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Medieval and SCA tapestries.

 

NOTE: See also the files: looms-msg, velvet-msg, piled-fabrics-msg, silk-msg, linen-msg, lace-msg, weaving-msg, embroidery-msg, cross-stitch-msg.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

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Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

    Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                          Stefan at florilegium.org

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From: cjcannon at ucdavis.ucdavis.EDU

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: RE:  Wonderful book!!!

Date: 8 Feb 1994 14:26:46 -0500

 

UCD just acquired this volume, and it's REALLY nice, albeit expensive

($125.00 cased).  Lots of color illus. and very clear black & white's, as well.  Good references and a

brief illus. description of the history of tapestry weaving, as well as

the difference between regular tabby weave vs. tapestry weave.  The

bibliographical info. follows:

 

Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.)

  Medieval tapestries in the Metropolitan Museum of Art / Adolfo

Salvatore Cavallo.

New York : Metropolitan Museum of Art : Dist. by:  H.N. Abrams, 1993.

688 p. : ill. (part. col.) ; 31 cm.

Inc. bibliographical references and index.

 

Lib. of Congress Card #: 92-15540

ISBN:  0870996444 ; 0810964201 (Abrams)

Lib. of Congress Call #:  NK3005.M48 1993

Dewey #: 746.394/09/020747471

 

1.  Tapestry, Medieval--Catalogs.  2.  Tapestry--New York

(N.Y.)--Catalogs.  3. Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.)--Catalogs.

  4. Tapestry, Medieval--History.  I. Cavallo, Adolph S.

 

Hope the costumers, weavers, etc. among you enjoy it, too.--Carol

 

 

From: hrolfr at CAM.ORG (Hrolfr Gertsen-Briand)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Tapestry Suprise

Date: 2 Oct 1994 17:13:19 -0400

Organization: Communications Accessibles Montreal, Quebec Canada

 

      I have just come across pic's and a reference in Le Guide

Michelin to something called the Pirou tapestry, located predictably inth

the Chateaux of Pirou (Contentin peninsula, western normandy. 10km south

of Lessay, near Coutances.)

      Now, my father is a Norman history nutter, so coming across

another tapestry like the Bayeux tapestry but dealing with the

Conquest of Scicily, that he or I had never heard mention of much less

seen pic's of suprised us. (The lords of Pirou were related to the

Hauteville family.  Yes, the Hautevilles of the many brothers...)

      Does anyone have any reference to this work? (or even heard of it?)

 

      The pics show it to be on the same scale as the B.Tapestry but

the total length isn't shown.

 

      Regards, Hrolfr

 

 

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

From: uv591 at freenet.Victoria.BC.CA (Warren R. Edge)

Subject: Re: Bayeux Tapestry

Organization: The Victoria Freenet Association (VIFA), Victoria, B.C., Canada

Date: Thu, 2 Feb 1995 18:33:23 GMT

 

In a previous article, gray at ibis.cs.umass.edu (Lyle Gray) says:

>KATHLEEN GORMAN (KNGORMAN at ARTSPAS.watstar.uwaterloo.ca) wrote:

>: I've just seen the most amazing thing!  A prof in the French department here

>: has recreated the Bayeux Tapestry!  In it's original size and as close to

>: the original in all details as he could get!

>: Does anyone know of anyone who has done something similar?

>

>Not I.

>As close to the original in all details as he could get?  Well, considering

>that the Tapestry was repaired in several places, and that there is conjecture

>that the repairs changed some of the details, wouldn't it be more complete to

>say that it is as close to the original _in_its_current_state_ as he can get?

>

>I've _love_ to have seen the Tapestry before the repairs had been made...

>

>Lyle FitzWilliam

 

      Actually my lord, the Shire of Seagirt, Kingdom of An Tir (mka

Victoria, BC) has done "The Seagirt Tapestry" using the Bayeaux as a

pattern, and using a very similar, if not (dare I say it [daredare])

recreated stitch.  The Seagirt Tapestry, now considerably longer than the

original Bayeux, has been presented a numerous kingdom events, including

25YC (I believe, it could have been TYC), and written up in _Threads_

magazine.

      If you would like any other information about it, do not hesitate

to contact me about it.  We in the shire, and I dare say An Tir, are very

proud of it.

