly even in width; the next

line of stitching needs to be identical to its neighboring line of

stitching.

 

Pull the ends of your parallel stitches to gather in the skirt (matching

the waistband, of course) and knot the threads firmly. You will end up

with a row of even tubes of relatively stiff cloth. Now's the hard part

to explain:

 

Using STRONG thread again, whipstitch/catch the exact highest point/top

of each tube, right sides as one would see the final garment, to the

waistband. Essentially the header tubes are butted to the waistband.

Once stitched, turn the waistband over and catchstitch the lowest

portion of the tube to the waistband, butting that portion together. So,

your cartridge pleats now stick out at a perpendicular angle to the

waistband. Since there's a few rows of gathering stitches holding the

tubes together, the pleat extends some small distance away from the

waistband, forming neat pleats.

 

Hope this helps-- I've done this twice and it works! Cartridge pleating

is a distinctive gathering technique; once you see it it looks unlike

any other.

 

ciorstan

 

 

Date: Wed, 18 Jun 1997 10:07:04 -0800

From: Chris Laning <claning at igc.apc.org>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Cartridge pleating

 

A friend of mine passed on a neat trick for making the preliminary gathers

easier. Instead of folding over a self-heading on the skirt pieces, face

them with a strip of checked gingham. Then just use the checks as your

gathering guide, and your multiple rows of gathers will be all the same and

perfectly matched. (The needle has to go in and out at exactly the same

vertical spot in every row in order for the cartridge pleats to form.)

____________________________________________________________

O   Chris Laning

|   <CLaning at igc.apc.org>

+    Davis, California

 

 

Date: Wed, 25 Jun 1997 10:12:41 -0400

From: "lwperkins" <lwperkins at snip.net>

To: <sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu>

Subject: Re: Clothing Patterns

 

I have a friend who swears by the clear plastic picnic tablecloths that you

get at dollar stores--she uses a Sharpie marker to trace the pattern onto

the plastic, (and since it's clear that's easy to do); the tablecloth

plastic is also flexible enough to be folded and refolded without cracking.

--Ester du Bois

lwperkins at snip.net

 

 

From: "Perkins" <lwperkins at snip.net>

Subject: Re: [Q]s about Linen/seams

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Date: 30 Jul 97 14:48:48 GMT

 

> Kirrily Robert (kirrily at mira.net) wrote:

> : I know that wool cloth in SCA period was fulled/felted so that the raw

> : edges did not need the same degree of finishing as modern weaves. However,

> : I have seen no references to how other fabrics were finished.  Are there

> : any *historically accurate* ways of finishing the edges of linen, silk,

> : or other looser-weave fabrics?

 

Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn wrote about doing an overcast stitch,

which is my preference, but if you're doing Tudor I read that Walter Fyshe

( Elizabeth I's tailor) ordered candles in bulk to use as a seam edge

controller on silk and velvet. Early Fray-Check! Unfortunately this takes a

bit of practice-I lit a sample piece of silk on fire with the candle while

I was messing with it, peering at the edge I had just done. Good thing

Walter wasn't my boss.

--Ester du Bois

 

From: djheydt at uclink.berkeley.edu (Dorothy J Heydt)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: [Q]s about Linen

Date: 30 Jul 1997 05:35:42 GMT

Organization: University of California at Berkeley

 

Kirrily Robert <kirrily at mira.net> wrote:

>As a kid, I was taught something that my grandmother called "french seams"

>which involved putting the fabric wrong sides together, sewing the seam,

>then trimming very close to the stitching, turning it inside out, and

>sewing hte seam again.  This gave a sort of narrow roll of fabric along

>each seam which, while ravel-proof, can be uncomfortably bulky in some

>places like the underarms, and takes *ages* to do by hand.

 

I have never figured out the point of those.  A flat-fell seam,

however, lies flat on either side and looks finished on either

side--to the extent that I have occasionally put on a dress with

flat-felled seams inside out, and worn it out in public, and not

noticed it was inside out till hours later.  (You have to look

closely at the hem....)

 

So I do flat-fell seams on all my clothing, medieval and mundane.

 

Dorothea of Caer-Myrddin                              Dorothy J. Heydt

Mists/Mists/West                                    Albany, California

PRO DEO ET REGE                                         djheydt at uclink

(My account might go away at any moment; if I vanish, I haven't died.)

 

 

From: priest at NOSPAMvassar.edu (Carolyn Priest-Dorman)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: [Q]s about Linen

Date: 30 Jul 1997 15:17:09 GMT

Organization: Vassar College

 

Greeting from Thora Sharptooth!

 

Kenrick (kirrily at mira.net) asked:

 

>I know that wool cloth in SCA period was fulled/felted so that the raw

>edges did not need the same degree of finishing as modern weaves.  However,

>I have seen no references to how other fabrics were finished.  Are there

>any *historically accurate* ways of finishing the edges of linen, silk,

>or other looser-weave fabrics?

 

Yes, lots!  To begin with, not all wool cloth in period was heavily fulled or

felted, especially before about the twelfth century.  So ravelly edges were a

problem on all sorts of textiles.

 

In the tenth century Viking context alone, there are extant examples of

several types of edge finishes:  flat-felled (several variants),

hemmed, rolled, bound, overcast, decorative overcast, and (as Tangwystl points

out) one that looks like a French seam.  Generally flat-felled seams were used

on linens, undergarments, and lightweight fabrics, with the varieties of

overcasting reserved for heavier and wool fabrics.  Linens were

frequently hemmed with a double fold, wools with a single fold.  Rolled hems

were usually found at the edges of lightweight silk fabrics.  Bound edges

involved taking a strip of grain-cut (i.e., not bias-cut) lightweight textile

and enclosing the raw edge of a heavier textile with it, much as bias tape is

used today, and with a similar decorative effect stemming from the contrast of

texture and color.  

 

For book references, see the Penelope Walton (1989), Elizabeth Heckett (1987),

and Inga Ha"gg (1984) citations in my bibliography of textile sources,

available at:

 

        http://www.cs.vassar.edu/~capriest/textilebiblio.html

*************************************************************************

Carolyn Priest-Dorman                  Thora Sharptooth

priest at vassar.edu                      Frostahlid, Austrriki

          Gules, three square weaver's tablets in bend Or

           http://www.cs.vassar.edu/~capriest/thora.html

*************************************************************************

 

 

Date: Tue, 12 Aug 1997 00:51:42 -0700

From: Brett and Karen Williams <brettwi at ix.netcom.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Pattern sloper webpage!

 

Ooh, ooh, ooh, ooh! (ciorstan waves hands madly in air) I just found an

interactive web page that will produce men's and women's slopers from

measurements! Take a look at:

 

http://www.panix.com/~aqn/tailoring/drafting/index.html

 

I haven't tried it out yet, but since the premise of the women's sloper

insists on accurate measurements over foundation garments, what about

trying on one's Elizabethan or Tudor corset and plugging in the

measurements? The possibilities... using a tightish kirtle for an

undergarment, plugging in *those* measurements, swivel out the

(possible) darts, slash and add seam allowances for a 10-gore dress?

