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rabbit-dishes-msg – 3/24/12

 

Period rabbit and hare recipes. Cooking and serving rabbits and hares.

Coneys.

 

NOTE: See also these files: rabbits-msg, chicken-msg, sauces-msg, vinegar-msg, fur-msg.

 

************************************************************************

NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that

I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some

messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium.

These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done  a limited amount  of  editing. Messages having to do  with

seperate topics  were sometimes split into different files and sometimes

extraneous information was removed. For instance, the  message IDs  were

removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I

make  no claims  as  to the accuracy  of  the information  given  by the

individual authors.

 

Please  respect the time  and  efforts of  those who have written  these

messages. The  copyright status  of these messages  is  unclear  at this

time. If  information  is  published  from  these messages, please give

credit to the orignator(s).

 

Thank you,

   Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                         stefan at florilegium.org

************************************************************************

 

Date: Sun, 21 Sep 1997 14:28:41 SAST-2

From: "Ian van Tets" <ivantets at botzoo.uct.ac.za>

Subject: SC - Re: rabbir/hare

 

Good my Lords and Ladies

With respect to rabbit meat, we in Australia have a rampant

population of feral 'English' rabbits (my preferred method of cooking

is stuffed with mushrooms sauteed in butter, then covered with bacon,

then roasted), and the flesh is always white.  I had an interesting

time with this at one stage.  When we ate my husband's honours

experiment (pigeons) we made a stew and stretched the pigeon meat

with rabbit, thinking to mollify those who were uncertain about

eating pigeons they had known...  Um.  Pigeon meat is stark black when

cooked and rabbit very very white...

 

Cairistiona

*****************************************************

Dr. Ian van Tets

Dept. of Zoology

University of Cape Town

Rondebosch 7701 RSA

 

 

Date: Tue, 23 Dec 1997 09:55:56 +1100 (EST)

From: Charles McCathieNevile <charlesn at sunrise.srl.rmit.edu.au>

Subject: Re: SC - rabbit recipes

 

Cold bruet of rabbits (from a photo copy. All I can say is the heading is

'ADAPTED RECIPES', and p 182/183 has this, Dyvers desyre and Viaund and

Mawmene ryall. So I don't know what the original looked like. And the

intro to this refers to MS L ???)

 

Anyway, the redaction I have used a few times, and enjoyed:

 

1/2 rabbits, cut up.

2 cups broth

 

cook rabbit in salted broth, drain and bone.

 

1/2 cup almond

1 cup water

 

make up almond milk simmer then strain to thicken (a lot)

 

1/2 cup seedless raisins or pitted dates

1/2 cup sweet wine

 

mix together

 

tsp cinnamon

1/2 cup sweet wine

 

mix

 

tsp mixed spice

1/4tsp cardamon, ginger

1/3 cup wine vinegar

1/4 cup sugar

 

mix

 

simmer all together, til thick, serve hot or cold.

 

Oh. That's a bit different from what I remember. But no matter. the

original apparently says this is also good for chicken...

 

charles ragnar

 

 

Date: Tue, 23 Dec 1997 09:48:46 -0800

From: "Crystal A. Isaac" <crystal at pdr-is.com>

Subject: Re: SC - rabbit recipes

 

Charles McCathieNevile wrote:

> Cold bruet of rabbits (from a photo copy. All I can say is the heading is

> 'ADAPTED RECIPES', and p 182/183 has this, Dyvers desyre and Viaund and

> Mawmene ryall. So I don't know what the original looked like. And the

> intro to this refers to MS L ???)

 

The bunny recipe you quoted is from _An Ordindance of Pottage: An

Edition of the Fifteenth Century Culinary Recipes in Yale University's

MS Beinecke 163_ by that Saint of the Society, Constance B. Hieatt. It's

a really good book and copies are occasionally avalible through Posion

Pen Press.

 

The original on page 71 (number 96)

Cold bruet of rabets.

Grynd reysons or datys; draw hem up with osey. Put therto creme of

almond & poudyr of canel, a grete dele, drawyn with swete wyn; poudyr

lumbard, poudur of greynez, & poudyr of gynger & a lytyll of venyger &

whyte sygure. Set hit on the fyre; when hit ys at boylyng, take hit of &

put hit in a boll. Have rabets boyled, & that in good broth, & salt;

take hem up. Unlace hem by the bake for the bonnys on both sydys; ley

hem in sewe. Serve hem forth; ley hem in dyschys & poure on the sew

therto. Serve hit forth, & yf thu wylt, thu may chop hem in pecys. & yf

thu have chikenys, reys the whynges & the thyes of hem, kepe hem; & chop

the body. & when hit ys in the sewe, serve hit forthe in the same manner

as Sewe ryall.

 

Crystal of the Westermark

 

 

Date: Tue, 23 Dec 1997 10:45:55 -0500

From: margali <margali at 99main.com>

Subject: Re: SC - hassenpfeffer

 

Tyrca wrote:

> <<

> What's a hassenpfeffer?

> Stefan li Rous >>

> Even better, it is a sort of rabbit stew with lots of pepper in it.

> It is really delicious.  and no, I don't have the recipe.

> Tyrca

 

iirc, my german nanny made if for us now and then, you pickle the bunny

parts in vinegar and spices for several days, remove and reserve the

pickle, dredge bunny bits in flour, brown well, and simmer for a while

in strained pickle [juice].

margali

 

 

Date: Tue, 23 Dec 1997 10:47:55 EST

From: Varju <Varju at aol.com>

Subject: Re: SC - hassenpfeffer

 

<< What's a hassenpfeffer?

 

Literally "rabbit pepper".  My father still raves about it, despite the fact

that his family almost had to survive on it and potato soup after WWII.

 

Noemi

 

 

Date: Fri, 06 Feb 1998 00:26:47 -0500

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: SC - Re Hares in Papdele

 

> From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

> This looks like an interesting one to try, but I don't know if I can find

> hare.  Have you ever tried hare?  If so, does it taste like rabbit; or what

> would you recommend substituting for it?  I ask because I notice that in

> the period cookbook, there are separate and different recipes for hare and

> cony (rabbit).

> Elizabeth/Betty

 

I've eaten hare a couple of times, but never cooked it myself. Bearing

in mind the proviso that most of the "game" animals I have easy access

to are in fact farm animals (including venison, rabbits, etc.), the

extreme likelihood is that for a purpose like this hares and coneys are

pretty much interchangable. Now I'm sure there would be noticable

differences between wild samples of the two critters, since their habits

in the wild aren't the same. Another aspect to be considered is

presentation: hares are larger, and a roast loin of hare looks like

something. Maybe not too much, but it has considerably greater impact

than the same portion of a rabbit cooked similarly. As I say, in this

dish, with the meat picked off the bones, it's probably pretty much the

same.

 

With regard to the flavor, the closest comparison I can draw is to pork

tenderloin. Fairly white in color (some people claim it is more like

veal, but it has a finer, closer texture more like pork or chicken) and

with a rich, sweetish flavor. Doesn't taste a bit like veal, to me. And,

like pork tenderloin, it has a tendency to dry out if you're not

careful, in that it mostly lacks both substantial connective tissue and

fat, both of which contribute to the element of moisture.

 

I'll be using rabbits when I do this dish in May for EK Crown Tourney,

and simply call it Coneys in Papdele.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Wed, 1 Apr 1998 15:07:36 +0200

From: Jessica Tiffin <melesine at ilink.nis.za>

Subject: Re: SC - A Barley recipe

 

Charles Ragnar wrote:

>There is one in British Museum Cookbook - Amyndoun Seaw which I

>frequently make as a barley dish:

>Barley, milk, saffron, parsnips, carrots, spices, fruit, stew it all up.

>(More or less)

 

I have another barley recipe which I found on the web - it claims to be from

the British Museum Cookbook and to be 7th century English, and entails

cooking up chicken pieces with leeks and barley and herbs.  It's actually

one of my favourite medieval dishes - has that slightly vinegary flavour.

Wonderful. But I don't have the original British Museum Cookbook, and would

love to know the original source of the recipe - anyone?  Sounds

substantially pre any of the standard sources - the BM presumably has secret

stashes of ancient manuscripts.

 

Hare, Rabbit, Veal or Chicken Stew with Herbs & Barley

 

Serves 6

 

In 7th century England, herbs were one of the few flavourings available to

cooks and were used heavily...

 

   * 50g (2oz) butter

   * 1 -1.5kg (2-3 lb) (depending on the amount of bone) of hare or rabbit

   * joints, stewing veal or chicken joints

   * 450g (1lb) washed and trimmed leeks, thickly sliced

   * 4 cloves garlic, chopped finely

   * 175 g (6 oz) pot barley

   * 900 mL (30 fl oz, 3 3/4 cups) water

   * 3 generous tablespoons red or white wine vinegar

   * 2 bay leaves, salt, pepper

   * 15 fresh, roughly chopped sage leaves, or 1 tablespoon dried sage

 

Melt the butter in a heavy pan and fry the meat with the leeks and garlic

till the vegetables are slightly softened and the meat lightly browned. Add

the barley, water, vinegar, bay leaves and seasoning. bring the pot to the

boil, cover it and simmer gently for 1 - 1 1/2 hours or till the meat is

really tender and ready to fall from the bone. Add the sage and continue to

cook for several minutes. Adjust the seasoning to taste and serve in

bowls-- the barley will serve as a vegetable.

