Home Page

Stefan's Florilegium

largess-ideas-msg



This document is also available in: text or RTF formats.

largess-ideas-msg - 5/17/10

 

Ideas for largess and gifts. Gifts for Royalty.

 

NOTE: See also the files: baby-gifts-msg, food-gifts-msg, merch-books-msg, 12th-nite-msg, Candlemas-msg, Yule-msg, holidays-msg, crown-cost-msg, holiday-gifts-lnks, Pennsic-gifts-msg, gifts-4-staff-msg.

 

************************************************************************

NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

   Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                         Stefan at florilegium.org

************************************************************************

 

From: Oriana <oriana at pacbell.net>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Gifts - any ideas?

Date: Mon, 23 Jun 1997 12:31:18 -0700

 

Greetings one and all.

 

Our little group seems to have run out of ideas for gifts for

royals (well, we had LOTS of good ideas, but they all seem to

have occurred to other people has well!).

 

Any ideas?  

 

What has been done so far (either by us or by others who did

it before we had a chance):

 

notecards with their devices printed on them

table linens with their devices

feastware/candlesticks/other table ware

handmade candles

postage

fabric/trims/etc

garb

'fruits of the valley' - pomegranites, persimmons, raisins, nuts, etc.

honey and honeycombs

jewelry

games and gameboards

scented bath salts

peacock feathers

lots and lots of chocolate

various foods:  homemade cocoa mix, breads, cookies, etc.

various alcohol beverages

knives

chairs/benches

banners

 

So ... any other ideas?  

 

Lady Oriana

mailto:oriana at pacbell.net

 

 

From: "Melissa Rogers" <Scott-n-Missy at worldnet.att.net>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Gifts - any ideas?

Date: 24 Jun 1997 00:00:02 GMT

 

Our household has made a reasonably consistent effort at providing our

crowns with toys with which to gift the children present at an event.  This

is a Meridien tradition and may not apply to your kingdom.  We have been

able to purchase very affordable, surprisingly appropriate items such as

wooden reed flutes, rings with "gems", and various simple wooden

noisemakers, etc.  These can be found from party supply stores or catalogs,

or, if you're fortunate enough to live where Mardi Gras is celebrated, a

supply house of that type will have _many_ options.

 

Along the same lines, a frequent gift to the crowns seems to be other small

tokens that they may give to a gentle as a form of appreciation other that

those deserving of awards.  These might be hand-painted beads strung on a

cord, affordable rings, or homemade potables, mostly cordials in this

kingdom.

 

I think any crown would appreciate items that may enable them to play more

generously and encourage the courtesy that is so common among Meridiens.

 

Lady Eilidh nin Choinnich, Gleann Abhann, Meridies

 

 

From: XSimmons <"jls9" at  MSG.TI.COM>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Gifts - any ideas?

Date: Mon, 23 Jun 1997 16:38:48 -0500

Organization: Texas Instruments

 

Oriana wrote:

 

> Our little group seems to have run out of ideas for gifts for

> royals (well, we had LOTS of good ideas, but they all seem to

> have occurred to other people has well!).

> Any ideas?

 

Charter scrolls in the King's/Queen's personna style.  This is useful

long-term if there are  lots of similar personnas thereabouts.

 

What about a tourney chest painted in the appropriate colors, with or

without the arms?  (Or a wooden cover for the ice chest that could be

latched, so it can serve as a packing box for travel.)

 

Rope bed for luxury camping?

 

"Spices of the Orient" in calligraphy-labeled glass bottles (with

corks)? (Spices are usually reasonable these days, but would have been

a spiffy gift in period.)  A wood storage box to protect them from

breakage would be nice.  Whole spices and a tiny grater/mortar and

pestal would be fun, too.)

 

Book of Hours for the Queen (not a _real_ one, necessarily -- just a few

illustrated pages bound in tooled leather.  I bet your group could put

together something pretty. . .  .

 

Commission one of the SCA's famous cartoonists to do their portraits

(bambie-oidish or Tudor-Glitzie, or whatever).

 

Something ornate in marzipan (which can be "depicted" by the great

painter, Polaroid, and then shared out.  No packing!)