 

ciorstan

(mentally hunting for rings to finish the lacing holes on her corset to

complete the first experiment above...will report back with results

eventually!)

 

 

Date: Tue, 12 Aug 1997 17:03:07 -0500

From: pnomail at bratshb.uwc.edu

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Pattern sloper webpage!

 

>what is a sloper?  a basic pattern for which to draft many different things

>off of? a specific garment?

>(cool web sight- though I do not have a tape measure at work)

>-brid

 

A sloper is a specific and basic fitting pattern, also called a toile.  It

contains the minimum wearing ease for a garment.  The standard sloper

pattern for women is a long sleeved dress with bust and waist darts in front

and shoulder and waist darts in the back.  The sleeves have two darts.  The

skirt part has 4 darts in front and 4 again in back, or two in each

quadrant. It is used for fitting and design.  If your waist measures 29"

(or 23") and the pattern is for 27", you need to alter the pattern to get

the correct fit.  The sloper lets you know what alterations you need to make

in a fashion garment.  

 

I have not been to this web site, but it sounds really cool.  If it does

what I think it does, then by plugging in your basic measurements it will

give you a basic fitting shell that basically fits.  (Any measurement they

consider to be standard, might need alteration.  Big or small bones affect

the wrist measurement.  You would then use this pattern as the base for

drafting patterns that fit you.  All you would have to do is add "design"

details, like full sleeves and skirts.  To use it well, check out books in

the library or pattern catalogues.  (The sloper is the really strange dress

pinned in the back and pictured in gingham.)  They would have instructions

and good pictures.  A darted sloper can be converted to princess seams if so

desired. If I can help further, please feel free to contact me directly, or

on the list.

 

DJ on her husband's account

 

 

Date: Tue, 12 Aug 1997 14:57:02 -0700

From: Brett and Karen Williams <brettwi at ix.netcom.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Pattern sloper webpage!

 

Marisa Herzog wrote:

> what is a sloper?  a basic pattern for which to draft many different things

> off of? a specific garment?

> (cool web sight- though I do not have a tape measure at work)

> -brid

 

It can be both. Ideally I'd love to have a basic sloper of my

measurements with mundane underpinnings, then a sloper for each of the

various costume periods I like. I'm a child of the sixties-- 1360, 1260,

1560...(cackle)

 

A sloper, specifically, is a customized dingus (love that all purpose

word!) that represents an individual's measurements translated into an

extremely basic flat pattern. It is usually a simple garment made out of

woven gingham (allows the seamster to fit precisely, on the cloth's

grain), like a shell-style dress with a waist seam, bodice darts and a

back zip (look in the back of McCalls, Butterick or Vogue for an

example) So, a bodice sloper made to your measurements taken over a

specific undergarment, will produce a specific garment tailored just for

you. It is a tailoring technique used to produce custom patterns--

pattern companies use slopers drawn from a certain set of measurements

to produce their commercial patterns. I won't get into reviews of

individual pattern companies' slopers here-- that's a whole 'nother

subject.

 

Once a seamster knows how to perform alterations, changing seam lines

and eliminating darts is simple stuff. Having a sloper that conforms to

one's individual body, IMHO, is a wonderful tool for someone to use to

create their own patterns, so it logically follows, I hope, that being

able to insert one's measurements to a computer program would be a Very

Useful Thing!

 

ciorstan

 

 

Date: Tue, 12 Aug 1997 23:20:19 -0700

From: Brett and Karen Williams <brettwi at ix.netcom.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Pattern sloper webpage!

 

And this is addressed to everyone contemplating the sloper engine-- and

is something I thought of a little while ago and promptly smacked my

head. Bad ciorstan, no bisquit!

 

Please don't take the measurements yourself. Have someone else do it for

you. The act of lifting one's arms to twist the measuring tape around

yourself will subtly distort your measurements and thusly distort the

finished sloper. If all else fails, your web access is at work and your

sacrificial vict-- helper, yeah, helper! is at home, print the page,

take the measurement requirements home and have Your Beloved do them.

You'll be happiest with the results!

 

ciorstan

 

 

From: "Morgan E. Smith" <mesmith at freenet.calgary.ab.ca>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Questions on Velvet

Date: Wed, 13 Aug 1997 07:30:27 -0600

Organization: Calgary Free-Net

 

As an addendum:

  The pattern layout in Janet Arnold's book on Rennaissance costuming

(forget which one exactly) shows that period seamstresses were more

concerned with making the darn dress than with getting the nap to all go

one way. Some parts are just pieced in on one gown, clearly with the nap

going the "wrong" way, which probably means that under candle

illumination, the difference was not as noticable, or that they simply

didn't care about this as much as they cared about getting the dress made!

 

Morgan the Unknown

 

 

Date: Fri, 22 Aug 1997 08:29:31 -0400 (EDT)

From: LadyEirinn at aol.com

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Pattern sloper webpage/Duct tape double

 

Has anyone seen this webpage?

http://pw2.netcom.com/~leahna/DuctTapeDouble.html

 

Basically, it's a homemade dressmaker's dummy that takes all you lumps &

bumps (and corseted figures, if you wanted!) into consideration.  I'm really

excited to try it!

 

Bersides, even if it doesn't work exacly how I wanted, I haven't blown a ton

of $$$$ on a dressmaker dummy that really doesn't look like me!  IMHO, they

all look like "Barbie".

 

Eirinn

 

 

Date: Sun, 23 Nov 1997 07:46:37

From: Nancee Beattie <nbeattie at blackcat.dunklin.k12.mo.us>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: inserting gussets/gores

 

>Does anyone have tips on inserting gore or gussets into a center panel

>without a center seam?  I can insert them into a seam, and it looks great.

> However, I can't seem to get them into a panel.  Please help.  Has anyone

>seen instructions in a book (maybe it would be easier to understand)?

> 

>                            Rosamund von Bardowiek

 

I do this all the time with great success, but it is really hard to

explain. I wish you could come to my house for the afternoon--I'd show you.

 

I'll try to explain.

 

Pin one side of the gore in place. Sew from the hem to the point of the

triangle, with the gore on top, and leave the needle in place. Lift the

presser foot. The main garment must then be swung around under the needle

until the second side of the gore and the second side of the slit in the

main garment line up. Now, sew from the point back down to the hem. When

you are finished, go back and snip the top of the slit all the way down to

the seam line to reduce puckering.

 

Does this help. It takes practice--so try it several times on scrap fabric.

 

Meredydd

 

 

Date: Mon, 24 Nov 1997 09:59:40 -0600

From: <pnomail at bratshb.uwc.edu>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: inserting gussets/gores

 

Dear Rosamund,

 

Merdydd gave you the sewing book way (read correct) way of putting in a

gore. I'm impressed with anyone who can do it that way.  

