Home Page

Stefan's Florilegium

fd-France-msg



This document is also available in: text or RTF formats.

fd-France-msg – 6/26/10

 

Food of medieval France. References.

 

NOTE: See also the files: France-msg, fd-Germany-msg, fd-Normans-msg, fd-Celts-msg, snails-msg, Gaul-art, Normans-msg, Paris-msg, frogs-msg, duck-goose-msg.

 

************************************************************************

NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

   Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                         Stefan at florilegium.org

************************************************************************

 

Date: Wed, 08 Dec 1999 15:15:02 -0500

From: Angie Malone <alm4 at cornell.edu>

Subject: Re: SC - cookbooks

 

>Since I'm from the France, in the 1500's, I thought it was high time that I

>learn some recipes from the region and time period. So, if anyone knows the

>name of a cookbook that I can pick up at the library, I would really

>appreciate it.

>Chante

 

Not sure what century this book is from but it would probably be helpful to

look at it:

 

Early French Cookery: Sources, History, Original Recipes and Modern Adaptations

   D. Eleanor Scully  Eleanor Scully  Terence Scully

 

Your library should be able to get it if they don't have it thru

interlibrary loan.

 

       Angeline

Lady Angeline di Aquila

Seneschal--Dominion of Myrkfaelinn, Kingdom of Aethelmearc

 

 

Date: Wed, 08 Dec 1999 15:18:17 -0500

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - cookbooks

 

Pink Sunshine wrote:

> Since I'm from the France, in the 1500's, I thought it was high time that I

> learn some recipes from the region and time period. So, if anyone knows the

> name of a cookbook that I can pick up at the library, I would really

> appreciate it.

 

Hmmm...16th century...

 

you seem to have instinctively hit on something of a gap in the written

material, at least compared to the 15th and 17th centuries in France.

 

From the fifteenth century we have Chiquart's (in this case _very_ early

15th) Du Fait de Cuisine, and then somewhat later there's the Vivendier,

which is, IIRC, a 16th-century ms. found in Germany but written in

French, which may or may not be a direct linear descendant of

Taillevent's Le Viandier. It has some very buff and kewl stuff in it,

and there's a fairly recent edition edited by Terence Scully. And

speaking of Scully, I believe Le Viandier might have had some textual

currency in the form of copies being made until at least the sixteenth

century, so one might argue it (or rather a linear descendant -- the

recipes seem to change a bit over time, either due to food

fashion/evolution or scribal changes) might have had a culinary

influence on some strata of 16th-century French society.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Wed, 8 Dec 1999 13:10:52 -0600

From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

Subject: Re: SC - cookbooks

 

At 1:46 PM -0600 12/8/99, Pink Sunshine wrote:

>Since I'm from the France, in the 1500's, I thought it was high time that I

>learn some recipes from the region and time period. So, if anyone knows the

>name of a cookbook that I can pick up at the library, I would really

>appreciate it.

 

You will find English translations of two cookbooks a little earlier

than that on my web page.

 

David Friedman

http://www.best.com/~ddfr/

 

 

Date: Wed, 8 Dec 1999 16:24:55 EST

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - cookbooks

 

Savoring the Past also delves deeply into the changes in French cookery from

the Middle Ages to the abrupt style change in the early modern or' nouveau

cuisine' period. This book like many others of its ilk tends to parrot the

old cliches and inaccuracies that appear in almost every supposedly

'scholarly' work on the subject but as a source for basic information on

French cookery just post-middle ages, it is not a bad read.

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Thu, 09 Dec 1999 02:03:12 +0100

From: Thomas Gloning <Thomas.Gloning at germanistik.uni-giessen.de>

Subject: SC - French 16th century cookbooks

 

A good place to start is the article:

Philip Hyman et Mary Hyman: Les livres de cuisine et le

commerce des recettes en France aux XVe et XVIe siècles.

In: Du manuscrit à la table. Ed. Carole Lambert.

Paris/ Montréal 1992, 59-68.

 

This article contains a chronological list of printed French cookbooks

from about 1486 up to about 1620 (2 1/2w pages bibliography; about 50

versions).