      Including the purple cow.

 

      In service to Shire Kingdom and The Dream

            Erasmus the Traveller

            Seneschal, Shire of Seagirt

 

 

From: kellogg at ucssun1.sdsu.edu (C. Kevin Kellogg)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Bayeux Tapestry

Date: 6 Feb 1995 22:15:18 GMT

Organization: San Diego State University Computing Services

 

Warren R. Edge (uv591 at freenet.Victoria.BC.CA) wrote:

: The Seagirt Tapestry, now considerably longer than the

: original Bayeux, has been presented a numerous kingdom events, including

: 25YC (I believe, it could have been TYC), and written up in _Threads_

: magazine.

 

      It was at TYC, that's where I saw it.  I must admit, it was very

impressive.

 

            Avenel Kellough

 

 

From: iys6lri at mvs.oac.ucla.edu (Lori Iversen)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Bayeux Tapestry

Date: 8 Feb 1995 00:32:43 GMT

Organization: ucla

 

ekenny at gandalf.ca (Erin Kenny GMSI) says:

[Snip about the Seagirt Tapestry]

>

>Is it an actual tapestry, or technically an embroidery?

>        Claricia / (Erin doesn't know the difference anyway)

 

Alexis here!

 

The Bayeaux Tapestry isn't really a tapestry at all; it's more a

really long embroidery (Note to Erin:  the difference is that a

tapestry's designs are *woven in* to the fabric of the piece itself,

while an embroidery is, well, embroidered onto a pre-existing piece

of fabric).  I've never seen the Seagirt Tapestry (my luck; I was

at TFYC, not TYC), but since Mr. Edge (sorry; didn't get your nom

de SCA) says that it's done in the style of the Bayeaux Tapestry,

I would therefore assume that it too is embroidered and not a

proper tapestry at all.

 

Yet another piece of *Jeopardy* trivia,

 

Alexis Vladescu                           Lori Iversen

WyvernHo-ette                             (IYS6LRI at mvs.oac.ucla.edu)

Altavia, CAID                             The Valley, CA

 

 

From: Phyllis_Gilmore at rand.org (Phyllis Gilmore)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Bayeux Tapestry

Date: Wed, 8 Feb 95 12:59:05 GMT

Organization: RAND

 

iys6lri at mvs.oac.ucla.edu (Lori Iversen) wrote:

<snip>

>The Bayeaux Tapestry isn't really a tapestry at all; it's more a

>really long embroidery (Note to Erin:  the difference is that a

>tapestry's designs are *woven in* to the fabric of the piece itself,

>while an embroidery is, well, embroidered onto a pre-existing piece

>of fabric).  <snip>

 

Fun with language time again.  Mileage will *definately* vary on

this--in France (tapisserie) and England (tapestry), the word is

applied to needlepoint as well as to woven hangings.  The common

point I've noticed is that the term is *generally* used to denote

pictures, hangings, or upholstery done in some fiber art or another

(my Oxford French dictionary includes "embroidery" in the definition).  

And the French folks call that piece of embroidered fabric over in

Bayeux une tapisserie.

 

--which is not to be confused with un tapis.  Thou shalt not walk

on the tapisserie --

******************************************

SCA:  Philippa de Ecosse, Lyondemere, Caid  

mka:  Phyllis Gilmore, Santa Monica and Torrance, CA

 

 

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Bayeux Tapestry (1/7 scale reproduction)

From: system at blah.bsu.edu (Matt Stum (SCA: Gwydion ap Myrddin))

Date: Wed,  8 Feb 95 20:43:25 EST

Organization: Ball State University

 

Greetings!

 

What with all of the talk about the Bayeux Tapestry, I thought I'd share

with you something that I acquired today...

 

.. a 1/7 scale color reproduction of the entire tapestry. It's printed on

paper and in book form... but the pages are not bound to the spine and are

in an accordian fashion.  Thus, you can unfold it and stretch it to

approximately 31 feet!

 

The printed tapestry is about 3" tall plus borders above and below.  Above

there are "frame numbers".  Below there are descriptions in French,

English, and German.

 

The paper quality isn't the greatest, but for $15 I'm not gonna complain!

There really isn't any publishing information... the title is simply "La

Tapisserie de Bayeux" and there isn't any other publishing information

other than "Edition Ville de Bayeux" on the inside cover.

