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presrvd-lemons-msg – 10/29/11

 

Dried, pickled and salted preserved lemons.

 

NOTE: See also the files: fruit-citrus-msg, vinegar-msg, Period-Fruit-art, saffron-msg, salt-msg, fd-Jewish-msg, Preservng-CMA-art.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that

I  have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some

messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium.

These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I  have done  a limited amount  of  editing. Messages having to do  with

separate topics  were sometimes split into different files and sometimes

extraneous information was removed. For instance, the  message IDs  were

removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I

make  no claims  as  to the accuracy  of  the information  given  by the

individual authors.

 

Please  respect the time  and  efforts of  those who have written  these

messages. The  copyright status  of these messages  is  unclear  at this

time. If  information  is  published  from  these messages, please give

credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

   Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                         Stefan at florilegium.org

************************************************************************

 

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 17:36:03 +0000

From: "Olwen the Odd" <olwentheodd at hotmail.com>

Subject: RE: [Sca-cooks] Preserved (Pickled) Lemons

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

>has anyone else done any cooking with preserved lemons. I think they are

>Morrocan. My supermarket sells them loose along with olives and pickles

>and stuff. Are there any good period recipies that use them?

>I just discovered them the other day and have so far used them to make a

>great eastern chicken stew.

>--

>Yehoshua ben Haym haYerushalmi

 

Are you talking about the pickled lemons?  If so, then I can tell you that

the fighters really like them.  I often have them on our dayboards or

hospitality tables.  I have used them sliced in some of my home recipes but

do not recall seeing them called for in any period recipes, but I have a

limited library so others may have.

 

Olwen

 

 

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 19:01:43 +0000

From: "Olwen the Odd" <olwentheodd at hotmail.com>

Subject: RE: [Sca-cooks] Preserved (Pickled) Lemons

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

>They seem a bit sour to eat as is. At least the ones I have seen for sale

>at the shuk or in the supermarket. But they cook up great.

>--

>Yehoshua ben Haym haYerushalmi

>Senischal soon to be Shire of Beit Aryeh

>MKA Zachary Kessin Jerusalem, Israel

 

Yes. Pickled with saffron.  Very sour.  That is why the fighters like them.

They go well in marinades for meats and fish.  They stand up well in heavy

meat stews and make very nice accompanying garnish with spinach and salads.

Olwen

What is shuk?

 

 

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 10:31:17 -0800

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Preserved (Pickled) Lemons

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

Yehoshua wrote:

>has anyone else done any cooking with preserved lemons. I think they are

>morrocan. My supermarket sells them loose along with olives and pickles

>and stuff. Are there any good period recipies that use them?

>I just discovered them the other day and have so far used them to make a

>great eastern chicken stew.

 

First, Olwen, i don't know what kind of pickled lemons you have, but

the Moroccan lemons are salted. I have posted to this list, i

believe, some recipes for making Moroccan salted preserved lemons...

most minimally, you wash the lemons well, dry them, slit/cut them in

specific ways, pack the slits with salt, layer them in large glass

jars with more salt, and let stand in a dark cool place for some

time, turning occasionally. They become tender and silky and are a

good addition to many recipes.

 

So, Yehoshua, what do you want to know? I have purchased some very

delicious, but expensive, mustard which is made with garlic and

Moroccan salted lemons. If you're interested i can post a list of

ingredients and you can make your own.

 

I also have a LOT of Moroccan cookbooks, including a Moroccan

Sephardic cookbook. The most common recipe using salted preserved

lemons uses them sliced or chunked with chicken and green olives. If

you like i can post some recipes...

 

Anahita

 

 

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 11:55:44 -0700

From: James Prescott <prescotj at telusplanet.net>

Subject: RE: [Sca-cooks] Preserved (Pickled) Lemons

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

>>has anyone else done any cooking with preserved lemons. I think they are

>>Moroccan. My supermarket sells them loose along with olives and pickles

>>and stuff. Are there any good period recipies that use them?

 

There are many in Lancelot de Casteau. Ouverture de Cuisine. Liege:

Leonard Streel, 1604. Note that Casteau's active working life, when

he used these recipes, was prior to 1600.

 

The translation is nearly finished. Here are the recipes that

use preserved lemons (here called salted sour lemons). There may

be a few changes before the translation is finalised, but these

should be close to their final form. Translation copyright 2003

James Prescott and Jeremy Fletcher.

 

1. [A boiled capon.]

 

Boiled capon[:] when it is almost cooked, add

rosemary, marjoram, mace, a salted sour lemon cut

into slices, a rummer of white wine, or verjuice,

and some butter, some beef marrow bones, and let

them stew well together, some toasts of white

bread underneath.

 

13. Other sort of disguised veal.

 

Take the [leftover] flesh once you have made the

leg all prepared thus [see recipe 9], and making

some round balls or long like small sausages, and

stew them in good stocks, and [add] a salted sour

lemon in slices, mint, marjoram, a bit of

verjuice or wine, and stew it well, and serve

thus.