 

Thomas

 

 

Date: Fri, 10 Dec 1999 21:27:24 -0500

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - French 16th century cookbooks

 

Pink Sunshine wrote:

> <<  Philip Hyman et Mary Hyman: Les livres de cuisine et le

>   commerce des recettes en France aux XVe et XVIe siècles.

>   In: Du manuscrit à la table. Ed. Carole Lambert.

>   Paris/ Montréal 1992, 59-68.  >>

> I'm not sure what this is, is it something I look up at the library or on

> the internet?

> Chante

 

No, this is the real thing; you need a library. It's a book of collected

essays on culinary history in several languages, French and English

making up most, but not all, of the text, which is edited by Carole

Lambert, published in Paris and Montreal in 1992 by a company called

Champion-Slatkine. The title is "Du manuscrit à la table", and the ISBN

is 2-7606-1564-2 _OR_ 2-85203-707-6. The rest of the above is the title

of an essay by Philip and Mary Hyman.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Fri, 10 Dec 1999 21:45:54 -0500

From: "Robin Carroll-Mann" <harper at idt.net>

Subject: Re: SC - French 16th century cookbooks

 

And it came to pass on 10 Dec 99,, that Pink Sunshine wrote:

> <<  Philip Hyman et Mary Hyman: Les livres de cuisine et le

>   commerce des recettes en France aux XVe et XVIe siècles.

>   In: Du manuscrit à la table. Ed. Carole Lambert.

>   Paris/ Montréal 1992, 59-68.  >>

> I'm not sure what this is, is it something I look up at the library or on

> the internet?

> Chante

 

_Du manuscrit a la table_ is a collection of essays on various aspects

of medieval cuisine.  About half of them are in French, and half in

English. (It was published in Montreal, dontcha know.)  Your local

library will probably not have the book, but they should be able to

request photocopies of pp. 59-68 for you.  Tell the librarian that the

ISBN is 2-7606-1564-2.

 

Lady Brighid ni Chiarain

Settmour Swamp, East (NJ)

 

 

Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2002 11:02:54 -0800

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

From: david friedman <ddfr at daviddfriedman.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] any suggestions for soltie?

 

Olwen wrote:

>OK the Bright Hills cooks are at it again in April.  The time and theme for

>that feast will be recipes from the era and area of King Rene'.  In other

>words, late 1400's French cookery.  No one at the meeting made any

>suggestions about a soltie and I have no idea, being not french and way long

>dead by the 1400's (I'm 9th centruy Welsh/Saxon).

 

Look at _Du Fait de Cuisine_ (1420, French--not too far off what you

want); my translation is on Cariadoc's website and there exists a

professional one by Terrance Scully. It describes some subtleties or

"entremets" which are elaborate past anything I've seen or heard of

at SCA feasts.

 

Elizabeth/Betty Cook

 

 

Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2003 07:36:33 -0700

From: Sue Clemenger <mooncat at in-tch.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] OOP-French food website

To: "SCA Cooks' List" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Maire, again, with another food website. This one has some very

yummy-looking french foods (herbs, flours, coffees, teas, pastries,

jams, etc).

http://www.furansunocafe.com/html/en/index.php

 

--maire

 

 

Date: Thu, 13 Apr 2006 23:37:06 -0700

From: David Friedman <ddfr at daviddfriedman.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Introduction and a Request

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> So basically I'm looking for any suggestions any of you may have for

> recipes (or leads on where to find them) for Provencale foods,

> either period or modern.

 

You might want to look at _Du Fait de Cuisine_--there is a

translation webbed on my site. It's a 15th century cookbook written

by the chief cook of the Duke of Savoy, which gets it pretty close to

Provence. I don't know of any period cookbooks that are actually from

Provence, but I'm not very familiar with the 16th century sources.

--

David/Cariadoc

www.daviddfriedman.com

 

 

Date: Fri, 14 Apr 2006 08:48:12 -0400

From: "Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius"

        <adamantius.magister at verizon.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Introduction and a Request

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

On Apr 14, 2006, at 2:37 AM, David Friedman wrote:

>> So basically I'm looking for any suggestions any of you may have

>> for recipes (or leads on where to find them) for Provencale foods,

>> either period or modern.

