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looms-msg - 5/19/10

 

Medieval looms. Warp-weighted looms. Inkle looms. Card weaving. Rigid Heddle looms.

 

NOTE: See also the files: weaving-msg, spinning-msg, felting-msg, velvet-msg, piled-fabrics-msg, quilting-msg, dyeing-msg, textiles-msg, Stick-Weaving-art, weavng-sizing-msg.

 

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This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

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Thank you,

   Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                         Stefan at florilegium.org

************************************************************************

 

From: esp at cup.portal.com (Emily Sue Pinnell)

Date: 12 Apr 91 04:38:50 GMT

Organization: The Portal System (TM)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

 

While I cannot document an inkle loom, I can point out a rigid

heddle loom and card weaving in the same illumination.  In the

famous Codex Manesse, also called the Minnesanger ms (German,

early 1300's), there is an illumination which shows a lady working

on weaving [f. 285].  I don't think the artist had any idea how

weaving works because he has the finished belt on the back side of

the rigid heddle.  There are hexagonal cards in front, and it looks

like the lady is beating (that's a weaving term!) this guy's hair

into her warp.  Besides the fact that it's backwards, it does show

that there were free-standing rigid heddle looms.

   [It is basically a flat board with slots cut into it, and a row

of holes across the center.  The warp is threaded one thread in the

slot, next in the hole, etc.  The warp threads in the slots can be

pushed up and down, while the ones in the holes are stationary.

Patterns can be created with either cards or pick-up sticks.]

 

While I haven't seen documentation for them, one or two hundred

years ago in early America people were using rigid heddle boards

that could be held between the knees.  They used them to weave

tapes, belts, and bindings in plain weave.  They make a very

portable package; the board is basically the size of a smalll bread

board or large hand-held mirror.

                                                    ___________

The one in the Codex Manesse is on a stand.         |           |

                                                   | | | | | | |

                       [imagine more and           | |o|o|o|o| |

                 smaller slots and holes]          | | | | | | |

                                                   |____   ____|

                                                        | |

                           knees would go   ->       ___| |___

                           here if wood curved

 

Hope this is of some help.  I too would be interested in more

information on this subject.

 

                            in service,

                           Amelie d'Anjou

                          [esp at cup.portal.com]

 

 

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

From: kreyling at lds.loral.com (Ed Kreyling 6966)

Subject: Re: Weaving question

Organization: Loral Data Systems

Date: Tue, 5 Oct 1993 02:16:44 GMT

 

Syr.Bennen.Mactire at p12.f1066.n374.z1.fidonet.org (Syr Bennen Mactire) writes:

>I am in the process of building one of those big Viking looms, you know

>the kind that lean up against the wall. I have two pictures to work from

>but need more to work out the details .

>Any ideas on books or points of reference that I can turn to?

 

"The Viking World" by James Graham-Campbell (Ticknor & Fields, New Haven,1980)

has a good diagram (p. 120) of a warp weighted loom. I think I have an exploded

diagram in another book but can't lay my hands on it right now. (Oh, the trials

of an SCA library). We'll send you a copy. "The Viking" published by Crescent

Books, New York (ISBN 0-51744.553-0) has drawings of all of the weaving tools

as well.

>Also, how fine a weave can be accomplished on just such a loom?

>How much tension is involved?

 

I assure you the limit of how fine the weave is will be my skill, not the type

of loom. Shouldn't be a problem to do 50 epi (threads per inch, Benen), which

is what the Pennsic place mats were, once I get the hang of weaving UP. I have

a photo of a scrap dug up at York that must be about 100 epi. The tension isn't

a problem since you tie bundles of threads to the loom weights. The finer the

thread, the more you tie to the weight. Of course, I will be much more

knowledgable after I've had a chance to play, swear, and weave on it for a while.                                          Brigit

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Ed Kreyling                 | Master Erik of Telemark O.L.,O.P.

kreyling at world.lds.loral.com | Shire of Brineside Moor

Sarasota,Fl. USA           | Kingdom of Trimaris, SCA

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

From: hwt at bcarh11a.bnr.ca (Henry Troup)

Subject: Re: Weaving question

Organization: Bell-Northern Research Ltd., Ottawa, Canada

Date: Thu, 7 Oct 1993 13:52:25 GMT

 

> There is a book I have looked thru but do not own, "The Warp Weighted Loom" by

> Marta Hoffman.  It is considered one of the best sources on warp-weighted

 

Available by mail order from Robin & Russ Handweavers, McMinnville, Oregon.

The exact address can be got from most weaving magazines, and the list of

publishers in the estimable Books in Print.

--

Henry Troup - H.Troup at BNR.CA (Canada)

 

 

From: jab2 at stl.stc.co.uk (Jennifer Ann Bray)

Newsgroups: rec.crafts.textiles,rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Weaving a rain cloak

Date: 2 Nov 93 10:05:44

Organization: STC Technology Ltd., London Road, Harlow, UK.

 

Fiacha said

"you need to be able to get to all parts at any time, this tends to

mean 3' foot clearance on all four sides"

 

For large floor looms, if you are willing to crawl around inside the

loom you don't need clearance outside. i have an old Andrew loom,

(floor loom with overslung batten) The loom occupies something like a

five foot cube. The left side is six inches from a wall, (which just

gives me room to draw the curtains between loom and wall) The right

side is touching a chest of drawers for the back two feet. The back of

the loom is four inches clear of the wall (which just gives room to

extract the pegs holding the warp beam in) The front of the loom

touches my bed which I sit on to weave (the bed is unusually high, so

works OK as a loom bench)

 

To further add to the crowding, I have fixed a shelf to the top of the

loom at the back which takes my boxes of yarn, shuttles, spare reeds,

hooks etc.

 

The bedroom looks very crowded, but it is perfectly possible to thread

up the loom by sitting on a stool with its legs stuck between the

treadles. If threads break I crawl underneath the warp at the back

and fix them from below. Similarly if I want to adjust the tie up I

crawl inside the loom and fix it from inside. I suspect that I would

have to climb into the loom to get at parts even if I had a mass of

space around it, though it would probably be easier being able to

crawl in one side and out the other instead of having to reverse!

 

 

From: holsten at nature.berkeley.edu (Donna Holsten)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Inkle Looms (was: Re: "a reasonable attempt"...)

Date: 9 Apr 1996 21:32:42 GMT

Organization: University of California, Berkeley

 

To the person who asked just *what* an inkle loom is:

 

It is a type of loom that allows a person to weave a thin, plain-weave

strip of fabric--like a piece of trim or a lacing.  It's basically a

framework with some dowels sticking out, onto which the warp is looped.