 

A royal beast, like a chained cheetah or hawk.  (There are lots of

realistic stuffed animals on the market these days.  Alas, this item

would have to be packed.)

 

Rent/borrow a heavy horse and a white Arab cross and have the Royals

"depicted" on horseback in garb, with fancy halters, and maybe banners,

if the horses don't object. . . .).  Give them 10 x 14s suitably

framed. (Do you have a photographer in your group?  Might not break the

bank.)

 

Offer to sneak them away for a private picnic away from all the pomp and

complaints -- er, pagentry, late in their reign.  (No, forget that one;

I'd probably be strung up by some irate _Blank_ocrat!)

 

Commission a set of praise poems/songs (suited to the Royal personnas)

from an SCA bard.  Publicly reward said bard with lengths of fine cloth

or "spices of the Orient," or whatever.

 

Give the Royals copies of the praise series in nice calligraphy,

suitably rolled or framed.

 

Hope that helps.  (Sure is fun thinking up stuff for _other_ folks to

do!) 8-)

 

With regard, Ly Meara al-Isfahani

 

 

From: "Sam & Bobbie Galyean" <GreenbriarAZ at worldnet.att.net>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Gifts - any ideas?

Date: 24 Jun 1997 05:43:02 GMT

 

As a past Head Lady in Waiting I need to supply my Queen with a lot of

small gifts.

       1. Some of the ideas I used were geared around the time of the year such

as home made christmas ornaments ( candy canes threaded through lace, pine

cones with painted highlights, lace angels, cinnamon sticks wrapped with

lace).

       2.  I also had some handkerchiefs with a painted or needle work symbol on them.

       3. There are crafts stores in most larger cities that have wood craft

sections, You can get little wooden pill boxs, candel holders, needle

cases, stamp dispensors, egg holders (great for salt celler) with scoops.

       4. Handmade soap ( with a surprise inside), Treasure candles.

       5. The papermache department often times has some great small boxes

       6. Make your own paper with fiber pulp you can buy at the craft stores.

(Add herbs and flowers) To make a small notebook press the cover in a ceramic cookie mold and buy a regular sheet of rough paper for the interior pages.

 

My best source for ideas often time came from all the craft show on the

cable channels or wondering the book isles at a craft store like "Ben

Franklins"& "Micheals".  I could occasionally get some ideas from the

fabric store pattern books.  They sometimes have knic-knacks and small

items you can make.

 

I hope this helps I know I did a lot of other things but for the life of me

my mind has drawn a blank at the moment.

 

Her Ladyship Waine Nogard of Greenbriar

 

From: Library Staff <betpulib at ptdprolog.net>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Gifts - any ideas?

Date: 24 Jun 1997 19:14:07 GMT

Organization: Bethany Public Library

 

From the July/August Issue of Family Life magazine:

 

Soaps with "surprises" in them (simple enough for a children's craft w/

adult supervision).

(edited for relevance and to save bandwidth)

 

Ingredients:

1 bar clear, unscented glycerine soap

Beads, seashells, glitter, plastic confetti in shapes, other small

"surprises" and found objects.

Molds or mini loaf pans

Essential oils (lavender, rosemary and thyme are nice)

 

Directions

 

1. Put one bar of glycerine soap in a bowl and zap in the microwave for

60 seconds, or melt it in a double boiler (10 to 15 minutes). When done,

pour about 1/4 inch of melted soap into mold or mini bread pan. Let

harden slightly (3-5 minutes).

2. Scatter small toys or other found objects face down on top of the

hardened soap in the mold. Reheat the remaining soap. Add one drop of the

essential oil, and mix with a fork. Pour a second, thicker layer on top,

sealing the prizes inside. Let harden about 30 minutes. When done, have

an adult run a sharp knife around the edges and (may have to run the mold

under hot water to loosen) then let the soap maker smack the pan facedown

against the counter. The soap will pop out. It looks fine like this, but

can also be cut into small, chunky blocks.

 

Candy molds make the soap go farther and look prettier.

 

 

From: Greg Shetler <shetler at ti.com>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Gifts - any ideas?