> You might want to look at _Du Fait de Cuisine_--there is a

> translation webbed on my site. It's a 15th century cookbook written

> by the chief cook of the Duke of Savoy, which gets it pretty close

> to Provence. I don't know of any period cookbooks that are actually

> from Provence, but I'm not very familiar with the 16th century

> sources.

 

It's been alleged that the Harpestrang manuscript, a version of which

has been published as "An Old Icelandic Medical Miscellany", and in

another form as "Libellus de arte coquinaria" are in fact recipes

from the South of France.

 

I don't know if there's any more compelling reason than the

comparatively frequent appearance of olive oil, almonds, and saffron

in a manuscript in the library of a Dane believed to have gone to

medical school in the South of France, but the theory that these

recipes are more French Riviera than Scandinavian is definitely out

there.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Fri, 14 Apr 2006 10:39:38 -0700

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] provencal Recipes

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

Barbara Santich in "The Original Mediterranean Cuisine" includes two

recipes from a Meridionale cookbook (that's southern France, not

necessarily Provence, but doubtless close). They are for stuffed

fresh sardines (quite different from the canned version) and for

blancmange.There are apparently two versions of the original:

Anonimo Meridionale/Libro A

and

Anonimo Meridionale/Libro B

 

   I don't recall seeing them - or maybe they're on Thomas Gloning's

site - but it's in Langue d'Oc, which is unlike Medieval French

(feels like a combo of French, Catalan, and Italian), and i can't

read it well yet.

 

So, do you want Santich's two recipes, or do you want modern  

Provencal recipes?

--

Urtatim (that's err-tah-TEEM)

the persona formerly known as Anahita

 

 

Date: Fri, 14 Apr 2006 12:18:59 -0700 (PDT)

From: Louise Smithson <helewyse at yahoo.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re: provencal Recipes

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

=====

   Urtatim wrote:

Barbara Santich in "The Original Mediterranean Cuisine" includes two

recipes from a Meridionale cookbook (that's southern France, not

necessarily Provence, but doubtless close). They are for stuffed

fresh sardines (quite different from the canned version) and for

blancmange.There are apparently two versions of the original:

Anonimo Meridionale/Libro A

and

Anonimo Meridionale/Libro B

I don't recall seeing them - or maybe they're on Thomas Gloning's

site - but it's in Langue d'Oc, which is unlike Medieval French

(feels like a combo of French, Catalan, and Italian), and i can't

read it well yet.

=====

 

OK I have both of them at home.  To me they read like an Italian  

dialect and I have always taken them to be southern Italian in  

origin. That is generally how they are identified in the Italian  

culinary sources.  I know from the times I have browsed them that the  

recipes are very similar to those in the martino corpus.  But then  

again when you look across europe there were very many dishes in  

common across the royal cultures.  Blancmange, losyns, white tart, to  

name just a few. I'll have a look at them again tonight and see how  

it pans out.

   The one thing that I would say about the food in the warmer climes  

is that you find a lot more salads and raw fruit turning up in the  

menus.

   I once did a lunch for the laurel meeting at Pennsic with Mistress  

Rachaol based on a menu from August from Scappi.  It was based on the  

first and last courses, everything was served cold, from the ham, to  

the pies, to the salads and fruit.  Serving the number of people you  

need to serve should certainly be doable.

 

   Helewyse

 

 

Date: Sat, 15 Apr 2006 01:21:37 -0700

From: David Friedman <ddfr at daviddfriedman.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Re: provencal Recipes

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> Do you mean to say that the recipes are in Occitan?  (It is related to

> French, Spanish, and Catalan, by the way.)  I would like to see them.

> Also, I have heard that the early 13th century northern cookery  

> book that Rudolf Grewe translated may be a translation of a Provencal  

> cookbook.  Any thoughts?  Can anyone confirm this idea (or not)?

 

My memory is that Grewe thought the original was from southern

Europe, but I don't remember anything as specific as Provence.

--

David/Cariadoc

www.daviddfriedman.com

 

 

Date: Sat, 15 Apr 2006 06:58:26 -0700 (PDT)

From: Louise Smithson <helewyse at yahoo.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re: Introduction and a Request.