 

I bought it mail-order from a company called "Past Times".  They're based

in Oxford, England and have some great stuff, even if it's a bit pricey.

They have a U.S. "outlet" as well:

 

Past Times

280 Summer St.

Boston, MA  02210-1182

Telephone orders:  1-800-621-6020 (24 hrs/7 days)

Fax orders:        1-617-451-1167

Enquiries:         1-800-242-1020

 

Their prices already include the import duties.  If you want to order the

Bayeux Tapestry reproduction, the order number is 2406, the description is

"Bayeux Frieze", and the price is $14.95. (Shipping and handling is a

fixed $5.95 no matter how much you order, so I usually save up and order a

bunch of stuff at once.)

 

Just FYI...

Gwydion

--

Matt Stum                 Gwydion ap Myrddin Arglwydd     Ball State University

00mjstum at bsuvc.bsu.edu    Shire of Afonlyn, MK           Muncie, IN  USA

 

 

From: DUNHAM%EUGLIB at mred.lane.EDU (PATSY DUNHAM)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Seagirt / Bayeux tapestry

Date: 8 Feb 1995 13:37:52 -0500

 

Although I have not seen it, I did see the color photo in _Threads_

(early 1994 issue ?) and my husband is a close friend of the dear crazy (er,

inspired!) man who started the project, Master Cathal Sean O'Connlon (sic).  

 

I'm 99.9% sure the Seagirt is an embroidery (as is the Bayeux) in the

exact style of the Bayeux, both artistically as to the design of figures and

tableux, the captions, decorations in upper and lower borders, etc.; and in the

embroidery stitches used (outlining filled with 3-layer couching--I took an

excellent class years ago from Mistress Janet of Arden, Adiantum, An Tir, on

Bayeux embroidery).  I don't know if the Seagirt kept exactly to the Bayeux

color palette, but the section in the photo indicated they were at least pretty

close.

 

The subject matter is, appropriately, the founding and subsequent history of

the shire of Seagirt (Victoria BC).  Therefore, tho he's never seen it, my

husband is in it.  One of these days...

 

--Mistress Chimene des CinqTours, OP, An Tir                           

--Meistari Gerekr fjarsjandi Rognvaldsson, the Farseeing, OP, OL, An Tir

        mka                                                               

  Patricia R. Dunham, Gary Walker       e-mail:dunham%euglib at MRED.LANE.EDU      

                                               gerekr at aol.com

  Eugene OR  USA                        home, machine: 503-688-7210    

+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+

 

 

From: JARI.JAMES at rook.wa.com (jari james)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Bayeux Tapestry

Date: Thu, 09 Feb 1995 10:17:26 GMT

 

-=> Quoting Iys6lri at mvs.oac.ucla.edu to All <=-

Iy> ekenny at gandalf.ca (Erin Kenny GMSI) says:

>

Iy> [Snip about the Seagirt Tapestry]

>

>Is it an actual tapestry, or technically an embroidery?

>        Claricia / (Erin doesn't know the difference anyway)

 

It's an embroidery done on 'many' linen panels depiction the history of

the Shire of Seagirt.  It is *most* wonderful.  Come to 30YR and see it!

 

Rowan

Barony of Blatha an Oir

An Tir

 

 

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

From: uv591 at freenet.Victoria.BC.CA (Warren R. Edge)

Subject: Re: Seagirt / Bayeux tapestry

Organization: The Victoria Freenet Association (VIFA), Victoria, B.C., Canada

Date: Wed, 15 Feb 1995 13:55:10 GMT

 

In a previous article, DUNHAM%EUGLIB at mred.lane.EDU (PATSY DUNHAM) says:

>Although I have not seen it, I did see the color photo in _Threads_

>(early 1994 issue ?) and my husband is a close friend of the dear crazy (er,

>inspired!) man who started the project, Master Cathal Sean O'Connlon (sic).  

      March 1994, pg. 78, m'lady. I just double-checked that with

Master Cathal.