There is another way.  It works, therefore it's also correct, but its one of

those techniques that are, well, aah, too "overly inventive" to be included

in a sewing book.  I run into trouble at the very top, because I don't have

enough seam allowance to sew comfortably on my sewing machine.  I install a

false seam allowance.  Now that I've confused you totally, let me continue.

Mark the top of the gusset on the main garment.  

Sew a trapezoid shaped scrap of fabric to the pointy top part on the right

side. The scrap should be about 4" long.  Sew the sewing lines of the

gusset. You should have an inverted v shape.  If you take one or two

stitches across the top of the point truncating it, the corner will actually

turn better than if you come to a sharp point.  

Cut the fabric up to the reinforced triangle.  (Fray check the point)

Turn the scrap to the wrong side and press so the scrap doesn't show.  

Now sew the gusset in using the extra fabric from the scrap as seam allowance.

(it easier to control than that little itty bitty tiny edge)

Sew to the top of the point, (on top of the stitching line from the scrap)

and stop.

Do the same for the other side, or sew across the top and sew back down.  My

preference is to sew each side separately.  Sewing widest to narrowest

doesn't make the fabric fray as easily, and I find it easier to control

stretch.   

Trim the scrap down, it's served its purpose.  

 

Good luck.  

Drucilla

 

 

Date: Mon, 24 Nov 1997 12:12:17 -0600 (CST)

From: "Donna Holsten" <holsten at nature.Berkeley.EDU>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: RE: inserting gussets/gores

 

In message Sun, 23 Nov 1997 18:04:05 -0500 (EST), <Eddiediana at aol.com> writes:

> Does anyone have tips on inserting gore or gussets into a center panel

> without a center seam?

 

If I'm machine sewing an outfit with a center gore, I pin the gore into

place, sew up to two inches from the point, and hand-sew the point.

I find it *hugely* less frustrating than trying to do the point on the

machine. I can never get it to look right by machine.

 

At the very top of the slit, I usually end up with *no* seam allowance (on

the center panel--there is still a s.a. on the gore piece) and so will

often stitch a reinforcing "bar" (usually I do a triangle) right at

the top point, where the fabric might tend to tear or ravel or otherwise

come apart.  The first couple I did, I got a lovely little pucker in the

fabric at the point, but each time it got better and better.  Really, other

than patience and taking very small stitches, there aren't any "tricks" that

I can think of.

 

Joanna

 

 

Date: Mon, 24 Nov 1997 23:17:16 -0500

From: Kapaj <kapaj at webspan.net>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: inserting gussets/gores

 

I sew the point of the gore in first by hand, I find that it gives me

more control.  If you want to try sewing from the point first here is

how I do it: (for example sake, say you are using 1/2 inch seam

allowances) Start with your needle inserted into the point of the gore

at the point that is 1/2 inch in from each cut edge (wish I could draw a

picture here) with right sides together insert the needle (still in the

point of the gore) 1/2 inch from the cut center of the opening for the

gore. Match up the cut edge of one side of the gore and one side of the

opening sew about an inch, turn and sew back to the point.  Now line up

the other side and sew about an inch again.  The rest of each seam can

be sewn by machine. Clip the material of the main piece upto the

stitching at the point. You have to cut very close to the stitching line

to ensure that the seam lie flat.  Make sure you do not cut through your

stitching! Hope this helps

 

Lady Jacqueline Helene Loisel

 

 

Date: Sun, 11 Jan 1998 11:02:51 -0800 (PST)

From: Jenn <audacity at teleport.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: More Sewing Questions

 

>If you were to help a friend (new to sewing, but really wants to learn)

shop for a sewing machine, what features would you consider an absolute

must, and what features would you consider nice to have, but not srictly

necessary. Which of these features would change from one category to the

other depending on whether the person expects to do only historic costuming

or also mundane?

 

Some necessary things for a beginner sewer...easy to thread. My sewing

machine has a "three second thread," you just push the spool on, click it

down into a little thingy, and then it has a few sunken areas that you look

it into, and then you just have to do the hard part, getting the thread

through the eye of the needle. If it weren't for threading the needle, it'd

take me less than a second to sew. Also, you'll want something that allows

feet to be changed easily, and a sewing machine that has both auto and

manual tension. And tell your friend to test each feature, DON'T just have

the sales person demonstrate. If they won't allow you to try it, they don't

deserve your business. Also, buy the best machine you can afford that fits

your needs. You don't necessarily need a machine that has several

embroidered designs built in, but do buy the highest quality machine you

can. You can buy a cheap machine for $50 and replace it in a year, or you

can spend $200 on a machine and have it for life.

 

>For those of you with permanent sewing rooms or areas, What is your

favorite thing about how you have your sewing room/area set up?

 

A good thing is to have a window (or several), but with heavy curtains, as

well as good lighting. You need heavy curtains so that you can block out

natural light and work from artificial, and try to have more than one light,

ie, a light in the ceiling and a lamp by your sewing machine. Some people

prefer an overhead light source, others prefer one close ot the level

they're working on. DON'T keep your sewing stuff in your bedroom, if you do,

you'll associate your bedroom with wakeful activities, making it harder to

sleep. Keep decorations to a minimum, and make sure you have a comfortable

chair to sit in while sewing.

 

>Do you pin your fabric by placing the pins perpendicular or parallel to the

cut edge?  Do you sew over the pins, or do you remove them just before you

get to them? Why?

 

When I sew over pins, I place them perpendicular to the fabric. If I remove

them after cutting, I place them parallel, so that cutting is easier.

Generally I place them perpendicular after cutting, ie, when piecing stuff

together, parallel is for cutting. If I only have rather thick pins, I

remove them right before they go under the foot, I HAVE had a few bent

needles cause it hit a pin (generally they just slide right off).

*************************************************************

*        Jenn Reed          *     Today is the Tomorrow     *

* audacity at teleport.com    *   You Dreamed of Yesterday    *

*************************************************************

* Shire of Stromgard / Barony of Three Mountains - An Tir  *

*       Vancouver, Washington / Portland, Oregon - USA      *

*************************************************************

 

 

Date: Sun, 11 Jan 1998 22:03:57 -0500 (EST)

From: Carol Thomas <scbooks at neca.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: More Sewing Questions

 

>If you were to help a friend (new to sewing, but really wants to learn)

shop for a sewing machine, what features would you consider an absolute

must, and what features would you consider nice to have, but not srictly

necessary. Which of these features would change from one category to the

other depending on whether the person expects to do only historic costuming

or also mundane?

 

I picked out my machine (many years ago) based on Consumer Reports.  If they

are still rating sewing machines from time to time, they usually provide a

lot of useful pros and cons.  I am not a highly skilled sewer, but checking

their ratings prevented my buying a machine that jams as soon as lint gets

any where near it.