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

Irene wrote:

===

   * I have plans for a soteltie dessert that will require a cake  

of some   sort.  If necessary, I can go with a recipe that isn't  

really   Provencale.  But if anyone has any cake recipe ideas I'd  

love to hear   them.  (Otherwise I'll probably just do some sort of  

orange flavored   cake, maybe with bits of candied orange peel in the  

batter.)

===

 

Not a whole lot of cakes in period, oven usage and all that.  Might  

I suggest the addition of orange flower water in addition to orange  

juice it will really liven the flavor up.  You can get orange  

flower water at most middle eastern stores.

 

===

   * In addition to the soteltie, I'd like to offer some sort of  

fruit   plate or fruit salad.  Any ideas?

===

 

Please check out the menus for the month of August taken from Scappi.

http://www.geocities.com/helewyse/augustmenus.html

 

   The menus are incredibly fruit heavy, this isn't your Northern  

European cuisine, it is hot, cold fruits are tasty (often by the 16th  

century they were chilled in snow prior to service).

 

   For example the lunch on the 16th of august there are six  

different fruits served, including red (water) and white (sweet)  

melons, Peeled plums served with sugar. Capon Sopramentati is a  

boiled capon with a spice blend sprinkled on it.  Cold ham is simply  

that, cold ham, make a nice mustard.

 

   The last course (from the sideboard) is also served cold, here you  

find things like pears cooked in wine, peaches peeled and served in  

wine (very tasty with a chilled lambrusco).  With dinner menus you  

tend to see salads: salad of mixed green with flowers, borage salad,  

salad of citron sliced etc.

 

   August at Pennsic is just as hot as August in Italy or Provencal  

the same types of foods would be popular, cooling foods, light  

foods.

 

   Helewyse

 

 

Date: Sat, 15 Apr 2006 18:57:15 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Provencal Recipes

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

There is an actual source for Provencal recipes dating from the Middle Ages.

Carole Lambert wrote her PhD  using such a manuscript.

The thesis is titled--

Trois réceptaires culinaires médiévaux : Les Enseingnemenz, les Doctrine

et le Modus Édition critique et glossaire détaillé /

Carole Lambert 1989  French  Book :  xiv, 303 f.

[Montréal] : Université de Montréal,

Contact your library to see about ILLoan.

[Her MS was titled---

Edition d'un recueil de recettes culinaires et d'un réceptaire sur les

greffes inédits du XVe siècle (Paris, B.N. Latin 6707) /

Carole Lambert French  Book vi, 92 f. [Montréal] : Université de

Montréal, 1983. Don't let the library staff at ILLoan get the two  

mixed up.]

 

She refers to the collection of recipes as Modus and refers

to them in her chapter on Southern France that appears

in Regional Cuisines of Medieval Europe: A Book of Essays, ed.

Melitta Weiss Adamson (New York and London: Routledge, 2002), xviii +

254 pages.

That would be an excellent place to start to research the topic by the way.

She's the co-author of Fêtes gourmandes au Moyen Âge  along with

Jean-Louis Flandrin; which appeared in 1998.

 

Johnnae llyn Lewis

 

 

Date: Mon, 5 Jun 2006 22:45:16 -0700

From: David Friedman <ddfr at daviddfriedman.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Update on Lisabetta's Feast

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

> It is going to be French, and 4 removes

> The last remove will be a desserts & salad  remove

> as said before it will be for roughly 80 people, we do have a lot of

> people on Atkins, and would like to have a balance for those who

> don't do the starches..

> we also have a few non red meat & non pork eaters, so I am thinking

> at least one needs to include chicken..

> anyone have links for period french cuisine?

 

http://www.daviddfriedman.com/Medieval/Cookbooks/Menagier/

Menagier_Contents.html

 

http://www.daviddfriedman.com/Medieval/Cookbooks/Du_Fait_de_Cuisine/

du_fait_de_c_contents.html

 

And you can find some worked out recipes at:

 

http://www.daviddfriedman.com/Medieval/miscellany_pdf/Misc9recipes.pdf

--

David/Cariadoc

www.daviddfriedman.com

 

 

Date: Thu, 29 Jun 2006 14:33:00 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Period French Cookbooks

To: Cooks within the SCA sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

 

betta wrote:

<<< Can anyone recommend any period french cookbooks?