 

>I'm 99.9% sure the Seagirt is an embroidery (as is the Bayeux) in the

>exact style of the Bayeux, both artistically as to the design of figures and

>tableux, the captions, decorations in upper and lower borders, etc.; and in the

>embroidery stitches used (outlining filled with 3-layer couching--I took an

>excellent class years ago from Mistress Janet of Arden, Adiantum, An Tir, on

>Bayeux embroidery).  I don't know if the Seagirt kept exactly to the Bayeux

>color palette, but the section in the photo indicated they were at least pretty

>close.

      It is as you say, m'lady, although the borders are interspaced

with armorial displays of Seagirtians.  As far as the colour goes, well,

er, there have been a couple of notable exceptions....Remember teh purple

cow I mentioned in my original post?  And no, I don't know the story

behind it...

 

>The subject matter is, appropriately, the founding and subsequent history of

>the shire of Seagirt (Victoria BC).  Therefore, tho he's never seen it, my

>husband is in it.  One of these days...

      I am very certain that any time you wish to visit our fair shire,

we will be more than pleased to bring it out and show you.

      The Tapestry will be out at the various events being held this

year in honour of the Genghis Khan exhibit in Victoria over the summer,

and I know there are plans to take it to 3YC next year. If you have any

further questions, do not hesitate to contact me.  I will get ahold of

whoever I need to here in the shire to make sure I get the proper answers.

 

      In service to Shire Kingdom & The Dream

            Erasmus the Traveller

            Seneschal of Seagirtshire

 

 

From: mchance at crl.com (Michael A. Chance)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Embroidery Stitches

Date: 20 Mar 1995 15:44:32 -0800

 

Mistress Alison writes:

>There's another (more German) style of narrative tapestry work that

>is (I think) 13th c.

...

>The hanging I mention tells the story of Tristan and Isolde.

 

Is this the tapestry at the abbey in Celle, Germany?  If so, I've had

the opportunity to see it, up close, and it's truly magnificent.

 

For those who are either in Europe or are planning to be in northern

Germany (near Hannover or Braunschweig/Brunswick) in late May/early

June, the Celle abbey (which is normally not open to visitors, except

for a small gift shop/book store) holds guided tours of its collection

of medieval tapestries for just 10 days each year, starting on

Whitmonday.  None of the nuns giving the tour at the time that we were

there spoke enough English that they could do all of the tour in

English, by they tried their best to give us the important bits.

(And they were patient beyond all belief with a couple of crazy

Americans with a cranky one month old baby.)

 

Well worth the effort to try to find the time.

 

Mikjal Annarbjorn

--

Michael A. Chance          St. Louis, Missouri, USA   "At play in the fields

Work: mc307a at sw1stc.sbc.com                             of St. Vidicon"

Play: mchance at crl.com

 

 

From: ac508 at dayton.wright.EDU (Beverly Roden)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Tapestry Weaving information

Date: 24 Mar 1995 06:17:59 -0500

 

Greetings to tapestry enthusiasts everywhere from Mistress Alexis MacAlister

 

I have two nice books on historical tapestries.  The first, The Unicorn

Tapestries, by Margaret B. Freeman published by the Metropolitan Museum

of art thru Dutton.  It has wonderful close up pictures of the Unicorn

Tapestries, along with other, less famous tapestries which include unicorns

in their work.  The back portion of the book gives technical information

on the weaving of the work, including the dyestuffs used for different

colors.  If you are interested in the Unicorn Tapetries, this is a

wonderful book.   Tapestry - Mirror of History by F.P. Thomson, Crown

Publishers (isbn 0-517-534150)  is a greater overview of the history of

tapestry weaving - beginning with Greek and Roman tapestry weaving thru

to modern times (the book was published in 1980).. It has a good section

in the front covering the technical side of tapestry weaving.

 

I recommend these books for tapestry history, and inspiration for a first

effort.  Start small - make something that you will turn in to a pillow,

and work in a larger format - say 20 e.p.i. - this will give you a project

that you can FINISH!, and still allow you to have the experience of doing

a detailed piece of tapestry.  Get any of those books that you found on

the technical side of tapestry weaving, especially if you have no mundane

weavers guilds in your area.

 

I would be happy to correspond with you in regard to this topic, and

share sources and information.  Good Luck!

 

Alexis MacAlister, O.L.