 

20. Carp in soup.

 

Take a carp well scaled and cleaned, and cut it

into four pieces, and take some onions fried in

butter, a salted sour lemon cut into slices, a

nutmeg, a bit of ginger, marjoram and mint

chopped very fine, then add some wine or verjuice

and butter, and stew it well thus with a bit of

barley beer.

 

22. Pike of another sort.

 

Take a pike well cleaned and put it to boil with

salted water and vinegar, then break it into

pieces, in order to remove the bones, then chop

the pike very fine, and put it into a small pot

or a flat bottom dish, and take a fresh lemon or

sour lemon chopped very fine, mace, a bit of

pepper and new butter, and white wine, a bit of

orange, and stew it well together.

 

82. To make poupelin pasties.

 

Take some dough as above, a roll a bit thicker

and longer than the other pastry, and arrange it

always rising, so that you can put a partridge

inside, and put the partridge the feet upwards,

then add salted sour lemon cut into slices,

nutmeg and ginger, chopped marjoram, and new

butter, then close the pastry at the top so that

the feet of the partridge come out, then put it

in the oven.

 

86. To make pasties of disguised veal.

 

Take a pound of raw veal and half a pound of beef

fat, and chop well all together, and add three

raw eggs, two nutmegs, a bit of pepper, a salted

sour lemon, well chopped all together, and make

some flesh like a small leg of mutton, and plant

in some pine nuts, and make the pasty according

to the size of your flesh: being half an hour in

the oven pour in some white wine or verjuice, and

let it cook well.

 

88. To make pasty of fresh cuttlefish.

 

Take the cuttlefish well cleaned, and put it to

boil until it is cooked, then take two or three

onions chopped and fricasseed in butter, a salted

sour lemon in pieces, nutmeg, and pepper, a bit

of chopped mint, and put all together in the

pasty, and enough butter.

 

Note that is is necessary to cut the cuttlefish

into pieces[:] the pasty being half cooked add a

bit of Spanish wine.

 

101. Roasted sturgeons.

 

Take a piece of sturgeon and boil it strongly to

remove the scales, then put some whole cloves on

top with some small sprigs of rosemary inside,

and put it thus to roast, always basting well

with butter: being well cooked make a sauce on

top with wine, sugar and cinnamon, nutmeg, a

salted sour lemon cut into slices, a bit of

butter in [it], and boil well all together, and

pour it on the sturgeons, and serve thus.

 

104. To make mortadella [sausage] of sturgeon.

 

Take three pounds of sturgeon, as above, half an

ounce of cinnamon, two nutmegs, a bit of salt,

two ounces of grated Parmesan [cheese], and mix

all together, three egg yolks, two ounces of

fresh butter, and when all is well incorporated

together, make the sausages, and put them to stew

with a bit of water and some wine, marjoram, leaf

of nutmeg, a salted sour lemon in slices, and

some butter, and boil well together, some toasts

of white bread underneath in the flat bottom

dish: serve the sausages on top.

 

105. Sturgeon in daube.

 

Take a piece of sturgeon well cleaned, roasted

and fricasseed in butter or olive oil, then you

will take vinegar, and wine as much of the one as

of the other, and put it to boil, a salted sour

lemon in slices, some saffron, some pepper, bay

laurel leaves, rosemary, marjoram, ground radish

root, a small handful of coriander: being boiled

pour all hot on the sturgeon, and keep it thus

well covered.

 

109. To make pike sausage.

 

Take pike flesh, and carp flesh, and fresh salmon

as much of the one as of the other, and chop well

all together: add nutmeg, salt, pepper, chopped

marjoram, and mix all with three egg yolks, and

roll the flesh with the hand like small sausage,

take the stomach and the bladder of the pike, and

fill it with your flesh, and put it to cook with

wine, water, butter, a salted sour lemon in

slices, rosemary, marjoram in [it]: being well

cooked serve thus.

 

135. To make veal hotchpotch home style.

 

Take a veal thigh being half cooked, add mace, a

salted sour lemon in slices, marjoram and mint,

some verjuice or white wine and some butter, and

let stew well together.

 

138. To make a stuffed veal liver in soup.

 

Cut the liver at the thickest, the length of a

small finger, then with a very sharp knife you

will cut the liver inside, and you will pull out

what you can, without turning underneath or on

top: then boil the liver a bit when it is pulled

out, and chop it very fine with a bit of beef

fat, and chop a small handful of good herbs with

[it], and a chopped onion: you will add a bit of

nutmeg and ginger, a bit of salt, three egg

yolks, well mixed together: then refill the

liver, and take an intestinal caul of veal, or of

pork, and squeeze the liver inside, let it be

well tied, then you will put it to cook in a pot

with good stock, mace, a bit of verjuice or wine,

and a salted sour lemon in slices, and you will

leave all to stew well, and serve.