I would like to spend my holiday weekend reading :) and planning.. >>>

 

My earlier suggestions from June 6 2006 still remain in the archives.

I suggested then-

 

Le Menagier comes to mind. Several recipes

already out there for that one. Try Googling menagier and recipes

for a selection. (Not all will be appropriate.)

Also check out the list of sources mentioned

here.

http://www.staff.uni-marburg.de/~gloning/cookmat.htm

A number of texts are online or can be interlibrary loaned.

 

Also check out the illustrations shown here

http://expositions.bnf.fr/fouquet/enimages/expo_us/index.htm

http://expositions.bnf.fr/gastro/enimages/anglais/index.htm

http://www.bnf.fr/enluminures/aaccueil.htm

They may give you some ideas.

 

Johnnae

 

The relevant question today might be can you read French or do you need all

translated texts. The new edition of The Goodman of Paris is out again.

http://www.boydell.co.uk/43832224.HTM

 

Johnna

 

Johnna wrote on June 29th 2006

 

It seems obvious to me that you might want to start with Wheaton's

Savoring the Past

and read that volume. Then take her bibliography and look up all

the sources mentioned there and read those. Thomas has his list posted at

http://www.staff.uni-marburg.de/~gloning/cookmat.htm

You could start with that list of sources.

I think we've already mentioned that the Online French are posted here

http://www.thousandeggs.com/cookbooks.html#FRENCH

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Mon, 1 Oct 2007 10:45:53 -0400

From: Jadwiga Zajaczkowa / Jenne Heise <jenne at fiedlerfamily.net>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] found by the side of the search

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

I'm once again working with the Chocolate research of someone editing

Madame de Sevigny's letters, and she's looking for background material

on the development of medicinal food theory in 17th-18th c. France.

 

Anyway, this article popped up as I was searching:

Medieval French food for Jewish New Year:

http://www.triviumpublishing.com/articles/medievaljewishnewyear.html

--

-- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika jenne at fiedlerfamily.net

 

 

Date: Wed, 5 Dec 2007 07:45:48 -0800

From: "Anne-Marie Rousseau" <dailleurs at liripipe.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] 1500'S French cookbooks

To: "'Cooks within the SCA'" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Hi from Anne-Marie

 

When I was doing my research for my French Food in the Renaissance CA/Feudal

Gourmet, I found the same "hole". After Chiquart (which was definitely a

medieval cookbook in terms of flavorings and techniques), and until la

Varenne (SO not medieval) there was this big hole...most odd!

 

And yet somehow in that time, we saw the evolution of the emulsion sauce, a

switch in flavorings, souring agents, etc.

 

Casteau and his Ovverature de Cuisine seems to be a bridge in that  way (and

thanks to Tomas Glonig for making it available to us!) with a foot in both

the medieval and the "new" styles. He's late 1500s, and more Belgian than

French, but maybe it will suit your needs?

 

--Anne-Marie, who thinks the trends in cooking techniques, etc is  

just as much fun as the recipes themselves :)

 

-----Original Message-----

From: Nancy Kiel

 

I'm looking for any translations of French cookbooks from the 1500s.  I've

got pre- and post- that century, but a distressing lack in between.  Thanks

for any suggestions!

 

Nancy

 

 

Date: Wed, 5 Dec 2007 11:18:39 -0500

From: Nancy Kiel <nancy_kiel at hotmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] 1500'S French cookbooks

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

I did find a reference to "Le Grand Cuisinier"  

edited (?) by Pierre Piroulx, but haven't found any more info about  

it. I think they want more the first half of the century, so  

Viandier (sp?) might suffice.

 

 

Date: Wed, 05 Dec 2007 12:13:54 -0500

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] 1500'S French cookbooks

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>,     Nancy Kiel

        <nancy_kiel at hotmail.com>

 

Nancy Kiel wrote:

> I'm looking for any translations of French cookbooks from the  

> 1500s.  I've got pre- and post- that century, but a distressing  

> lack in between.  Thanks for any suggestions!