 

Beverly Roden  ac508 at dayton.wright.edu

 

 

From: IVANOR at delphi.com

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Embroidery Stitches

Date: 25 Mar 1995 22:51:03 GMT

 

Quoting 3cdr from a message in rec.org.sca

   > This isn't embroidery so much as tapestry, I suppose, but I'm finishing

   > one of the 6 (or is it 7?) Senses series, specifically the Lady and the

 

There are two kinds of tapestry:  Embroidered (surface decorated on plain

woven fabric) and woven (where all the figures are an integral part of the

weave while it's on the loom.)

 

If you are adding surface work to a plain ground, it is embroidery, even if

it covers entirely, as needlepoint does.

Carolyn Boselli    Host of Custom Forum 35    SCAdians on Delphi

Ive Annor M'Quhairr of Sighty Crag, AoA, Sen. Canton Dragon Forge, EK

 

 

From: Phyllis_Gilmore at rand.org (Phyllis Gilmore)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Tapestries

Date: Mon, 18 Dec 95 15:54:05 GMT

Organization: RAND

 

In Article <4av0eu$kht at newsbf02.news.aol.com>, tedlechman at aol.com

(Tedlechman) wrote:

>I'm in the market to purchase a tapestry for my home of the ars

>nova/renaissance period style. anyone out there make them ?

 

If I did, you probably couldn't afford it.  

 

Ahem.  The Toscano catalog folks (the ones who sell gargoyles)

also sell a number of machine-woven copies of tapestries from

a broad assortment of periods.  Several other catalogs (esp.

museum-related ones) also sell tapestries of this general

type.

 

Be prepared to pay several hundred dollars for anything of

decent size.

******************************************

SCA:  Lady Philippa de Ecosse, Lyondemere, Caid  

mka:  Phyllis Gilmore, Santa Monica and Torrance, CA

 

 

From: brettwi at ix.netcom.com(Brett Williams )

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Tapestries

Date: 19 Dec 1995 01:17:01 GMT

 

In <Phyllis_Gilmore.1169689685B at nntp.rand.org> Phyllis_Gilmore at rand.org

(Phyllis Gilmore) writes:

>

>Ahem.  The Toscano catalog folks (the ones who sell gargoyles)

>also sell a number of machine-woven copies of tapestries from

>a broad assortment of periods.  Several other catalogs (esp.

>museum-related ones) also sell tapestries of this general

>type.

>

>Be prepared to pay several hundred dollars for anything of

>decent size.

>

>******************************************

>SCA:  Lady Philippa de Ecosse, Lyondemere, Caid  

>mka:  Phyllis Gilmore, Santa Monica and Torrance, CA

 

My lord husband caught a little news program blurb somewhere in the

depths of CNN around 5 AM one morning-- the Gobelin tapestry works is

very much still in existence doing restoration, recreation and original

tapestries as they've done for a long time.

 

A largish tapestry from the Works is the price of a modest sized house

in An Tir.

 

ciorstan

 

 

From: Phyllis_Gilmore at rand.org (Phyllis Gilmore)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Tapestries

Date: Mon, 18 Dec 95 17:46:30 GMT

Organization: RAND

 

In Article <4b53qd$qlq at ixnews2.ix.netcom.com>, brettwi at ix.netcom.com(Brett

Williams ) wrote:

 

>My lord husband caught a little news program blurb somewhere in the

>depths of CNN around 5 AM one morning-- the Gobelin tapestry works is

>very much still in existence doing restoration, recreation and original

>tapestries as they've done for a long time.

>

>A largish tapestry from the Works is the price of a modest sized house

>in An Tir.

>

Yes, but you cannot buy them.  The factory belongs to the

French government, and its products are normally intended to

go in government buildings or are given as very special

gifts.  When I was there in 1993, they were working on a

commission, though--from another European country as a tribute

to its queen (if memory serves--and it wasn't England, either).

 

It's a neat place to visit, whenever you're in Paris (you may

have to make arrangements to join an English-speaking tour group,

though).  The facility houses both the Gobelin (tapestry) and

Savonnerie (carpet) works.  The tapestry looms are enormous,

as are the resulting tapestries--and I gather it takes several

years to produce just one (memory fails on exact estimates).

 

Neither the factory nor any of its products, alas, is period,

but the "innards" look like at least one period drawing I've

seen (don't ask for a source--you all know my memory and my

library by now!).