 

143. A leg of mutton disguised and boiled.

 

Peel the skin away from the flesh, and take all

the flesh away from the bones, and chop it very

fine with a bit of beef fat, and a salted sour

lemon cut into pieces, well washed, and you will

take a bit of mint also chopped with [it], then

add nutmeg and pepper, a bit of salt, half a

rummer of white wine, and three raw eggs, and

chop well all together, and mix it well, and

after you will replace the flesh between the

bones, and make it in the shape of a leg as it

was: then take a pig's intestinal caul: [ensure]

that you have some beaten egg yolks: then you

will rub the same caul with the egg yolks, and

after you will wrap the caul around the leg, so

that it is well covered, then tie it well

lengthwise and crosswise, so that nothing comes

out, and put it to boil until it is cooked: then

[take] half of a white bread [loaf], and soak it

with the stock, and strain it with four ounces of

blanched almonds ground and strained through

cheesecloth: then put with the leg court bouillon

and a bit of mace, and some white wine, and let

it stew well.

 

145. Disguised veal in soup.

 

Take a thigh of veal, and chop it very fine with

some beef fat, half as much of fat as of flesh:

then prepare it with the same sort of spices

[with which] you have made the leg: then you will

take some flesh as large as two eggs, and shaped

by hand like a small leg, and put it thus to stew

with a bit of wine, nutmeg, salted sour lemon in

pieces, and a bit of capers, and stew it well:

then serve four or five on a plate.

 

153. To make a veal loin stuffed and roasted.

 

Take some good stuffing herbs, and chop them very

fine, fricassee them in butter: add 4 egg yolks,

nutmeg, ginger, cinnamon, a bit of sugar, some

salt, and cook it a bit, not too much: then chop

a salted sour lemon mixed with the stuffing: then

take a veal loin which is a bit parboiled: then

put the stuffing under the veal kidney, and cover

it with a double veal intestinal caul, and attach

it with some skewers so that nothing falls out,

then being cooked take the kidney out, and chop

it: add two egg yolks, a bit of sugar and

cinnamon, a bit of salt, and put the said kidney

on some bread toasts, and put it into a pie dish

with some butter, and put the covers on top with

some fire, so that the toasts are very little

heated, and put around the plate where the veal

loin is, and pour all the fat on the loin with

some vinegar, and [put] some oranges cut into

pieces on top.

 

156. Otherwise. [Veal rolls]

 

Take a thigh of veal, and cut it into slices the

length of a hand, and three fingers wide, and

beat it with a knife without breaking it: then

take some good herbs chopped very fine, and add

some egg yolks, nutmeg, cloves and ginger, a bit

of salt, beef fat chopped and mixed together:

then spread the slices of veal on a table, and

take some of these greased herbs, and spread them

on the slices of veal, then roll them, and insert

some skewers of wood or of iron, and put it to

boil, and stew with salted sour lemon, mace,

verjuice or white wine, and some butter, and let

it stew well, and serve: if you wish the same you

can put it to roast and serve it with oranges,

and melted butter.

--

James Prescott / Thorvald Grimsson

Coordinator, Ouverture translation project

 

 

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 17:04:03 -0700

From: James Prescott <prescotj at telusplanet.net>

Subject: RE: [Sca-cooks] Preserved (Pickled) Lemons

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

At 16:10 -0700 2003-12-16, Harris Mark.S-rsve60 wrote:

>> There are many in Lancelot de Casteau. Ouverture de Cuisine. Liege:

>> Leonard Streel, 1604. Note that Casteau's active working life, when

>> he used these recipes, was prior to 1600.

 

> I must have missed this earlier, or have simply forgotten it. Is this

> a French book in French?

 

Largely in the French culinary tradition, with some obvious Italian

and Dutch and Spanish influences, written in French with some Walloon

words, from what is today called Belgium.

 

> Isn't "sour lemons" a bit redundant? Aren't all lemons sour? But each

> of these recipes, or at least the translation, use this term. Or are

> these recipes calling for a type of lemon that is particularly sour

> and then salted?

 

There are regular lemons, and there are lemons which are noticeably

more sour.  The original French uses two different words.  Think of

the difference between regular oranges and the sour Seville oranges

destined for the modern marmalade.

 

The original French offers phrases which can be translated as "fresh

lemon", "fresh sour lemon", and "salted sour lemon".

 

Sour lemons are available today preserved in salt.

 

Thorvald

 

 

Date: Sun, 21 Dec 2003 15:44:21 -0800 (PST)

From: Judith Kingsbury <miriambaslevi at yahoo.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] more on lemons

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

"Pixel, Goddess and Queen" <pixel at hundred-acre-wood.com> wrote:

>>>> 

So, apparently the people at Whole Foods who make up the labels for things

have never tasted the preserved lemons they made up labels for that say

one should use them to add a lemony zip to things like baked goods. They

are, in fact, the Moroccan salty kind (and got used in a tagine last

night, yum!).

 

Anahita, do you know how period they are?

 

Margaret

<<<< 

 

Since Anahita hasn't answered your question as yet, I will endeavor to

do so.