> Nancy Kiel

 

What happens is that there is a gap in publications in France during

the 16th century.

 

I can tell you that Le Ouverture has been translated into English.

*Ouverture de Cuisine* (France, 1604 - Daniel Myers, trans.)

 

The original source can be found at MedievalCookery.com

<http://www.medievalcookery.com/notes/ouverture.shtm>;

It was published in 1604 but Terence Scully indicates that it was actually written about 1585. In his new translation of La Varenne, Scully gives us a  

helpful list of the books published between 1486 and 1615.

 

Another that is available of course is Nostradamus's book on confections. I did

a TI article on that book about 3 years back.

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Wed, 5 Dec 2007 13:03:01 -0500

From: " Guenievre de Monmarch? " <guenievre at erminespot.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] 1500'S French cookbooks

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

I can fill in that hole just *slightly* - it's still not 1500's, but  

it's at least *later* 1400's - 1466, to be exact.

http://www.erminespot.com/docs/Le%20Recueil%20de%20Riom.pdf

 

Guenievre

 

 

Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2008 15:58:06 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae at mac.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Forthcoming titles Fall 2008 LONG

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

As promised sometime back here's a list of some forthcoming

fall 08- winter 09

titles that might be of interest to readers of this list.

They cover a full range of topics.

I've included details, descriptions or links where I have them.

A number of the lists I used didn't record prices possibly because

they were not yet set.

 

Johnnae

-----------------

*A Revolution in Taste: The Rise of French Cuisine, 1650 to 1800: *by Susan

Pinkard 336 pages. ?Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (31 Oct 2008)

English 0521821991*. * 978-0521821995

 

 

Date: Tue, 13 Oct 2009 01:57:41 +0200

From: Ana Vald?s <agora158 at gmail.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] for the French speakers on the list!

 

http://www.fabula.org/actualites/article33483.php

 

It's a book with recipes from the XV century, from the French region of

Auvergne. It's called "Le recueil du Riom"

 

Pr?sentation de l'?diteur:

 

*Le Recueil de Riom*, oeuvre anonyme conserv?e dans un manuscrit auvergnat

du XV?me si?cle, renferme quarante-huit recettes de cuisine, dont un certain

nombre se retrouve dans d'autres trait?s culinaires tant du XIV?me que du

XV?me si?cles. Il se distingue des trait?s pr?c?dents par une v?ritable

bri?vet? de ton, s'apparentant alors dans sa forme aux *Enseignemens qui

enseingnent a apareilier toutes manieres de viandes*. En effet, les recettes

qu'il offre sont, ? de tr?s rares exceptions, assez succinctes et se

r?sument souvent ? donner l'essentiel.

 

Cette ?dition du *Recueil de Riom* offre, en regard du texte original, une

traduction en fran?ais moderne. Elle est compl?t?e par une introduction, une

annexe et un glossaire.

 

Jean-Fran?ois Kosta-Th?faine, docteur en litt?rature m?di?vale, est

chercheur associ? au Centre d'Etudes des Textes M?di?vaux ? Universit? de

Rennes 2.

--

http://anavaldes.wordpress.com

http://passagenwerk.wordpress.com

http://caravia.stumbleupon.com

http://www.crusading.se

Gondolgatan 2 l tr

12832 Skarpn?ck

Sweden

 

 

Date: Mon, 12 Oct 2009 20:49:20 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae at mac.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Le Recueil de Riom for the French speakers on

        the    list!

 

On Oct 12, 2009, at 7:57 PM, Ana Vald?s wrote:

<<< http://www.fabula.org/actualites/article33483.php

 

It's a book with recipes from the XV century, from the French region  

of Auvergne. It's called "Le recueil du Riom" >>>

 

It's up as a .pdf here in an English translation.

 

www.erminespot.com/cooking/le-recueil-de-riom

 

There's also a dissertation on it by Carole Lambert.

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Mon, 15 Feb 2010 12:21:40 -0500

From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae at mac.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>,

        SCA-AuthenticCooks at yahoogroups.com

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Livre fort excellent de cuisine 1555

 

While doing some work this am, I came across this announcement dated

Tue, January 26, 2010.

