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card-weaving-msg - 4/15/09

 

Card and tablet weaving.

 

NOTE: See also the files: weaving-msg, looms-msg, piled-fabrics-msg, lace-msg, weaving-lnks, embroidery-msg, mdvl-textiles-bib.

 

************************************************************************

NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

    Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                          Stefan at florilegium.org

************************************************************************

 

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

From: hwt at bcarh11a.bnr.ca (Henry Troup)

Subject: Re: Weaving

Organization: Bell-Northern Research Ltd., Ottawa, Canada

Date: Fri, 20 Aug 1993 17:33:59 GMT

 

motto at cbnewsf.cb.att.com (mary.rita.otto) writes:

|> I was wondering if anyone was interested in Card Weaving.

...

|> Has anyone some patterns or techniques to share?  Or an interest in

|> getting the patterns I've made?  Or suggestions for the uses for the

|> woven bands (other than trim on garb)?

 

Great stuff!

 

The cardweaving interest list was running from cw at envy.kwantlen.bc.ca and

administered by:

 

Elizabeth "E.B." Braidwood                Donna Hrynkiw

Lions Gate, An Tir                        Kwantlen College

donna at envy.kwantlen.bc.ca                 Surrey, B.C.

 

I use cardwoven bands as tie-and-carry straps, and as drawstrings. I find this a great use for the samples of learning techniques. One of my banners is hung on cardwoven tape.

 

Have you done any of the two-and-two threading? You thread all the cards with two adjacent holes in one colour and the other two in a different colour. By manipulating the cards you can get all kinds of things from plain to stripes to diagonal stripes. It's in Collingwood, and looks really spiffy.

 

*Peter Collingwood, "The Techniques of Card Weaving", out of print.

--

Henry Troup - H.Troup at BNR.CA (Canada) - BNR owns but does not share my opinions

 

 

From: palmer at cis.ohio-state.edu (sharon ann palmer)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Weaving

Date: 22 Aug 1993 01:54:20 -0400

Organization: The Ohio State University Dept. of Computer and Info. Science

 

Henry.Troup at BNR.CA writes:

>Have you done any of the two-and-two threading? You thread all the cards with two adjacent holes in one colour and the other two in a different colour. By manipulating the cards you can get all kinds of things from plain to stripes to diagonal stripes. It's in Collingwood, and looks really spiffy.

 

I made a sash threaded each card alike, with a shade in each hole:

White, blue, navy, black.  It has wonderful bargello-like patterns.

I use crochet cotton for sashes and cords, it comes in many colors

and is smooth and strong.  

 

Ranvaig  sapalmer at magnusug.acs.ohio-state.edu

 

 

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

From: motto at cbnewsf.cb.att.com (mary.rita.otto)

Subject: Re: Weaving

Organization: AT&T

Date: Sun, 22 Aug 1993 06:37:40 GMT

 

Henry.Troup at BNR.CA writes:

 

Greetings Henry!

 

I'm so glad to hear you are interested in talking about weaving.  I have

written to Elizabeth, as you've suggested.  But how nice to exchange a

few ideas.

 

Your suggestions of tie-and-carry straps and drawstrings are good.  And also

for the hanging of banners.  Someone else suggested narrow ribbons for

the hanging of pendants.  Another person suggested narrow ribbons for the

sealing of scrolls, which opens a door of opportunity to trade with the

scribes for all manner of interesting things.

 

Have I done the 2+2 threading?  Why, yes.  My first sampler band was woven

in just this technique, and shows stripes, solids, checks, diagonals, and

letters.  It is a very useful technique.

 

I have done an interesting variation on this technique, based on research

into ancient pieces in museums.  I call it the 2+2-varying pattern.

Essentially, it is like the 2+2 technique.  The first two threads of

each card are threaded with the same color for all the cards.  For example,

white.  Then the other two threads, while matching each other, vary across

the warp to create stripes of different colors.  By choosing stripe colors

which are of similar color values, the non-varying color becomes the

"foreground" and the varying color becomes the "background".  The overall

effect is quite striking.  Using Kountry Kabled Kotton (brand) yarn, I

wove a rather interesting piece with this technique, using the following

draft pattern (although with more cards than shown below, but you get the

idea).

 

A      white  white  white  white  white  white  white  white

B      white  white  white  white  white  white  white  white

C      white  red    red    blue   blue   green  green  white

D      white  red    red    blue   blue   green  green  white

Because the color values are so similar, the strikingly different colors

still blend together into a background for the dominant white pattern.

It is hard to imagine this with a fire red, brilliant royal blue, and

deep emerald green, but it is so.  Perhaps you can experiment with this

yourself.  I think the effect is really amazing, which is probably

why it was a common technique.

 

Are there many card weavers where you live?  I have found a number of

Inkle weavers, but no card weavers near me.  So, to try to interest them

I've woven a puzzle belt that in sections can not be distinquished from

an Inkle weave, and in other sections could not possibly have been done

using Inkle weaving (just how hard would it be to take the center 12

warp threads, split them in two groups, and move them six threads closer

to the boarder, crossing the threads over each other?)  I hope it will

cause some spirited discussion and interest in the versatility of card

weaving and the interesting things that can only be done with card

weaving and no other techniques.

>*Peter Collingwood, "The Techniques of Card Weaving", out of print.

Ah, yes.  I've tried to get my hands on a copy with no success yet.

I have the books by Mary Atwater and by Candace Crockett, and have

borrowed the library's copy of Eileen Bird's book, which I feel gives

the best description of the structure but is woefully short on

history and patterns.  I also have a book by Russ Goff, self published

by Robin and Russ Handweavers, which is a collection of patterns.

But I'd still like to get a hold of Collingwood's book.

 

Would you be interested in exchanging patterns?

 

Rosaline

Shire of Rokkehealdon, MK

(Mary)

>Henry Troup - H.Troup at BNR.CA (Canada)

 

 

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

From: motto at cbnewsf.cb.att.com (mary.rita.otto)

Subject: Re: Weaving

Organization: AT&T

Date: Sun, 22 Aug 1993 06:44:17 GMT

 

In article <2571mcINNodb at iguana.cis.ohio-state.edu> palmer at cis.ohio-state.edu (sharon ann palmer) writes:

>In article <1993Aug20.173359.18685 at bcars6a8.bnr.ca> Henry.Troup at BNR.CA writes:

>

>>Have you done any of the two-and-two threading? You thread all the cards with two adjacent holes in one colour and the other two in a different colour. By manipulating the cards you can get all kinds of things from plain to stripes to diagonal stripes. It's in Collingwood, and looks really spiffy.

>

>I made a sash threaded each card alike, with a shade in each hole:

>White, blue, navy, black.  It has wonderful bargello-like patterns.

>I use crochet cotton for sashes and cords, it comes in many colors

>and is smooth and strong.  

>

>Ranvaig  sapalmer at magnusug.acs.ohio-state.edu

 

Greetings, Ranvaig!

 

Your blue white and black belt sounds very nice.  I was experimenting

with a four color threading pattern of green, red, blue and black.

With single card rotations, to vary the pattern, everything from diagonals

to houndstooth is possible.  And quite fun.  If you flip the cards, then

you get the reverse order on half the belt as well, adding to the variety.

 

I've done a number of braids in crochet cotton, but the ones done with

heavier yarns tend to be more "popular". ?

 

Rosaline

(Mary)

 

 

From: palmer at cis.ohio-state.edu (sharon ann palmer)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Weaving

Date: 22 Aug 1993 11:10:17 -0400

Organization: The Ohio State University Dept. of Computer and Info. Science

 

Greetings to Rosaline and the other card weavers on the net.  

 

We are just back from Pennsic, where I saw some *wonderful* card

weaving!  I had the baby along and didnt make it to any classses.

But I met Thora Sharptooth briefly, who was wearing a belt by

Mistress Rowena d'Erwalt (sp?) in Snartemo technique, where

each card is threaded alike with four colors, for instance

red, blue, green, yellow.  and each card is turned separately

to make interlocking geometric patterns.  Gorgeous!!

 

_Tablet Weaving_ by Egon Hansen, dist by Books for Craftsmen

1304 Scott Street, Petaluma CA 94954 USA, has reproductions

and patterns for this and other Viking bands.  It is

$50 for a slim paperback volume, with _lots_ of typos.

But very useful.

 

If you are card weaving on an inkle loom with all cards threaded

alike, you can save lots of time warping, by this method.

Put the cards in a pack and thread all of them at once, one ball

for each color.  Tie the ends to the beam, leave one card behind,

and warp the four threads on the pegs, back to the breast beam,

leave another card behind and continue.  When all cards are warped,

tie the beggining to the end for a continuous warp, like in inkle

weaving.  When I started this seemed the obvious way to do it,

but it doesnt seem to be generally done.