 

I don't know whether inkle looms are in our period--I've certainly never

seen one portrayed.  However, I *have* seen box looms portrayed--I'm

thinking specifically of the one in the tapestry I saw at the Louvre

(the name of which I can't remember, but I can look it up if anyone is

curious.) A box loom basically looks like a lap-sized rigid heddle

loom, and produces the exact same type of fabric as an inkle loom.  Now,

I haven't researched the topic, so I don't know if there have been any

trim or lacings found that would have been woven in a two-shed device

like a box loom--but if there's one shown in a tapestry, that's pretty good

evidence (for me) that inkle/box loom strips are historically accurate.

 

Joanna

 

 

From: foxd at silver.ucs.indiana.edu (daniel fox)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Inkle Looms (was: Re: "a reasonable attempt"...)

Date: 10 Apr 1996 05:26:19 GMT

Organization: Indiana University, Bloomington

 

Ok, the inkle loom in the form we have it is something Mary Atwater was

shown in England in the early part of this century.  Since Mrs. Atwater

regarded any textile or texitle tool predating about 1890 to be "ancient"

we have no idea of the actual antiquity of the piece.

 

She also says in _Byways in Handweaving_ that she was told the English wove

plainweave bands on the inkle loom and embroidered them.  She thought this

was boring so she devised the current methods of striped and pickup weaving

techniques for it.

 

HOWEVER:

 

The term inkle is definitely period:

 

Helen Bress gives two citations from the 16th century of the use of the term

spelled variously unkle and incle.   It seems to have been used for tapes or

laces.

 

Inkle bands are simple warp-faced bands.  Their weave structure is identical

to backstrap, rigid heddle and rep weaves.  Backstrap is certainly in use

far earlier than SCA period, rigid heddles have been found in viking graves,

and rep weaves can be woven on most harnes looms.

 

The methods Atwater adapted for modern inkle bands are period, we just

don't know if they were done on a thing that looked like an inkle loom, or

in a band box, or on a rigid heddle.

 

Audelindis de Rheims

 

 

From: deisla at aol.com (De Isla)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Inkle Looms (was: Re: "a reasonable attempt"...)

Date: 10 Apr 1996 03:41:59 -0400

 

The inkle weaving technique is definitly period but wasn't introduced to

the US until the 1930's.  My father is a dealer in hard to find textile

books and sells Helene Bress's book _Inkle_Weaving_ for $30.

 

Wm. MacDonald

 

 

From: fiddler at Eng.Sun.COM (Steve Hix)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Inkle Looms (was: Re: "a reasonable at

Date: 17 Apr 1996 22:13:38 GMT

Organization: Sun Microsystems Inc.

 

In article ht5 at newsbf02.news.aol.com, deisla at aol.com (De Isla) writes:

:The inkle weaving technique is definitly period but wasn't introduced to

:the US until the 1930's.  

 

That may be "reintroduced".

 

I've been researching woven sashes in pre-Revolution North America,

and while most of the Great Lakes-Canadian samples look to have been

finger-woven, there are some that are clearly heddle-woven,  plainweave,

warp-face fabric.

 

If they weren't inkle woven, somebody went to a lot of bother making

things harder for themselves than necessary.

 

Even if inkle looms in NA predate the 1930's, the don't seem to have been

very common, though.

 

:My father is a dealer in hard to find textile

:books and sells Helene Bress's book _Inkle_Weaving_ for $30.

 

A very good introduction to the inkle loom.

 

 

From: David Corliss <CORLISD at aa.wl.com>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Inkle Looms (was: Re: "a reasonable at

Date: 18 Apr 1996 13:37:29 GMT

Organization: Parke-Davis Retrospective Validation

 

An inkle loom is, very simply, a tool for making inkles. Inkles are

referenced in Shakespeare. Narrow-band warp-faced articles have be

produced by many diverse methods continuously for a *very* long time. The

use of the term "inkle" refering to certain articles within this broad

classification seems to have arisen in the late 1500's. The inkle loom,

as that term is used today, was not known to western culture at that

time: indeed, it seems to been eventually named the "inkle" loom because

it produced what were already known as inkles.

 

Beorthwine of Grafham Wood

 

 

From: brettwi at ix.netcom.com(Brett Williams)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Inkle Looms (was: Re: "a reasonable attempt"...)

Date: 10 Apr 1996 15:45:31 GMT

 

holsten at nature.berkeley.edu (Donna Holsten) writes:

>To the person who asked just *what* an inkle loom is:

>It is a type of loom that allows a person to weave a thin, plain-weave

>strip of fabric--like a piece of trim or a lacing.  It's basically a

>framework with some dowels sticking out, onto which the warp is

>looped.

>I don't know whether inkle looms are in our period--I've certainly

>never seen one portrayed.  However, I *have* seen box looms

>portrayed--I'm thinking specifically of the one in the tapestry I saw

>at the Louvre (the name of which I can't remember, but I can look it

>up if anyone is curious.)  A box loom basically looks like a lap-sized

>rigid heddle loom, and produces the exact same type of fabric as an

>inkle loom.  Now, I haven't researched the topic, so I don't know if

>there have been any trim or lacings found that would have been woven

>in a two-shed device like a box loom--but if there's one shown in a

>tapestry, that's pretty good evidence (for me) that inkle/box loom

>strips are historically accurate.

>Joanna

 

Small box looms with a rigid heddle were used to make ribbons with fine

threads, such as silk. I just came home from the library last night

with the first set of proceeds from ILL (grin) on tablet weaving, and

incidentally got a copy of Crowfoot et alia's _Medieval Finds From

Excavations in London: 4, Textiles and Clothing_, HMSO 1992, ISBN 0 11

290445 9, which, on page 25, shows a drawing of a woman using a small

box loom 'as it might have looked in the 14th century'.  I find no

archeaological evidence *so far* for decorative trim with merely tabby

shed; rather more complicated designs were done with tablet/card

weaving techniques; however I haven't looked very hard yet and am

nothing what I'd term an expert. Crowfoot's work does not mention

two-shed trim at all, other than silk ribbon used where we would use a

lining/interfacing reinforcement on the business end of a garment, like

button/buttonhole closures.

 

Of all things, I got the last box loom of this sort from Halcyon Yarns

last week. The manufacturer no longer makes them.

 

For the non-cognoscenti with respect to weaving terminology, a shed is

the V-shape formed when threads split in a loom enabling a shuttle to

go through. A pick is one weft shot-- so when someone is talking about

45 picks per inch, that's 45 weft shots per inch. Tabby is the weaving

world's name for plain woven fabric. Most of the cotton-poly

broadcloths seen in garb in Caid, for example, is tabby woven.