 

If you can speak to people who repair machines, they probably can tell you

which machines are troublesome, which are not.

 

>When is pinking fabric appropriate?

 

When the Laurels are nowhere around.  Pinking helps on fabrics such as

cotton, that fray a bit.  Linen frays so badly that zigzagg stitching the

edges of each piece may save a lot of annoyance later.

 

>For those of you without permanent sewing rooms or areas, How do you

>organize your supplies and equipment?

 

Organize? What's that?

 

>Do you pin your fabric by placing the pins perpendicular or parallel to the

>cut edge?  Do you sew over the pins, or do you remove them just before you

>get to them? Why?

 

I put the pins in perpendicular, and have them stick out so I can pull them

easily. I may sew over them if it is wool and I'm not worried about how it

comes out.  (My machine will sometimes hit the pin with the needle, making a

mess.) If it is thin material and appearance is important, I pull them just

before the needle.  When sewing something eased or gathered, I stop just as

it gets to the needle, pull pin, make sure both pieces of cloth are sitting

right, and start again slowly.

 

Lady Carllein

 

 

Date: Sun, 11 Jan 1998 23:18:44 -0800

From: Brett and Karen Williams <brettwi at ix.netcom.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: More Sewing Questions

 

Irene leNoir wrote:

> So, here is the latest installment of questions.

> 

> (Just to clarify:  I am not asking most of these questions because I am a

beginner sewer and do not know the answers or have an opinion.  I am asking

them to see what other people's answers and opinons are.)

> 

> If you were to help a friend (new to sewing, but really wants to learn)

shop for a sewing machine, what features would you consider an absolute

must, and what features would you consider nice to have, but not srictly

necessary. Which of these features would change from one category to the

other depending on whether the person expects to do only historic costuming

or also mundane?

 

Relevant to my situation, I don't necessarily think that fancy features

is synonymous with functional. I'm happy with something that does an

automatic buttonhole, some form of zigzag and overcast for seam

finishing and reverses with the push of a button. That's pretty

uncomplicated.

 

If I wanted Real Speed from a machine, I'd buy a serger.

 

> What are your favorite specialized sewing machine presser feet?

 

A walking foot.

 

> For those of you with permanent sewing rooms or areas, What is your

> favorite thing about how you have your sewing room/area set up?

 

> For those of you without permanent sewing rooms or areas, How do you

> organize your supplies and equipment?

 

It's called the Closet From Hell. I have a set of those cheezy chipboard

drawers full of the Notion Department (who says I might not need

something at 0400 on a Thursday morning?), with cloth stacked up on top.

The cloth is guaranteed to fall out on the head of anyone other than

myself who opens the closet door. This is highly useful with small

children in the house-- that'll teach 'em to stay outta the closet! :)

 

> Do you pin your fabric by placing the pins perpendicular or parallel to

> the cut edge?  Do you sew over the pins, or do you remove them just before

> you get to them? Why?

 

Assuming I use them, I place them perpendicular to the stitching line. I

don't sew over pins, having dulled/bent/broken two too many needles in

my reprehensible youth. Sewing over a pin will dull one's needle anyway,

which can lead to a burr-- and if one is sewing something relatively

delicate, a burred needle will damage the fabric.

 

Needles are designed to either pierce fabric or push aside threads (ball

point). Something with a burr will tend to catch threads, and the very

motion of the needle will pull warp/weft as it's pushed/pulled out of

the fabric. That's an effect I really don't need.

 

ciorstan

 

 

Date: Mon, 12 Jan 1998 08:26:14 -0700

From: "Rebecca Mikkelsen" <RMikkelsen at mail.lhs.logan.k12.ut.us>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: More Sewing Questions

 

> For those of you with permanent sewing rooms or areas, What is your favorite

> thing about how you have your sewing room/area set up?

 

  I have a large dining-room-size table for cutting fabric on.  One

of those cardboard grid cutting boards fits on it.

  My fabric is sorted according to color, use, type, project, etc. in

photocopier paper boxes (These boxes are just the right size to put

all your project materials together.  They are sturdy with a lid and

stack very nicely.  I work in an office and can get all I want, but

check at a copy store to see if you could get some)  I taped a

"ziploc" bag to the end of each box with a little snip of whatever

fabric is in there.  When I want something, I know exactly where to

look.

  You MUST have an ironing board and a good iron (if you forget

to turn it off like me, get one with an automatic shut-off)  Pressing

hams are really nice but not mandatory.

  Lighting is very important.  I have a lamp on the sewing table and

one on the cutting table, two overhead lights, and a window.

  A full-length mirror.

  A closet or clothes rack for hanging works-in-progress.

  I have children who love to sew, so I have a box that all the

scraps go into.  They know that they can have anything in that box

for their projects without asking.  Scraps are also good for stuffing

things (peascod bellies, headrolls . . .) and more period than

fiberfill! <g>  Make a fabric sampler for when you teach newbies

about which fabrics they should look for when fabric shopping.  Also,

there is a church in our area that makes quilts and another that

makes rag dolls for humanitarian purposes.  Check in your area for an

organization that could use your scraps.  Recently our shire chose a

shire bard and made a patchwork cloak for him/her to wear.  Anyone

else recycle their scraps?

 

Rebecca

 

 

Date: Mon, 12 Jan 1998 09:04:38 -0700

From: Nancy Lynch <lughbec at info2000.net>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: More Sewing Questions

 

> Do you pin your fabric by placing the pins perpendicular or parallel to the

> cut edge?  Do you sew over the pins, or do you remove them just before you

> get to them? Why?

 

Pins go perpendicular to fabric, heads so that they can be pulled as you

sew with your pincushion easily accessible to your right hand.  I

generally have pins a palm width apart.  For the most part this allows

you to keep sewing without stopping, unless you need to adjust fabric.

I worked professionally in an upscale fashion design shop and we were

prohibited from sewing over pins.  The likelihood of breaking, bending,

burring needles was a time and money waster, but the slight possibility

of slamming a pin down onto your bobbin hook and harming the machine

made the management adamant about this policy.  We were under strict

orders to never sew over pins, so I got rather anal about that.:)  Still

seems like a good idea.

 

Lughbec

 

 

Date: Mon, 12 Jan 1998 09:27:55 -0700

From: Nancy Lynch <lughbec at info2000.net>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: More Sewing Questions

 

> Do you pin your fabric by placing the pins perpendicular or parallel to the

> cut edge?  Do you sew over the pins, or do you remove them just before you

> get to them? Why?

 

Another bit on pins... spend the extra and get good pins!  I find that

plastic headed pins are happy to melt with your iron and the metal is

inferior in them and they get dull and nasty, sometimes immediately.