 

> I've done a number of braids in crochet cotton, but the ones done with

heavier yarns tend to be more "popular". ?

 

Crochet cotton is the heaviest I have used, the finest was sewing

thread.

 

I want to do some weaving again.  While I was pregnant, my

arthritis was too bad, and I have just been too busy since

then.  But Pennsic is over and I can stop sewing garb for

a while. :-)

 

Ranvaig  

 

 

From: motto at cbnewsf.cb.att.com (mary.rita.otto)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Weaving

Date: 25 Aug 93 18:09:50 GMT

Organization: AT&T

 

Greetings, Ranvaig!

 

How interesting!  What four colors were in Thora Sharptooth's belt?

I have never heard the technique of individual card rotation referred

to a Snartemo before.  I'd actually never heard a particular name

assigned to the technique.

 

Neither had I heard of the book by Egon Hansen.  Thank you for the lead.

 

I agree heartily with your statements about continuous warping.  I use

it whenever possible because of the increase in speed it provides in

warping.

 

I have been doing my card weaving on an Inkle loom since January, when

my husband and some loving friends gave me the loom for my birthday.

While it is not quite as simple and versatile as card weaving off the

loom, it has the advantage of being easily interruptible. In my

household, there is precious little time for weaving, after tending

to my children, and the housework, and, of course, the day job that

pays the bills and gives me net access.  Being able to leave the weaving

set up so that I can weave for a few minutes whenever I get a chance

makes the difference between getting something done in what appears to

be no-time versus being ever frustrated that there are no blocks of time

to get set up and weave.

 

Another thing I always do is warp the loom for the maximum length.

This allows me to make about a 9 foot length of weaving if I make it one

piece.  But more commonly I now make it into several pieces.  First I

will make a wearable belt or band.  Then I will make a sample piece with

the same pattern as the band, about 9-12 inches long, to show the pattern

and colors.  It makes it easier to part with a band if I have a piece to

keep for myself.  Then I can use the remaining length to experiment with

different weavings of the warp.  For example, after making a very striking

belt with a 12 forward, 12 reverse weave pattern, I wove it with a 4 forward

and 4 reverse pattern for an entirely different effect. Another woven with

the 4 forward, 4 reverse I wove entirely in one direction with a single

reverse -- the effect changed particolored diamonds into triangles and

was strikingly different than the original pattern.  I find the experimenting

to be the most satisfying part of the weaving.

 

I am fortunate that there are excellent sources of materials in my shire

and in the neighboring shire.  While I find the available colors of

crochet cotton to be very limited, there is a weaving workshop in the

area which carries a full array of colors in carpet warp. Embroidery

threads such as pearl cotton and stranded cotton floss are also both

cheap and abundant.  But most exciting were some recent closeouts of

"odd lots" of yarns in fine wools, rich, heavy cottons, and some amazing

silky rayon chained cord.  My bins are overflowing!  While the single

4-oz balls of cotton yarn in a dozen colors would seem a lost cause to

a knitter, for card weaving it is raw material for at least two dozen heavy

belts.  Belts that can hold up swords.  Belts that are up to

5 inches wide and can be worn as sashes.  Belts that are bold bands of color

across a garment.  (ah.... getting a little carried away -- forgive me)

 

There's just this artistic vision I get when I see a bin full of yarn,

the colors crying out to be paired and twisted together into a thing

of beauty and grace.  Kinda makes it all worthwhile, somehome.

 

Rosaline

Shire of Rokkehealdan, MK

(Mary)

 

 

From: scoth at cyberspace.com (Scot Harkins)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Weaving

Date: 25 Aug 1993 09:23:31 -0700

Organization: (CYBERSPACE) Public Internet 206.286.1600

 

Since you mention weaving, my lady, HL Alastrina McKeary, has a knotty

problem in the card weaving area.  She is going to produce about fifteen

yards of trim displaying a badge, somewhat symetrical, reversible in such

a way that one side will display vertically and the other horizontally.

To do this, we are fabricating *eight* sided cards (52 of them) for the

purpose.  We are only in the conceptual stage right now; pricing supplies

and graphing the pattern.  We are being careful to document progress for

future entry in competitions/tourneys.  All of this by Christ's Mass or

Twelfth Night.  If anyone is interested or has input, let me know or

reply.

 

HL Scot MacFin

Western RH, AnTir

 

 

From: jab2 at stl.stc.co.uk (Jennifer Ann Bray)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: tablet woven borders

Date: 26 Aug 93 12:19:40

Organization: STC Technology Ltd., London Road, Harlow, UK.

 

I don't know if anyone else has tried this, but tablet weaving was

once used as a starting border for loom weaving. the warp of the main

cloth is the weft of the tablet weaving. you produce a piece of tablet

weaving with the weft pulled out on one side around a couple of short

posts (the posts are hammered into the ground or fixed to one side of

a frame you are tablet weaving on) Marta Hoffman gives an excellent

description in her book on the warp weighted loom.

I tried this as a starting border for a warp weighted loom and it

worked fine, but I find the loom excrutiatingly slow to work on.

having just restored a 1930s frame loom I tried using a tablet woven

header on that. I was told by an expert it couldn't be done, but I

didn't really have any problems. I just sewd the tablet weaving to the

rod I would have tied the end of the warp to. I suspect I threaded the

loom up back to front as I had to do a lot of winding to get the warp

even on the back beam, but I wove a couple of inches last night and it

worked.

the loom will weave up to 40" so I fancy trying a square viking cape

on it. The next stage is to figure out how to do tablet woven sides

as well. I think if I stick to two threads per card I might be able to

fit them through the reed, but I won't get any really fancy patterns

that way unless I use brocading.

Has anyone else out there tried tablet weaving in association with

loom weaving? Has anyone got any suggestions?

I think from my reading that most bands that were integral with the

cloth and not sewn on were pretty plain, (though the Thorsbjerg

cloaks had very wide borders they don't seem to have been patterned)

does anyone know if this was the general rule, or know of any

exceptions to it?

 

 

From: PRIEST at vaxsar.vassar.EDU (CAROLYN PRIEST-DORMAN)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Weaving

Date: 27 Aug 1993 19:30:33 -0400

 

Unto the Fishyfolk of the Rialto, greeting from Thora Sharptooth!

 

Stephen of the Grove wrote:

 

>I've done much more with double-face (2+2) patterns than the

>threaded in paterns.  The pictures of period tablet weaving I've

>seen have all been done with that method...  None that I've found

>used the threaded in patterns.  Have any of you found documentation

>for threaded in patterns?

 

Several extant medieval pieces have border treatments that are small

threaded-in patterns.  The Coptic arrowhead motif discussed by Collingwood is

one; related simple threaded-in patterns were common to early period Coptic

weaves.  Also, checkered selvedges are found on some tenth-century Anglo-Saxon

pieces (some of the relics of St. Cuthbert).

 

A famous threaded-in pattern is the Saxon diamond piece. It's the remnants of

a "late pagan" Anglo-Saxon belt in three colors. The original write-up of it

is by Grace Crowfoot; Collingwood also discusses it and Gale Owen-Crocker's

DRESS IN ANGLO-SAXON ENGLAND has a very good photo of the piece on page 100.

While it displays the continuous forward turning and simple design of a

threaded-in pattern, the interesting thing about this weave is the turning

sequence:  you turn only the odd tablets and throw a weft, then turn only the

even tablets and throw another weft, and like that.

 

A Finnish woman's belt from the Eura graves (circa 1000 CE) has a small

semi-meander design that I think is threaded-in.  However, I haven't yet been

able to duplicate it; perhaps the book I found it in reproduces it oddly, or

perhaps I misinterpreted the design when trying to weave it.

 

Later in period (1294, to be precise), there's a threaded-in tubular silk

ribbon used as a seal tag on a Scottish royal charter. The pattern is worked

on eight tablets:  two side-by-side squares (one blue, the other pink) with

green centers on a white background.  The effect is sort of psychedelic, as the

tubular weave makes the squares spiral around the cord.

 

Many types of tablet weaving are period, however.  There's diagonal

double-turn, double-face double-turn, various twills, brocading, and shadow

patterning, let alone the more complicated four-color "Snartemo" technique.

And a far greater proportion of the finds are plain weave than anyone would

have you believe. ;>

 

For sources, e-mail me.  Remember, my offer of weaving two yards of silk trim

for the first person to definitively document "stinkin' diamonds" in period

still stands....