 

   "For making tabby-woven ribbons a rigid heddle or heddle-frame was

suitable (see page 141). The frame consisted of a series of pierced

slats through which alternate ends were threaded enabling a shed and

countershed to be created when the fame was raised or depressed; it

could either be used on its own with the warp tensioned as for tablet

weaving, or fitted into a small box loom supported on the lap (figure

8). An elk antler heddle-frame from a 13th- or early 14th century

depsoit in Bergen Norway, shows that extra rows of holes for the warp

were sometimes pierced through the edge of the frame at the top and

bottom to assist with patterning."

 

   Page 141:

 

   "Silk ribbons in tabby weave appear in English depsoits of the 10th

and 11th centuries (Pritchard 1984, 473, 281-2, no 36, pls IVB; Walton

1989A 367-9; Crowfoot 1990, nos 1017-19, 1021, pls xxxviif, xxxvii a

and b) but they do not reappear until the late 14th century, when the6y

are generally woven from two-ply warp and weft yarn.  The earlier

ribbons are not woven from plied thrown silk; instead, gre'ge

(undegummed) silk was common and the warp and/or weft yarn sometimes

had a S-twist. This indicates that the ribbons have different places of

origin, the earlier ones perhaps coming from  small workshops situated

in the Levant or central Asia, the later ones being locally produced in

London from imported thread...."

 

I think the fringed garter on the next page (142) is too cool...

(cackle)

 

ciorstan

 

 

From: theducks at greenduck.com (Steve Urbach)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: New hobby- weaving

Date: Sun, 12 Jan 1997 18:15:54 GMT

Organization: Green Duck Designs

 

deadpool at phoenix.net (Lord Whoever) wrote:

 

>I am considering learning a new skill, weaving (yes, everyone in my

>household, especially my lady, thinks I've finally lost it, but...). I

>don't plan on anything too elaborate, just some 24" wide tartan. The

>question is, where to get the loom (or plans to build it). I should be

>able to live with a simple fixed heddle loom, but if I knew I probably

>wouldn't be asking. I need to be able to do 24" by a minimum of 5

>yards. Is there a good way to learn about this stuff?

 

Green Duck Designs carries a "Loom Plan". I will have to find a copy

and see how wide a warp it will handle.

We will be at Estrella again this year.

Keep the Duck Green, bring money <evil G>.

 

Derek

>-------------------------

>Lord Gundiok Swienbrothar

>-------------------------

>Laird Collin MacLean

>-------------------------

>Ravensfort, Ansteorra

>deadpool at phoenix.net

       _

      | \                           Steve Urbach

      |  )erek

   ____|_/ragonsclaw                 theducks at greenduck.com

  / / /                              http://www.greenduck.com

 

 

Date: Mon, 11 Aug 1997 12:31:48 -0600 (CST)

From: "Donna Holsten" <holsten at nature.Berkeley.EDU>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: RE: inkle weaving & warp faced band weaving

 

> Does anyone have any evidence for inkle looms being used in period?  I

> have heard both that they didn't exist and that by the 16th century (in

> Scotland?) they seem to have existed.

 

>From what I understand, the "inkle loom" that many people use (the one

that's basically a bunch of dowels sticking out of some boards) is 19th

Century. *However*, a "box loom" is well within our period, and just as

easy to make, and possibly even easier to use.

 

The term "inkle" would be appropriately used to describe a narrow band of

cloth or ribbon, no matter what type of loom was used to weave it.

 

For a drawing of a box loom, see the Museum of London's _Textiles and

Clothing_. (I don't have it handy, otherwise I'd give you a page number.)

It's basically just what it sounds like--a lap-sized box with a cloth beam

and warp beam, and a rigid heddle.  It works just like any modern

rigid-heddle loom.  The advantages of it over an "inkle loom" are that

it's more lap-sized (the "inkle-looms" I've seen people use haven't exactly

been lap-sized), you can wind on exactly as much warp as you want

(an "inkle loom" can only take a specific length of warp), and it was

used before 1600.

 

Now, I'm not a carpenter, so I'm afraid I can't really tell you how to make

one, although I was actually planning on finding a woodworker to help me,

some time in September.

 

The only actual period drawing of a box loom I've seen is in _The Book of

Tapestry_ on page 40-something.  It's in a noble pastoral millefleur

tapestry from about...1400 or so (again, I don't have it with me)...from the

Louvre. (If anyone knows of any *other* period drawings of a box-loom, I'd

be forever indebted!)

 

Joanna Melissa Ronsivalle

 

 

Date: Tue, 12 Aug 1997 08:42:22 -0700 (PDT)

From: Cynthia Virtue <cvirtue at well.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: RE: inkle weaving & warp faced band weaving

 

>For a drawing of a box loom, see the Museum of London's _Textiles and

>Clothing_. (I don't have it handy, otherwise I'd give you a page number.)

>It's basically just what it sounds like--a lap-sized box with a cloth beam

>and warp beam, and a rigid heddle.  

 

Roy Underhill (the PBS chap who does woodworking without power tools)

showed how to make a box loom on one of his shows a few years back.  It

looked just like the Museum of London's picture, although he said the

style was about 100+ years old.  There's a good chance

that Mr. Underhill has books out that follow his projects -- one might be

able to find construction information for the box loom.

 

cv

 

 

Date: Mon, 18 Aug 1997 12:53:43 -0700

From: Brett and Karen Williams <brettwi at ix.netcom.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: warp weighted loom

 

Mary Hysong wrote:

> Maggie.Mulvaney wrote:

> A friend of mine and I have been trying to come up with a handspun

>

> > yarn strong enough to work as warp for an upright (warp-weighted)

> > loom, yet thin enough to match period examples.

>

> *******************

> Sorry I can't help on the question, but Please tell me where you found

> info on warp wieghted looms--I'm very interested in trying them. I

> understand Scandinavian countries used them right into this century for

> blankets and they often began with a tablet woven heading, so if you

> used it for a cloak your trim is built in--info and sourced vastly

> appreciated!

> Mairi

 

And here I was waiting for someone else to answer this... ;)

 

I don't have any particular books in mine own library specifically about

warp-weighted looms, though I know that there is at least one already

out there: Marta Hoffman, _The Warp Weighted Loom_, ISBN unknown at this

writing. Professor Barber's _Prehistoric Textiles_ (a fascinating read)

is a tad on the early side for SCA folk, but has a lot of interesting

information about textiles woven on the warp-weighted loom.  However,

being a snoop armed with curiosity and a good search engine...