 

I'd include the URL for the original site, but I can't remember where it

was. Definitely not the Miscellany, but perhaps one of those links on the

Ren Food page.

 

Now I'm drooling slightly.  Oh, well.

 

Melisant

 

 

Date: Wed, 24 Jun 1998 19:11:15 EDT

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: SC - Will's- Recipe 1

 

Here is a recipe from Ancient Cookery (Arundel) which I used for cooking the

rabbits.. The copy that I worked from was taken from Duke Cariadoc's

"Collection of Medieval and Renaissance Cookbooks), vol. 1

 

ORIGINAL RECIPE

 

Conynges in Turbature

(Ancient Cookery)

 

Take conynges and parboyle hom, and roste hom tyl thai ben negh ynogh, and

then take hom up and choppe hom in a pot; and do therto almonde mylk made with

gode brothe of beef; and do thereto clowes and ginger mynced, and pynes, and

raisynges of Corance, and sugur  or honey; and let hit boyle; and colour hit

with saunders or saffron; and in the settynge downe do therto a lytel vynegar,

and powder of canelle medelet togedur, and serve hit forthe.

 

My translation:

 

Take coneys and parboil them. And roast them until (almost done). And then

take them up and chop them in a pot. And do thereto almond milk made with good

"beef broth". And do thereto cloves and minced ginger, and "pine nuts",  and

Raisons of Corinth, and sugar or honey. And let it boil. And color it with

sandlewood or saffron. And in the setting down do thereto a little vinegar,

and "powdered cinnamon" mixed together, and serve it forth.

 

Coneys in Turbature

(copyright 1998 by L. J. Spencer, Jr.)

 

1 Rabbit, cleaned

2 cps Almond milk

1/4 tsp Cloves, ground

1 tsp Fresh gingerroot, peeled and minced finely

1 tblsp Pine nuts

2 tblsp Zante raisons (trade name- dried currants)

1 tsp sugar

1 tsp Powdered red sandlewood (or 1 large pinch saffron, crumbled)

2 tblsps Cidar vinegar, to taste (red wine vinegar may be substituted)

1/2 tsp Cinnamon, ground

 

Sunmerse rabbit in boiling water fro 5 mins. Put the rabbit in a baking dish

or casserole and roast uncovered for 25-30 mins. at 350 degrees F. or until

golden brown. Remove from oven.

 

Cut into 4 pieces. Put pieces in a pan. Add almond milk, cloves, ginger, pine

nuts , raisons, sugar, and sandlewood. If needed, add water to barely cover or

more almond milk. Cook until tneder.

 

Mix vinegar and cinnamon together. Remove rabbits to a platter. Mix

vinegar/cinnamon mixture in sauce. Pour suace over rabbit and serve. Makes 4

servings.

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Wed, 24 Jun 1998 21:54:10 EDT

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: SC - Will's- thoughts 1

 

Take your rabbit and slay it took on a whole new meaning last Thursday as

Phlip pulled in my drive way with 27 living rabbits. Several hours later the

deed was done and the animals were skinned, cleaned and stored in my frig for

use the next day.

 

The actual slaughter went cleanly and was more humane than any I 've seen at

the slaughter house. This is not a recommendation for you to slaughter and

butcher your own animals. The skills involved are not something that your

average person possesses. The act of killing was very traumatic. OTH, at the

price ($3.00 a head) it was the most practical way of doing things. My

experience on the farm came into play for the most part and  Goddess was with

me for the rest.

 

Human casualties were 2 wounded. Phlip recieved 6 stitches to a cut on her arm

and I refused treatment for the one at the base of my thumb. The skins were

salted and rolled for later use.

 

The rabbits were one of the most popular dishes in the feast with no leftovers

being returned to the kitchen.

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Thu, 23 Jul 1998 23:15:27 EDT

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: SC - Fetal Rabbbit Experiment

 

Rather than let a perfect opportunity pass me by, I decided this evening to

find out if fetal rabbits are edible.I removed one of the  embryonic pouches

from the "string" of pouches leaving 3 intact.

 

(Amazingly, the entire structure of the string of embryos when held out in

front of you with two hands reminds you of a necklace with jewels hanging

down.)

 

For the actual cooking process I chose to "parboil" it. I based this decision

on the personal observation that most of the period recipies, with which I am

familiar, call for the parboiling of offal when some form of precooking is

indicated. Other possibilities would have been cutting up raw embryo into

small pieces or forcing it through a sieve. Neither of the last two seemed to

be viable alternatives to parboiling. One of the best reasons that I can think

of is appearance.  This dish, if it existed, would have been very expensive.

For every serving of cooked rabbit embryos , a total of at least 5 rabbits

would have been sacrificed-the doe and the 4 potential rabbits she was

carrying.. If I were doing that, I certainly would want something more than

mush on a plate for all my efforts. :-)

 

So I thawed out the embryonic pouch that I had cut from the frozen string. I

brought two inches of water in a small saucepan to a boil then reduced the

heat to a slow simmer. At this point , I put  the pouch into the water. I

allowed it to simmer for 20 mins.

 

I removed the pouch from the water with a slotted spoon and allowed it to cool

to room temperature. I sliced it in half. Apparently this embryo was not as

advanced as it could have been because I noticed no "white bits". :-) The

appearance was sort of crumbly textured, not surprisingly somewhat similar to

clotted blood although the color was noticably different. The flavor was

similar to liver. There were of course little nuances that make it impossible

to describe it's flavor as anything other than cooked embryo but to simplify

things, I think liver is a good compromise. :-)

 

My impression was that it was immenently edible. but then again, I do like

organ meats of all types, so I may be  naturally drawn to those types of

flavors. If I were to serve them, I would most likely choose any of the sauces

recommended for testicles.

 

At the very least we now know they are edible. Unfortunately this experiment

didn't prove they were eaten in the Middle Ages. However, I now know that if

the recipe is ever found or if they are ever served to me I won't hesitate to

eat them. :-)

 

Yours in Service to the Dream,

al-Sayyid A'aql ibn Ras al-Zib, AoA, OSyc

 

 

Date: Mon, 27 Jul 1998 23:24:31 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Bunny recipes? (long)

 

Mike and Pat Luco wrote:

> Anyone have a really 'knock down dead' recipe for rabbit?  as long as I don't > have to put it on a spit and roast outside its ok.  We had fresh bunny in

> Firenza and I was thinking about it today, but have no idea what to do with

> the furry beasts?  My supermarket usually has bunnies in the meat section

> so... Also is osso bucco especially period?

 

Osso Bucco is something I haven't run across a period recipe for, but

that doesn't mean there isn't one. There are numerous recipes calling

for either the meat or the marrow from a knuckle of veal, or even both,

but as I say, no actual osso bucco that I'm aware of. Maybe someone else

has had more luck, although I think this question was asked once before

on the list, and got no results.

 

As for Rabbit, here's a rabbit recipe we used at the event we often

discuss in terms sometimes heated but never boring (well, maybe

sometimes!) the East Kingdom's Spring Crown Tourney, held back in May:

 

Connynges in Papdele

 

“26     Hares in papdele. Take hares; perboile hem in gode broth. Cole the

broth and

wasshe the fleysshe; cast a3ain togydre. Take obleys o*er wafrouns in

defaute of loseyns, and cowche in dysshes. Take powdour douce and lay

on; salt the broth and lay onoward & messe forth.”

Curye on Inglysch, Book IV, “The Forme of Cury”, c. 1390 C.E.

 

What they did:

       Note that the recipe calls for hares. Hares are simmered in stock

(probably chicken, capon, or white beef stock) until the meat can be

easily removed from the bones. The stock is strained off the hares,

which are cleaned of all bone, gristle, and extraneous proteins like

albumen scum, which may or may not actually involve rinsing the meat, as

washing would suggest to the modern mind. The chunks of meat are added

back to the broth, and the stew is layered between sheets of cooked

pasta or wafers. The difference between obleys and wafers seems to have

been pretty minor: both are a thin pastry cooked between irons like a

thin waffle, and after they’ve sat in hare broth for a few minutes the

difference becomes even less important. Our hare lasagna is topped with

a mixture of powdered sweet spices like cinnamon and cloves.