 

Preserved lemons are listed in the recipes from the MEDIEVAL ARAB

COOKERY trans. by Rodinson, Arberry, and Perry,  pg. 144.  So they are

indeed period.  I love all sorts of preserved and salted items for my

cooking.  I was intrigued by seeing the recipe for salted grapes on the

stem in the same book.  I adore preserved lemons in my tagines, my

favorite one is Chicken cooked with preserved lemons, dried apricots,

and kalamata olives with a honey sauce. I don't know if it is a period

recipe, but everything we use in it was available within period in

Morocco.

 

A Somewhat Quiet Member of this List,

Miriam bas Levi

 

 

Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2004 01:12:08 -0500

From: "vicki shaw" <vhsjvs at gis.net>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Moroccan preserved lemon recipe

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Here is the recipe for the preserved lemons that I had been trying to send to you all when I was using incredimail.  Please feel free to ask any questions.  

Angharad

 

  a.. Wide mouth jar that will hold about 10 or so lemons, depending on size of lemons.  Best to boil up some water and fill the jar to overflowing to sterilize.

  b.. About 12 to fifteen lemons, making sure to reserve a few for juice

  c.. Kosher salt, or if you have a Korean grocery shop near you, they generally have several varieties of coarse sea salt.  You do not need the coarsest variety, but you have a choice, or else just get it from the grocery store.  BUT DO NOT USE TABLE SALT

 

  a.. Roll each lemon across a cutting board, hand over hand until you feel them soften, to loosen the juices.  

  b.. Now, holding the first lemon in the palm of your hand, cut down from the top to the bottom without severing the lemon into two halves. Then cut crosswise again to the bottom without severing. It should look like a flower in the palm of your hand when you pry open the quarters.

  c.. With the jar nearby, pour salt into the opened sections of the lemon and stop when the salt begins to spill out between the sections, and place that lemon in the jar.

  d.. Repeat this process until the jar is full and you could not possibly stuff another lemon into it.

  e.. If you accidentally sever a lemon into two halves or four quarters, save those to stuff in the top before you seal it.

  f.. Now pour the juice you prepared earlier into the jar, put a square of saran across the top and close the jar and forget about it for three weeks to a month. Be sure that the lid is on tightly and periodically turn it upside down so the juice can also bathe the lemons at the top of the jar for a few hours at a time. In time the salt will draw out the juices from the lemons, and it will develop into a salty syrup.

  g.. When you see that the color of the lemons has changed a bit and that they seem to have gone a bit limp, they are ready to use in salads. You would remove one or two quarters of a lemon and dice them up and sprinkle on top and later mix when ready to serve.

  h.. Keep them in a cool place but not the fridge unless you are in very hot and humid country.  If you put them right away in the cold, they will take a much longer time to ripen.

When you slice a quarter or two for salads, remove the pulp and return it to the jar.  It will be handy later to add in blended sauces.  Makes my mouth water to think about the lemons.  I am never ever without a jar of them!

 

Now you want recipes for using the lemons, don't you!  Come on, 'fess up, your mouth is watering too!

 

 

Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2004 11:22:09 -0800

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Moroccan preserved lemon recipe

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

Stefan wrote:

>Angharad gave us her recipe for salted lemons.

>I have a few questions, though. (no surprise, huh?)

> >  a.. Wide mouth jar that will hold about 10 or so lemons,

>depending on size of lemons.  Best to boil up some >water and fill

>the jar to overflowing to sterilize.

>Are you leaving the water in the jar? Or dumping it out? Since you

>are pouring the salt over the lemon slices later, I assume you are

>dumping it out. If so, is there that much juice in the jar? Or does

>the salt draw a lot of water from the lemons? How much of the jar is

>filled with liquid when the lemons are "done"?

 

I'm not Angharad, but...

 

Dump out the water. It's just to sterilize the jars. The lemons

themselves will produce liquid as they cure.

 

> >f.. Now pour the juice you prepared earlier into the jar,

>Do you mean just the lemon juice, "b.. About 12 to fifteen lemons,

>making sure to reserve a few for juice"?

 

Yes.

 

> >  g.. When you see that the color of the lemons has changed a bit

>and that they seem to have gone a bit limp, >they are ready to use

>in salads. You would remove one or two quarters of a lemon and dice

>them up and sprinkle >on top and later mix when ready to serve.

>Are you dicing up the entire lemon? Peel, pith and pulp? Because

>later on you say:

 

Absolutely. The salted lemons transform into tasty tender

translucence, real tongue tempters...

 

(well, they're not completely translucent, but all that alliteration

and consonance sounded good, and they are tender and delicious.)

 

> >When you slice a quarter or two for salads, remove the pulp and

>return it to the jar.  It will be handy later to add >in blended

>sauces.

>Which seems to say you are using just the peel and pulp. You are

>dipping/straining the pulp out of the jar later to put into these

>sauces? What kind of sauces would these be?

 

I don't know which ones Angharad means, but i can post a bunch of

*modern* Moroccan recipes that use salted lemons.

 

Let me know if you like and i'll post modern recipes. Also, since

they have become "fashionable", with a google you should be able to

turn up "nouveau" recipes using salted lemons.