Date: Tue, 24 Jun 1997 09:08:36 -0700

 

Don't know if anyone else has mentioned it, but a gift of a carved

and/or painted drinking horn goes over really well.  The Rialto archives

include some pretty good instructions from a number of people on just

how to do this, and it makes for a really pretty, useful gift.

 

Mordock von Rugen

 

 

From: "Chatzie Massey" <admass at monsanto.com>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Gifts - any ideas?

Date: 24 Jun 1997 18:42:46 GMT

Organization: Monsanto Company

 

I don't know what kingdom you are from, but here

are a few that the Shire of Arenal did for Meridies

royals:

 

Platters with the device on them for the high table at feast

Needle cases (done at a Pennsic for each of the Queens

in the Known Worlde)

Sheet wall for the Kingdom Pennsic camp.

belt pouches in kingdom colors (filled with "gold" choco coins)

Matching ceramic mugs for high table in kingdom device/colors

Tablecloth for high table

pillows for kneeling in court in the presence

drapes/throws for the bare-wood thrones (so they aren't "cold"

       when they sit)

Lap shawl for wintertime for court

decorated fans on long handles for summer (for the court

       attendants to fan their majesties with)

Matching Capes in Kingdom colors/devices

"Travel Fund" contributions in appropriate pouches.

Cloth in Kingdom colors for new majestic garb

 

Hope these spark some ideas for you.

--

Chatzie Massey

 

 

From: pwam1 at aol.com (PWAM1)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Gifts - any ideas?

Date: 25 Jun 1997 11:15:53 GMT

 

One thing you might do would be to make blank scrapbooks with the

kingdom's arms on them.  The Royals could then fill them in with pictures,

thoughts and autographs and keep them as a memento of their riegn.  Of

course this assumes they have time to fill them in.

 

Agnes

 

 

From: excmairi at aol.com (EXCMairi)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Gifts - any ideas?

Date: 25 Jun 1997 15:51:53 GMT

 

Best gifts for Royalty? Stamps.  And Her Majesty of the East, Moruadh,

recently mentioned Phone Calling Cards (the kind you can get with a set

number of minutes on them).  What a great idea!

 

Mairi

 

 

From: Oriana <oriana at pacbell.net>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Gifts - any ideas - thanks

Date: Wed, 25 Jun 1997 13:34:28 -0700

 

Thank you to everyone who responded to my request for ideas for gifts.

 

At Their recent Coronation, Their Majesties received a great many gifts,

both very practical and perhaps not-so practical (but fun!).  They

received stamps, calling cards, fast-food certificates, much fabric,

table linens, etc.  Also, in this Kingdom, Their Majesties typically

have a substantial retinue of ladies-in-waiting, guards, advisors,

heralds, royal scribes, etc., so gifts of practical service are not

so terribly, well, practical (at least not while they are on the thrones).

 

We are looking for something unique and memorable for a special

occasion. We have a while yet, and so are still gathering ideas.

 

Thanks again,

Oriana

oriana at pacbell.net

 

 

From: maddie teller-kook <meadhbh at io.com>

To: ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG

Date: Thu, 07 Aug 1997 19:08:17 -0500

Subject: Re: ANST - largess

 

dentim at mail.myriad.net wrote:

> I was wondering if any of you had given or received some particularly great

> largess at any events?  I would love to know the reason they were given or

> received, and at what event.

>

> Allysyn

 

As for largess, I usually put together some sort of 'cooking' treat to

give away. I have given little bottles of seasoned salt, for example. I

have also given some pretty beads on a ribbon.  Largess is anything you

want to make it.  I give mine (usually for arts and sciences) for work I

think shows excellent research and execution.  Also, If I see someone do

something above and beyond that I think deserves recognition, I may

thank them or recognize them with a small token. Granted, I am a peer,

but that doesn't mean anyone can't do this. I think it is a wonderful

way to recognize someone in a special way and YOU will be remembered for

it.   So.... If you want any ideas or suggestions for types of largess,

just let me know.

 

in service,

meadhbh

 

 

From: Lisa Carter <zkr26 at ttacs1.ttu.edu>

To: ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG

Date: Thu, 07 Aug 1997 20:26:31 -0500 (CDT)

Subject: Re: ANST - largess

 

I been given items such as small pins, coins, beads and flowers.  I have

given out pottery, pins, Apple butter, small boxes with tea, glass jars

with salt and pepper for feast table and a host of other items.