 

What we’ll do differently:

       The primary difference is that we’ll be using coneys (rabbits), since

they‘re more readily available and sufficiently adventurous for most

SCAdians I know anyway. We’ll pretty much follow the recipe as stated

above, using chicken broth for our rabbits, and interpreting the phrase

“good broth” to include a generous amout of fresh herbs, like whole

thyme, savory or marjoram, and parsley stems. But, while the rabbit meat

is being removed from the bones, we’ll reduce the broth to a saucier,

syrupy consistency, and lay the meat between our loseyns, while the

recipe is rather unclear on just how the meat and pasta are arranged.

We’ll take a line from a recognizable lasgna dish as far as the

presentation is concerned. By the way, a nearly identical dish of

braised duck sforza on papardella was, until quite recently, a big

seller at Felidia’s in New York City

 

What you need to make eight small servings:

1 large rabbit, around three pounds, jointed

1 quart good chicken stock, low sodium if canned

dry white wine or water

optional: fresh herbs -- parsley, thyme, rosemary, etc. ; use 1/3 the

amount if dried

optional: packet of unflavored gelatin if       using canned stock

1/2 lb dry lasagna noodles (at least nine       strips)

salt to taste

1/4 tsp powdered cloves

1/4 tsp powdered cinnamon

 

In a 3-or-4-quart saucepan, bring the rabbit to a boil in the stock with

the optional herbs and enough wine or water to cover the rabbit pieces

well. Reduce the heat to a simmer, skim, and cook for about 2  1/2 to 3

hours, or until rabbit is tender. Let the rabbit cool in the broth for

half an hour or so.

 

Meanwhile, boil your lasagna noodles in lightly salted water for around

12 minutes or until tender. Remember this doesn’t get a subsequent

baking, so it won’t absorb the tomato sauce that isn’t there anyway, and

get softer. Boil it until it’s as tender as you want it to be. Drain and

reserve the noodles, with a little oil to keep them from sticking

together.

 

Lift the rabbit pieces from the broth. Strain the broth and reserve the

rabbit.

 

Reduce the broth, if necessary: moisten the gelatin, if using, with a

little lukewarm water, until it puffs up and becomes clear. Heat the

broth and dissolve the gelatin (which occurs naturally in real stock,

but is more or less absent from canned) in it. Bring the broth to a boil

and reduce it to around 2 1/2 cups, by which time it will have thickened

slightly: you’ll see the bubbles that normally occur on top of boiling

liquid suddenly collapse, and the liquid will have become slightly

syrupy.

 

While the sauce is cooking, remove the meat from the rabbit bones.

Scrape rib meat from the bones with a paring knife, but the rest should

come right off using the fingers. Watch our for gristle. Give the meat a

rough chop if you want to, and add it to the broth/sauce.

 

Lay out 1/3 of your noodles in a serving bowl, and spoon half of the

rabbit hash (or stew if you’ve left it in big chunks) onto it, spreading

it evenly. Cover with another layer of pasta, followed by the other half

of the rabbit. Top with the last of the pasta. Pour any remaining broth

over the top. Cut like a tac-tac-toe board, dust lightly with the cloves

and cinnamon, mixed, and serve.

 

HTH. This was probably the only dish we had absolutely no problems with,

and it was pronounced as tempting vegans to stray from their lifestyle.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Tue, 28 Jul 1998 10:44:38 -0400

From: mermayde at juno.com (Christine A Seelye-King)

Subject: Re: SC - Bunny recipes?

 

>Anyone have a really 'knock down dead' recipe for rabbit?  as long as

>I don't have to put it on a spit and roast outside its ok.

 

The best recipie for rabbit I have ever done is out of a Welsh cookbook,

and is called "Hares in Ale".  We have done it with both rabbit and with

chicken leg quarters, and it is wonderful both ways.  Of course, I have

been unable to recover the book from the cook who borrowed it (a divorce,

move, and subsequent pleas to her ex-husband have been unsuccessful), but

I will try to give it to you from memory as best I can.

 

Hares in Ale - Served with Onion Stuffing

 

Clean Rabbit of skin, and separate it into portion-sized sections.

(When using chicken, we have cooked the leg quarters both whole and

separated into legs and thighs).

Dust with seasoned flour, and briefly sautee to brown, not to cook all

the way through.

Place the browned meat in a deep roasting pan (at least 3 inches), and

cover with beer.  (Use your own discretion as to brand.  Cheap American

is ok, as it will be picking up flavors from the meat. Don't use more

than necessary to cover the meat, as you want it to thicken.)  (I seem to

recall that the original recipie called for doing this step on the

stovetop, but it works very well in the oven, and is easier to do this

way for large quantities.)

Bake at 350 - 375 for 1 hour or so, or until the meat is very done, and

the liquid has started to take on a syrupy consistancy.  (The flour

coating from the pre-sautee will also thicken the sauce.)

Meanwhile, take several large white onions, and slice them into strips.

Sautee them with butter in a pan until they start to turn translucent.

Take a mixture of breadcrumbs, salt, pepper, and saffron, and add it to

the onions. Add some of the sauce from the meat to moisten, and cook

until the breadcrumbs have absorbed the liquid, and the mixture has

turned golden brown.   This is called a stuffing, but the breadcrumbs are

more of a coating for the onions, and it does not achieve the consistancy

we think of for a stuffing.  I think I would actually use the term

'dressing' instead, as it is a side dish anyway.

Serve together.  You cannot imagine the rich taste this dish has.  The

slow-cooking of the meat with the seasoned flour and the beer produces  a

rich, mellow, almost sweet flavor that is just wonderful.  Sorry I can't

provide the details of the recipie book, maybe I will have to go and

smack Sir Simon again and get him to look for that book.

Mmmmm, my mouth waters just thinking about it (the recipie, not the

smacking!)

       Good Luck,

       (Watch out, Bunnies!)

       Mistress Christianna MacGrain, OP, Meridies

 

 

Date: Tue, 28 Jul 1998 18:55:00 -0500 (CDT)

From: jeffrey stewart heilveil <heilveil at students.uiuc.edu>

Subject: SC - Hasenpfeffer, OOP

 

I would hate to be thought of as a spoon tease, and so here is the rabbit

recipe. As I have been unable to obtain rabbit since I recieved the

recipe, I haven't tried it yet...

 

cut 1 rabbit into serving portions, and put in a jar.  Cover with a 1:1

vinegar water solution, add 1 lg onion (sliced), salt, pepper, cloves and a

bay leaf (no idea how much cloves).  Leave 2 days.  Remove meat and brown

in butter, turning often.  Add the pickle to the meat.  Let simmer 30

minutes, stir in 1 C thick sour cream, and serve.

 

Bogdan

 

 

Date: Tue, 28 Jul 1998 19:25:18 -0500

From: "Decker, Terry D." <TerryD at Health.State.OK.US>

Subject: RE: SC - Hasenpfeffer, OOP

 

> cut 1 rabbit into serving portions, and put in a jar.  Cover with a 1:1

> vinegar water solution, add 1lg onion (sliced), salt, pepper, cloves and a

> bay leaf (no idea how much cloves).  Leae 2 days.  Remove meat and brown

> Bogdan

 

Try four to six whole cloves.  The pickle is similar to Sauerbraten and that

is what is commonly called for in that recipe.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Tue, 28 Jul 1998 19:49:31 -0500

From: vjarmstrong at aristotle.net (Valoise Armstrong)

Subject: Re: SC - Bunny recipes?

 

Bogdan wrote:

>> It's not period, but I have a hasenpfeffer recipe, if you want.

 

Actually Hasenpfeffer (or jugged hare) is late period. Sabina Welser

included it in her cookbook. Unfortunately, this recipe would seem to call

for a freshly slaughtered rabbit or hare, but if you know a hunter or a

rabbit breeder who could save the blood, it might be interesting to try.

 

Valoise

 

19 Jugged hare

 

       Take the hare, rinse the blood with wine and vinegar into a clean

vessel, then chop the hare in pieces. Cook the front part in the blood.

Take wine or water and stir it, until it is mixed with the blood, so that

the blood does not clump. Take rye bread that is finely grated, fry it in

fat and put it into the jugged hare. Season it well. You can also chop the

lungs and the liver into pieces and roast them with the rye bread and put

them into the jugged hare.

 

 

Date: Wed, 29 Jul 1998 12:18:12 EDT

From: RuddR at aol.com

Subject: SC - Re: Bunny Recipes

 

Here is a rabbit recipe that has been vetted by my family and friends, and by

the writer of a food column in the Minneapolis Star-Tribune:

 

SAUPIQUET FOR RABBIT

(Onion and Ginger Wine Sauce for Rabbit)

 

For making the Saupiquet to be put on the rabbit, depending on the quantity to

be made, take two onions, and slice them finely, and take good pork lard, melt

it, and sautée your onions; to prevent them from burning as they fry, put in a

little bouillon.  Then put in a lot of white wine to the amount of the

saupiquet you want to make for the rabbits.  And take your spices, good

ginger, grains of paradise, a little pepper, which should not predominate, and

saffron to give it color; and add vinegar to taste so carefully that it is

neither too sharp nor too little; and the same with salt.