 

Also i have become addicted... uh, accustomed to a wonderful (but

rather expensive) mustard made by a very expensive restaurant here in

NoCal. It's made with finely diced salted lemons (more like the

"matchhead" size used in many Chinese recipes for ginger and garlic)

and garlic and herbs. I keep thinking i should try to make my own to

save money.

 

Anahita

 

 

Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2004 17:53:11 -0500

From: "vicki shaw" <vhsjvs at gis.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Moroccan preserved lemon recipe

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

The filling of the jar with boiled water is to sterilize it.  when you have

done that it is ready for the lemons to be placed inside the jar, one by

one, from the bottom up [duh!], layering them as you go.

 

When all the lemons have been cut and filled with salt and are in the jar,

then you make juice out of the remaining uncut lemons.  That is why I said

to get 12 to fifteen lemons.  If they are small, 10-12 may very well fit in

the jar, so you need xtra.

 

No, you do not fill up the jar with lemon juice since the salt will draw out

the juice from the lemons to yield that nice syrup.  The jar will never be

full of syrup, but you can fill the jar to the half-way mark with juice if

you like, no problem!

 

Just don't forget to periodically upend the jar so the lemons at the top

can bathe in the juice.

 

I only put the diced rind into the salad because I have seen some people

pucker up when  they landed a chunk of the pulp in their mouth.  Me, I love

it! But the pulp adds up in the jar over time if I take it out for salad,

and then when I make blended sauces in my mini-cuisinart, I fish for a

tablspoon or so of the pulpy pieces from the jar and throw them in - sans

pips - with the rest of my sauce ingredients.

 

As Anhahita mentioned, you can google moroccan recipes that use the lemons,

and both of us, I am sure will be willing to help you with more ideas or if

you don’t feel like searching the internet but need something right away.  I

know sometimes I just don’t have the patience to spend hours and hours

searching!!!

Angharad!!!

 

 

Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 12:15:25 -0500

From: "vicki shaw" <vhsjvs at gis.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Moroccan preserved lemon recipe

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> Is there any chance those of us on low salt can safely eat these?

> Margarite

 

sure because you are only eating a few squares in the salad, and when you

begin to use it in other dishes, you are not adding additional salt to the

dish, and ultimately you are only eating one serving at a time.  It's like

having cake when you are diabetic.  A half a slice is ok, where you might

otherwise have had a suicidal 2 or three or more!

 

Angharad

 

 

Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 14:40:39 -0500

From: "vicki shaw" <vhsjvs at gis.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Moroccan preserved lemon recipe

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> I have a question concerning the preserved lemon recipe:  What kind of

> lemons to use.  Here in Southern California, I am lucky enough to have

> many varieties available.  I grow both Meyer and Eureka lemons in my

> back yard (along with blood oranges, kumquats, mandarin oranges, and

> two kinds of limes, ), and have plenty of both.  

>     Mike Acord

 

The best lemons to use would be thin-skinned ones with the smoothest skin.

They tend to be somewhat smaller than the thick-skinned type with lots of

pocks, or large pores.  If all I can find on the market are larger pored

thick skinned lemons, then before I cut them at all, I let them soak in cold

water for a few days, changing the water everyday.  It takes some of the

bitterness out of the skin.

 

Angharad

 

 

Date: Fri, 19 Mar 2004 11:28:12 -0800

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Moroccan Preserved Lemons

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

This topic came up a while back. Here are some recipes published in  

English...

 

Preserved Salted Lemons - L'Hamd Markad

 

Preserved salted lemons are an essential part of Moroccan cuisine.

While it takes a few weeks before they're ready to use, they are very

simple to make. You can also do this to limes.

 

-------

Cooking at the Kasbah: Recipes from My Moroccan Kitchen

by Kitty Morse

Chronicle Books, 1998

ISBN: 081181503X

Kitty Morse was born to a Moroccan Sephardic Jewish mother and

English father and raised in Morocco in the city of Casablanca. She

now divides her time between Southern California and Azemmour in

Morocco. Her books are pretty good.

 

12 or more unblemished organically grown Meyer or other lemons, scrubbed

Sea salt

fresh lemon juice as needed

 

Wash lemons and pat dry. Cut a thin dime-sized piece from both ends

of each lemon. Set each lemon on end and make a vertical cut three

quarters of the way through, so halves remain attached at the base -

do not cut all the way through. Turn lemon upside down and make a

similar cut through at a 90 degree angle to the first. Fill each cut

with as much salt as it will hold. Place lemons carefully in a

sterilized wide-mouth glass quart jar. Compress lemons while adding

them until no space is left and lemon juice rises to the top. Lemons

must be covered with juice at all times, so add lemon juice if

necessary. Seal and set aside in dark place.

 

Keep for 4 to 6 weeks before using. To use, discard seeds, and rise

lightly if necessary. Once opened, store in refrigerator where they

will keep up to 6 months.

 

-------

Couscous and Other Good Food from Morocco

by Paula Wolfert

-- Hardcover: HarperCollins, 1973

# ASIN: 0060147210

-- Paperback: Quill, 1987

ISBN: 0060913967

Paula Wolfert, a noted food expert, especially of cuisines from

around the Mediterranean, spent quite a few years living in Morocco

in the 1960s, IIRC. This book is quite possibly the best on Moroccan

food in English, although she leaves out a few essential items, such

as most breads. Still in print and well worth owning...