Also the cheap pins rust more readily. I love my good pins (about $6 a

box). I also don't use pins much when cutting out my patterns.  I use

sewing weights.  My favorites are about the diameter of a 50 cent piece

and 1 and 1/2 inches high, coated in a white rubberized plastic.  They

are quick, don't mess up the pattern and have other uses to weight

fabrics.

 

Lughbec

 

 

Date: Mon, 12 Jan 1998 18:30:10 -0600

From: Nancee Beattie <nbeattie at blackcat.dunklin.k12.mo.us>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: More Sewing Questions

 

>I also don't use pins much when cutting out my patterns.  I use

>sewing weights.  My favorites are about the diameter of a 50 cent piece

>and 1 and 1/2 inches high, coated in a white rubberized plastic.  They

>are quick, don't mess up the pattern and have other uses to weight

>fabrics.

>Sonas ort!

>Lughbec

 

Another good pattern weight? Table knives. They're the heaviest piece of

flatware in the set, and we all have them already. Oh yeah, they too have

other uses: you can butter your bread and cut your meat with them.

 

Meredydd

 

 

Date: Mon, 12 Jan 1998 09:48:53 -0700

From: "Rebecca Mikkelsen" <RMikkelsen at mail.lhs.logan.k12.ut.us>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: More Sewing Questions

 

re: pincushions--I wear a pincushion on my left wrist.  I love it!  I

am never without a pincushion and it keeps me from putting pins in my

mouth (another bad practice).

 

re: sewing machines--I bought my Sears Kenmore machine over 20 years

ago: A basic machine that is still going strong.  I also have a

serger. If you are serious about sewing you will want both.  I have

taught basic costuming to many people who have used "regular" sewing

machines but never a serger.  Once they start playing on the serger,

they are "hooked" and I can't get them off! <g>

 

 

Date: Mon, 12 Jan 1998 20:51:16 -0800

From: Brett and Karen Williams <brettwi at ix.netcom.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Sewing Questions

 

Irene leNoir wrote:

> I want to thank everyone for sharing information and opinions on my sewing

questions. Most of the actual questions I had have been answered, and I've

gathered some interesting opinions.

> 

> Re: Pinking

> I asked the pinking question because I ran across a strange reference in a

book. In a description of pinking shears it implied that using pinking to

control fraying was shoddy workmanship but did not say why, or what pinking

shears _should_ be used for.  I also ran across a different reference that

said to _never_ pink wool, and then another that said that you _should_ pink

wool (to reduce the bulk in the seam allowance and to avoid a ridge showing

through to the front from a straight-cut edge.)

 

It's been my practical experience that pinking shears are attractive

antiques. ;) I have two of 'em, and have yet to actually use either one

except for a decorative finish on a leather turn back for a pair of

gloves. I have the feeling that the pinking finish is considered shoddy

workmanship as it tends to make ravelly points of fabric that are easily

pulled apart.  Machine-woven non-fulled fabrics just don't get along

with pinking.

 

> I loved the suggestion of using pinking instead of clipping a curve.  I

never would have thought of that one.

 

Actually, that sounds like an easy way to notch for grading a curve, now

that I think of it. Hey, a reason for hanging onto those attractive

antiques! ;)

 

ciorstan

 

 

Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 00:40:31 -0500

From: "Terry S. Schneiter" <rolena at bright.net>

To: <sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu>

Subject: Re: More Sewing Questions

 

I've never had a lot of success with pattern weights myself, but a few

years ago I acquired several pairs of forceps which I use when working with

very slippery, crawly fabrics to anchor the ends and sides to the cardboard

cutting board. Unlike other clips I've tried these will lock in place until

I move them.

 

I wish I could remember who gave them to me because a few more would go all

the way around the cutting board.  Acquiring them would be the major

problem I suspect for most of us.

 

 

Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 08:56:30 -0500

From: Caitlin Cheannlaidir <caitlin at phosphor-ink.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: More Sewing Questions

 

At 12:40 AM 1/13/98 -0500, Cassandra of Wyndhaven wrote:

>I've never had a lot of success with pattern weights myself, but a few

>years ago I acquired several pairs of forceps which I use when working with

>very slippery, crawly fabrics to anchor the ends and sides to the cardboard

>cutting board. Unlike other clips I've tried these will lock in place until

>I move them.

>I wish I could remember who gave them to me because a few more would go all

>the way around the cutting board.  Acquiring them would be the major

>problem I suspect for most of us.

 

You can get forceps at any large flea market.  They always have one or more

big booths full of little bins of every medical & dental instrument, small

tool, little part, etc. you ever dreamed of, all for a max of about $2

each. I've bought nice dental picks (for glassworking) and locking

hemostats, for example.

 

--Caitlin Cheannlaidir

 

 

Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 14:50:10 -0500

From: Rowen Stuffer <rowenstuffer at earthlink.net>

To: SCA-Arts Listserv <sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu>, irene at ici.net

Subject: Re: More Sewing Questions

 

Irene leNoir wrote:

> So, here is the latest installment of questions.

> (Just to clarify: I am not asking most of these questions because I

> am a beginner sewer and do not know the answers or have an opinion.

> I am asking them to see what other people's answers and opinions are.)

 

My dearest lady -

 

I am _extremely_ new to sewing, having just recently started to learn

(wanted to learn to make my own garb, instead of relying on the free

time of others). I can, however, address two of your questions, one

that my instructor had detailed and one by dint once having a friend

whos father owned a sewing machine shop> ;-)

 

> If you were to help a friend (new to sewing, but really wants to

> learn) shop for a sewing machine, what features would you consider

> an absolute must, and what features would you consider nice to have,

> but not strictly necessary.

 

The one thing I was told, by a man who ran a hospital for sick and

injured sewing equipment, was that the best sewing machines were the

older ones, the ones our mothers and grandmothers owned. Older sewing

machines were constructed with metal gears inside, newer ones rely on

plastics. His most common diagnosis was that the young sewing machine

had caught a case of stripped gears, while older ones never suffered

from this malady. Indeed, many older machines were hardy enough to sew

upholstry fabrics and even some light leathers, a task the young were

unable to accomplish. The heavier fabrics can cause the plastic gears to

jump, an exercise they are not designed for, or crack off teeth, causing

terrible and costly dental bills.

 

> Do you pin your fabric by placing the pins perpendicular or parallel

> to the cut edge? Do you sew over the pins, or do you remove them just

> before you get to them? Why?

 

My first instructor in sewing had be doing this for quite a while, and

had in fact, progressed to the point of taking tailoring classes

specifically for clothing fitting. She was of the opinion that the

material should be pinned perpendicular to the line of sewing. If you

pin parallel, you create bulges in the fabric along the sewing line as

the pin is pushed in, and these will cause problems in the fit of the

final product. Pin perpendicular to the sewing line, with the heads of

the pins to the outside of the machine (to aid in pulling them out

easily) and remove each pin about 1" before it reaches the foot.