(Chiquart's On Cookery)

 

(I have chosen to sauté the onions in butter rather than pork lard, and

substitute allspice for grains of paradise.)

 

Three or four pounds of rabbit, or chicken thigh quarters, cut into serving

pieces

1 medium onion, thinly sliced

1/4 C beef stock or bouillon

1 C white wine

1 tsp powdered ginger

1/8 tsp pepper

Pinch of allspice and saffron

1/2 tsp wine vinegar, or to taste

1 T butter for sautéing

Salt to taste

 

1. Preheat oven to 450°.

 

2. Put rabbit or chicken on a rack in a roasting pan, put it in the oven,

reduce heat to 350°, and bake for one hour or until the meat is cooked

through.

 

3. In a saucepan, over medium heat, melt butter and sauté sliced onions until

they are translucent.

 

4. Stir in beef stock and spices, reduce heat and simmer for five minutes,

stirring occasionally.

 

5. Stir in wine, return to a boil, reduce heat and simmer, stirring

occasionally, for fifteen minutes.

 

6. Remove from heat and stir in vinegar and salt.

 

7. Arrange rabbit or chicken on a serving platter, and pour the sauce over

it.

 

Yields one and a quarter cups of sauce.

Serves four to six.

 

Rudd Rayfield

 

 

Date: Fri, 28 Aug 1998 12:06:01 -0600

From: "Diana Skaggs"<upsxdls at okway.okstate.edu>

Subject: SC - Cooking a dog-sized hare

 

> Mordonna wrote <snip? How about it, anybody out there with

> experience cooking these dog-sized hares??

 

   It's been several years, but I have cooked lots of jackrabbits.  My husband

   is an avid hunter, and when we were married 17 years ago, I told him that

   If he could kill and clean it, I could find some way to prepare it. (Me and

   my big mouth!)  The young hares can be cooked like bunnies/chickens.  If

   the hare is old (large in size and fur resists removal) pressure cook or

   stew and keep the broth but throw the meat away.  The last old hare my

   wonderful husband brought home the cooked meat was so tough it was like

   trying to eat hair, but the stock was heavenly.

 

   Leanna of Sparrowhaven

 

 

Date: Wed, 10 Feb 1999 21:01:31 -0500

From: "Robin Carroll-Mann" <harper at idt.net>

Subject: Re: SC - Recipe request for Ras

 

And it came to pass on 9 Feb 99,, that LrdRas at aol.com wrote:

> Recipe plaese? original, OK. Translation, preferred.

 

Okay... from _Libro del Arte de Cozina_, 1599:

 

To Make Pastry of Domestic Rabbits

 

Take the rabbit and cut off the head, and the feet, take out the

entrails and wash it with many waters, and stuff it with a mixture

made of chopped lard, ham, and its liver cleaned of the bile, mint,

chopped marjoram, sour grapes, pepper, cinnamon, cloves,

nutmeg, and salt, raw egg yolks, and when it is full sew up the

opening, and the rabbit sprinkled with the said mixture, put it in a

pastry made in the manner of "nauezilla" with some little slices of

bacon underneath, having taken out the legs, put them upon the

rabbit with as many more little slices of fat pork, and sprinkle all

with the same spices, cover the pastry, and make it cook in the

oven, and serve it hot.

 

Brighid

Lady Brighid ni Chiarain

Settmour Swamp, East (NJ)

 

 

Date: Fri, 13 Aug 1999 11:08:57 +0100

From: Christina Nevin <cnevin at caci.co.uk>

Subject: SC - OOP - Rabbit stew

 

Being inspired (erm, perhaps the wrong word) by our rabbit and possum

thread, I made a casserole for some friends for dinner last night. Everyone

agreed it was most delicious. Here's the recipe:

 

Rabbit & Chestnut Stew

Rabbit (enough for however many people you are feeding, I used 1 rather

skinny Chinese rabbit I had in the freezer and a small 200g pack of fresh

meat from the supermarket)

Spelt flour (or whatever you have, but I personally like the taste of spelt

or wholemeal)

Butter (the real stuff)

Lager (or ale or a light beer)

Can of chestnuts

Shallots

Thyme (mine was 'fresh going to slightly dried')

Freshly ground salt and black pepper

 

Debone and cut the rabbit into large mouthfuls. Lightly dust in flour and

fry in plenty of butter until golden brown. Place in casserole with some

thyme (I used aprx 1 tsp) and add a bottle or two of lager and put on a low

heat. In the meantime, skin the shallots, cut the larger ones in half and

sweat them until they start to turn translucent. Place in casserole and cook

on low for three quarters of an hour. Don't forget to stir every now and

then, and add more lager if necessary. Season to taste and add the

chestnuts. Cook for another quarter hour or so. Serve.

 

Cordialmente

Lucretzia

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Lady Lucrezia-Isabella di Freccia   |  mka Tina Nevin

Thamesreach Shire, The Isles, Drachenwald | London, UK

 

 

Date: Tue, 9 Nov 1999 14:17:36 -0500

From: Cindy <cindy at thousandeggs.com>

Subject: SC - Hares in papdele - another source

 

Hello! I recall that Hares in papdele was a topic of debate sometime last

year, but I've lost the file.  I just ran across another recipe for it in

the Liber Cure Cocorum that Adamantius sent me, so I figured I'd pass it

along before I forgot about it.

 

Adamantius posted this recipe last year:

 

Connynges in Papdele

"26     Hares in papdele. Take hares; perboile hem in gode broth. Cole the

broth and wasshe the fleysshe; cast a[3]ain togydre. Take obleys o[th]er

wafrouns in defaute of loseyns, and cowche in dysshes. Take powdour douce

and lay on; salt the broth and lay onoward & messe forth." Curye on

Inglysch, Book IV, "The Forme of Cury", c. 1390 C.E.

 

And here's the one in verse from LCC:

 

Harus in Perdoylyse.

Take harys and perboyle hom, I rede,

In goode brothe, kele hit for drede,

And hew [th]y flesshe and cast [th]erinne.

Take swongen eggus, no more ne myn,

And cast in [th]y sewe and sethe hit [th]enne.

Take obles and wafrons, as I [th]e kenne,

Close hom in dysshes fare and wele;

Salt [th]e sewe, so have [th]ou cele,

And lay hit above as gode men done,

And messe hit forthe, Syr, at [th]o none.

 

This recipe differs from the FOC version in that the broth in which the

hares were cooked is being thickened with beaten eggs.  Also, only salt is

added, not powder douce.

 

Cindy Renfrow

cindy at thousandeggs.com

Author & Publisher of "Take a Thousand Eggs or More, A Collection of 15th

Century Recipes" and "A Sip Through Time, A Collection of Old Brewing

Recipes"

 

 

Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2000 11:45:45 -0500

From: "Alderton, Philippa" <phlip at morganco.net>

Subject: Re: SC - Coronation feast

 

Lucretzia asks:

>Any ideas how many a normal bunny would feed as a mid-course dish?  Phlip?<

 

It would obviously depend on how you served it, and the size of the animal,

but you can usually figure on a rabbit being the same size as a chicken, so

if you roasted or fried it, it would feed 4, made it into a pie, a table of

8, and if you put it into a stews, as many as you want ;-)

 

Rabbit is a nice meat to work with- it's a bit exotic for most folks, but

you can use it in any recipe you'd use chicken for. The same cautions apply,

though- a young rabbit can be cooked any way, an older rabbit, like an older

chicken, needs to be tenderized. The flavor things goes the same as well-

older rabbits and chickens have a more intense flavor, so they do take well

to stew types of things.

 

Also, if you don't have enough rabbit, you can cheat a bit- add boneless

dark meat or chicken to fill out the dish- we have specials here, where you

can buy chicken leg quarters for $0.29 a pound- been living on them, lately.

 

The rabbits I got for Ras' event were at perfect butchering weight- about 8

weeks old, and very tender, other than the few I picked up at a livestock

auction- do you remember how tough they were to skin, Ras? It's just a

thing, where as they mature, their connective tissues grow more tough and

dense, as with any other animal.

 

Phlip

 

Philippa Farrour

Caer Frig

Southeastern Ohio

 

 

Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2000 14:04:38 -0500

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Coronation feast

 

Christina Nevin wrote:

> I might talk to some friends down

> south and see if I can get some rabbits (usually I can only get the

> expensive frozen Chinese imported bunnies in London - ridiculous!). Any

> ideas how many a normal bunny would feed as a mid-course dish?  Phlip?

Not Phlip, and don't play her on TV ;  ). Maybe 4-6 as part of a large

meal. If you joint or section them properly, 1 1/2 wabbits per table of

eight ought to do it pretty well. This assumes the wabbits are like the

ones we have here. Is anybody aware of any even remote industrial

standard, such as with, say, chickens? I'd guess a dressed rabbit around

here weighs about 2 1/2 pounds, with about half of that meat. One and a

half of those gives you just under two pounds of meat, which, with other

dishes and a nice sauce, ought to be plenty. Especially since not

everyone eats wabbit. Actually, Phlip, if you think I'm way off here

please jump in.