 

5 lemons, scrubbed

1/4 c. salt or more as needed

fresh lemon juice as needed

 

Optional spices as used in the city of Safi:

1 cinnamon stick

3 cloves

5-6 coriander seeds

3-4 black peppercorns

1 bay leaf

 

Wash lemons. To soften rind, soak lemons in lukewarm water for 3

days, changing water daily. Pat lemons dry.

 

Quarter lemons from top to within 1/2 inch of bottom. Sprinkle salt

on exposed flesh and press sides back together. Place 1 Tb. salt in

bottom of sterilized 1 pint mason jar. Pack in lemons, push them

down, adding more salt, and optional spice mixture between layers.

Press lemons down to release juice and make room for more lemons.

Lemons must be covered with juice, so add fresh lemon juice if

necessary. Seal and set aside in warm dark place.

 

Turn jar upside down each day to distribute salt and juice. Let ripen

for 30 days before using. To use, rinse as needed. No need to

refrigerate after opening. Lemons will keep up to a year - pickling

juice can be used 2 or 3 times over the course of a year.

 

-------

from The Moroccan Cookbook, 1975, by Irene F. Day

Irene Day lived in Morocco for three years and has a few amusing

stories to tell. Most of the recipes are not particularly

outstanding, but some of her basics are good. It's still in print,

but, really, there's no need to rush out and look for this book, so

i'm not giving pub.details. I bought it when it was first published,

back when there were limited resources on Moroccan cooking in English.

 

12 or more firm ripe lemons, scrubbed

Sea salt

fresh lemon juice as needed

 

Wash lemons and pat dry. Slash sides of each lemon lengthwise from

top to bottom 3 or 4 times but do not cut apart. Fill each cut with

as much salt as it will hold. Place lemons carefully in a sterilized

wide-mouth glass quart jar. Compress lemons while adding them until

no space is left and lemon juice risen to the top. Lemons must be

covered with juice, so add lemon juice if necessary. Seal and set

aside in warm dark place.

 

After 10 days, remove lemons, place in sterilized jar, add more salt

and enough lemon juice to cover fruit, and re-seal. Store for another

10 days or more and use. Will keep 2 months or more.

 

 

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Two batches of Garum (for anyone here who knows)

From: Robert Uhl <ruhl at 4dv.net>

Date: 26 Jun 2004 10:25:35 -0600

 

"Amanda Poirier" <griet at rogers.com> writes:

> MMm preserved lemons... did you salt them or use some other method?

 

IIRC, I simply preserved the lemons & limes in a proportional mixture of

lemon & lime juice, with some salt added, a small amount of peppercorns

and a pinch of saffron.  To prepare the fruit, I sliced them lengthwise

nearly all the way; next time I do this I'll slice them _all_ the way

through, and will probably cut them into rounds instead.  For the first

month I shook the jar periodically, but for the last several I've just

let it sit.  It's not a killed pickle, but a live one--a sediment forms

after awhile.  I only trust fermented pickles--if the good bugs haven't

devoured the food, then the bad bugs may.

 

The end result is some hyper-sour, soft-all-the-way-through lemons &

limes. They are not terribly appealing looking; this is probably due to

the fact that I used less-than-fresh fruit (in fact, I pickled them

because they were getting a touch old in the fridge).  They taste pretty

good, though, and would go nicely with cold cuts of meat.  I might also

try rubbing them into a roast beef, along with my standard garlic,

Worcestershire sauce & fresh ground pepper rub.

 

Next time I'll also probably add some mother of vinegar and let

acetobacter convert all the carbohydrates in the juice into vinegar.

This will produce a layer of mother on top, but I've a feeling it will

lead to a more attractive result, and an even higher acid content (while

I believe that straight lemon-juice-and-salt will prevent nasties from

growing, I _know_ that good strong vinegar does a great job: lemon

juice, salt, _and_ vinegar gotta do an amazing job).  I'll also use

fresh fruit straight from the grocer's.  Perhaps I'll add a bit of fresh

ginger. Lastly, I'll prob. leave out the pinch of saffron.  I can't see

that it does any good: the liquid doesn't need a slightly ruddy tint,

and I've a notion that saffron has anti-preservative effects.

 

There are several receipts online for pickled lemons; many describe

pre-slicing the lemons, and letting them sit covered with salt for a

day; many preserve in oil, fewer in juice (and one I found in brine);

most involve some amount of salt; several involve paprika.  One involved

recipe involves repeatedly parboiling the lemons and collecting the

fluid which drips therefrom.  I combined a few to come up with mine--I

wanted something easy which would still preserve the things, as I've

little desire to poison myself.

 

Hope all this helps.

 

 

Date: Fri, 14 Apr 2006 21:53:09 -0700

From: David Friedman <ddfr at daviddfriedman.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Preserved Lemon recipes?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> A couple of friends of mine have just gifted me with

> a large jar of preserved lemons. Now I know they

> are very common in Morroccan cuisine but does anyone

> have any good recipes for dishes using these? Period

> is nice but not necessary. I just need to come up

> with ways of getting rid of them.