 

This exhausts my knowledge of the subject. I hope it is of use. With my

regards,

 

    Tzigan Volchovich

 

 

Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 21:17:29 -0500 (EST)

From: rlandry at phc.igs.net (Mr & Mrs Landry)

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: More Sewing Questions

 

>I've never had a lot of success with pattern weights myself, [snip]

 

I find that pattern weights work best with a self-healing cutting board and

cutting wheel.  You can cut many layers all at once, saving time, straighter

lines, and greater accuracy.  If you are thinking of one, you may have to

put out a bit ($65CND is what I paid for mine), but it is an invaluable part

of my sewing tools.  Practice before you cut anything out.  The wheels cut

faster than you think and before you know it...oops.

 

Lady Gwenhwyfar ferch Llewelyn.

 

 

Date: Thu, 14 May 98 00:15:40

From: "Arianne de Dragonnid mka Grace Schosser-Payne" <arianne at trimaris.com>

To: "sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu" <sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu>

Subject: Re: Frayed Linen [SCA]

 

On Tue, 12 May 1998 11:27:31 -0500, pnomail at bratshb.uwc.edu wrote:

>To make a flat felled seam, sew the fabric together at 5/8" right sides

>out. Yes that's right, wrong sides together.  Trim one seam allowance to

>about 1/4".  Press both seam allowances to the same side, so the longer one

>covers the trimmed one.  Fold the remaining 5/8" seam allowance so the raw

>edges are tucked onder and press.  Top stitch near the fold.    No raw

>edges exposed and a garment that will last for a very long time.

 

First off, those of us who learned to flat fell by hand (a process that in my opinion looks MUCH better) probably do it a bit differently.  I learned to flat fell by sewing the fabric pieces together with the RIGHT sides together. That puts our work on the inside, where you don't have to be such a perfectionist.

 

Then cut one side to half the original seam allowance.  You might want to omit this step if you're working on a lightweight fabric that frays easily.  Then fold the other side around the short side and press to the shorter side.  Hemstitch down. No stitches will show on the right side, and the garment is just as strong.

 

There's another stitch I learned when I was young that would work well, although I've forgotten what it's called.  It works much like flat felled, but instead of cutting one side and folding the other side over it, the seam is pressed open and each side is folded over its own rough edge and sewn down.  It's about twice as much work, but you don't get such a big wad of fabric when you go to hem it.  I wouldn't use anything else for my large maunch sleeves.  If anyone knows what it's called, I would appreciate knowing.  Maybe now that I care about such things, they'll stick around in my head!

 

 

Date: Wed, 28 Oct 1998 12:41:38 -0800

From: Melinda Shoop <mediknit at nwinfo.net>

To: Artspersons <SCA-ARTS at UKANS.EDU>

Subject: Cloaks

 

It is very important to allow an unhemmed, recently made cloak to hang from

a hanger or dressmakers' model for a day or two to allow the fabric to

"stretch" and sag before you hem it.  This will avoid having to take out

the hem in the future and try to straighten a wavy lower edge.

 

Ditto with many dresses, skirts, and other garments.

 

After hanging, try on and measure for the hem.  The best way is to have

someone (like your roomie) use a yardstick or similar and measure a set

distance from the FLOOR, wearing the shoes you plan to wear with the cloak.

 

Set the yardstick on its end on the floor, and put a pin at intervals all

around the cloak at the desired length.  This gives you a cloak which is an

even distance from the ground, all around its length, and will not sag in

the mud.  Trim the hem allowance evenly all around, and then hem the cloak.

 

This will give your roomie a chance to help you with at task that is doable

by a non-sewer!

 

Vigdis Bjornsdottir

 

 

Date: Thu, 29 Oct 1998 13:37:45 -0500 (EST)

From: Grace Morris <gmorris at cs14.pds.charlotte.nc.us>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Cloaks

 

A little trick I learned from Mistress Lyra in regards to hemming:

Stand on a book that is about the width of a hem.  Mark

where the fabric hits the floor with chalk, and then cut on the chalk

line. If you hem up the garment exactly the thickness of the book, the

garment will just skim the the floor. Hem up more for a cloak, to avoid

the mud.  This eliminates all the time usually consumed in measuring from

the floor, pinning, measuring again, repinning...

 

Jessamyn di Piemonte

 

 

Date: Mon, 26 Jul 1999 06:33:37 -0400

From: "Erik Dutton" <edutton at carolina.rr.com>

To: <sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu>

Subject: RE: sewing by hand

 

<<< Does anybody know how to sew by hand so that the edges won't start to fall

apart sooner or later... It is all very easy with a machine, but it would be

nice to do it in a more period manner every now and then.

The best I've done this far is to sew double-seams. First the edges are sewn

with what we call a "pillar stitch" looking somewhat like |_|_|_| ,the

horizontal stiches lining the edge. Then the a normal horizontal stich is

sewn to the other end of the vertical stiches.

It is most certainly a good seam, but it takes ever so much time.

I'd like to know if anybody has a better/faster solution? >>>

 

With a light enough fabric, once I've sewn the seam I sometimes fold the

seam allowance in on both sides and basically topstitch that edge down to

one side of the piece, so that I end up with a sort of flat-felled seam

"envelope". Let's see if I can draw it (doubtful <g>)...

 

           | |<- seam allowance

___________| |___________

fabric    sewn     fabric

          seam

 

1. _____|\/|_____ fold the seam allowance down into the seam

 

(2. ____||_____ optional - sew this folded edge together)

 

3. _____//_______ lay this to one side and tack it to the fabric

 

For a heavier fabric, I suppose you could do steps 1 and 2 and skip 3, just

make the "envelope" a bit smaller.

 

Rhodri

--

Erik Dutton/Rhodri ap Hywel

 

 

Date: Mon, 26 Jul 1999 12:12:17 -0500 (CDT)

From: "Pixel, Queen of Cats" <pixel at hundred-acre-wood.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: sewing by hand

 

You can use double-folded hems, french seams, flat-felled seams, or

whipstitch the raw edges and press them flat. _Textiles and Clothing_ also

mentions sewing down the seam allowance with a running stitch if the

material is heavy enough to require extra encouragement to lay flat. For

hems, you can fold them over in the traditional way either once or twice,

you can edge them with ribbons, or weave a thin border onto the raw edge

with four or six tablets or so. I've never tried this--I would love to

hear from someone who has.

 

Margaret FitzWilliam of Kent

 

On Mon, 26 Jul 1999, Elonwen ap David wrote:

 

> Does anybody know how to sew by hand so that the edges won't start to fall

> apart sooner or later... It is all very easy with a machine, but it would be

> nice to do it in a more period manner every now and then.

> The best I've done this far is to sew double-seams. First the edges are sewn

> with what we call a "pillar stitch" looking somewhat like |_|_|_| ,the

> horizontal stiches lining the edge. Then the a normal horizontal stich is

> sewn to the other end of the vertical stiches.