 

Adamantius, on the fly/no flies on me

 

 

Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2000 22:21:11 EST

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - Coronation feast

 

ktradford at cyberport.com writes:

<< it will be the rear legs and the breast  >>

 

There is little if any meat on the breast (e.g., chest of a rabbit. The meat

is located on the back legs, and along the backbone as well as some on the

front legs. When Phlip and I did the rabbits at a past Will's Revenge, we

just put the entire rabbit (2 per table) an a platter and let them have at

it. There was plenty for all.

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2000 19:52:57 -0500

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Coronation feast--Rabbits for Feasts

 

Aelfwyn at aol.com wrote:

> would stretch as part of a 3-4 course feast. And the pointer about age is a

> great one. I'll be sure to ask the lady for that info to help me plan on the

> choice of recipe.

 

FWIW, I vaguely recall there being some interesting material on how to

tell the age of a rabbit (or was that hares only?) in Le Menagier de Paris...

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2000 14:45:17 -0500

From: grizly at mindspring.com

Subject: Re: SC - Rabbit tips?

 

Conys in Syrup (spelling butchered fer shur) can be found in Pleyn Delit (Forme of Curye originally, I think).  It is a cooked rabbit with a wine/spice/raisin sauce that it simmers briefly IIRC.  IT is a really simple, yet elegant recipe to serve.  Rabbit is smote to gobbets.

 

niccolo difrancesco

 

 

Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2000 19:29:21 EST

From: CBlackwill at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - Rabbit tips?

 

Domestic Rabbit tastes exceptionally good if it is first floured, fried, and

then braised in Barolo wine (or any high quality dark red wine if Barolo is

out of era).  Plus, doing it this way makes it a one-pot-meal...perfect for

camp cooking.  Throw in some Onions, raisins or currants, and a little bit of

turnip (which has a great buttery flavor when cooked) and you have a

fantastic dish.  Of course, this is the way I prefer to cook it, and is not

from a primary source.  Anyone got anything close??

 

Balthazar of Blackmoor

 

 

Date: Sat, 1 Apr 2000 12:12:48 EST

From: ChannonM at aol.com

Subject: SC - Re: rabbit tips

 

<< Domestic Rabbit tastes exceptionally good if it is first floured, fried,

and then braised in Barolo wine (or any high quality dark red wine >>

 

Agreed on that. Red wine, not white as I have had some people argue. Seems to

quell any bitterness in the meat. Black pepper seems to be good for it as

well.

 

Hauviette

 

 

Date: Mon, 3 Apr 2000 13:28:44 -0400

From: Christine A Seelye-King <mermayde at juno.com>

Subject: SC - Rabbit tips

 

> Agreed on that. Red wine, not white as I have had some people argue.

> Seems to  quell any bitterness in the meat. Black pepper seems to be

> good for it as  well.  

 

> Hauviette

 

Or better yet, ale or beer.  Hares in Ale is a popular favorite of mine.

Christianna

 

 

Date: Fri, 6 Apr 2001 16:03:24 +0100

From: Christina Nevin <cnevin at caci.co.uk>

Subject: SC - Rabbit/Hare Broth Recipe    WAS Not eating cute furry animals

 

        Begga asked

        Does anyone have any "new" recipes for the above beast?

 

Not 'new' but nice nonetheless. The mundane friends who harrass me about my

Silly Clothes Association came over for dinner a couple of weeks ago, and I

usually get my revenge by feeding them some medieval recipe and then teasing

them back when they say they liked it (somehow I get the feeling they're

getting the best of me on both counts here, but never mind). Anyway, I fed

them the Hare/Rabbit Broth from Le Menagier this time (us NZers deeming it a

civic duty to rid the world of bunnies), which turned out quite delicious.

Here's the redaction:

 

Original - Translation Janet Hinson:

Hare Broth.

First, cut the hare through the breast: and if it is freshly taken, that is

no more than one or two days since, do not wash it, but put it on the grill,

that is roast it over a good coal fire or on the spit; then have cooked

onions and fat in a pot, and add your onions to the fat and your hare in

pieces, and fry them over the fire, shaking the pot very frequently, or fry

them on the griddle. Then heat and toast bread and moisten in stock with

vinegar and wine: and have ginger, grain, clove, long pepper, nutmegs and

cinnamon ground beforehand, and let them be ground and mixed with verjuice

and vinegar or meat stock; gather them up, and set to one side. Then grind

up your bread, mixed with stock, and sieve the bread and not the spices, and

add stock, the onions and fat, spices and toasted bread, cook all together,

and the hare also; and be sure the broth is brown, sharpened with vinegar,

mixed with salt and spices.

Coney [Rabbit] Broth as above.

 

Lucrezia's Redaction:

1 wild rabbit (precut into 6)    2 onions, sliced

4 slices white bread, decrusted Goosefat

100 ml good red wine vinegar     1 C decent red wine

2 TB verjuice                      2 C non-UK beef consumme

Spices:

1 healthy pinch ginger            1/2 tsp grains of paradise

1 healthy pinch cloves            1/2 tsp long pepper

1 healthy pinch nutmeg            1/2 tsp cinnamon

(yeah, you can guess my favorite spices, can't you?)

 

1. Grill the rabbit until browned.

2. Cook 2 onions (I boiled mine, but I think roasting would be good too)

and then slice them.

3. Add the rabbit and onions to a pan with some fat and fry.

4. While this is happening, toast the 4 slices of bread and roughly break

it into pieces, adding the 1 cup of red wine and 100 ml vinegar and a little

stock/consumme to it and let soak.

5. Mix the ground up spices with the rest of the 2 cups of stock/consumme

and 2 TB verjuice and let soak.

6. Grind up the wine-soaked bread and pass through a metal sieve.

7. Add the spices & stock/consumme, the bread, the onions, fat and hare

together in a pan and cook for an hour and a half on a medium low heat. (If

you need more liquid - though you shouldn't - add the onion water)

8. Ten minutes before serving, season with salt and add enough vinegar to

give the broth an edge.

9. Enjoy!

 

Al Servizio Vostro, e del Sogno

Lucrezia

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Lady Lucrezia-Isabella di Freccia   |  mka Tina Nevin

Thamesreach Shire, The Isles, Drachenwald | London, UK

 

 

Date: Tue, 03 Jul 2001 20:13:56 +0200

From: tgl at mailer.uni-marburg.de

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Ack! I've lost it also! (rabbit dish)

 

To roste a Hare

First wash it in faire water, then perboyle it and lay in

cold water againe, then larde it, and roste it in a

broch. Then to make sauce for it, take red Vinigar, Salt,

Pepper, Ginger Cloves, Mace, and put them together. Then

minse Apples, and Onions, and frie them with a litle

Sugar, and let them boyle wel together, then baste it

upon yor hare, and so serve it foorth.

(The good huswifes handmaide ... 1594)

 

 

Date: Fri, 20 Jul 2001 10:56:01 -0500 (CDT)

From: "Pixel, Queen of Cats" <pixel at hundred-acre-wood.com>

To: SCA-Cooks maillist <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] bunnies

 

On Thu, 19 Jul 2001, Stefan li Rous wrote:

> Margaret said:

> > I've just never done canning for war. My sweetie is trying to convince me

> > to can a batch of the rabbit saupiquet to bring. ;-)

> What is rabbit saupiquet? I thought at first you had said rabbit

> saurkraut! :-)

> Is this dish a period one?

 

Yep. This is the bunnies in sauce that I briefly mentioned back in

May as wanting a vegetable to go with it. It's similar to the hare in

broth recipe that's been posted, actually. I *think* we used Scully's

_Early French Cookery_ for the initial translation, certainly that's where

I got the name from, but at the moment I don't remember if we actually

redacted it or used somebody else's redaction. It's been a tense and

stressful couple of weeks, and my mind is fuzzy. And my notebook is at

home.

 

I served the test version with peas according to Platina, with cinnamon

and sugar, but being lazy and having only one pot at the event, just threw

the peas in with the bunny.

 

Basically, bunny in sauce made of onions, a sour liquid beginning with 'v'

that I think was wine vinegar, wine, bread crumbs, grains of paradise,

ginger, maybe cinnamon. Bunny is roasted then fried in lard with the

onions. The sauce is #14 (or is really similar to it) from Du Fait de

Cuisine:

 

14. To make sauce piquant to put on conies, according to the quantity of

it which one is making take onions and chop them fine, and take fair pork

lard and melt it and saut your onions, and so that they do not burn in

sauting put a little broth in; and then put in a great deal of white wine

according to the quantity of sauce piquant which you want to make for the

said conies; and take your spices, good ginger, grains of paradise, a

little pepper which is not at all too much, and saffron to give it

color; and season it with vinegar in such proportion that it is neither

too much poignant nor too little; with salt also.