******************************************

SCA:  Lady Philippa de Ecosse, Lyondemere, Caid  

mka:  Phyllis Gilmore, Santa Monica and Torrance, CA

 

 

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

From: Andrew Lowry <alowry at wchat.on.ca>

Subject: Re: Tapestries

Organization: WorldChat / The Online Source, Burlington Ontario.

Date: Tue, 19 Dec 1995 04:54:56 GMT

 

I have seen woven tapestries based on various med/ren examples - Bayeux

Tapestry, Unicorn etc. at a large fabric store in downtown Toronto. They

looked pretty good but prices are in the 100s of dollars depending upon

the size. I don't know the manufacturer but I could find out if you

needed to know. I know that they were made in Europe. My lady is using

one pattern in uphostery fabric to do two chairs. It is a man with a

falcon from the Bayeux Tapestry :).

 

I would suggest you ask some of the larger fabric stores in your area

especially ones with European clients / suppliers about tapestries. If

they don't have them maybe they know where to get them.

 

Richard Larmer

Ealdormere

 

 

From: bj at alpha1.csd.uwm.edu (Barbara Jean Kuehl)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Tapestries

Date: 19 Dec 1995 14:50:17 GMT

Organization: Information & Media Technologies, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

 

tedlechman at aol.com (Tedlechman) writes:

>I'm in the market to purchase a tapestry for my home of the ars

>nova/renaissance period style. anyone out there make them ?

 

I'm not sure what kind of tapestry you are looking for or on how

grand a scale, but I saw several tapestries for sale in the

Past Times catalog.  They carry a 44" x 34" reproduction of a 1500

French tapestry, a 4'1" x 2'5" reproduction of a Flemish tapestry,

and a 3'5" x 2'4" reproduction of 1550 Flemish tapestry -- for $295

each.  They also have a 39" x 19" 1885 English tapestry for $175.00.

You can get a catalog from Past Times at 280 Summer Street, Boston,

MA 02210-1182 or trying calling 1-800-242-1020.

 

I've never ordered from Past Times, but I have heard good things

about them.

                              BJ

 

 

From: "Jennifer Kubenka" <jkubenka at post.cis.smu.edu>

To: ansteorra at eden.com

Date: Wed, 19 Jun 1996 11:23:02 +0000

Subject: New tapestries book

 

Good morning, all.

 

For you tapestries enthusiasts:

 

Brown, Clifford M. Tapestries for the courts of Federico II, Ercole, and

Ferrante Gonzaga, 1522-63. Seattle : College Art Association in

association with University of Washington Press, 1996.  In the series

Monographs on the fine arts ; v. 52.  ISBN 029597513X

 

There is an extensive bibliography at the back. Unfortunately,

though, most of the photos are black and white only, with just 11

color plates.

 

Lots and lots of historical stuff, though.

 

Jennifer D. Kubenka (Emher doesn't know anything about cataloging

books)

 

 

From: priest at vassar.edu (Carolyn Priest-Dorman)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Tapestries

Date: 8 Mar 1997 22:31:44 GMT

Organization: Vassar College

 

Greeting from Thora Sharptooth!

 

Morgan the Unknown (mesmith at freenet.calgary.ab.ca) asked:

>In the books that I have looked at, most of the tapestries are listed as

>being of silk and wool.

>Which would be the warp and which the weft? or are they mixed?

 

In the tapestries I have physically handled (four, at the Frances Lehman Loeb

Art Center of Vassar College), both wool and silk have been used as weft.  

Some used all wool weft, but others were mixed.  Ground warp is sometimes

linen, sometimes wool.

 

Catalogue entries for a great many other extant tapestries (particularly those

at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Cloisters in New York, which I have

read most closely) confirm what I have seen.  Linen warp was used sometimes,

and wool warp was used the rest of the time.  Wool weft is used for most of

the tapestry, and silk is used where sheen or delicacy of texture is needed

(e.g., armour, flesh, or rich garments).

 

The size of threads vary; the nicest ones I have handled (a pair of Judith

tapestries, sixteenth century) used silk weft that is not quite as thick as

buttonhole twist thread.  The wool was something thicker, perhaps about the

equivalent of a 20/2 yarn.  Both silk and wool wefts were used in plys,

generally 2-ply for wools and sometimes 3-ply for silk. The weft was a

heavier, undyed, 3- or 4-ply yarn.  Again, this is only what I have

experienced personally, but it seems to match the information I have read

about other tapestries.