 

I was advised by HE Margaret - past Queen of the East - on largess - it

does not matter what it is - small, large, as long as it is given in

appreciation - it will mean a lot to the receiver.  My most prized peice

is a piece of costume jewelry given to me by her Grace Mikaela - I wear it

as if it was made out of gold and diamonds.

 

Kayleigh Drake

Baroness of Bonwicke

The Western Region of Ansteorra

 

 

From: damaris <damaris at io.com>

To: ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG

Date: Thu, 07 Aug 1997 22:14:52 -0500

Subject: Re: ANST - largess

 

Lisa Carter wrote:

> My most prized piece is a peice of costume jewelry given to me by her Grace

> Mikaela - i wear it as if it was made out of gold and diamonds.

 

I once recieved a leather covered carafe with matching leather goblets

from Mistress Branwyn.  Those of you who know Branwyn know that one of

her talents is finding valuable things in invaluable places. I thought

it rather appropriate for my display of mead, wine and beer.

 

I also recieved a necklace from her Grace Mikaela that I treasure and a

glass bead crafted by none other than Mistress Mara.

 

Damaris

 

 

From: "Eric Jackson"<jackser at okway.okstate.edu>

To: ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG

Date: Fri, 08 Aug 97 10:14:56 -0600

Subject: Re: ANST - largess

 

Allysyn said:

>I was wondering if any of you had given or received some particularly great

>largess at any events?  I would love to know the reason they were given or

>received, and at what event.  (Please don't feel you're bragging, because I

>just want to know!)

  

I have received many wonderful things for largess in the past. As a

   server at feast, I was given a full salt cellar from Ragnar of Ragnars

   Rock. I have also rerceived candle holders and some jewelry but my

   favorite is a necklace that was given to me at a Guardian, when I was

   working in the kitchen. This young Lady came up to me and said, I have

   seen you working so hard this weekend so I wanted to give you this.  I

   have also been given quartz crystals for dying well at the last Gnomon

   Vale Margrave event which I carry on my person all the time. IMHO I

   think just letting the person know why you are giving them something

   makes the item that much more special.  Also on this note if you ever

   eat at a feast and your server does a good job, at the very least

   please tell them that you think so, and remember that something as

   simple as salt can become a treasured item so if you feel up to it go

   on and give your server at a feast a little largess.  This will help

   in making sure that there are plenty of experienced servers in our

   fair kingdom.

  

                               Owen ap Aeddan ap Trahaearn

                               Eldest son of House Windbourne  

                               One of the founders of Wyrmschlauger

                               Member of the Liondragon guard  

                               Herald to the Shire of Mooneschadowe      

 

                                 

From: mfgunter at tddeng00.fnts.com (Michael F. Gunter)

To: ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG

Date: Fri, 8 Aug 1997 10:43:48 -0500

Subject: Re: ANST - largess

 

When I was new to the SCA I fought the King's squire, Ian MacBaird, in an

Eldern Hills Championship. After our fight, Ian (now Sir Ian), asked me to

sit with him under the ROYAL PAVILLION and we talked fighting. He gave me an

uncut opal as a rememberance of a good fight.  I still have that opal.  Part

of the largess is the opal but another part was being given respect and honor

from an experienced fighter. For a new fighter that was very special.

 

I have also given largess both great and small. At one of Inman's Coronations

I fought Talen and since the tourney was for those who impressed the new King

we presented roses to each others ladies and he joined me in singing "Shield

Wall" as we fought.  I was so impressed with his aplomb that I gave him a

large chunk of pressed amber. I guess he liked it because he still mentions

it upon occassion.

 

I have given coins minted during the second crusade found in Jerusalem.

 

One thing I like to give largess for is when people help me in the kitchen.

In addition to those snazzy white plastic aprons everyone was entitled to,

we made up tickets for a free meal at Black Wolf Tavern for anyone we found

who had helped with the Coronation feast.

 

I think everyone, Peers most especially, should always carry some largess.

It's not the trinket itself that's important but the "Thank you" that comes

with it.