 

We cooked it more like a stew, in one pot, for east of transport and

reheating. It freezes and reheats excellently. And the bunny was, well,

really really good. Similar to that profound yet subtle and quiet way that

dropping a very heavy cast-iron dutch oven on one's foot elicits a pause

and a very quiet "ow".

 

Margaret FitzWilliam

 

 

From: "Susan Laing" <gleep001 at hotmail.com>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Date: Mon, 17 Sep 2001 02:58:34 +0000

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Rabbits in Pastry - Oh my!!

 

Some of you may remember my endless round of Rabbits & Pastry questions of a

month or two ago - finally posting the information on it all....

 

This is the recipe from which was created many of the little beasties for

the first Baronial invest of St Florian's in Brisbane, Australia (sorry - no

pictures seem to have been taken)

 

Tips to remember if doing this recipe-

NB - personal alterations to the recipe below are marked with **

 

*Definately make up your pastry the day before (I didn't have access to the

ingredients etc until the day of the event and it really is better if the

pasty has time to relax before using).  We used this heavy pastry for all

decorating purposes (ears; heads; feet etc)

 

*we used bought sheet pastry to encase the bodies - took about 2 & 1/3rd

sheets to snugly tuck in about the rabbit (no heads attached)

 

*ensure the rabbit carcase is completely defrosted (these weren't quite) I

ended up using a sheet of baking paper under each and advised everyone NOT

to remove it (upon pain of death) as the carcase thaw was making the bottom

layer of pastry squidgy.  They went into the oven on this and it was removed

after baking

 

*Don't be afraid to use reasonable force when repositioning the rabbit's

fore & hind legs AND remember to use bamboo skewers to keep everything in

place (I found that after encasing; adding features & storing in the fridge

for over an hour prior to cooking, the skewer could be removed before

cooking if necessary to conserve space - no position change was noticed from

removal). I also used poultry shearers to clip off the tail bone as it was

a sharp, boney bit that was causing the pastry to split (we were creating

false pastry tails anyway)

 

*taking the advise of others on the list, we (my two willing "Bunny

features" assistants & myself) made sure that all the ears were not of the

"Sticking up variety" - this avoided the burn factor in the oven and we had

a lot of fun creating various "ear styles" for each wabbit... (and giving

names such as "flopsy, mopsy etc"

 

*lastly - when your head cooks says "We'll be able to fit all of them into

the ovens at once" and you've only got two industrial ovens - neither of

which is very wide - laugh loudly & run away... :-p (they had forgotten to

take into account the height of each plus width so they ended up having to

stager the cooking run...)

 

From accounts of those that ate them (I was in the "no food please zone"

after cooking all afternoon) - they turned out lovely (steamed in the pastry

case with the spice mix & bacon wrap to flavour through the flesh) and I'll

be looking to make these again...

 

Mari

 

**I haven't got the Medieval Kitchen by Redon here with me at work, but can

post the original (In french I believe) and the full redacted recipe from

home is anyone asks :-)

 

***************

RABBIT BAKED IN PASTRY (Medieval Kitchen p 143)

 

1 Rabbit whole

300g salt pork **(we used bacon strips instead)

1 pinch of ground cloves

1 tspn ground ginger

1 tspn black pepper

1 tbspn salt

2 dried black beans (decoration, optional)

 

Pastry

7 cups flour

250g Butter

1 egg

approx 1 =BC cups water

20g kosher salt **(we used ordinary cooking salt)

 

1.Day before prepare pastry, wrap in plastic and refrigerate

2.Preheat oven to 190C

3.Grind salt pork, [Omit if using bacon strips]

4.Mix the spices and salt and set aside

5.Trim the rabbit and coax it into a crouching position

6.Roll the dough out into a rectangle and lay it on a sheet pan

7.Set the rabbit into a third of the dough (if head attached, set it raised

using bamboo spears) leaving the larger portion of the dough free to fold

over the rabbit

8.Spread the chopped salt pork all over the rabbit and sprinkle generously

with spice-salt mixture

9.Fold the dough over the rabbit, sealing it carefully with water; pressed

closely against the body

10.Make a crease in the dough where the mouth would be, make ears and a tail

of pastry and fasten to pie with water. Insert two dried black beans into

the dough for eyes

11.Bake for about 90 minutes during which time the rabbit will cook to

perfection. The pie is done when the pie is deep brown.

12.Bring to table whole and cut down the back then carve as you would a

roast rabbit.

 

 

Date: Tue, 17 Jun 2003 17:06:32 -0400

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

From: "Cindy M. Renfrow" <cindy at thousandeggs.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] project

 

Hi. Please forgive the interruption, but there are some typos (and symbols

that were not represented) here that may prevent accurate translation.

Here is a corrected version. The symbols are marked <>. The f's you see are

actually long s.

 

Hares in Papdele XXIIII

Take Hares p<er>boile hem in gode broth. cole the broth and waifshe the

fleyfsh. caft azeyn to gydre. take obleys o<ther> wafrous in ftede of

lozyens. and cowche in dyfshes. take powdo<ur> douce and lay on falt

the broth and lay onoward a<n> meffe forth.

 

Cindy

 

 

Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2003 12:16:43 -0800

From: "Lorenz Wieland" <lorenz_wieland at earthlink.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] cooking times over an open fire

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

jenne at fiedlerfamily.net wrote:

> Ok, for a discussion (about 'instant stews' in fantasy) on another

> list, I'm wondering how long it would take to cook 2 rabbits, either

> roasted or cut up and cooked in boiling water, over an open fire.

> Anybody have a good guess? Also, how long would it take from the

> point you start the fire to the point you could start cooking?

 

There are too many variables to answer your questions definitively, but

here's some guidelines:

 

A 3lb rabbit sectioned normally will need about 1 hour to fully cook in

simmering liquid.  Figure 20 minutes more to braise a whole rabbit.  I

wouldn't recommend grill-roasting rabbit, as it tends to go dry very

easily.

 

Very low heat spit-roasting or hot smoking might work, but braising is

Much easier.

 

As for fire preparation, time varies by type of fuel used, how it is

arranged and started, and ambient temperature and humidity.  A home grill

quantity of mesquite charcoal lit in a chimney starter takes about 20

minutes to get to a cook cooking temperature.  A full-sized

Santa-Maria-style pit grill with split white oak logs takes 2.5 to 3

Hours to get a good coal bed.  Your mileage *will* var.

 

-Lorenz

 

 

Date: Tue, 17 Jun 2003 17:06:32 -0400

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

From: "Cindy M. Renfrow" <cindy at thousandeggs.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] project

 

Hi. Please forgive the interruption, but there are some typos (and symbols

that were not represented) here that may prevent accurate translation.

Here is a corrected version. The symbols are marked <>. The f's you see are

actually long s.

 

Hares in Papdele XXIIII

Take Hares p<er>boile hem in gode broth. cole the broth and waifshe the

fleyfsh. caft azeyn to gydre. take obleys o<ther> wafrous in ftede of

lozyens. and cowche in dyfshes. take powdo<ur> douce and lay on falt

the broth

and lay onoward a<n> meffe forth.

 

Cindy

 

 

Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2003 12:16:43 -0800

From: "Lorenz Wieland" <lorenz_wieland at earthlink.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] cooking times over an open fire

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

jenne at fiedlerfamily.net wrote:

> Ok, for a discussion (about 'instant stews' in fantasy) on another

> list, I'm wondering how long it would take to cook 2 rabbits, either

> roasted or cut up and cooked in boiling water, over an open fire.

> Anybody have a good guess? Also, how long would it take from the

> point you start the fire to the point you could start cooking?

 

There are too many variables to answer your questions definitively, but

here's some guidelines:

 

A 3lb rabbit sectioned normally will need about 1 hour to fully cook in

simmering liquid.  Figure 20 minutes more to braise a whole rabbit.  I

wouldn't recommend grill-roasting rabbit, as it tends to go dry very

easily.

 

Very low heat spit-roasting or hot smoking might work, but braising is

Much easier.

 

As for fire preparation, time varies by type of fuel used, how it is

arranged and started, and ambient temperature and humidity.  A home grill

quantity of mesquite charcoal lit in a chimney starter takes about 20

minutes to get to a cook cooking temperature.  A full-sized

Santa-Maria-style pit grill with split white oak logs takes 2.5 to 3

Hours to get a good coal bed.  Your mileage *will* var.

 

-Lorenz

 

 

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

From: djheydt at kithrup.com (Dorothy J Heydt)

Subject: Re: venison

Organization: Kithrup Enterprises, Ltd.

Date: Wed, 29 Sep 2004 19:34:18 GMT

 

Robert Uhl  <ruhl at 4dv.net> wrote:

>"Tammy" <threeczzzs at atc-zzzpa.com> writes:

>> Rabbit, on the other hand I have not tried, but I have some in the

>> freezer, but don't know how to prepare it...any good suggestions.