**************************************************************************

Carolyn Priest-Dorman                     Thora Sharptooth

Poughkeepsie, NY                   Frosted Hills ("where's that?")

priest at vassar.edu                      East Kingdom

            Gules, three square weaver's tablets in bend Or

**************************************************************************

 

 

From: jab2 at stl.stc.co.uk (Jennifer Ann Bray)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Weaving

Date: 2 Sep 93 11:38:52

Organization: STC Technology Ltd., London Road, Harlow, UK.

 

Thora Sharptooth wrote of a Finnish woman's belt from the Eura graves

witha threaded in semi meander pattern. I believe she is referring to

one described in "Ancient Finnish Costumes" by Pirkko-Liisa Lehtosalo-

Hilander.

It looked to me as if the pattern was that given below:

 

% % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % %

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

% % % . % % % . % % % . % % % . % % % . % % % . % % %

% , % . % , % . % , % . % , % . % , % . % , % . % , %

% , % . % , % . % , % . % , % . % , % . % , % . % , %

, % . % , % . % , % . % , % . % , % . % , % . % , % .

% . % , % . % , % . % , % . % , % . % , % . % , % . %

. % , % . % , % . % , % . % , % . % , % . % , % . % ,

% , % . % , % . % , % . % , % . % , % . % , % . % , %

, % . % , % . % , % . % , % . % , % . % , % . % , % .

% % % , % % % , % % % , % % % , % % % , % % % , % % %

, % , , , % , , , % , , , % , , , % , , , % , , , % ,

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

% % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % %

 

% represents first darkest colour

, and . are the two lighter colours

so the top line is done by a card threaded all with %

the next line is threaded all .

the next line is three corners with % and the fourth with .

and so forth

If you squint at the diagram above you might get the idea

but its a lot clearer if you copy it onto squared paper

and colour it in.

 

Jennifer

Vanaheim Vikings

(not SCA but I was passing the Rialto & thought I'd stop for a chat)

 

 

From: priest at vaxsar.vassar.edu (Carolyn Priest-Dorman)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Weaving

Date: 10 Sep 93 07:40:31 +1000

 

Unto the Fishyfolk of the Rialto, particularly its Weavers, greeting from Thora

Sharptooth!

 

Ranvaig writes:

 

>>How interesting!  What four colors were in Thora Sharptooth's belt?

>>I have never heard the technique of individual card rotation referred

>>to a Snartemo before.  I'd actually never heard a particular name

>>assigned to the technique.

>I dont remember the colors.  At Red Dragon last year, Mistress Rowena

>showed me a similiar belt (or maybe the same one) she had made.  Each

>repeat of ~ 3" took an entire day to weave.

>

>Perhaps Thora would describe it better.

>

>Snartemo refers to a specific piece described in Hansen.  I believe

>Mistress Rowena used the phrase, Snartemo Technique, but I could

>have made it up myself. :-)

 

Mistress Rowena does indeed use the phrase "Snartemo technique."  I remember

when she came running up to me at Pennsic XX and hollered "I figured out

Snartemo!" ;>

 

Snartemo is the name of the Norwegian location at which a variety of

sixth-century tablet-woven pieces, among other things, were found.  "Snartemo

technique" refers to the technique by which the most intricate of the Snartemo

pieces (as well as some other pieces) was woven:  a four-color threading for

each tablet (red, blue, yellow, and green for Snartemo V) and a weaving method

relying (like "Egyptian diagonals" technique) on diagonal alignment of colors

to make elaborate patterns.  Most of the pieces in this technique are early

period, but there's an extant twelfth-century Norwegian piece (a cloak edging)

in what looks to be the same technique.  (Those of you who have seen

Collingwood's write-up on the technique, be warned:  he got this one DEAD

wrong.  It's much less bizarre than he claims it is.  Of course, Hansen's

explanation isn't much easier to follow, at first glance!)

 

The piece Mistress Rowena made for me was a gift.  We discussed the coloring

and patterning beforehand--it is actually woven in only three colors (my colors

of gules and Or plus sable).  Most of Rowena's Snartemo work has been in four

colors, like the Snartemo V piece; however, last year she wove a belt for

herself in her colors (azure, vert and argent) which looked so nice I thought

I'd ask for something with the same general three-color effect.  Mine has some

of the patterns from the original Snartemo finds plus some original patterning

Rowena devised that looks like little weaving tablets (the main charge in my

arms).  It's wool, about 1.5" wide with solid borders, a little over 2

yards long with long tubular-braided ends.  (The only problem with this most

gorgeous of belts is that many people think that it is a machine-produced

length of trim, at least until it is explained to them!)

 

Rowena has also woven several other pieces--trim for a Viking apron-dress,

other belts, etc.--in this technique.  But her 3/1 broken twill figured

double-cloth pieces (the "field belts" that she wears so casually!) are equally

stunning and exceptional.  She is without question the most authentic and

technically perfect tablet-weaver I have ever seen or heard tell of in the

Known World.  It's not for nothing that all my students and I call her the

"Tablet-weaving Goddess."

****************************************************************************

Carolyn Priest-Dorman                     Thora Sharptooth

Poughkeepsie, NY                   Frosted Hills ("where's that?")

priest at vassar.edu                      East Kingdom

            Gules, three square weaver's tablets in bend Or

****************************************************************************

 

 

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

From: motto at cbnewsf.cb.att.com (mary.rita.otto)

Subject: Re: tablet weaving info needed.

Organization: AT&T

Date: Tue, 28 Sep 1993 03:13:20 GMT

 

In article <mjc.749144066 at NL.CS.CMU.EDU> mjc+ at cs.cmu.edu (Monica Cellio) writes:

>>I've just started tablet-weaving hems for my tunics, and need some info.

>>What is the best way of ending the braid? If you cut a long band into several

>>pieces (for sleeves), then how do you keep it from raveling?

>

>The same way as for other woven trims -- fold the ends under if the threads

>are fine enough that the bulk won't be a problem, or sew the ends into the

>seams of the tunic.  (If you're really desperate I suppose you could apply

>Fray-Check, available at your fabric/notions store, but I've never had much

>success with that.)

>

>Ellisif

 

Tightly woven tablet weaves are quite fray resistant.  Sew them together

with sewing thread with the end to the outside to make a short, decorative

fringe.  Make long strands between the pieces -- 6 inches of yarn ends at

each end to be joined, for example, and braid them together, finishing each

braid with an overhand knot for a luxurious fringe effect. Be truly

obsessive and alternately weave them into each other along the pattern lines

to make it appear seamless.  Enclose the ends in a french seam finish on

the garment itself.

 

Those are my ideas, anyway.

 

Rosaline

(Mary)

 

 

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

From: mjc+ at cs.cmu.edu (Monica Cellio)

Subject: Re: tablet weaving info needed.

Organization: School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon

Date: Mon, 27 Sep 1993 15:34:26 GMT

 

>I've just started tablet-weaving hems for my tunics, and need some info.

>What is the best way of ending the braid? If you cut a long band into several

>pieces (for sleeves), then how do you keep it from raveling?

 

The same way as for other woven trims -- fold the ends under if the threads

are fine enough that the bulk won't be a problem, or sew the ends into the

seams of the tunic.  (If you're really desperate I suppose you could apply

Fray-Check, available at your fabric/notions store, but I've never had much

success with that.)

 

Ellisif

 

 

From: jab2 at stl.stc.co.uk (Jennifer Ann Bray)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Eura tablet weaving pattern

Date: 29 Sep 93 11:45:52

Organization: STC Technology Ltd., London Road, Harlow, UK.

 

I posted this before, but someone asked to see it, so maybe it never

got out properly here goes the second attempt...

 

This is my attempt at a tablet weaving pattern from Eura. It is in 3

colours, I don't know exactly what they were or which went where.

 

* represents one colour ' is another and / is the third

on the original * was dark and the other two were light

All tablets turn in the same direction given by the slope of the / and '

 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' '

* * * ' * * * ' * * * ' * * * ' * * * ' * * * ' * * * ' * * * ' *

* / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' *

* / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' *

/ * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * /

* ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / *

' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * '

* / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' *

/ * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * /

* ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / * ' * / *

* * / * * * / * * * / * * * / * * * / * * * / * * * / * * * / * *

* / / / * / / / * / / / * / / / * / / / * / / / * / / / * / / / *

/ / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / /

/ / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / /

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

 

To use the pattern you would probably need to copy it onto a piece of

graph paper using coloured pens. then thread up your tablets with the

first four colours in each row.

 

Red from plants in the madder family was used on the textiles, as was

a dye identified as indigo (which presumably could have come from woad

aswell) There was also an unidentified yellow or green. the

reconstructors used heather birch leaves and nettle for the yellow or

green colour in their version.

The original band was "no more than 11mm wide"

 

I made a copy with ' as a dark indigo blue, ' as a strong weld

yellow and * as a bright madder orangey red.