 

Yers,

Gunthar

 

 

From: "Richard L. Rohde" <talen at microtutors.com>

To: 'ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG'

Subject: RE: ANST - largesse

Date: Fri, 8 Aug 1997 15:05:21 -0500

Organization: MicroTutors Technologies LLC

 

Sir Gunthar is correct.  I cherish that large piece of cherry amber,

and many drool over it when they see it.  To the best of my

recollection, it was my first largesse, my first piece of amber, and I

made a necklace out of it and various other beads. When I dress for

court or populace I almost always wear it.  It's as much a part of my

"awards" as my comet or crane.  I also had a wonderful time in that

fight, but only got to the beginning of the second verse of "Song of

the Shield Wall"  before Sir Gunthar took my arm and I yielded.

 

Another piece of "largesse" that I cherish almost as much is my

"doofus" that H.E. Master Korwyn and his Lady Silvan gave to me at

Mikael & Mikaela's last Coronation.  I had been serving the head table

at the time.  Though of little intrinsic value, it means a lot to me as

I value their opinions.  It's true that the actual largesse is less

important than the fact that it was received and who gave it.  Those

times are the fabric of the tapestry called "the Dream".

 

Talen

--------

Centurion Talen Gustaf von Marienburg, Kriegsherr von Nordsteorra

Falcon, AOA, Comet, Crane, CSS

Personal E-mail: talen at microtutors.com

 

 

From: Elyh at aol.com

To: ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG

Date: Fri, 8 Aug 1997 22:21:19 -0400 (EDT)

Subject: Re:  ANST - Largesse

 

My favorite pieces of Largesse have been the pieces given to me for bardic

performances. A baroness I could barely see in the dim firelight (and whose

name I  have never figured out) gave me a lovely bracelet once.  

 

The first largess I ever recieved was from a gentleman who simply thought I

was pretty.  My friends and I give each other little trinkets that on could

call largess.   Something like: "I was in this store and I saw this ________

that just screamed your name, so here it is."  

 

Speaking of largess and bardic performances, I would like to encourage all

bards going to Gothic this year to enter the bardic competition.  And I would

like to encourage all non-performers to be there handing out either largess

or words of encouragement to our bards.  I will be there handing out

largess....

 

Ghia

 

 

From: Brendan McEwan <brendan1 at airmail.net>

To: ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG

Date: Fri, 08 Aug 1997 21:37:10 -0500

Subject: Re: ANST - largess

 

Hand made quilt (beautifully done)       A&S display of lutes

10 yds of silk                           same

natural rock beads                       same different event

gold coin chocolates    I don't know except that they were very cool

1 foot of silk                           white scarf

ceramic feast gear                       rapier champion

squire&cadets                                  invitational

Handmade gauntlets are my specialty for largess.   

 

        Brendan McEwan

        Steppes, Ansteorra

              

I've found that it doesn't really matter the largess, it's the thought

and intention that counts. I still have all of this, except for the

chocolates, but the flavor (pardon the pun) this can add is incredible.

It's just nice to be noticed.  

 

 

From: chiang at door.net (Chiang)

To: ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG

Subject: ANST - Largess

Date: Sat, 09 Aug 1997 03:46:41 GMT

 

Largess is nice. More than once I have returned to my A&S display to

see a bead or string of beads. It lets you know that your work is

appreciated.

 

   I also like to give it out. Once when a young lady danced in my camp

I gave her a small necklace. I know for a fact that she still has it. I

try to give out largess when I feel it is deserved, or when I feel like

it. It is neat to give a gift just to watch the expression on someone's

face when they receive it.

 

   I carry a small backpack that I try to keep stocked with different

items for those occasions, 'sides that with my friends you can never

tell when I may need to ransom myself back.

  

   Chiang (not being formal tonite)

   Barony of Bonwicke

   Western region of Ansteorra

 

 

From: "J. Michael Shew" <jshewkc at pei.edu>

To: ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG

Date: Fri, 8 Aug 1997 23:36:48 -0500 (CDT)

Subject: Re: ANST - Largess

 

        Ah, My favorite "awards" are those that the people give me, not

the crown.  (Not that I turn my nose up at a dubis from the throne,

but....well just read on...)