 

Try a look at Master Gerekr's pages. There's a specific page i his site

with a photograph of a warp weighted loom set up and ready to go at:

 

http://users.aol.com/gerekr/costume.html#warp

 

There's also a page with two encyclopaedic-style illustrations, complete

with labels and terminology both in Icelandic and English at:

 

http://www.dmv.com/~iceland/vefstadur/vefstadur.html

 

The latter site is one of the pages in Ullarbladid (both 'd's are the

thorn-type d), a commercial site for a woman who exports Icelandic wool,

yarns and some tools to the US. She has, incidentally, a bone needle

suitable for naalbinding in her pages. I am not even a satisfied

customer, so can't make any further comment, other than providing the

reference.

 

I forgot to add-- Indigo Hound, the people who make a variety of wool

processing combs for worsted preparation (anything from single to five

pitch! Viking Combs is what they call 'em), also makes a warp-weighted

loom and two sizes of late-period appropriate great wheel. I have a copy

of their catalog since I was toying with the idea of ordering combs, but

neither the wheel or loom is depicted therein. They advertize in

Spin.Off regularly.

 

ciorstan

 

 

Date: Wed, 20 Aug 1997 22:44:09 -0500

Subject: Re: inkle weaving & warp faced band weaving (forward)

From: tamapa at juno.com (Cynthia A Kraus)

 

>>From: Wendy Robertson <wcrobert at blue.weeg.uiowa.edu>

>> 

>>Does anyone have any evidence for inkle looms being used in period?  I have

>>heard both that they didn't exist and that by the 16th century (in

>>Scotland?) they seem to have existed.

 

My research has yielded little hard evidence of any small looms.  Unless

there is a museum or archaelogist find out there that most scholars don't

know about, the majority of the evidence is in pictures.  I am a believer

in using reasoning and speculating about tool evolution.  The automobile

did not spring full-blown but was a series of little discoveries that led

up to putting it all together.

 

The 'inkle' loom as we know it cannot be dated further back than early

Victorian era though the name comes from Scandinavia.  Remember that

'inkle' refers to a narrow band of cloth, not the weaving technique.  It

is possible to weave anything on an inkle loom on a full size loom (you

just waste a lot of warp space).

 

If you look at the design of an inkle loom, you will notice that it is

essentially a warping board with an adjustable peg.  The key design

element to modernly label a loom as an inkle loom is that adjustable peg

- it is also present on the floor models.  When you remove the adjustable

peg, you simple have a warping board which are period.

 

Now the question is - were warping boards used to weave on or were they

strictly for measuring the warp?  If you are planning on tranferring your

warp to a full-size loom, you will need to actually thread up the

'shafts' - either rigid heddles, string loops, tablets, etc.  Alll of

these techniques were used to weave wider fabrics than are generally

available on a inkle loom - yes, even tablet weaving could use over 200

cards - in fine silk this weaves about 3" wide but you need the wider

loom to handle the thickness of your card and to give more space for

multiple 'packs'.

 

It does seem to be a more common practice to weave wider pieces on the

wider loom and we know it is possible to weave the narrower pieces

'back-strap' which is also a loom but with a more sensitive tensioning

mechanism. The argument against back-strap is generally that the

medieval woman could not afford to be 'tied' to her work.  I disagree

since in general it is as easy to 'untie' yourself as it is to get up

from a standard loom.  The worry about tangling your warp is not really

an issue - if you are routinely interrupted, you develop techniques to

putting down your weaving for a temporary break and different techniques

for a longer break.  I do not see a medieval woman spending 30 min per

task each day, but rather more the old farm way of a day for laundry, a

day for cleaning, a day for weaving.  Yes, you will get interrupted for

such things as meals and children, but on the day's (or morning's) chore,

you would typically get several hours of work done.

 

The next question to ask is - what is the real advantage of changing the

existing method for a miniature loom.  Under the feudal system, the

landowner actually owned the looms and the serfs did the weaving.  What

is the landowner's investment in a miniature loom worth?  Does he want

many special purpose looms that may be idle or general-purpose looms that

can be used for any need at hand?  The average serf would not have a loom

in their home so back-strap is the only option available for what little

time they could call their own.  They would probably not be able to

afford the extra wood needed for a loom and it is vulnerable during a

harsh winter to becoming firewood - better the loom than the table.

Besides, the cloth woven at the landowner's demand would be shared among

all the serfs.

 

As we move forward in time, professional weaving guilds appear.  Did they

spend time on bandweaving?  Probably or we wouldn't have some the

spectacular tabletwoven stoles like St. Cuthbert's.  Did they use a

special loom?  Who knows.  Medieval guilds are a secretive group - your

wealth and status is dependant on keeping ahead of the competition so

there were often rules against sharing 'trade secrets' outside the guild

- there is not documentation for the European draw-loom which must have

existing prior to the 18th century but this is when it's documented.  The

loom itself determines what can be woven - if your loom can't, you can't.

The same arguements apply to the guild as to the landowner - will the

investment pay off?  The answer depends on the specific guild.  Each

guild will often have a 'specialty' - if that specialty benefits from a

specialized loom, it is probably worth the investment.  It is easy to

imagine a medieval weaver figuring out that you can combine measuring

your warp with threading your warp into one step.  Besides, warping

boards take less space and less wood so you can put more weavers to work

in less space.  Did they add the adjustable peg?  Possibly not - this is

a convenience, not a necessity.  While we think it seems obvious, it has

already been done  - hindsight is 20/20.

 

I personally use an inkle loom because I'm a recreationist and have only

small blocks of time to devote to my weaving - just like a costumer uses

the sewing machine.  I understand the history of the tool I use and do

not try to justify it's use.  If someone asks, I pretty much tell the

what I've written.

 

Tamara Tysjachyolosova

Spinning Winds, Calontir

 

 

From: shansu at xmission.com (shansu)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Card weaving

Date: Wed, 03 Sep 1997 19:25:38 GMT

Organization: Silverwood

 

On 1 Sep 97 10:25:05 GMT, tierna at agora.rdrop.com (Britt ) wrote:

>I've just taken up card weaving, ummm, about three hours ago.  Well, the

>weaving part, that is.  In the past week I've read a couple of books and

>made my own cards thus far, and am now two and a half feet into a simple

>(4 forward, 4 back) practice band in acrylic yarn.  I've made eight

>different kinds of mistakes, fixed most of them (my first 4 inches are

>*awful, I'll unweave 'em when I'm done and fringe it), found my stride

>and finally gotten my edges even.  This looks hopeful.

>I plan on making custom trim for my household if I can get the hang of

>it all.  Would there possibly be an email list applicable to the craft?

>Would anyone be willing to offer tips/threading patterns/advice?

>I plan on making my own period equipment soon, so I can weave at events.

>(Anyone know where I can purchase a pair of iron shears?)