The result came out like a series of flames, well I thought it did

anyway.

 

I worked this pattern out from Ancient Finnish Costume by Pirkko-Liisa

Lehtosalo-Hilander  

Their interpretation of the pattern is "from the very beginning of

the band. where the pattern had not yet been formed" so other

patterns based on the same threading are plausible.

I would be grateful for any corrections, any information on what the

original clours were, or any ideas on better ways of sending

tablet weaving patterns through email.

 

Jennifer

Vanaheim Vikings

(Not SCA, but I was passing the Rialto & stopped for a chat)

 

 

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

From: kreyling at lds.loral.com (Ed Kreyling 6966)

Subject: Re: Table Weaving (was Truth and Beauty (was: A&S Competitions)

Organization: Loral Data Systems

Date: Tue, 5 Oct 1993 02:52:30 GMT

 

In article <aliskyeCE8D5w.BIq at netcom.com> aliskye at netcom.com (Laura F. Jenkins) writes:

>Can someone recommend some good books on this topic? With publishers.

>

Peter Collingwood is the definitive author on tablet weaving. His "Techniques

on Tablet Weaving" is generally considered the best. It may be out of print.

It IS hard to find. (Watson-Guptill Publications, New york, 1982).        

Russell Groff's "Card Weaving" is a nice little how-to but has nothing about

period weaves. There are alot of patterns provided, quite a few of which are

basic geometrics. (Robin and Russ Handweavers, McMinnville, Ore.) Someone might

be able to send you an address (I've lost my catalog).

Interweave Press is the best publishing company for any weaving style  as a rule

                          Brigit    

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Ed Kreyling                 | Master Erik of Telemark O.L.,O.P.

kreyling at world.lds.loral.com | Shire of Brineside Moor

Sarasota,Fl. USA           | Kingdom of Trimaris, SCA

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

From: priest at vaxsar.vassar.edu (Carolyn Priest-Dorman)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Card Weaving

Date: 29 Nov 93 08:06:32 +1000

Organization: Vikings R Us

 

Unto the Fishyfolk of the Rialto, greeting from Thora Sharptooth!

 

Konrad von Buren asks:

>I've been doing card weaving for awhile and I was wondering what type

>of trim would be appropiate for a thirteenth century sideless surcoat?

>What type of material would have been used for the thread (ie. wool, silk,

>linen)?

 

Well, I'm not a specialist in thirteenth-century garments, so I can't tell you

if tablet weaving is appropriate trim for a sideless surcoat in that period.

However, there are several surviving pieces of decorative thirteenth-century

tablet weaving.  Plain weaves in silk (sometimes linen) brocaded in silk or

spun gold (or silver) thread were used for ecclesiastical trimmings, hairnet

edgings, and girdles; they were decorated in geometric or heraldic motifs.

Then there's the Belt of Philip of Swabia (died 1208), which is silk and

decorated in a variety of ways:  brocading, soumaking, and shadow checks.

(Shadow checks are idiot-simple to weave, and in a fine shiny thread make a

plain but gorgeously subtle band.)

 

>Does anyone know a good book on brocaded card weaving?

 

To my knowledge, there is no book focusing on brocaded tablet weaving.  It is

covered in both Collingwood's THE TECHNIQUES OF TABLET WEAVING (still out of

print, as far as I know) and in Egon Hansen's TABLET WEAVING (which is in print

but costs $55 if you can find it); however, neither source is particularly

simple to absorb.  Other how-to books touch on it, but I've never found one of

them that sheds more light on the subject than Collingwood or Hansen.  If you

can't figure it out from books, try looking for someone to show you; this

technique is easiest to learn by being taught by someone who's good at it.

 

As always, I am happy to discuss sources, etc., via private e-mail.

*************************************************************************

Carolyn Priest-Dorman                     Thora Sharptooth

Poughkeepsie, NY                   Frosted Hills ("where's that?")

priest at vassar.edu                      East Kingdom

            Gules, three square weaver's tablets in bend Or

*************************************************************************

 

 

From: sclark at epas.utoronto.ca (Susan Clark)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Card Weaving

Date: 29 Nov 1993 16:50:31 -0500

Organization: EPAS Computing Facility, University of Toronto

 

Greetings!

        Most of the examples of theirteenth century clothing

I have seen do not show prominent trim.  A few of the early fourteenth

century examples I have noted in sources do have a sort of

plain band trim along the neckline and armholes.

        If you wanteted to trim a thirteenth century sleeveless (not

sideless--that's a mostly 14th century style, except in Spain) surcote,

I'd suggest a small, geometric-patterned card weaving

(not too wide) of silk along the neckhole.

 

        Thirteen century clothing seems to have relied on

patterend cloth, rather than lots of trim, to give the

ooh-ah factor.  (Or really expensive cloth, or interesting weaves..etc.)

 

Cheers!

Nicolaa/Susan

Canton of Eoforwic

sclark at epas.utoronto.ca

 

 

From: habura at vccnw06.its.rpi.edu (Andrea Marie Habura)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Card Weaving

Date: 30 Nov 1993 14:25:03 GMT

Organization: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy NY

 

On trim: There are several fourteenth century funeral brasses that show

bands of decorative trim on the garments. Favorite locations seem to be the

edges of mantles and sideless surcoats. (Other styles of trim and decoration--

carpet patterns, "foliated" stuff--appear as well, but we're talking about

bands here.) A large percentage are alternating figures within a thin border,

like so:

 

=============================================================================

* <> * <> * <> * <> * <> * <> * <> * <> * <> * <> * <> * <> * <> * <> *

===========================================================================

 

The pattern I've drawn is based on a real one; a mid-14th c. brass has

trim with a pattern of alternating diamonds and dots. (My memory says this

is from the brass of Joanna de Woodward, but my notes are at home and I will

not swear to it.)

Other alternating patterns used quatrefoils or cinquefoils alternating

with dots, or hollow trefoil-like things in opposite orientations.

 

Since funeral brasses are not good sources for technique, I don't know

whether these bands were embroidered or woven. There *are* surviving

embroideries that use similar patterns, but that doesn't necessarily mean

that embroidery was the only way they were done.

 

Another note: a 13th c. chasuble at Melk shows the Virgin and St. John

at the Crucifixion, both wearing loose tunic-like garments with bands at the

neck and sleeve. The bands are--lessee--white or ivory background, gold

boundary and quatrefoils. On a human-sized garment they would be about 1" wide.

 

Alison MacDermot

Needle Jock

 

 

From: vinwaluf2 at aol.com (VINWALUF2)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: tablet weaving patterns

Date: 31 May 1995 21:32:42 -0400

Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364)

 

Another book you may want to find is "Tablet Weaving" by Egon Hansen. (I

got my copy from Unicorn Textile Books).  It's a bit of a bear to read, as

it was evidently (poorly) translated from the original Finnish, but the

bulk of the items he covers are from archaeological textiles.  

 

Hope this is of help.  

Gwennan ferch Gwydion O'Ddyved

Barony of AnCrosaire

Trimaris

 

 

From: priest at vaxsar.vassar.edu

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: tablet weaving patterns

Date: 1 Jun 95 07:22:24 +1000

Organization: Vassar College

 

Greeting from Thora Sharptooth!

 

Gwennan (vinwaluf2 at aol.com) wrote:

> Another book you may want to find is "Tablet Weaving" by Egon Hansen. (I

> got my copy from Unicorn Textile Books).  It's a bit of a bear to read, as

> it was evidently (poorly) translated from the original Finnish, but the

> bulk of the items he covers are from archaeological textiles.  

 

Hansen's workshop worked on reproducing early period tablet weaves for use at

the Danish open-air museum at Moesgard.  (The original language was not

Finnish, but Danish.)  Some of the textiles covered in the book were

archaeological, some were relics.  Good photos of the reproductions are

included.  Photos of some of these reproductions are also included on the World

of the Vikings CD-ROM, including two Anglo-Saxon pieces.

 

Hansen's explanations take careful reading, and there are some printing errors

in some of the patterns.  Not a beginner's book!

 

Does anybody remember who once told the Rialto about this book that it was

written by "Danes from Mars"?  I've quoted her often since then. ;>

**************************************************************************

Carolyn Priest-Dorman                     Thora Sharptooth

Poughkeepsie, NY                   Frosted Hills ("where's that?")

priest at vassar.edu                      East Kingdom

            Gules, three square weaver's tablets in bend Or

**************************************************************************

 

 

From: donna at kwantlen.bc.CA (Donna Hrynkiw)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Tablet Weaving news!!

Date: 25 Oct 1995 16:37:37 -0400

 

For all you tablet-weavers/card-weavers out there.