 

Madira

al-Baghdadi p. 41/ 6

 

Cut fat meat into middling pieces with the tail; if chickens are

used, quarter them. Put in the saucepan with a little salt, and cover

with water: boil, removing the scum. When almost cooked take large

onions and leeks, peel, cut off the tails, wash in salt and water,

dry and put into the pot. Add dry coriander, cummin, mastic and

cinnamon, ground fine. When cooked and the juices are dried up, so

that only the oil remains, ladle out into a large bowl. Take Persian

milk, put in the saucepan, add salted lemon and fresh mint. Leave to

boil: then take off the fire, stirring. When the boiling has

subsided, put back the meat and herbs. Cover the saucepan, wipe its

sides, and leave to settle over the fire [i.e. at a low heat], then

remove.

 

Fat meat (lamb) or chicken or both:    2 leeks       4 c yogurt

   3 1/2 lb chicken or 2 1/2 lb boneless lamb     1 t ground coriander

        1/2 lemon

1 T salt      1 t cumin     1 T salt

water to cover-no more than 1 quart    1/8-1/16 t mastic   1/2 c

fresh mint = ~1 oz

4 medium onions     1/2 T cinnamon

 

Chicken version: Cook chicken about 30 minutes. If you want to serve

it boned (not specified in the recipe, but it makes it easier to cook

and to eat-we have done it both ways), remove it from the water, let

cool enough to handle, bone, and put the meat back in the pot. Add

leeks, onions and spices. Cook away the rest of the water, remove

meat and vegetables, and add yogurt, lemon, salt and mint; mint is

chopped and lemon is quartered and each quarter sliced into two or

three times with a knife. Let come to a simmer and put back the meat

and vegetables. Heat through, not letting it boil, and serve. Use

proportionately less water if you expand the recipe substantially.

 

As you can see, we didn't have preserved lemons--modify our recipe

accordingly, since you do.

--

David/Cariadoc

www.daviddfriedman.com

 

 

Date: Sat, 15 Apr 2006 11:47:13 -0700

From: David Friedman <ddfr at daviddfriedman.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Preserved Lemon recipes?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

I am reasonably sure that we cut up the leeks and onions, but it's

been some years since we last made it.

 

Note that the amount of mastic--an eighth to a sixteenth of a

teaspoon--is not a typo. It's powerful stuff. There is a recipe in

_Soup for the Qan_ for a mastic dish with quantities, and the

proportion is similarly small.

 

We've generally made the chicken version.

 

> Yummm!

> Are the leeks and onions put in whole? The original doesn't say,  

> beyond the cutting off of the "tails."

> --maire, hungry for lamb...mmmm.....

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: "David Friedman" <ddfr at daviddfriedman.com>

> To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

> Sent: Friday, April 14, 2006 10:53 PM

> Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Preserved Lemon recipes?

>> 

>> Madira

>> al-Baghdadi p. 41/ 6

>> 

>> Cut fat meat into middling pieces with the tail; if chickens are

>> used, quarter them. Put in the saucepan with a little salt, and  

 

 

Date: Mon, 24 Apr 2006 12:52:18 -0700

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Preserved Lemon Recipes - Modern - One

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

Duke Cariadoc already sent the only SCA-period recipe that uses

preserved lemon that has been translated into English that i know of.

 

But in his long essay on Medieval Arab cuisine and cookbooks,

"Studies in Arabic Manuscripts Related to Cookery" (republished in

"Medieval Arab Cookery"), Maxime Rodinson notes there is a recipe for

making preserved lemon and 3 recipes using it in al-Kitab al-wusla

ila al-habib fi wasf al-tayyibat wa al-tib, which he translates as

"The Book of the Bonds of Friendship or a Description of Good Dishes

and Perfumes" (but is also sometimes called "The Book of the Link to

the Beloved").

 

While this book contains a number of recipes repeated in

al-Baghdadi's "al-Kitab al-Tabikh", it also has even more that are

not. And unfortunately the preserved lemon recipes have not been

translated into English to the best of my knowledge. In a foot note,

Rodinson says that in the recipe for making preserved lemons, "The

lemon is split lengthwise and then filled with coarse salt. It is

left thus for two nights and then kept in lemon juice covered with

oil." (footnote 1, p. 144, "Medieval Arab Cookery")

 

Urtatim (that's err-tah-TEEM)

the persona formerly known as Anahita

 

Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2009 18:55:28 -0700

From: David Walddon <david at vastrepast.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Salted lemons

 

Big old ceramic container.

2 or 3 dozen lemons.

25 pounds of salt.

In the wine cellar for 4 to six months.

When I dig them out I put them in smaller "canning" jars and pack salt

around them. No one has died.

They smell divine! And taste wonderful.

They make a great garnish on all things.

Rinsed is good but scraped of most of the salt and sprinkled judiciously on

almost anything they are pretty amazing as well.