>And yes, I've been through Stephen's Florilegium files, thanks.  :)

 

 

Something my  lord build for me (so I wouldn't have to tie myself to a

doorknob) was a cardweaving "loom."  It consists of a 1x6 about 3 feet

long, with pieces of the same board fixed upright at both ends.  One

of these has a notch cut in it, about 1/4 inch deep and all the way

across the board, except for 1/2  inch at either side.  The other end

has two pieces of 1/4 square stock with holes drilled in both ends-

run a long, stiff wire through the hole at one end, across the board,

and thrrough the other hoile.  Stack the other bar on top.  Bend the

ends over and attach to the non-notched end board with screw eyes.

This is a tensioning device- your finished work goes over both bars,

then under the bar furthest from you and up between the two bars.

Then it goes over the bar closest to you and hangs down.

 

Sound complicated enough? (grin)  It's really quite simple, but hard

to describe.  He got the idea from a book on card weaving that I have

in the basement somewhere.  It is a very useful book- I can find the

author and title for you if you'd like.  I can even send you the

instructions/plans for the "loom."  

 

You need an empty cardboard tube and some string to wind your unwoven

yarn on.

 

This device might not be strictly period- but then again, who knows?

I haven't researched it- but it stands to reason that anyone that did

this type of weaving would have some way to make it more portable than

having to literally "tie" themselves down!

 

You can also use an inkle loom to hold your cardweaving- but this

limits your width.

 

I also have some really good patterns for cardweaving, and

instructions for making a two-color reversible band.  In fact, I made

a pair for my Queen (Corisande) to wear as tippetts when she stepped

down. Done in her colors, with her device.  Lots of work, but worth

it.

 

Yours in service,

Shansu

shansu at xmission.com

 

 

Date: Sun, 28 Sep 1997 22:17:36 +0000 (GMT)

From: mmy at fp.co.nz (Maggie.Mulvaney)

To: SCA-ARTS at UKANS.EDU

Subject: the quest for a warp on a warpweighted loom - update

 

        Greetings to all who have graciously expressed interest in and

suggestions for the project to weave an authentic cloth on the

warp-weighted loom!

 

The latest news is good, we've indeed managed to spin a single-ply

warp thread to correct thinness and warp a test piece.  I've updated

the webpage about the project at:

 

http://www.fpnet.co.nz/users/m/maggiem/costume/warp.htm

 

thanks to all who have been helpful!

 

/mmy

************************************************************

* MMY             *               Maggie.Mulvaney at fp.co.nz *=20

* Maggie Mulvaney * http://www.fpnet.co.nz/users/m/maggiem *

************************************************************

 

 

Date: Mon, 3 Nov 1997 09:39:07 -0500 (EST)

From: "Charles J. Cohen" <charles at eecs.umich.edu>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Inkle Look Question

 

[Posted for a friend, sorry about the delay - Midair]

 

From: TLBougher at aol.com

Date: Sun, 19 Oct 1997 13:49:05 -0400 (EDT)

 

<<I'm begging my very-handy-with-wood mother for an inkle loom for Christmas.

I'm not particularly worried about it being period in design, so long as I

can weave on it.>>

 

First things first. The *inkle loom* is NOT period. The style of weaving IS

period. The loom is not. The *inkle loom* was developed in the mid 1800's. We

use it in the SCA because it is portable. People in the SCA use it for

weaving narrow strips of warp-faced cloth, either by employing the use of

heddles (as in "inkle weaving") or tablets (as in "tablet weaving"). Inkle

weaving (narrow strips of warp-faced weaving employing the use of heddles)

has been found as early as 2500BC.

 

<<What would be the longest feasable length for unsupported, hardwood pegs?>>

 

The longest pegs I have seen have been about six (6) inches long.

 

<<For supported (ie the loom is two sides and pegs between, one side possibly

removable for ease

of winding-on and removing)?>>

 

You could make an inkle loom of this design just about any width. However,

this design is a Royal PITA (Pain In The A**) to warp.

 

<< Since I'd like to make as long bands as possible at once, or have the

option to, at least.>>

 

The length of the band has nothing to do with the length of the pegs. The

length of the pegs would only effect the *width* of the band. The length of

the band is determined by the number of pegs that are used.

 

<< Also, what's a 'tensioning wheel?>>

 

The tension bar is there to adjust the tension of the warp and is treated as

one of the warping pegs. As you weave, the overall length of the band

shrinks. This is because, when you first warp the loom, all the warp is in a

straight line. As you weave, the warp is now traveling over and under the

weft. This effectively shrinks the length occupied by the warp. When warping

the loom, the tension bar is at its fully extended position. As you weave,

you loosen the tension so that you may advance the warp. When you tighten it

again, you will eventually find that you can't get it all the way back to its

original fully extended position.

 

<<I'm trying to give them drawings or diagrams of as many different methods

of doing *everything*, so as to give them ideas.>>

 

Go to the library and look for books on weaving. Many of them will have a

chapter on inkle weaving and include photos of inkle looms. Some even have

diagrams and plans for making your own. I know that the book titled

_Inkle_Weaving_ by Helene Bress has plans for two different inkle looms. One

is a table top sized loom (like most of us use) that produces between 8 and

10 feet of finished length. The other is a floor sized loom (like only a few

of us own) that can produce many more feet of length. A friend of mine built

me a floor inkle loom that produces 19-1/3 *yards* of finished length.

 

<<What are the pros and cons of a sliding peg, a pointed-oval-board that

swivels, a tensioning wheel, other methods? >>

 

Having a tensioning bar that has a cross section that is not round is better.

My favorite inkle loom (I own three of them) has a tensioning bar that has a

cross section that is basically triangular (with rounded edges, of course).

This allows me to have small minor tension adjustments when necessary.

 

I hope this helps answer your questions. Good luck in getting a loom for the

holidays <g.

 

Lady Anne Marie de Garmeaulx

 

 

Date: Fri, 07 Nov 1997 22:18:42 -0800

From: Brett and Karen Williams <brettwi at ix.netcom.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Inkle Loom Question

 

John or Fraya Davis wrote:

> Can anyone send me diagrams of an inkle loom and the way it is used?  We

> don't have anyone nearby that I know of to teach us, and there are many

> people here who would love to learn.

 

Heehee-- ask and ye shall receive. I wrote this for another list, but

it's pertinent here.

 

*begin quotation*

 

It's hard to tell someone how to use a specific object without resorting

to visual aids. I will try, nonetheless. (trots off to get hers)

 

My inkle loom is a Howell-- it has that little spread-eagled man burnt

into the wood.  Each manufacturer has a slightly different arrangement

for a tensioning device-- which is immaterial to the lecture at hand,

for the nonce. The loom is basically shaped like this (yes, out of

proportion due to limitations of ascii art:

 

               _     _

             1 *     * 2

             3 | *---|

               |     |

____________4__|*    *___ 5

*_______________*_______*_|

6               7       8

 

I've indicated each peg with the * symbol and assigned a number.