> It is most certainly a good seam, but it takes ever so much time.

> I'd like to know if anybody has a better/faster solution?

 

 

Date: Mon, 26 Jul 1999 10:46:12 PDT

From: "pat fee" <lcatherinemc at hotmail.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: RE: sewing by hand

 

I use french seams and small stiches.  This seems to hold fine.  I always

run my sewing thead across a beeswax block first.

 

Morganuse.

 

 

Date: Mon, 26 Jul 1999 22:24:37 EDT

From: <JADEWON at aol.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: sewing by hand

 

What I think you need to do is learn to do a French-flat  or felled seam.

This is done by first doing a back stitch with the edges on the outside of

the garment.  Try to keep the stitches as close to the edge as you can and

still stay back from the edge. Do all seams on outside of garment first,

then turn garment inside out and iron all seams smooth.  Then again stitch

the seams down on the edge. You now have a closed seam but it is standing up.

 

Again iron the seam down and whip stitch the other edge down.  

 

LIZBET de Granville

 

 

Date: Thu, 30 Sep 2004 06:22:58 -0400

From: "Dianne & Greg Stucki" <goofy1 at suscom.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] OT- question about cutting silk/slick

        synthetics.

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> I had suggested one of the roller cutters, which I've seen in fabric

> stores, but I've never used one myself, so I don't know how well they

> work. Has anyone tried a hot knife on this? I think there are

> electrically heated ones. Wouldn't this have the additional advantage

> of melting the edge of a synthetic and keep it from fraying?

> 

> Thanks,

>    Stefan

 

I have never used a hot knife, but as a quilter, I have used the rotary

cutter with special mat and ruler almost constantly. They are wonderful

things. I would recommend small dots of rubber cement or sandpaper on the

back of the ruler to minimize slipping, which can lead to inadvertent

removal of flesh...

 

Laurensa

 

 

Date: Fri, 1 Oct 2004 10:22:53 -0700

From: "Bj/Jane Tremaine" <vikinglord at cox.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] OT- question about cutting silk/slick

        synthetics.

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

I live in San Diego and one of the smaller chains of fabric stores has a

polyester fabric they call china silk and it is not silk.  I looks like

silk, feals like silk but he colors were not right and when I checked the

fabric content it was 100% poly.

 

AS to sewing or cutting slippery fabric. Use very sharp sizzors pin do death

for cutting.  For sewing ut old pattern paper between the two layers of silk

and tear it out later. My mothers trick.

 

Jana

 

 

From: Lucia Digioia <vs_bryngwlad at ansteorra.org>

Date: December 5, 2007 1:20:53 PM CST

To: Barony of Bryn Gwlad <bryn-gwlad at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: [Bryn-gwlad] Tip on pre-washing fabrics

 

If you're making an outfit that you plan to wash (i.e., not dry-clean-only), it's always a good idea to pre-wash the fabric (twice!) before beginning to construct the garment. However, washing yard goods can be an iffy proposition, as the cut ends may fray and the action of a home washing machine is almost guaranteed to turn a length of fabric into a very tightly twisted rope. So here's a tip:

==Before you throw your yardage in the washing machine,

fold it in half (end to end, not selvage to selvage) and

sew the two cut ends together using a zigzag stitch.==

Fabric sewn into a loop this way is much less likely to wrap itself into a rope; the sewn-together ends keep fraying to a minimum; and after you've washed and dried it this way, you can just cut off the sewn zigzag with a rotary cutter or scissors. You will typically lose less than an inch of fabric. Try it; it really works!

 

             selvages

       ===================

      ||<                 |

      ||<                 |

cut   ||<                 |

edges ||<                 |

      ||<  zigzag         |

      ||<                 | fold

      ||<                 |

      ||<                 |

      ||<                 |

      ||<                 |

       -------------------'

             selvages

 

 

 

From: Elizabeth Crouchet <elizabeth at crouchet.com>

Date: June 3, 2008 12:04:37 AM CDT

To: Barony of Bryn Gwlad <bryn-gwlad at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Bryn-gwlad] sewing machines on sale

 

EW Brown wrote:

If you do pick up a machine to learn on,  here are a few lessons I

ignored when I started that I wish I hadn't.

 

Use the good thread, the cheap stuff will just break your heart.

Oil it like it says too but not too often.

Don't adjust the bobbin tension till you REALLY know what you are doing.

When sewing slippery stuff or leather, that knob on the top adjusts

the pressure of the foot, and will prevent slipping and stretching if

you adjust it correctly.

Use a leather needle to sew leather, and a silk needle to sew silk.

 

Cal-

 

I'll add to that.

 

For a new sewer, you need a machine that will do straight stitch,

zig-zag and reverse. That covers 99% of what you will ever do.

 

If the sewing seems to not be working despite adjusted tension and good

thread, like it just catches once in a while, get a fresh needle and use

the right kind of needle. Usually one for medium weight fabric will do

most things, but do use the light weight and heavy weight needles when

you know you are working with those fabrics. Change the needle when you

change projects.

 

Clean the lint out of the machine as often as possible.

 

Learn to use the iron. Buy lots of pins, get a magnet to hold your pins

and hunt for pins with.

 

Get one pair of good fabric scissors and a blade sharpener. If you cut

lots of linen you will need to renew the edges often.

 

Buy a tape measure and a seam ripper and a lint brush.

 

Use good lighting when cutting and sewing.

 

Sew with a buddy and rest when tired. You will have to rip out much less

stuff that way.

 

Enjoy! T-tunics made on a period pattern are very easy, very fabric

conservative and cover lots of time periods!  Pants/trews are not so

hard either.

 

Caps and hoods come later in your experience but are also not so hard

once you have the basics down.

 

Claire

 

 

Date: Sat, 26 Feb 2000 11:54:58 -0700

From: Mary Hysong <ladymari at cybertrails.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Further info on the Simplicity Patterns

 

JADEWON at aol.com wrote:

> Seams areperiodbut you need to use a flat felled french seam

 

Not everywhere ;-)  Most period garments I've seen {and I personally

examined late period Irish garments in Ireland last summer as well as

having the MoL books and Janet Arnold} do not use flat felled seams.

Many seams are simply sewn with a running stitch and not finished

otherwise. Some are roughly overcast along the edges {with or without

running stiches}.  The back leg seam of the Dungiven trews were sewn by

folding back the edge of the fabric about 1/4-5/8" then stitching

through the four layers.  In fact off hand I can't recall any felled

seams in period garment construction and would like to see some examples

if you could point me in the right direction?

 

I am putting some things like this together for a possible article/class

for costumers.

 

Mairi, Atenveldt

 

 

Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2009 16:41:00 -0400

From: bronwynmgn at aol.com

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Twill weaves and garb,     was Re:  Substitute

        for Potatoes?