 

Eduardo

 

On 8/25/09 2:49 PM, "Raphaella DiContini" <raphaellad at yahoo.com> wrote:

<<< Eduardo made some of these, and although I may be remembering incorrectly I

think they had sat for at least 6 months, just packed in salt, and I believe

just in his garage? He shared a jar with me, and at July Coronation had

included some of them in a rice dish he did as part of the Scappi Dinner on

Saturday night. YUM!

 

Raffaella >>>

 

 

Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2009 15:42:53 -0600

From: Susan Lin <susanrlin at gmail.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Salted lemons

 

I agree that the salt is an excellent preservative.  There are many things

that are preserved in salt and nothing else and they do not get refrigerated

(or didn't before refrigeration was available)  In the U.S. of A. we are a

culture of people very touchy about food safety.  Things I do having done

some research and having lived all over the world make others twitch.

 

I made preserved/salted lemons and left them on the counter and they were

fine. I did not "can" them with either a water bath or under pressure.

Just lots of lemons and lots of salt.  Let them sit, added more lemons and

more salt until the jar was stuffed.  Then just let them sit.

 

Once we opened it to use we put it in the fridge.  Figured the constant

exposure to air from opening/closing might do something unpleasant if we

kept them out.  Nobody has ever gotten ill from these lemons.

 

Note: When we use the lemons we always rinse them and even sometimes soak

them for a while.

 

My opinion is to open one of the jars, take out a lemon, rinse it and give

it a try - it should be salty but should not taste "off".

 

shoshana

 

On Tue, Aug 25, 2009 at 3:32 PM, Jennifer Carlson <talana1 at hotmail.com>wrote:

<<< Urtatim's recipe reminded me:

Last spring (after my tagine inquiry), I made up a few, small jars of

salted lemons - just lemons packed with salt, nothing else added.  Then I

put them aside and forgot about them.  They've been sitting at room

temperature on a shelf in my kitchen four about four months now.

 

I did not process them in a water bath or do anything else to them.  Are

they still safe to eat, or should I pitch them?  They have not changed

color, nor have the lids swollen nor is there any seepage.  Logic says

salt+citric acid = ok, but paranoia says don't use them.

 

Any canning experts out there?  I only know about canning things with

sugar.

 

Talana >>>

 

 

Date: Thu, 21 Oct 2010 08:10:38 -0600

From: Susan Lin <susanrlin at gmail.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] cooking for a vigil

 

<<< I ended up not using the preserved lemons as I couldn't find them, and

leaving the chickpeas slightly chunky instead of a smooth puree.

 

Madhavi >>>

 

Mark Bitman had a quick preserved lemon recipe on NYTimes.com. I saw

it yesterday.

 

I have a jar I keep that I made last time Whole Foods had Meyer lemons on sale. They last forever although I do refrigerate after we open the jar. They super simple to make as well.

 

 

Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2010 14:12:01 -0700

From: Susan Lin <susanrlin at gmail.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] A preserved lemon question

 

On Wed, Nov 10, 2010 at 2:06 PM, Pixel, Goddess and Queen <

pixel at hundred-acre-wood.com> wrote:

<<< I have this jar of preserved lemons that I made a few years back, and I was

wondering if they ever really go bad?

 

Margaret FitzWilliam >>>

 

No. If you made them just with washed lemons and salt and the lemons have

been completely submerged they should be fine.  If you open them and the top

ones doesn't look so hot just toss those and the ones below should be fine.

Just add lemon juice to cover them and store in the fridge - that's where we

store ours after we open them.  The first jar I put up lasted us more than 3

years (I think I packed about 15 lemons in a quart mason jar) and we've only

just opened the one I made last year - it'll probably last equally as long.

 

Shoshana

 

 

Date: Thu, 11 Nov 2010 15:47:06 -0500 (EST)

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] A preserved lemon question

 

Margaret FitzWilliam wrote:

<<< I have this jar of preserved lemons that I made a few years back, and I

was wondering if they ever really go bad? >>>

 

If the jar was prepared and stored appropriately, the lemons should still be good. They can go bad, if improperly stored, or not enough salt was used (as in, get moldy).

 

They keep best if stored unopened in a cool dark place, and in the refrigerator after opening.

 

They should be no longer bright yellow, but still yellowish, the peel somewhat translucent, and the pulp hardly noticeable. They won't smell like fresh lemons, but should still smell lemony (as well as salty and acidic).

 

I go through jars quickly. I chop them up and mix with mayonnaise and mustard and herbs 'n' spices which making tuna salad. I sprinkle slivered peel and slivered dried tomatoes on steamed broccoli. And of course they are luscious with cooked chicken or fish.

 

I don't rinse them off, just use them instead of salt, but I know some people prefer to give 'em a rinse before using. In some of her books, Kitty Morse - who, despite her name is actually Moroccan - mentions the possibility of white stuff floating on top of the liquid, which she says can just be discarded. I have never seen this in any of the preserved lemons I have made or have been gifted by others.

---

Urtatim (that's err-tah-TEEM)

the persona formerly known as Anahita

 

<the end>



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