>I understand that nearly any recipe for duck works for rabbit, and vice

>versa.

 

I cannot believe that; duck is very oily meat, whereas rabbut is

very dry.  I generally put rabbit into a stew or a pie (we used

to raise them, back in AS single-digits), but when I roasted them

I'd stuff them with a pork forcemeat and drape slices of bacon

over them.

 

Other rabbit recipes involve inserting thin slips of fat pork

into the flesh with a larding needle, but that always sounded too

much like work.

 

Now, if you were to add fat to the rabbit meat in any of the ways

described, and *then* cook as if it were duck, that might work.

 

Here's the rabbit pie I used to bring to tourneys:

 

Take one rabbit.  Cutting it up will make it easier to fit in the pot.

Cover with water, add some Italian herbs (oregano, sage, parsley,

thyme, you can buy it as a mixture). Bring it to a boil, cover it,

and let it simmer till the meat is ready to fall off the bones.

Take the rabbit out of the pot, drain it (keeping the liquid

you're draining out of it), pick the meat off the bones, throw

the bones away.  Cut some onions into quarters and saute' them

till they're limp and golden, not crisp. Set aside.  Take some

mushrooms, if they're big cut them in halves or quarters, if they're

little leave them whole.  Saute' them till they're brown but not

crisp.  Set aside.  Take about a pound of jack cheese and slice it

thin or grate it with a coarse grater.  

 

Meanwhile you have made enough piecrust for a top and a bottom

crust, either with one of the period recipes from _Traveling

Dysshes_ or as follows, but do NOT use the Betty Crocker style

recipe that's designed to be light and flaky and fall apart on

the fork.

 

1 cup flour

1/2 cup shortening (or butter or lard or whatever)

1/4 cup water, not iced, just any old water

1 tsp salt

 

Dump the flour into a bowl.  Cut in the shortening till it looks

like a bowlful of small pebbles.  Then dump in the water, and mix

it with your hands till it's a sticky ball.  Wash your hands,

take half, and roll out for the bottom crust.  If it tears

anywhere, just pinch a bit off the side and patch it.  Repeat for

top crust, and let them sit on waxed paper or pastry cloths till

you're ready for them.

 

Now make the gravy, either by making a roux of butter and flour and

slowly stirring the rabbit juice into it, or by mixing cornstarch with

a little cold water and stirring that into the (boiling) rabbit juice

till it gells.  (Or if you want to be a little more perioid, use

breadcrumbs.)  You want a gravy that is liquid when hot but will

be rather solid when cold, it's going to help hold the pie together.

Taste and add salt, pepper, whatever, till it tastes quite

savory, though not too savory.  It's going to lend salt and other

flavors to the whole pie filling.

 

Now put the bottom crust in the pie pan. Layer in rabbit, onion,

mushroom, cheese, and repeat till you're out of filling.  Put the

top crust on and pinch the sides together so the top crust is

securely fastened to the bottom crust. Open a hole in the middle

of the top crust.  Through this, cautiously pour in gravy.  It's

tricky, since you want the pie to be nearly full but not so full

it spills out while baking.  Since it probably will anyway, put

the pie on a baking sheet.  Bake it at 400 F till the crust is

brown--everything inside is cooked anyway.  You can serve this

hot, in which case you'll pass the rest of the gravy.  Or let it

cool, pack it up, and take it to the tournament or picnic or

office party or ....  When cold, it ought to have gelled solidly

enough (particularly with the gelatine from the rabbit bones in

the gravy) that you can cut out a chunk, pick it up, and walk

around munching it.  

 

Dorothea of Caer-Myrddin                        Dorothy J. Heydt

Mists/Mists/West                              Albany, California

PRO DEO ET REGE                               djheydt at kithrup.com

 

 

Date: Mon, 31 Jan 2005 20:52:52 -0500

From: Daniel Myers <edouard at medievalcookery.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] - a slight rant on loic (was Sauerbraten)

To: mooncat at in-tch.com, Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

On Jan 31, 2005, at 8:33 PM, Sue Cleenger wrote:

> Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius wrote:

>> Off the top of our collective heads, do we have period recipes for a

>> vinegar-jugged hare (a.k.a. hassenpfeffer) in those same German

>> sources? If we did , we might actually be coming close to the whole

>> "pickle, then cook" mentality.

> The closest bunny-type recipe that I can think of is "Coneys in

> Syrup," which has wine, vinegar, and sweetish spices, but that's a bit

> earlier than the 16th c.  And it's English, IIRC.  And the wine nd

> vinegar are part of the cooking process (no evidence of pickling that

> I could discern).

> --Maire

 

How about this one?

 

19 Jugged hare. Take the hare, rinse the blood with wine and vinegar

into a clean vessel, then chop the hare in pieces. Cook the front pat

in the blood. Take wine or water and stir it, until it is mixed with

the blood, so that the blood does not clump. Take rye bread that is

finely grated, fry it in fat and put it into the jugged hare. Season it

well. You can also chop the lungs and the lier into pieces and roast

them with the rye bread and put them into the jugged hare.

[Das Kuchbuch der Sabina Welserin, V. Armstrong (trans.)]

 

- Doc

 

 

Date: Mon, 31 Jan 2005 19:29:54 -0800 (PST)

From: "Cat ." <tgrcat2001 at yahoo.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Hasenpfeffer in Rumpolt was Sauerbratenetc

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

Master A, you asked for it, Rumpolt got it (well sort

of)

 

Rumpolt contains 20 rabbit recipes and as I was

reading through them for something that might fit the

bill I found  #11 (translating on the fly)  Mind you,

I did the transcription for Thomas, and I never

noticed the term go by.  Guess I had the wrong brain

switched on. ;-)

http://staff-www.uni-marburg.de/~glonng/rumphase.htm

 

# 11 Yellow (implying saffron) preserved (prepared)

rabbit. Take blood from a rabbit/ and the whole

rabbit/ when you him have undressed (skinned and

gutted?)/ stick him on a spit/ and roast him till he

is done/ take the blood/ and a goo beef broth/ and

vinegar/

Cut therein onion/ bread/ and an apple or two/ let it

therewith simmer/ strain (stroke) the blood through a

hair cloth (fine sieve) / take small chopped onion/

that is well sweated in a butter/ or pork fat/ make it

(season it) with pepper/ cloves/ and crushed cinnamon/

put them into the rabbit blood/ let them come to a

boil therewith/ so it becomes lovely and good/  will

(like) you make it sour/ or sweet leave it.  Take

thereafter the roasted rabbit/ cut him to pieces/ and

put him in the blood/ serve with the sudt (cooking

liquid – not sure I would use the word sauce here)/ so

it is a good Hasenpfeffer (!!!!!! RUMPOLTS  term!!! )

You can such a roasted rabbit also cook in a scraping

(gescharb – small minced or scraped veggies or

fruits)/ be it almonds or apples/ be it at banquets or

weddings/ so the womenfolk like to eat it.

 

So Rumpolt actually calls it Hasenpfeffer, but it is

not marinated and braised, but roasted and then

simmered in a liquid of blood and broth and vinegar

with spices.

 

Several other rabbit recipes use the roast and

seasoned liquid with vinegar and pepper technique but

only #11 is called Hasenpfeffer

 

For #2 you wash the cubes of rabbit in water and

vinegar to remove the blood then simmer them in blood

thickened with bread, with apples and onions, bacon

fat, pepper and cloves,

or (one recipe 2 variations) with blood and water and

vinegar 'but it is better if you have cold beef broth'

and then the same general ingredients and seasonings

with the note  make it sour or sweet.

 

For #16 you take the back end of the rabbit roast it a

little, chunk it/ then simmer with broth onion,

vinegar, pepper, a little saffron and some juniper

berries.

 

In Service

Gwen Cat

PS, #20 is for a rabbit that is pregnant, what to do

to serve the unborn young ...

 

 

Date: Wed, 26 Apr 2006 10:12:01 -0500 (CDT)

From: Cat Dancer <pixel at hundred-acre-wood.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Re: Pleasant Italian fish recipes

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> So, I look for pleasant, easy recipes that lend themselves to  

> feasts -- does *anyone* do Med/Ren cooking for less than 50  

> anymore? :) -- have period ingredients & techniques that might  

> help or inspire someone.  Fancy & complex I'll save for arts  

> entries. :)

 

Actually, yes. The consort and I are extremely fond of the civey  

recipe in Taillevent:

http://www.telusplanet.net/public/prescotj/data/viandier/

viandier415.html#viandier19

 

It's tasty with chicken, but not nearly as tasty as with bunny, and it

freezes really well.

 

There's also a lovely fish recipe in the second of the Two Anglo-Norman

Culinary Collections, which of course is at home, but it involves grilling

the fish and then simmering in wine and spices. Really tasty. I'll  

have to post it tonight when I get home.