 

Elizabeth Braidwood

donna at kwantlen.bc.ca

 

---------- Forwarded message ----------

Date: 25 Oct 95 16:19:05 EDT

From: LINDA J. HENDRICKSON <102617.362 at compuserve.com>

Subject: Tablet Weaving

 

Hi Donna,

 

Here's a fact sheet on TWINE.  You will need to contact Linda Malan for

information on Marijke van Epen's workshops. I'm arranging Peter

Collingwood's workshops, and there are no definite plans yet.

 

TWINE

Tablet Weavers International News Exchange

 

Tablet weavers of any level of experience are encouraged to join TWINE,

Tablet Weavers International News Exchange.  Formed in July 1994, the

group now has approximately 60 members from the US, Canada, The Netherlands,

Denmark, England, France, Israel, and Australia.

 

Pirkko Karvonen, a leading fiber craftsperson from Alberta, Canada, is

coordinating a newsletter.  It consists of material written by the members,

and is distributed three times per year.  Topics include letters, techniques,

technical tips, historical articles, product news, and announcements of

interest to tablet weavers.

 

To join TWINE and receive the newsletter, send $ 9.00 if you live in the

U.S. or Canada, or $12.00 if you live elsewhere, to:

     Pirkko Karvonen

     373  - 22560 Wye Rd

     Sherwood Park, Alberta  T8A 4T6  Canada

     Phone (403) 467-4254

 

TWINE CURRENT NEWS    

    

TWINE is sponsoring a workshop by the Dutch tablet weaver Marijke van

Epen in July 1996, to be held in Seattle or Portland. Marijke has written

books on Indonesian tablet weaving, and on the use of tablets to produce

traditional designs from Peru and Bolivia.  For information, contact:

     Linda Malan

     830 Olympic Avenue

     Edmonds, WA  98020  USA

     Phone (206) 771-8072

 

TWINE is also planning a juried international tablet weaving exhibition,

to be held at the First Unitarian Church in downtown Portland in July

1996, to coincide with Convergence 96.  Additionally, Peter Collingwood,

British author of The Techniques of Tablet Weaving, is now scheduling

tablet weaving workshops to be held before and after Convergence 96

activities. For information on the exhibition and Peter's workshops,

contact:

     Linda Hendrickson

     140 SE 39th Avenue

     Portland, OR  97214-2002  USA

     Phone (503) 239-5016

 

The Techniques of Tablet Weaving, the most comprehensive reference ever written

on the subject, is currently out of print. A new paperback edition is ready to

be printed. To be sure you are on the mailing list to be notified when the

new edition is available, please write to Linda Hendrickson (address above) or

send supportive letters directly to:

     Peter Collingwood

     Old School, Nayland

     Colchester  C06 4JH   England

     Phone/Fax  011-44-1-206-262401

 

Below are the descriptions of the workshops Peter would like to teach:

 

LETTERING IN TABLET WEAVING (INTERMEDIATE)

Tablet-woven bands have traditionally been used as a means for weaving

inscriptions, which could be political, religious, commemorative, or even

amorous or humorous.  This class will learn three ways of doing this;

namely using S- and Z-twining, the versatile double-faced weave, and plain

weave double-cloth with only two threads per tablet.  But if you cannot

think of anything to say, you can concentrate on other motifs, either

traditional or self-engendered.

 

Suitable for students who have already had at least one introductory class

in tablet weaving and know how to make a continuous warp.

 

ADVANCED

There are some complex and little known forms of tablet weaving which

include its use in a twill double-faced weave, in producing a two-sided

velvet fabric, and in the products based on a modern form of the pasaka,

an Indonesian implement making two-layered warp twining possible. This

class will concentrate on these and other techniques.

 

Suitable for students who have the normal double-faced weave under (or

on) their belt and want to make the next step into the many possibilities of

tablet weaving.

 

For both classes:  

Duration:  Three to five days, preferably the latter.

Number:  Up to 15 students

Equipment:  Each student would need two C-clamps, suitable warp yarn, heavy

sword or shuttle for beating and about 40 tablets (more should be available in

the class).

 

Fee: 190 pounds sterling (you'll have to calculate what that comes to in

Canadian dollars [Somewhere over $400Can]) plus lodging & travel expenses.

 

Thanks for your help, and let me know what happens.

 

Linda

 

 

From: wdalt at wam.umd.edu (William Dalton)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re:Painted Trim

Date: Sun, 21 Apr 96 19:49:19 GMT

Organization: University of Maryland College Park

 

>Number Four:  The reason I ask about painted trim is that I am allergic

>to all the floral trim I've seen at the shops, and the pseudo-greek >type

>trim makes me retch, so I'm looking for alternatives. I've tried >tablet

>woven trim, but till I get myself a loom that can handle longer lentgths,

>I've put that on hold.  Or is trim even period for extreme northwest

>Europe  of that time?  Perhaps trim then was more of a simple colored

>band?  Hmmm...

 

>Conmhara   <Phred>

 

I realize you mention not wanting to pursue tablet weaving, but Egon

Hansen's book "Tablet Weaving" (ISBN#87-7739-047-4) has many examples and

recreations of trims from the Viking Period.  Perhaps they can give you some

suggestions of what to look for in the trim section of a fabric store, or

inspire you to try tablet weaving again.

 

Nancy Dalton

aka Earnwynn van Zwaluwenburg

 

 

From: brettwi at ix.netcom.com(Brett Williams)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Collingwood's "Techniques of Tablet Weaving" back in print!

Date: 11 Jun 1996 16:01:33 GMT

 

I found an announcement on the weaving mailing list that Robin & Russ

Handweavers of McMinnville, Oregon, has reprinted Peter Collingwood's

"Techniques of Tablet Weaving", the most definitive book on the

subject.

 

You can email Robin & Russ directly at: robinruss at macnet.com for more

information, or you can order a copy directly from the head of TWINE:

 

Linda Hendrikson

140 SE 39th Avenue

Portland, OR 97214-2002

 

She says that it's US $40, which is good for both US and Canada-- and

includes shipping, however those outside the US should contact her

directly (102617.362 at compuserve.com) for info on international orders.

 

ciorstan

 

 

From: "Jennifer Kubenka" <jkubenka at post.cis.smu.edu>

To: ansteorra at eden.com

Date: Thu, 1 Aug 1996 07:21:19 +0000

Subject: Collingwood Tablet Weaving Book

 

Peter Collingwood's _The Techniques of Tablet Weaving_ is back in

print!  I received my copy in the mail yesterday, and it is a very

nice paperback, with the photos digitally enhanced, so that they are

clearer than in the original version.

 

Bibliographic details are:

 

Collingwood, Peter.  The Techniques of Table Weaving. McMinnville,

Oregon : Robin & Russ Handweavers, Inc., 1996.  ISBN 1566590558.

 

I ordered my copy from:

 

Linda Hendrickson

140 SE 39th Avenue

Portland, Oregon 97214-2002

Linda  Hendrickson <102617.362 at CompuServe.COM>

 

The price was 40.00, and that includes the shipping and handling.

 

You can also order the book directly from Robin & Russ.  Their

address is:

 

Robin & Russ Handweavers, Inc.

533 North Adams Street

McMinnville, OR 97128

robinruss at macnet.com (Robin & Russ Handweavers, Inc.)

 

I will say that both Linda and Robin & Russ were very courteous via

email, and responded quickly to my request.

 

Now, to make the time to read it.....

 

Emher ni Maille

 

 

From: "Morgan E. Smith" <mesmith at freenet.calgary.ab.ca>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: weaving

Date: Wed, 2 Apr 1997 07:42:26 -0700

Organization: Calgary Free-Net

 

On Mon, 31 Mar 1997, Sean Daly wrote:

> I'm posting this for a friend but please send any corrispondences to me

> and I'll forward them onto her.  She is interested in knowing more about

> "tablet" or "card" weaving.  If you know of any books with pictures and

> descriptions of this weaving technique, please e-mail me since I don't

> read this newsgroup often.  Thanks for all your help...L8R...Sean

>

> Reinmar the Alchemist

> Barony of Wurm Wald

 

Peter Collingwood's "Techniques of Tablet Weaving" is considered the

"bible", but another recommended book is "Card Weaving" by Candace

Crockett (which comes with 24 cards) is easier to get. (Interweave Press).

If you have trouble obtaining these books, email me

privately>mesmith at freenet.calgary.ab.ca.

(I own a bookstore)

Morgan the Unknown

 

 

Date: Thu, 14 Aug 1997 16:23:59 -0500

From: Jenn Carlson <jenn at cliffs.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: RE: inkle weaving & warp faced band weaving

 

Greetings to the members of this grand list from Maerwynn of Holme.

 

In regards to the "inkle" weaving thread, I have forwarded a couple of

references from a tablet-weaving venue to Ailene and she says I should

share with everyone.