 

So, the idea, all considerations of multi-colored warps aside for the

nonce, is to make a continuous warp by starting at peg 6. Go straight

back from 6 to 2, down and across to 3, ignore 4, go to 5, back to 7,

then down and back to 8 and under the entire loom's length to 6 again.

Ah, you say, what's number 1 and 4 for?

 

String heddles. On your second pass of warp threading, instead of

skipping peg 1, pass your warp from 6 to 1, then 2. The rest of the warp

path is the same. A string heddle is made by knotting a longish length

of string to make a firm loop around pegs 1 and 4. Attach one end of

your heddle to peg 4 by looping it over the peg, bring it around your

second warp end, then attach the other end of the heddle to peg 4 the

same way. Doubling your heddle makes for a strong one, and also means

less measuring time-- hey, winding warp is my least favorite step.

Continue this technique until the desired number of warp ends have been

achieved, alternating heddle pass and non-heddle pass.

 

An inkle loom has a shed already present once it's warped correctly.

Take a stick beater of some kind, insert it between peg 4 and the warp,

and force the un-string-heddled warp up through the other warp ends to

change shed. Voila-- instant tabby.

 

And that's how an inkle loom is used properly.  I highly recommend

Helene Bress' _Inkle Weaving_, ISBN 0-9620543-1-3, which covers inkle

technique thoroughly, though I have to admit the projects depicted

therein just scream "1970's!" due to color choices and just plain ol'

shifts in cultural tastes. Amusingly enough, I noticed that one of the

names of the sample contributors in this book, Doramay Keasbey, is still

appearing as the author of the occasional article in "Weavers"

magazine... I digress.

 

Anyhow, it just occurred to me-- what if one set up an inkle loom with a

string heddle and bar arrangement like that of a four-shaft warp

weighted loom? A narrow twill cloth instead of tabby? Hrm. Hrm!

 

*end quotation*

 

An inkle loom is not a device used in period to make tabby bands-- it is

at earliest a 19th century invention. The latest Tournaments Illuminated

has a very wonderful article on band looms of the larger, tablet weaving

sort; plain weave (tabby in weaver's lingo) were mostly woven on

proportionally smaller rigid-heddle box looms. Please be advised,

though, that the inkle loom *produces* a perfectly period item.

 

> Gillian

> MoAS for Inc. Shire of Ard Ruadh (St. George, UT) of Artemisia

 

ciorstan

 

 

Subject: ANST - Looms for Tape Weaving

Date: Mon, 08 Jun 98 07:18:05 MST

From: "Donna C" <dcdesign at shield.com>

To: ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG

 

>Actually just doing some inkle weaving. I know the inkle loom itself is

>a post-period creation but what did they use in period? I know the

>South/Central Americans use a method called backstrap weaving which

>gives the same effect. I once read how the ancients Scandanavians did

>their weaving but I have long since lost that memory. Mistrss Gunnora

>or anyone else????

>Moriel***

 

There were a lot of different methods for what was commonly called "Tape

Weaving". From the most simple; embedding two sticks in the ground a good

distance apart; to a small lap loom with ratchets and locking mechanisms.

 

Some of the most common were variations on the two sticks. In several

cultures, they would mount two rods onto a flat piece of board. This could

be done in many sizes; from one about two feet apart (that could fit on your

lap), to one about six feet apart (you either sat or stood between the

poles).

I know of people who have used their four poster bed as a substitute for the

larger of these.

 

I have found a modern commercial child's loom that fits the fourteenth

century loom that I want. It has a flat base with two sets of arms and rods,

one at each end. It has ratchets and locking clips. It also came with a

rigid heddle. The best thing of all is that it fits in my lap. No more

breaking my back to use the inkle looms!!! I am in the process of warping it

up with cards using silk.

 

To make the shed in period, what they would use would depend on what they

were making. If they wanted to make an edging for clothes, they would use a

rigid heddle. If they wanted to make a belt or anything sturdy, they would

use cards.

 

Two really good resources that I have found are:

 

- The Book of Looms by Eric Broudy (ISBN0-87451-649-8)

 

This one covers a lot of different looms from all over the ancient world.

 

- Textiles and Clothing by Elisabeh Crofoot, Frances Pritchard and Kay

Staniland (ISBN 0 11 290445 9)

 

This book not only briefly hits on a variety of looms, it also describes

massive information about twist, weave, dyes, content among other things.

All of the pieces of textiles in this one are existing.

 

Galla Cunningham

Barony of Bryn GwladE>

 

 

Subject: Re: ANST - Looms

Date: Tue, 09 Jun 98 13:40:58 MST

From: "Donna C" <dcdesign at shield.com>

To: ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG

 

>Where did you find such a loom? I have always wanted on that is more

>period.

 

I bought it from the local weaving supplier here in Bryn Gwlad. The company

is Hill Country Weavers. Their information is as follows:

 

Hill Country Weavers

Suzanne MIddlebrook

1701 S. Congress Ave.

Austin, Texas 78704

512/707-7396

 

The loom that I purchased is called an Easy Weaver made by Harrisville. It

costs around $100.

 

It is a very simple design that could be duplicated by someone with good

woodworking skills (unlike me).

 

GallaE>

 

 

Subject: Re: ANST - natural dyeing ... reds & purples

Date: Wed, 01 Jul 98 09:56:08 MST

From: jhartel <jhartel at net-link.net>

To: ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG

 

Just a bit more on Tyrean or "imperial" purple.  This info. I read from

Ann Hecht's book, THE ART OF THE LOOM-Weaving Spinning and Dyeing across

the world. [ISBN 0-8478-1147-6] This a a GORGEOUS book with lots of good

info.

 

<snip - See dyeing-msg file>

 

Moriel***

 

 

Date: Fri, 02 Oct 1998 14:50:29 -0700

From: "Gina L. Hill" <hekav at gte.net>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Speaking of Tablet Weaving --Inkle looms

 

E. W. Gray wrote:

> Anyone know a good cheap source for an inkle loom ?

> -Gabrielle of Wyndreach

 

You might try;

 

Earthguild;

http://earthguild.com/

 

Halcyon;

http://www.halcyonyarn.com/

 

Straw Into Gold;

http://www.halcyonyarn.com/

 

The Woolery;

http://ww1.woolery.com/webpages/jive/index.html

 

And there may be something among the links on this page for tablet

weaving...