 

Margaret FitzWilliam of Kent

Nordskogen

Northshield

 

 

Date: Sat, 27 Nov 2010 12:51:34 -0500

From: Sharon Palmer <ranvaig at columbus.rr.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] thieving bunny rabbits

 

> I'm not sure I have much on catching them in a period way, though.

 

Once they have been caught, maybe Rabbit knodel?

 

Von einem K?niglein

From a rabbit there are eleven dishes to make.

 

1. Roasted/ it could be cold or warm/ it is good in both manners.

 

2. Prepared in its own blood/ or in black

(sauce?)/ it could be sweet or sour/ like this

one can the Hare preserve in a pepper (sauce) and

blood.

 

3. Preserved in its own stock with parsley.

 

4. Rabbit in a pie/ it could be cold or warm.

 

5. Put up in a yellow gescharb sauce/ be it with

almonds or apples/ with onions chopped together

and browned/ made up with Butter/ yellow and

nicely sour/ with small black raisins/ and good

beef stock/ that is not oversalted/ take browned

flour into it/ and let them simmer together. And

when the rabbit is roasted/ than cut it into the

gescharb/ let it simmer together/ like this it

becomes well tasting and good. And such a rabbit

one can roast/ and in apple slices or in a almond

gescharb sauce/ and let cook together/ or put up

with onions nicely sweet/ like this it is good

and well tasting.

 

6. Smoked or salted rabbit/ cold or warm/ is good

in both manners/ also to cook under green herbs/

it could be spinach/ green or white cabbage.

 

7. Meatballs of rabbit white or yellow/ or

steamed nicely brown in a pepper (sauce) or also

in a gescharb sauce of apples or almonds/ sour or

sweet/ it is good to eat.

 

8. Also yellow prepared/ with salted lemon/ or

white with lemon/ or steamed/ when it is roasted/

that one slices and divides.

 

9. Also meatball pies/ they could be white or yellow in a covered Pie.

 

10. You can also make a black (sauce?) from the

rabbit/ let the blood simmer with lungs and

liver/ mix with mild spice/ nicely sweet/ like

this it is good and lovely to eat.

 

11. If you want to put up a live rabbit in a pie/

thus make a dough with white or black Flour that

is strong and solid/ raise the Pie high enough

that the rabbit can sit inside. And when you have

raised the pie/ make it completely full of Bran/

then make the cover over it/ fire? in oven and

bake/ take out and let become cold/ and when it

is cold/ then cut a hole under the base/ throw

the bran out/ thus becomes hollow. Make the hole

large enough that you can push the rabbit inside.

And when you will serve, push the rabbit inside/

set on a dish and let on a table carry. And you

must talk with the F?rschneider/ that the pie is

cut open on the table/ when it is cut open/ then

it jumps out/ like this it is very courtly and

delicate.

 

Of a Coney you can make all the dishes/ that you

would prepare from a rabbit/ for they are not

very different from each other.

 

Ranvaig

 

 

Date: Sat, 27 Nov 2010 19:04:23 +0100

From: Ana Vald?s <agora158 at gmail.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] thieving bunny rabbits

 

I ate period rabbit in Mallorca a few weeks ago. Marvelous flavour, they

said it was an old Catalan recipe from the 1400-century.

Garlic, oil and the rabbit cooked in his blood.

 

Ana

 

 

Date: Sat, 21 May 2011 14:00:40 -0700

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Venison, not necessarily deer meat?

 

On 21/05/2011 7:21 AM, lilinah at earthlink.net wrote:

<<< Although no one explicitly answered my question, most replies so far

have supported what i posted. So i am led to infer that in SCA-period

cookbooks, including those in English, any recipe for "venison" could

be made with boar (although most of us have access only to pig), meat

of other large game animals, and perhaps hare (or what is sold as

rabbit these days),  as well as whatever species of deer meat is

available. >>>

 

Antonia replied:

<<< I'm sorry, what? Hare and rabbit are two very different animals in

terms of eating. I'd be very surprised to find hare sold as rabbit. >>>

 

You misunderstood, i was not implying that hare is sold as rabbit,

but that if we must purchase meat from a butcher rather than

catching, dressing, and butchering it ourselves, then one may settle

for rabbit if hare is not available, and vice versa.

 

Hares and rabbits are both in the same family - Leporidae, there

being only one genus of hares, while there are 8 genera of rabbits.

While there some significant differences, rabbits and hares share

quite a number of similarities. Adding to the potential confusion,

the jackrabbit common in the US is not a rabbit, but a hare, and the

so-called Belgian hare is a rabbit. So, they can be easily confused

by those who are not well attuned to their visual differences.

 

And according to what i have read, hares and rabbits can be cooked in

the same ways. So those of us who are not hunters - which i suspect

is the majority - and must rely on what we can purchase, we may

substitute one for the other in recipes.

--

Urtatim [that's err-tah-TEEM]

the persona formerly known as Anahita

 

 

Date: Sun, 22 May 2011 17:59:45 +1200

From: Antonia di B C <dama.antonia at gmail.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Venison, not necessarily deer meat?

 

On 22/05/2011 9:00 AM, lilinah at earthlink.net wrote:

<<< And according to what i have read, hares and rabbits can be cooked in

the same ways. So those of us who are not hunters - which i suspect is

the majority - and must rely on what we can purchase, we may

substitute one for the other in recipes. >>>

 

Cooked in the same ways, yes, but they are poor substitutes for each

other. The flesh of the rabbit is light in colour and mild in taste, a

bit like chicken.  The hare is dark and strong, a bit like venison.

--

Antonia di Benedetto Calvo

 

 

Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2011 18:52:39 -0700 (GMT-07:00)

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Venison, not necessarily deer meat?

 

I had written:

<<< And according to what i have read, hares and rabbits can be cooked in

the same ways. So those of us who are not hunters - which i suspect is

the majority - and must rely on what we can purchase, we may

substitute one for the other in recipes. >>>

 

Antonia wrote:

<<< Cooked in the same ways, yes, but they are poor substitutes for each

other. The flesh of the rabbit is light in colour and mild in taste, a

bit like chicken. The hare is dark and strong, a bit like venison. >>>

 

Well, despite Antonia's protests, some medieval recipes specify one and say the other can be prepared the same way. Here is one example:

 

From the 13th c. cookbook, Fad?lat al-Jiwan fi tayyibat al-ta 'am wa-l-alwan, by Ibn Razin al-Tujibi of Murcia in al-Andaluz

 

Since the cookbook has not been translated into English, i have started with the Spanish translation by Fernando de la Granja Santamaria

 

[216] Recipe for Narjisiyya (my translation)

 

Catch a hare, wash it, clean it, cut it limb from limb and put it in a glazed earthenware dish, pour in water, salt, oil, pepper, coriander seed, cumin and macerated almori; dye it with saffron and put it to cook over the fire. When cooked, add a spoonful of good vinegar and bring it to the oven. When golden and left dry take it out, leave it to cool and eat it.

 

If you want you can prepare this dish, the same way, with rabbit.

--- end translation ---

 

I know Suey translated this, but there were some places where I differ from her translation. The name of the dish, for example. Because "j" has a similar sound in Arabic and English, but a very different one in Spanish, "j" is problematic when translating from Arabic to Spanish to English. I have returned the "j" to the Arabic name of this dish.

--

Urtatim [that's err-tah-TEEM]

the persona formerly known as Anahita

 

 

Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2012 10:35:59 -0700 (GMT-07:00)

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Substitution of nuts in qanura of rabbit

 

Adelisa wrote:

<<< I was looking at this recipe in the Anonymous Andalusian and am thinking of making it for an A&S competition:

 

Qanura of Rabbit in a Frying-Pan, which is Notable

Cut the rabbit in small pieces and boil them in water and salt, then fry

them in oil. Pound walnuts and garlic well. Dissolve them with vinegar and

water, and pour them over the rabbit with water. Cook until it is ready and

serve it.

 

However, I cannot stand walnuts - they taste bitter to me, even in sweets

like baklava - and am wondering if a cook would have substituted other nuts

- almonds or pistachios or pine nuts, to their own taste. >>>

 

I recommend removing the skins from the walnuts. Based on my experiences with the recipes, I think this was often done, although not always specified.

 

Besides the method suggested by Ranvaig, you could also toast the walnuts VERY lightly, so they don't really change color or only very slightly. Then rub off the skins - try and get them to lift out of the wrinkles. Too much toasting will make them more bitter, so watch them carefully.

 

I cannot promise this will make them fully palatable to you, but they will be much less bitter.

 

Hazelnuts do not often appear in Andalusi savory dishes, if at all, so they would not be a suitable substitute. Almonds might be a reasonable substitute because they are so commonly used. But i think that the walnuts were chosen intentionally as contrast to the sweet flavor of rabbit meat.

 

Urtatim (that's err-tah-TEEM)

 

<the end>



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