 

There are a couple of Anglo-Saxon bands that are done with a tabby weave

in the middle section with two cards of tablet weaving on each side. I

have come upon them in my search for early tablet weaving (at least 2,

some think they were done with 2 hole cards in the middle section). I

haven't yet done any rigid heddle stuff (though it is on my to do list),

so I didn't get to far into them.

 

Ailene said:

> I did warp-faced weaving weaving with a rigid heddle

> because it was easier for me - I wasn't getting very consistent edges in my

> (albeit brief) attempt at tabby weaving.

 

I would think that adding cards to the edges might help with the

inconsistency?

 

Here are the references:

 

Antiquaries Journal Vol. XXXVI, 1956, pp. 181-199 (esp. 188)

"Anglo-Saxon Sites in Lincolnshire: Unpublished Material and Recent

Discoveries," F.H. Thompson

 

Antiquaries Journal Vol. XXXIV, Nos. 3&4, 1954, pp.234-5

"Tablet-woven braid from a thirteenth-century site," Grace Crowfoot

 

The first is a very interesting technique that uses two strings of

different colors in each position and long floats on the reverse of the

band to make patterns (by pulling up the alternate color) on the front

side--very early patterning. The author suggests a "laze rod" to achieve

this, but might it be an interesting "inkle" project? (Says the tablet

weaver who has never done anything even approximating inkle weaving.)

 

Maerwynn of Holme

Mag Mor, Calontir

jenn at cliffs.com

 

 

Date: Thu, 09 Oct 1997 08:38:59 -0500

From: Jenn Carlson <jenn at cliffs.com>

To: Arts & Sciences List <sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu>

Subject: Finishing bands

 

In doing research on Anglo-Saxon wrist clasps, I ran across a fairly

well-preserved piece of tablet weaving that has some interesting

properties in G. Crowfoot. "Anglo-Saxon Tablet Weaving," _Antiquaries

Journal_ 32, nos. 3-4, 1952. (pp. 189-191)--I think this is the correct

reference, I'll check tonight. In analyzing the band, Crowfoot notes

that it has been "buttonhole stitched" at the end (which was then

covered by the wrist clasps). I had decided to try it on my next

project--

 

She also mentions some extra transverse threads that might be brocading,

but that aren't very "regular".

 

Maerwynn of Holme

Mag Mor, Calontir

jenn at cliffs.com

 

 

Date: Fri, 08 May 1998 22:42:37 -0700

From: Brett and Karen Williams <brettwi at ix.netcom.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Card Weaving Idiot??? [SCA]

 

Katriana wrote:

>

> _Card Weaving_ by Candace Crockett. Interweave Press

>

> Is in print again.  The new edition no longer comes with cards : (

>

> Same price... ($21.95)

>

> Question:  So now that this book no longer comes with cards, is it better

> than other (cheaper) books?  Since Collingswood is only $35 in paperback,

> and other cardweaving books are as cheap as $8.00, does this book have stuff

> that makes it worth owning, especially for beginners?

>

>   Katriana op den Dijk

>   Shire of Bois d'Arc

>   Kingdom of Calontir

 

I bought them both. Think of Crockett as the owner's guide/recommended

service manual, and Collingwood as the incredibly detailed

repair-and-fix tomes one consults when a definitive authority is needed.

 

ciorstan

(a weaver lurkant)

 

 

Date: Tue, 12 May 1998 14:00:43 EDT

From: SNSpies <SNSpies at aol.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Card Weaving authenticity [SCA]

 

There is archaeological evidence of bone tablets from Roman Britain (1st-4th

century A.D., but whether the Celts of the same time period and place were

tablet weaving or using it on their garb, I don't know. The earliest tablets

that I know of from Ireland are dated to the 11th century, although the ones

found in the crannogs may date earlier (they can't date them closely at all,

unfortunately).

 

Nancy (Ingvild)

 

 

From: Brett Williams <brettwi at ix.netcom.com>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Tablet, card and inkle weaving books

Date: Tue, 30 Jun 1998 23:26:34 -0700

 

Julie M. Lehrman wrote:

> Since tablet weaving has come up on this list...

>

> Could somebody please give me a quick description of the (modern)

> technique called "speed warping."

>

> The time it took to get ready to weave my first project is slowing the

> start of the second.

>

> Juliana

 

It can be done if you have the same color in the same holes of the pack

throughout. For example, if you're doing a two-color band with color 1

in holes A-B and color 2 in C-D, then your method is such:

 

Stack all your cards with alignment suiting your individual fancy.

Obtain four thread sources (in my case, cones or spools-- I won't do

this with skeins because of tangling issues).  Thread one Color 1

spool's end through all of Hole A in the stack; same with the second

spool of Color 1, through all of Hole B in the stack. Repeat one spool

of Color 2 through Hole C and second spool of Color 2 in Hole D of the

stack.

 

Grasp the entire pack in one hand and drag the stack around your

favorite warp-holder (this can be two posts, two c-clamps on a table or

a small loom, what ever you have). Each time you pass the point where

you want your pack to end up, drop one card off. This means you end up

with a continuous warp from Card 1 through Card N (e/g/, a pack of 25

cards means 25 trips around the posts). A wise gentleman I know deploys

a yarn-keeper during continous warping that consists of four plastic

soda bottles with the yarn threaded up through the small end, bottom cut

off for insertion of yarn cone or ball. He ties a rubber band around the

set of four for keeping the bottles/yarn sources in submission.

 

This method, while fast, only works for certain warps. If your project

has directions for specific color threadings in specific cards in

specific places (pretty much a modern method, used minimally in period

compared with the doublefaced and/or brocaded methods of patterning),

then you're outta luck and have to thread 'em one at a time. On the

other hand, if you're doing a solid color band (for brocade! Zowie!!),

or a striped band, or even Snartnemo-style, you're all set to go for

speed warping.

 

Hope the explanation helps. And don't get all anxious about threading--

when it comes to weaving, the time and quality of effort put into the

set up (warping and threading) is amply evident in the quality of the

finished product.

 

ciorstan

(who will admit to having taking a month to thread an eight shaft

pattern 18 inches wide and 36 ends per inch on the floor loom through

reed and heddles since she _despises_ threading)

 

 

Date: Sat, 26 Sep 1998 05:06:26 -0400

From: Melanie Wilson <MelanieWilson at compuserve.com>

To: "INTERNET:sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu" <sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu>

Subject: Tablet Weaving-making cards

 

You will find an article on making tablets from Wood, bone, horn and

leather on my web pages:

 

Main Anglian Page

http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/MelanieWilson/anglianm.htm

 

How to page:

http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/MelanieWilson/howto.htm

 

Tablet making Page:

 

http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/MelanieWilson/tabmake.htm

 

If you can't get horn flat plates in the US I supply various Period

Provisions including these, details are on

http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/LCVInternational/periodpr.htm

 

Hope this is some help.

 

Mel

 

 

Date: Sat, 26 Sep 1998 13:23:11 -0400

From: rmhowe <magnusm at ncsu.edu>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Speaking of Tablet Weaving

 

Jeane Watson wrote:

> Anyone know of a good source for cards...made of wood, or bone??

>

> THL Constanza C.X. de Valencia

 

http://www.radix.net/~herveus/  wooden tablets

 

Magnus

 

 

Date: Sat, 26 Sep 1998 23:16:31 EDT

From: <SNSpies at aol.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Speaking of Tablet Weaving

 

<< Anyone know of a good source for cards...made of wood >>

 

Try Laura Morgan, 1633 Stoney Creek Drive, Charlottesville, VA  22902, tel.

(804) 984-0537.

 

Nancy (Ingvild)

 

 

Date: Sun, 6 Dec 1998 11:12:03 EST

From: <SNSpies at aol.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Ivory bibilography and more

 

Thank you to everyone for all the information and references on ivory!  What

a treasure! [NOTE - See the Florilegium file: ivory-bib]

 

May I return the favor in a very small way by directing people who are

interested to a site that carries a rather definitive bibilography of

references on tablet weaving?  It is a combination of Peter Collingwood's and

my bibliographies.  It is not quite complete, I believe, but hopefully soon

will be.  It can be found via the following site:

http://w3.thegroup.net/~janis/

 

Nancy (Ingvild)

 

 

Date: Thu, 17 Dec 1998 11:29:21 EST

From: <SNSpies at aol.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Dublin Viking Cap documentation

 

Slaine asked about documentation for tablet weaving in Viking-age Dublin.  I

think this might help ...

 

There are 7 brocaded tabletwoven bands in the National Museum of Ireland,

Dublin, which were found in Viking-age urban deposits in Dublin dating from

the 10th to 12th century. (E. 71:11124, E. 122:13272, E. 122:13448, E.