 

http://w3.thegroup.net/~janis/resources.html

 

Eleanor

 

 

Date: Fri, 2 Oct 1998 15:02:55 -0700

From: "Melinda Shoop" <mediknit at nwinfo.net>

To: <sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu>

Subject: Re: Speaking of Tablet Weaving --Inkle looms

 

Also try Heritage Looms---

 

Vigdis Bjornsdottir

 

 

Date: Fri, 02 Oct 1998 19:04:22 -0400

From: rmhowe <magnusm at ncsu.edu>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Speaking of Tablet Weaving --Inkle looms

 

E. W. Gray wrote:

> Anyone know a good cheap source for an inkle loom ?

> -Gabrielle of Wyndreach

 

http://www.radix.net/~herveus/

 

Magnus, unaffiliated.

 

 

Date: Sat, 3 Oct 1998 04:29:26 -0400

From: Melanie Wilson <MelanieWilson at compuserve.com>

To: "INTERNET:sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu" <sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu>

Subject: Inkle loom

 

>Anyone know a good cheap source for an inkle loom ?

 

Make one :), PLans in David Bryants Book Wheels & Looms, esential for

making all things to do with spinning and weaving (he also sells individual

plans of these and period furniture)

 

Mel

 

 

Date: Sun, 4 Oct 1998 00:37:30 EDT

From: <Gwenllyan at aol.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Speaking of Tablet Weaving --Inkle looms

 

<< Anyone know a good cheap source for an inkle loom ?

-Gabrielle of Wyndreach

>>

Edward Boyceright of Calontir charges around $50 for really nice ones (which

he makes). Roller looms are about $35.

 

 

Date: Wed, 14 Oct 1998 15:42:27 -0500

From: Jenn Carlson <jcarlson2 at unl.edu>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Speaking of Tablet Weaving --Inkle looms

 

E. W. Gray wrote:

> Anyone know a good cheap source for an inkle loom ?

> -Gabrielle of Wyndreach

 

Sorry to be so slow in replying to this. But here's the website for a

very inexpensive and easy to make (if I can do it, anybody can)

inkle/card weaving loom designed by a friend of mine:

 

http://www.unl.edu/opcenter/homepages/tm/loom.html

 

I've found mine nearly impossible to break, and easy to use. I take one

side off when I warp and it works great.

 

Maerwynn

--

H.L. Mærwynn of Holme       "fiegnas syndon geflwære,  fleod eal-gearo,

Mag Mor, Calontir            druncne dryht-guman,  do› swa ic bidde."

maerwynn at unl.edu                                            --Wealhfleo

 

 

Date: Sun, 7 Feb 1999 05:58:13 -0500

From: Melanie Wilson <MelanieWilson at compuserve.com>

To: "INTERNET:sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu" <sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu>

Subject: Great Wheel Plans and other textile plans

 

The Great wheel plans were GBP 6.20

 

The Spindle wheel the same (smaller version of the Great wheel)

 

There is also plans for, Sloping Spinning Wheel, Norwegian Spinning wheel,

Shetland, upright, english traditional, connecticut chair, arkwright,

samual crompton, French, Dordogne, Charka wheels.

 

Drun Carder, spinning stool, tabby loom, tablet loom, inkle loom, 4 shaft

table, foot power looms and warping mill!

 

Top price of any is GBP10 Plus postage of course.

David Bryant +44 1565 651 681 (usually an ansaphone !)

 

He also did a book with many of these plans in it but this is now OOP.

 

Last time I bought plans for somebody in the US he didn't take plastic only

sterling so I sent a cheque for her, as I have a sterling & a dollar

account (and take plastic in my book business ) I'm willing to help out if

anyone is stuck

 

Mel

 

 

Date: Wed, 10 Feb 1999 07:56:06 -0500

From: Debra Kozak <berkana at en.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Treadle Loom Plans

 

Loom Construction by Jeri Hjert and Paul Van Rosenstiel

Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1978  New York

ISBN 0442234163 (hard bound)

ISBN 0442234171 (paperback)

 

Lady Berkana von Metz

House Darkyard

Middle Kingdom

 

 

Date: Wed, 10 Feb 1999 08:23:52 EST

From: <DettaS at aol.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re:  Treadle Loom Plans

 

I have plans available. "How to Construct a 4-Harness, 6-Treadle Jack Loom."

 

Detta Juusola, Detta's Spindle

 

 

Date: Tue, 28 Dec 1999 12:59:59 GMT

From: "Elonwen ferch Dafydd" <elonwen at hotmail.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Looms

 

A warp weighted loom is easier to make. You take three small trees from the

forest near by, erect two of them and the third one should be tied

horizontally on the top. Then you take the threads and make the warp. Tie

equally weighed sand bags in the bottom, to make the threads tight enough.

If you only saw a picture of it, on that basis it would be very(!) easy to

build. Oh, and don't forget a heddle, it makes the weaving ever so much

easier and is indeed and old invention.

 

Elonwen

 

 

Date: Fri, 4 Jan 1980 07:16:47 -0700

From: "Cathie" <Jorunn at qadas.com>

To: <sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu>

Subject: Re:Warp weighted looms

 

   I have built my own warp-weighted loom using clay weights and it works

great. I don't have it set up right now because I just moved and need to

work it in, but the book by Marta Hoffman, The Warp-Weighted Loom, was my

guide when I build it.

 

THLady Jorunn nic Lochlainn

Outlands

 

 

Date: Sun, 07 May 2000 13:42:16 -0700

From: Lynn Meyer <LMeyer at netbox.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re:Warp weighted looms

 

There's a whole bibliography and set of links on WWL's by Thora Sharptooth,

at <http://www.cs.vassar.edu/~capriest/wwloom.html>;.  

 

Also, the SCAWeaving list would be the place to ask detailed questions

of people with experience (of which I'm not one :-) ).  Barbara

posted her Pennsic display proposal there, too.  Send email to

<SCAWeaving-subscribe at egroups.com> to subscribe.

 

Or find it in one of the usual two "SCA lists of email lists",

<http://lists.ansteorra.org/lists.html>; and

<http://lists.ansteorra.org/sca-faq.html#sec2.1>

(which I urge everybody to bookmark :-) )

 

Halima

 

 

From: MEDTC-DISCUSS at yahoogroups.com [mailto:MEDTC-

DISCUSS at yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Viktoria Holmqvist

Sent: Friday, November 20, 2009 4:18 PM

To: medtc-discuss at yahoogroups.com

Subject: [MEDTC-DISCUSS] Pattern and Loom

 

John Becker's seriously out-of-print "Pattern and Loom. A Practical

Study of the Development of Weaving Techniques in China, Western Asia,

and Europe"  has been made available online by the co-author Don B.