 

<<I did buy a sewing machine, and I thread it over and over to make sure I know how, but I've yet to try to sew anything on it.>>

 

The few remaining Family and Consumer Science classes (what we used to call Home Economics) that I'm aware of, if they teach sewing, have the students practice making straight lines and corners neatly by running paper through the machine, with no thread in the needle.? It leaves a nice visible line of holes for feedback, and you can practice keeping your line straight, staying the correct distance from the edge of the fabric, and making corners neatly without wasting fabric or thread.? That might be a good way for you to get more comfortable with your new machine, Judith.

 

<<I think I'm going to need someone to come over and SHOW me what I'm doing wrong, and how to do something right, before I'll feel confident to try again.>>

 

Sewing is like that. It's much easier to learn when you've got somebody right there to help you and show you how to do it. Learning it from a book is tough. At least for me.

 

Brangwayna Morgan

Shire of Silver Rylle, East Kingdom

Lancaster, PA

 

 

Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2009 14:54:48 -0600

From: Susan Lin <susanrlin at gmail.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Twill weaves and garb,     was Re: Substitute for

        Potatoes?

 

"P.S. When you have a chance, invest in a pair of scissors that are

dedicated just to fabric."

 

Right on!  Fabric scissors are for fabric only and anyone caught using them

for any other purpose will suffer the consequences!

 

I solve the problem by having all my sewing scissor be left-handed!  I know,

doesn't work for your righties!

 

Or you can get yourself a rotary cutter and a cutting mat.  I used to do all

my cutting with a rotary cutter and still do for quilting.

 

Shoshanna

 

On Tue, Aug 25, 2009 at 2:50 PM, Euriol of Lothian <euriol at yahoo.com> wrote:

<<< I would also suggest checking with your local A&S officer and see if there

is anyone in your local group who would be willing to teach a "Machine

Sewing Basics" class. There maybe more than one person interested in taking

such a workshop in you local area. When I hosted a pre-Pennsic sewing

workshop at my home in May, I had quite a number of people who needed to

learn the basics of machine sewing. Since it was an all day workshop, there

was plenty of one-on-one time for all those new to machine sewing. It also

gave me the opportunity to teach some tailoring basics.

 

Euriol

 

P.S. When you have a chance, invest in a pair of scissors that are

dedicated just to fabric.

 

Euriol of Lothian, OP

Clerk, Order of the Pelican, Kingdom of ?thelmearc

Chronicler, Barony of Endless Hills >>>

 

 

Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2009 15:31:03 -0600

From: Georgia Foster <jo_foster81 at hotmail.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] scissors  RE:  Twill weaves and garb

 

I had exactly this conversation [about making sure no one uses your fabric scissors for anything but fabric] with Her Highness Sati of Artemisia some months back.  Her solution ... actually her grandmother's solution works a FINE treat for keeping fabric scissors for fabric.

 

It starts out like so many here.  Hide the fabric scissors.

 

BUT THEN

 

buy several pairs of less expensive scissors.  mark each with a tag that identifies the room and buy several pair for each room of the house.  Scatter them throughout the house.  

 

This solves the possibility of somebody needing a pair of scissors and just grabbing the wrong ones without concern for the certain death that will soon follow when the fabric manipulator finds the fabric scissors next to the chunks of plastic near the trash.  

 

Malkin

Otherhill

Artemisia

 

 

Date: Thu, 27 Aug 2009 05:11:33 -0400

From: Sharon Palmer <ranvaig at columbus.rr.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] sewing scissors

 

<<<"P.S. When you have a chance, invest in a pair of scissors that are

dedicated just to fabric."

 

Right on!  Fabric scissors are for fabric only and anyone caught using them for any other purpose will suffer the consequences! >>>

 

My sewing scissors have a short piece of trim looped through the

handle and sewn down.  It makes it very clear which ones are fabric

scissors and which are not.   If you don't have leftover trim, a

piece of ribbon would work.

 

Ranvaig

 

 

To:    _SCA at yahoogroups.com

Date: Tue, 28 Feb 2006 21:29:08 -0000

From: "roisinaisolde" <roisina at hotmail.com>

Subject: Period way to prevent fabric freying?

 

Can someone suggest some period ways to prevent fabric freying?

Normally I would use Freycheck.

 

I am making a medieval underdress in linen.

 

Roisina.

 

 

To:    _SCA at yahoogroups.com

Date: Tue, 28 Feb 2006 15:35:47 -0600

From: "Amy Heilveil" <amyheilveil at gmail.com>

Subject: Re: Period way to prevent fabric freying?

 

Pinking the edges, flat felled seams, hemming the edges under, finishing the edges with stitching (a zig-zag style or button-hole stitch)....

 

Despina

 

 

To:    _SCA at yahoogroups.com

Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2006 11:13:01 +1200

From: Maggie Forest <maggie at forest.gen.nz>

Subject: Re: Period way to prevent fabric freying?

 

Can someone suggest some period ways to prevent fabric freying?

Normally I would use Freycheck.

I am making a medieval underdress in linen.

 

with underwear, you'd boil and beat your linens clean. That means the

seams would be under extreme pressure, so they'd be finished very very

tidily and securely. So stitching is the way to go.

 

/maggie

 

 

From: "Sunny Briscoe" <sunnyday72 at gmail.com>

Date: June 3, 2008 3:53:41 AM CDT

To: "Barony of Bryn Gwlad" <bryn-gwlad at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Bryn-gwlad] sewing machines on sale

 

Change the needle when you change projects.

 

<<< Are you saying to throw out the old needle when you finish a project? Or that the needle needs to "rest" between projects or what? >>>

 

Yes, throw the old needle away.  I have to admit that I am bad about that, but dull or bent needles can cause all sorts of problems such as broken thread, skipped stitches, snagged fabric, damage to the machine, etc.

 

Learn to use the iron. Buy lots of pins, get a magnet to hold your pins

and hunt for pins with.

 

I prefer Glass Headed pins, they tend to be a bit slimmer than those bright yellow quilter's pins that everyone likes so much, so they work better on finer fabrics, but they have a big enough head that you can still grab hold of them.  They also don't melt when you iron over them.  I have also seen, but never used, glow in the dark pins (again in the quilting section).  And get rid of your pins when they get dull or bent.

 

Elisabetta

 

 

From: Elizabeth Crouchet <elizabeth at crouchet.com>

Date: October 21, 2009 6:15:40 PM CDT

To: Barony of Bryn Gwlad <bryn-gwlad at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: [Bryn-gwlad] Sewing Lesson On Line

 

I was looking for something else and ran across this site. It might be helpful for some of our new seamsters out there.

 

http://www.craftandfabriclinks.com/sewingbook/sewbook.html

 

Claire

 

<the end>



Formatting copyright © Mark S. Harris (THLord Stefan li Rous).
All other copyrights are property of the original article and message authors.

Comments to the Editor: stefan at florilegium.org