172:10679, E. 172:14373,

E. 173:158, and E. 190:1194).  All of them have silk warps and are brocaded

variously with "spun-gold", "spun-silver", and wools.  Further echnical

information can be found in the following articles.

 

Pritchard, Frances.  "Aspects of the Wool Textiles from Viking Age Dublin."

In "Archaeological Textiles in Northern Europe" (NESAT IV), edited by Lise

Bender Jorgensen and Elisabeth Munksgaard, 93-104. Copenhagen:  Det Kongelige

Danske Kunstakademi, 1992.

 

Pritchard, Frances.  "Silk Braids and Textiles of the Viking Age from Dublin."

In "Archaeological Textiles" (NESAT II), edited by Lise Bender Jorgense, Bente

Magnus, and Elisabeth Munksgaard, 149-156.  Copenhagen: Arkaeologisk

Institut, 1988.

 

Nancy (Ingvild)

 

 

Date: Tue, 23 Feb 1999 01:58:02 EST

From: <EalasaidS at aol.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Card Weaving

 

FalanMacF at aol.com writes:

<< Does anyone know where I can order some Cards so I can start Cardweaving?

I am trying to get a book on it by Candance Cruckett(sp) which is suppose to

have cards in the back.  But, since I am having to find an used one, I dont

suspect the cards will be atttached.

  >>

 

Robin & Russ Handweavers

533 N. Adams

McMinnville, Oregon  97128

 

I'm afraid I don't have a phone number or web site - I only have a few cards

left with their address.  The last time I ordered from them, I believe it was

around $12 for 100 cards.  I give the cards away when I teach card weaving,

so I like being able to get them in packs of 100.

 

At Estrella, I noticed that The Green Duck had cards. Their website is:

http://www.greenduck.com

 

I didn't look at the price, since I didn't need more cards at the time...

 

Ealasaid

 

 

Date: Tue, 23 Feb 1999 10:09:36 +0100

From: Anna Troy <Anna.Troy at bibks.uu.se>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Card Weaving

 

>Does anyone know where I can order some Cards so I can start Cardweaving?

 

>Faolan MacFarland

 

Cards are very easy to make your self. I've seen some made out of playing

cards clipped in half, the edges rounded with the holes just made with a

leather punch. :-)

 

Anna de Byxe

 

 

Date: Tue, 23 Feb 1999 09:23:22 -0500

From: "Gregory Stapleton" <gregsta at perigee.net>

To: <sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu>

Subject: RE: Card Weaving

 

Try Lark Books Publishing.  http://www.larkbooks.com They sell both the set

of book and cards and just the cards.  They are located in Asheville, NC.

 

Gawain Kilgore

 

 

Date: Tue, 23 Feb 1999 09:24:30 -0600

From: Roberta R Comstock <froggestow at juno.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Card Weaving -- Sources for cards

 

On Tue, 23 Feb 1999 00:21:31 -0700 Fred Yoder

<fyoder at mesa5.mesa.colorado.edu> writes:

>       By happy coincidence, I had some cards next to the computer

>desk and there are addresses on them, so...

>

>Earth Guild

>Asheville, North Carolina

>1-800-327-8448

>

>And

>

>Freouwebbe

>The Peace Weaver

>5318 Stillhouse

>Oak Grove, Missouri 64075

>(816) 625-8008

>(816) 625-7288

>

>Hopefully one or both are still in business...

>

>Good Luck!

>Phred

 

Freouwebbe's address has changed:

 

Freouwebbe, the Peace Weaver

Roberta Bragg

514 Walnut

Grain Valley, MO  64029

(816) 847-7737

 

Or email her at:  Freouwebbe at msn.com

 

I believe she used to carry several varieties of weaving cards - 4-hole,

6-hole, Maybe 3-hole?

I'm not sure what all she has these days.

 

If she isn't selling cards now, there should be some available at The

Yarn Barn in Lawrence, KS.  They have an 800 number, but I don't have it.

You should be able to get it from directory assistance.

 

Hertha

 

 

Date: Tue, 23 Feb 1999 10:00:47 -0600

From: Gunnora Hallakarva <gunnora at bga.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Beginning Cards for Cardweaving

 

Faolan MacFarland asked:

> Does anyone know where I can order some Cards

> so I can start Cardweaving?   I am trying to

> get a book on it by Candance Cruckett(sp) which

> is suppose to have cards in the back.  But,

> since I am having to find an used one, I dont

> suspect the cards will be atttached.

 

Faolan, the easiest way to get cards is to go purchase a packet of beer

coasters -- the cardboard ones you find in

bars.  I"ve found that Sam's Wholesale usually carries them, and a lot of

times the local beer distributors will give them away as well.

 

Take the whole packet of cards and C-clamp them firmly down, then use a 1/4"

drill bit to drill a hole in each of the

four corners right through the whole pack at once.

 

Then unclamp and tie the packet together with string, and paint each of the

four corners of the packet a different

color on the edge -- I find this is very helpful later when working with

more complicated patterns.

 

Some folks use thin plastic to make their cards out of because it holds up

better.  Me, I still have some beer coaster

cards that I've used for almost ten years.  I occasionally get one bent or

beat up, and I just throw it away and make new ones as needed.

 

Gunnora Hallakarva, OL

Bjornsborg and Bryn Gwlad

Ansteorra

 

 

Date: Tue, 23 Feb 1999 12:36:11 -0500

From: rmhowe <magnusm at ncsu.edu>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Card Weaving

 

FalanMacF at aol.com wrote:

> Does anyone know where I can order some Cards so I can start Cardweaving?

 

> Faolan MacFarland

 

Try:

 

Herveus d'Ormonde / Michael Houghton <herveus at radix.net>

        Bowie, MD, USA     Tablet and Inkle bands, and other stuff

        http://www.radix.net/~herveus/

 

He makes looms too. And She does custom favors, belts, bands in many

designs or to custom order. They really are quite nice and reasonably

priced.

 

Magnus, unaffiliated, but impressed.

 

 

Date: Mon, 1 Mar 1999 06:50:17 -0800 (PST)

From: Zaida <zaida424 at yahoo.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: card weaving

 

>>Faolan MacFarland asked:

Does anyone know where I can order some Cards so I can start

Cardweaving? <<

 

Hi, You can order cards from

Earth Guild      http://www.earthguild.com/     or

Lacis            http://www.lacis.com/          or

School Products  http://www.lacis.com/

 

I personally buy mine from Earth Guild, but that is just because they

used to be a supplier of ours when we were building inkle looms. They

sell a good sturdy cardboard card and a nice side belt shuttle that

works well with them.

 

Zaida

 

 

Subject: ANST - Period Iris Ribbon?

Date: Mon, 19 Jul 1999 09:25:07 MST

From: "C. L. Ward" <gunnora at bga.com>

To: ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG

 

I just received the following information from Mistress Tangwystyl that I

thought our weavers might find interesting:

 

--------from Tangwystyl---------

In the cathedral museum in Sens (France) there is a silk tunic attributed

to Saint Ebbon (8th c.), trimmed with clavii, neck and sleeve edgings of a

tabby-weave silk ribbon (ca. 7/8" wide) colored in longitudinal stripes of

red, black, white, green, blue, yellow, pink (possibly faded red, based on

the repeat pattern), black, white, green, and blue. Each stripe comprises

approximately 8 warp ends, except for the yellow (central) one, which may

be 12 ends.

 

Tangwystyl <hrjones at socrates.berkeley.edu>

--------from Tangwystyl---------

 

This is not, of course, precisely what we use for award insigni for the

Order of the Iris, but it gives a good documentation lead for very similar

narrow-band type trim weaving.

 

Ws u Hl (Waes Thu Hael)

 

::GUNNORA::

 

Gunnora Hallakarva, OL

Baroness to the Court of Ansteorra

 

 

Date: Sun, 25 Jul 1999 04:00:50 EDT

From: <EalasaidS at aol.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Card Weaving Questions

 

First, crochet cotton is a good choice for a first card weaving.  Cordonet

and Pearl Cotton are also good.  You want a nice smooth thread, that isn't

too fuzzy.  Fuzzy thread makes turning the cards difficult, and adds way too

much frustration to the learning process. <grin>

 

As far as winding the thread into a butterfly... I've used two C clamps

clamped upside down on a table (so that the handles are sticking up), and

just wind your butterfly on that.  Anything that has to projections which

will allow you slide the finished butterfly off will do.  Pass a thread

through the loops that from the "wings"  and tie it loosely around the

crossed threads in the center.  I'd also add a loose tie at the apex of each

of the "wings".   A loop four to six inches across works well for fine

thread. Tie the threads tight enough that your tie doesn't slide around, but

you should be able to slide your finger at least a little bit under the knot.