 

From Valparaiso University  and the Committee on Creative Work and  

Research.

 

Dr. Timothy Tomasik, assistant professor of foreign languages and  

literatures, to complete a translation and critical edition of the  

Renaissance French cookbook "The Livre fort excellent de cuisine".

 

The Livre fort excellent de cuisine dates from 1555 so having it  

available in translation would be a great

addition to the study of 16th century French cookery.

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Tue, 16 Feb 2010 22:50:00 -0600

From: "Terry Decker" <t.d.decker at att.net>

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] 12th Century

 

<<< (For an example- I'm currently doing a lot of research on the

Carolinginan Franks. And came across this:

http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/source/800Asnapium.html - it even tells you

what pots are in the kitchen! Very useful stuff!)

 

'Lainie >>>

 

There is also a copy of this out in the Florilegium.  I copied the text of

the inventory of Asnapium and the Capitulare de Villis when I first

encountered them about ten years ago in a sourcebook published in 1902.  The

Latin text of Capitulare de Villis can also be found on the web and it is

quite useful when arguing about 9th Century foodstuffs available in

Carolinginan France.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Sun, 18 Apr 2010 21:55:23 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae at mac.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Hello Back with some sources

 

There's one very short collection of 51 recipes written in Latin and  

Occitan. It's known as Modus viaticorum preparandarum. It's part of  

this doctoral dissertation:

 

Carole Lambert, Trois r?ceptaires culinaires m?di?vaux: Les  

Enseingnementz, les Doctrine et le Modus: ?dition critique et  

glossaire d?taill?. Dissertatio Universitatis Montis Regalis, 1989

The dissertation is in French.

 

I'd suggest starting with  Melitta Adamson's  Regional Cuisines of  

Medieval Europe: a Book of Essays. 2002. It has a chapter in it with a  

very good bibliography that addresses the south of France. The author  

is Carole Lambert who did the dissertation mentioned above.

 

Also

Santich, Barbara.  The Original Mediterranean Cuisine: Medieval  

Recipes for Today.  might be good to read also.

 

Occitian may appear under occitan.

 

Johnnae

 

On Apr 18, 2010, at 7:02 PM, Jamie Griffin wrote:

<<< I'm looking forward to learning from you all.  My Mom (Mordonna the  

Cook) has been teaching me to redact recipes and I'm looking to  

learn even more.  Also, I'm looking for some research ideas for  

finding Occitian recipes that would have been period.

Lady Lie du Bosc >>>

 

 

Date: Tue, 20 Apr 2010 00:44:53 +0000 (GMT)

From: emilio szabo <emilio_szabo at yahoo.it>

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Occitan recipes

 

What exactly are you looking for? Recipes from, say, Montpellier or Sete, in whatever Language? Or Recipes in a specific language (which one?). Mme Thibault-Comelade (I think she is based in Montpellier or in Perpignan) has written copiously on the history of Catalan cuisine, including its northern varieties which might be relevant for you.

 

E.

 

 

Date: Tue, 20 Apr 2010 10:07:04 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae at mac.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Thanks for the suggestions :)

 

Interlibrary loan ought to be able to supply the

Melitta Adamson's  Regional Cuisines of Medieval Europe: a Book of  

Essays. 2002.

 

Santich, Barbara.  The Original Mediterranean Cuisine: Medieval  

Recipes for Today was sold for a number of years for $5 a copy through

various reminder dealers. It should be in SCA collections and be able to be purchased cheaply.

 

The Lambert dissertation would have to be ordered probably through a  

University.

 

If you read either modern French or old French, please let us know.

 

Johnna (playing librarian)

 

On Apr 20, 2010, at 9:52 AM, Jamie Griffin wrote:

<<< Thanks for the research suggestions.  Now all I need to do is find  

them in a form I can afford ... off to the used book store and  

searching the on-line libraries...I miss having a large public  

library that had access to an even larger university library...sigh

Lady Lie du Bosc >>>

 

<the end>



Formatting copyright © Mark S. Harris (THLord Stefan li Rous).
All other copyrights are property of the original article and message authors.

Comments to the Editor: stefan at florilegium.org