Wagner.

 

See this link for more information and downloading:

http://www.staff.hum.ku.dk/dbwagner/Pattern-and-Loom.html

 

This is a great service to weavers and textile people with a interest

in historical textiles and techniques! I hope they'll manage to find a

publisher willing to put the book back into print too. (I have been

searching for it second hand for the past 5 years and would sign up for

a printed copy right away even though the digital version is available

for free.)

 

/Viktoria.

----------------------------------------------------

Lanam fecit ("she worked with wool")--Roman epitaph.

Viktoria Holmqvist, G?teborg, Sweden.

E-mail: lanam_fecit (at) hotmail (dot) com

 

 

To: Gleann Abhann (mail list) <gleannabhann at yahoogroups.com>

Subject: Re: looms

Posted by: "Catherine Koehler" hccartck at yahoo.com hccartck

Date: Tue Apr 13, 2010 1:02 am ((PDT))

 

I weave on a 54" 4-harness loom and the set up is indeed a large part of the process.  Experienced weavers always warp for several projects at a time if possible and have some "tricks" to make the changing of warps easier such as tying off the warp ends in front of the heddles.  The new warps can be tied to these ends and then rolled easily to the back beam without having to rethread the reed.

The first time you warp a loom, you swear you'll never do it again.....but you always do!!  (and you get remarkably faster at it with each warping)

--- On Tue, 4/13/10, Stefan li Rous <stefanlirous at austin.rr.com> wrote:

Melandra said:

<<< yah, it is a big loom, but being single, it doesn't matter if the

loom takes up half of the bedroom....I just wish it was in good enough shape for

me to actually use it - but that, hopefully, will be taken care of soon... >>>

 

When you first posted the question about the loom, that is what

immediately occurred to me, the complexity and size. But late period

wasn't that far from the Jaquard (sp?) loom, so I decided that that 5-

harness might be possible in a late period industrial setting if not

in a home.

 

I've seen what it takes to set up simpler looms. I'd be real

interested in hearing how long it takes you to get it set up for a new

job. Even if I had the patience for the weaving, I think setting up

the loom would drive me nuts. I could see where setting up the loom

could take you a large part of the total weaving time.

 

Of course there may be folks on this list who've actually got

experience in weaving on larger looms. Any comments?

 

Thanks,

Stefan

--------

THLord Stefan li Rous Barony of Bryn Gwlad Kingdom of Ansteorra

Mark S. Harris Austin, Texas StefanliRous at  austin.rr. com

 

 

To: Gleann Abhann (mail list) <gleannabhann at yahoogroups.com>

Subject: Re: looms

Posted by: "Catherine Koehler" hccartck at yahoo.com hccartck

Date: Tue Apr 13, 2010 1:24 am ((PDT))

 

It's 3:30 a.m. and I must be brain dead.....I need to make a correction because what I wrote makes no sense!!

You tie off the warp ends in front of the REED and then you do not have to re-thread the REED or the HEDDLES (assuming that you are using the same heddle sequence)

Aine the sleep deprived

 

 

To: Gleann Abhann (mail list) <gleannabhann at yahoogroups.com>

Subject: Re: looms

Posted by: "Stefan li Rous" stefanlirous at austin.rr.com stefanlirous

Date: Tue Apr 13, 2010 11:12 am ((PDT))

 

Aine said:

<<< I weave on a 54" 4-harness loom and the set up is indeed a large  

part of the process.>>>

 

That is a wide loom!

 

I seem to remember comments that most medieval cloth was woven on  

narrower looms. Do you weave by yourself or with someone else? What do  

you do? Throw the shuttle back and forth to yourself? It seems like  

your back would be sore from leaning left and right.

 

Stefan

--------

THLord Stefan li Rous    Barony of Bryn Gwlad    Kingdom of Ansteorra

   Mark S. Harris           Austin, Texas     StefanliRous at austin.rr.com

 

 

To: Gleann Abhann (mail list) <gleannabhann at yahoogroups.com>

Subject: Re: looms

Posted by: "melinda" mlaf at sbcglobal.net maybard

Date: Tue Apr 13, 2010 7:38 pm ((PDT))

 

From: "Stefan li Rous" <stefanlirous at austin.rr.com>

<<< I seem to remember comments that most medieval cloth was woven on

narrower looms. Do you weave by yourself or with someone else? What do

you do? Throw the shuttle back and forth to yourself? It seems like

your back would be sore from leaning left and right.

 

Stefan >>>

 

On my loom, the heddle has a flat ledge that the shuttle rests on.  On

either side is a small framework with a moveable block, attached to a rope.

The ropes meet in a wooden handle.  You yank the handle, the block hits the

shuttle, sending it zooming over to the other side, yank the rope again, and

it zooms over to the first side...

 

Melandra

 

 

To: Gleann Abhann (mail list) <gleannabhann at yahoogroups.com>

Subject: counterbalance looms

Posted by: "Catherine Koehler" hccartck at yahoo.com hccartck

Date: Tue Apr 13, 2010 4:51 pm ((PDT))

 

To Melandra and others who are interested...

I have come across a picture in the book The Book of Looms by Eric Broudy that was taken from a thirteenth century manuscript.  The illustration clearly shows a treadle loom with pulleys for counterbalancing but is only two harnesses.  A quote from the book regarding this illustration is as follows:

"Since the Middle Ages this loom has been refined to enable it to accommodate additional harnesses, to modify the shedding mechanism, or to make it sturdier but in essence it has remained unchanged." (Broudy, p.141-142)

I have a hard copy of the book, but I believe it is available to read online at Google books.

 

 

To: Gleann Abhann (mail list) <gleannabhann at yahoogroups.com>

Subject: Re: looms

Posted by: "Karen" nerak at aol.com mistress_nerak

Date: Wed Apr 14, 2010 6:11 am ((PDT))

 

<<< On my loom, the heddle has a flat ledge that the shuttle rests on.  On

either side is a small framework with a moveable block, attached to a rope.

The ropes meet in a wooden handle.  You yank the handle, the block hits the

shuttle, sending it zooming over to the other side, yank the rope again, and

it zooms over to the first side...

 

Melandra >>>

 

Ah, a 'flying shuttle' which allows one person to weave wider cloth.  

I have a 45" 4-harness loom and weave fabric for cutting garments.  I do need to 'lean' from side to side in order to throw the shuttles, but it gets to be a sort-of dance while sitting and quite relaxing.

 

Warping is time consuming, which is why I tend to weave longer pieces of cloth.  The loom will waste about a yard of warp in the warping process, and the set up time is about the same no matter how long the warp.  So, I rarely warp for less than 5 yards.

 

<the end>



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