 

Or, just wrap the thread around a smallish book or video cassette box, and

when you pull it off, tie the circle of thread in four places - just firm

enough to cause an indentation in the skein, but not as tight as you can get

it. You want the water and dye to be able to reach every thread.  This is

how I set the spin in my wool when I take it off the spindle and can't find

my niddy noddy (I swear it grows legs...)

 

"Card Weaving" by ??? Crockett is a good book (it might be Elizabeth or

Catherine Crockett, I can't seem to find my copy at the moment).  "Tablet

Weaving" by Egon Hansen is also good, but I find their method of drafting out

the pattern difficult to follow.

 

It also makes weaving easier if you set up some method to keep track of what

direction you are turning in and how many turns you've made.  I added six

pegs to the bottom support of my loom, a set of four and a set of two, using

tooth picks and a VERY small drill bit.  I  have two wooden beads.  When I am

turning away, the put one bead on the farthest peg of the two set, and when

I'm turning towards me, I move the bead to the nearer peg of the two set.  If

I'm in a situation where I may be interrupted at any moment (like at a demo

where people want me to talk and explain what I'm doing <grin>), I move the

second bead with every turn of the cards from peg to peg in the set of four

pegs. That way I can always tell at a glance exactly where I was in the

turning sequence.  I ruined several weavings at demos before I came up with

that method - I'd answer a question and then realize that I had no idea how

many turns I had done, or which direction I was going!

 

Mistress Ealasaid nic Shuibhne

 

 

Date: Sun, 25 Jul 1999 21:13:51 +0000

From: "Plastic for better taste. <plastic at codenet.net>" <plastic at codenet.net>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Card Weaving Questions

 

> "Card Weaving" by ??? Crockett is a good book (it might be Elizabeth or

> Catherine Crockett, I can't seem to find my copy at the moment).  "Tablet

> Weaving" by Egon Hansen is also good, but I find their method of drafting out

> the pattern difficult to follow.

 

"Card Weaving" by Candace Crockett is the best book I've seen, and have, on the

subject.  I just saw a copy of it at Borders today.  I also have "Card Weaving"

by Lois Clifford (1947) and "Card Weaving" by Russell Groff (1969).  These two

books were a bit more difficult to understand until I got Candace's book which

was published more recently.  Russell's book does have 50 some odd patterns, but

his drafts are a little difficult to read.

 

You might check out the card weaving list  mailto: listproc at frank.mtsu.edu with

"sub cards-l <your name> in the body of the message.

 

Bruno

Outlands

 

 

Date: Mon, 26 Jul 1999 10:47:33 EDT

From: "D Humberson" <dhumbers at hotmail.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: RE: Card Weaving Questions

 

Welcome to a great, if obscure, hobby.  Mercerized cotton should not shrink

much, if at all, in a tablet weave.  If you are beating each shot properly,

the weave will be very tight to start, as well.

 

As for color fastness, I use 8/4 Maysville carpet warp for my 'utility'

projects, and that is guaranteed color fast.

 

I wasn't real clear on why you'd want to wind butterflys for weaving - once

you warp on to the cards, you want to keep the warp as straight and even as

possible. You could use a butterfly to hold your weft, but I use an Inkle

loom shuttle whose edge I've beveled.  The shuttle serves as a beater too,

that way.

 

If you are a beginner, get Candace Crockett's book.  For a blue sky, some

day, eventually type wish book get Peter Collingswood's massive book.  Once

again though, start wwith Crockett.

 

Ragnar Ketilsson,

BMDL, Aethelmearc

 

 

From: Gwynafwy Sinclaire <gwynafwy26 at yahoo.com>

Date: July 10, 2007 4:32:14 PM CDT

To: "Kingdom of Ansteorra - SCA, Inc." <ansteorra at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Ansteorra] Question on: weaving finishes

 

Thank you very much for the suggestions.  It is for Tablet/Card  

weaving and inkle.

 

   Gwyn

 

"Haraldr Bassi (Ansteorra lists)" <ansteorra at haraldr.drakkar.org> wrote:

   You don't mention the style of weaving. If it is tablet woven, you can

use a technique of dropping cards every few turns, weaving normally.

This creates a narrowing tapered tongue at the end of the belt.

Depending on the style of the threading would determine where in the

pack of cards you would be dropping the cards out. You would want to

either cut the ends of the warp at the fell or bring them out and back

across as the weft during the tapering. I don't know there is any one

true way to finish a belt, however cutting things as you go doesn't

leave you much room to change your mind should you not like the results,

please think it through before cutting things.

 

In contrast you can always end the weaving, cut it, hem stitch it to

hold the ends together and use a metal belt end to protect the cut end.

 

If it's a flat weaving narrow work project, like modern inkle weaving or

some other form of rigid heddle style weaving, you could use a similar

taper but would want to incorporate the edge warps as the wefts of the

taper, bringing them in from both sides simultaneously, trimming them

can wait until after you are done with the taper but no sooner than

after they have passed through at least one to three weft throws.

 

The taper thing can be practiced on scrap warp before you do it for real

at the end of a long belt project :)

 

Haraldr Bassi, Bjornsborg (formerly Frosted Hills, East)

 

Gwynafwy Sinclaire wrote:

> I know that we all have many great ideas. I need a few... I am  

> looking for some different ways of finishing a woven belt. I have  

> done the knots, the wrapping and the "net makers" design. I would  

> like to try something new. Do you have any ideas?

>

> Gwynafwy

 

 

From: betsy <betsy at softwareinnovation.com>

Date: March 26, 2009 3:11:13 PM CDT

To: "'Kingdom of Ansteorra - SCA, Inc.'" <ansteorra at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Ansteorra] Card Weaving

 

Fiona the Needleworker wrote:

<<< Can anyone point me to someone or a website that can easily show me  

how to set up patterns/create them, and set up my loom for doing card  

weaving? >>>

 

Best site I've seen:

http://www.guntram.co.za/tabletweaving/

 

many patterns and samples! He also had (may still -did not review

extensively) a downloadable program for designing new patterns. (GTT)

Hope this helps, Pyro

 

 

From: Haraldr Bassi <ansteorra at haraldr.drakkar.org>

Date: March 26, 2009 11:13:45 PM CDT

To: "Kingdom of Ansteorra - SCA, Inc." <ansteorra at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Ansteorra] Card Weaving

 

What types of patterns are you looking for?

 

What I normally use for beginning weaving lessons is to have people make a two color warp. You would do that with 2 spools of thread of two colors. Take all of your cards as a single pack, pull one thread of each color through a hole with the color pairs next to each other. Now that you have the four threads, tie a knot in the end of the four threads and then attach that to your loom. Then, simply wind your warp around your loom, dropping off a card in the same location as you wind. I assume you are using either an upright loom or a modern inkle loom. Each time you pass through where you dropped the first card, drop another. When you use up all of the cards, tie to two ends of the warp to each other.

 

Now that you have a four color continuous warp, your choices of what to weave are endless. The simplest basic weave would be to initially turn successive cards so that the color pattern advances around the four holes of the cards. Split your warp in half and have the left half threaded in one direction and the right hand side threaded the other direction.

 

You should end up with a warp that will make chevrons. If the angles don't match, look under the weaving and you should see the angle lines properly. If that happens, you can swap the threading direction of the two halves.

 

Another style you can use with a two color single pack warp is the double faced double turn. This technique uses all the cards lined up with the same colors around the four corners in every card.

 

The base understandings of all techniques is that whatever color passes over the top is what will appear at the cloth line. For a double faced double turn you would start with the two colors in the vertical position. By taking two turns forward and two turns backward you will have the color that started closest to you on top and the other color on the bottom. By continuing some cards forward when the rest turn backwards you will bring the other color up to the surface for that position. This will allow you to use the color changes to make letters or animal or abstract designs. You can plot things out on graph paper or just wing it.

 

The final technique for two color warp is a much more advanced technique called 3-1 broken twill. I'd prefer to work with people directly, after they have worked some of the less complicated techniques.

 

As for websites, google will bring up many very good quality pages for searches of "tablet weaving" or "card weaving".

 

Haraldr

 

 

From: L T <ldeerslayer at yahoo.com>

Date: March 27, 2009 3:31:03 PM CDT

To: " Inc.Kingdom of Ansteorra - SCA" <ansteorra at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Ansteorra] Card Weaving

 

Also... there is a good list....  SCA-Card-Weaving at yahoogroups.com

I would suggest reviewing the archives and links before asking questions...

Several of the owners of the best tablet/card weaving sites/books are on this list as well as some amazing non-published researchers and rank newbies ;)

Lorraine DeerSlayer

 

<the end>



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