***********************************************************************

Carolyn Priest-Dorman                      Thora Sharptooth

priest at vassar.edu                          Frostahlid, Austrriki

          Gules, three square weaver's tablets in bend Or

***********************************************************************

 

 

Date: Sat, 24 May 1997 20:49:14 -0400 (EDT)

From: Carol at Small Churl Books <scbooks at neca.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: tapestry how-to

 

Was someone looking for information on how to make tapestries?

 

Just saw a book which is about the techniques - no history, but a lot on how

to put tapestries together.  "Tapestry Weaving: a comprehensive study guide"

by Nancy Harvey, Interweave Press.

 

It includes:

1. the basics

2. preparation for weaving

3. basic tapestry weaving techniques

4 - 6 more advanced techniques

7. finishing, mounting, care of tapestries

8. a survey of modern tapestry

9. cartoon planning and preparation

10. summary & comparison of techniques

- also - glossary

 

Lady Carllein

 

 

From: berkleygal at aol.com (BerkleyGal)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: tapestry

Date: 12 Jun 1998 23:34:14 GMT

 

The Reader's Digest Complete Book of Embroidery has some very nice ones -- both

illustrations (with instructions!) and photographs.  It also talks about the

historical era(s) in which the stitch(es) were developed.  I'm very excited

about learning some of the new techniques shown. :-)

 

Bright blessings,

Fiona de Bousis

Kingdom of the West (Mists)

 

 

Date: Thu, 18 May 2000 03:38:38 EDT

From: <EalasaidS at aol.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Embroidery Question

 

HRAFNASDOT at aol.com writes:

> I am doing a Norse based tapestry piece with embroidery/crewel work in wools

>  - does anyone have a reference on this type, other than the Bayeux Tapestry?

>  

>  Asa Hrafnasdottir/aka Cynthia Lonsberry

>  Loch Ruadh

 

In the National Museum in Reykjavik, Iceland, there are a couple of

embroideries that use the exact same technique as the Bayeaux Tapestry.  

Interestingly enough, they are dated a couple of hundred years after the

Bayeaux.  The one I have a picture of is an altar frontal from the cathedral

at Holar, probably second quarter of the 16th century.  It shows three

Icelandic Saints in full episcopal vestments and two attendants (angels?)

swinging censers.  It is laid and couched work in wool. The colors were

vibrant!  I was amazed at the difference between the real thing and the

picture in the museum book.  The book says there are several altar frontals

worked in laid and couch work, all from the same period - late medieval.

 

As an interesting note, all the embroideries there were dated to 200 to 400

years after the technique was popular in Europe.  Wonder if it has something

to do with trade routes and Iceland's relative isolation? Or maybe the

older versions of the same technique just didn't survive. Too bad the really

detailed book I got there that discussed the embroideries wasn't available in

English... <grin>  I'm hoping to find someone who speaks Icelandic...

 

If it's just embroideries in wools that you are looking for, the Tapestry of

Creation, on display in the cathedral at Gerona, Spain (consecrated in 1038)

is worked in colored wool threads.    "Embroidery, A History" by Pamela

Warner, states that the stitches are hard to identify, but could be split,

chain or stem stitches.  It is dated to somewhere between mid 11th century to

early 12th century.

 

By the 13th century, silk thread seems to have replaced wool threads as the

embroiderers choice, at least based on the examples in my various embroidery

history/museum textiles books.

 

Ealasaid nic Suibhne

Kingdom of Atenveldt

 

 

From: Cynthia Virtue <cvirtue at thibault.org>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Armor for Dogs/Devonshire

Date: Wed, 15 Nov 2000 22:24:42 -0500

 

> I keep seeing references to this image in the Devonshire Tapestries, but

> I've yet to find a picture of it. Any ideas?

 

The Devonshire tapestries are at the Victoria & Albert museum in london,

and are the least-reproduced, most-interesting set of medieval

tapestries in existance.  I had to go there during office hours and look

through their photo originals files in order to get decent copies of

them.  The museum does have postcards available, and there is one work

devoted to them, now out of print.

--

Cynthia du PrŽ Argent

 

<the end>



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