        I have a link from Syr Conn MacNeil's knight's chain, given to me

for my first tale in the SCA.

        I have a link from his mail, since he was paying attention to the

song I was singing and not the fight he was in, and that wicked snap-shot

rent his mail shirt....

        I have two Pensic coins from the same ten year old, two years

apart. He wanted to "Pay the bard" for his nightly story...

        I have beads from a lot of folk, all strung together to make the

necklace for my Lily badge.

        And I have a glass drop from a woman who told me she wanted to

"give you this...It's from my son.  He would give it to you himself, but

his wheelchair can't roll this close to the fire..."  I wheeled him home

and sang and told stories to him for three hours!

        I have a handful of strange bits and pieces from children.

        I have perhaps a dozen earings.

        And one feather pen from a dear friend who died not three months

after. He loved my tales, and swore I could write all the rest with that pen...

        I have coins from kings, Queens, Barons....Knives and toys from

Dukes, Counts.....Even books given to me as a gift.

        I have 17 household badges from the houses who felt I needed to be

a part of them, even if only for a night.

        It seems in Calontir, we believe in largess...

       

        I know, most folk think I sing for beer or other drink.  But my

real treasures probably wouldn't raise 2.50 at a good pawn shop

altogether. You could probably replace them for twenty bucks...

        Well, replace the items...The meaning would take millions....

 

        Sorry. I get maudlin late at night when I have a glass of port.

Forgive a fat old Norseman.  I'll go to bed quietly now...

 

        Mikal

____________________________________________________________________________

Herra-Domr Mikal the Ram; an annoying Bard of no redeeming qualities

 

 

From: marilyn traber <margali at 99main.com>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Largesse list

Date: Mon, 08 Sep 1997 13:48:22 -0400

 

Don Hicks wrote:

> I need some ideas (a list) for largesse **other than** alcholic

> beverages and embroidery & crosstitich, etc. since I don't do hand

> work.

> Maridonna

 

   Go to a flea market, buy junk jewelry that looks ok, and is cheap

enough. I lucked out and found kids jewelry-30 wire bracelets on copper,

silver and gold that are sized for lreteens, they are great for kids. I

also find other goodies that can be used as is or taken apart and

recombinant gene splicing performed to turn them into more period stuff.

 

   Advent gelt[gold chocolate coins] in basic drawstring pouches or

scattered freehand into a crowd.

 

margali

 

 

From: mittle at panix.com (Arval d'Espas Nord)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Largesse list

Date: 8 Sep 1997 12:15:27 -0400

Organization: PANIX Public Access Internet and Unix, NYC

 

Greetings from Arval! Maridonna asked:

 

> I need some ideas (a list) for largesse **other than** alcholic

> beverages and embroidery & crosstitich, etc. since I don't do hand work.

 

I bought several hundred reproduction coins from a Society coiner for about

a nickel apiece.  I give them out regularly to servers at feast and anyone

else who lends a hand.  It's really gratifying to see a newcomer's eyes

light up when I hand him a couple repro. 12th century silver pennies.  The

only drawback is that I usually have to explain what they are, which breaks

the mood.

 

Cariadoc avoid that problem by handing out silver armrings, which anyone

can understand.

===========================================================================

Arval d'Espas Nord                                         mittle at panix.com

 

 

From: mittle at panix.com (Josh Mittleman)

To: markh at risc.sps.mot.com

Date: Tue, 9 Sep 1997 09:52:53 -0400

To: markh at risc.sps.mot.com

Subject: Largesse list

 

> How big are these silver pennies? These are real silver right?

 

The proper historical size, about a half inch across and very thin, thinner

than a dime.  No, they are aluminum (and some are bronze, to simulate gold

coins). You think I can afford to give away real silver!?

 

> I've considered casting some coins (I haven't tried making dies

> yet) for a similar purpose.

 

These coins are stamped, which is apparently the standard method in our

period.

 

        Arval

 

 

From: Holly Cochran <ulfaidan at flash.net>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Largesse list

Date: Mon, 08 Sep 1997 17:35:07 -0600

 

How about calligraphied/illuminated cards with a nice saying on them? I

also made belt favors-a 3" brass ring with a tassel in my heraldic

colors (you can buy premade tassels) or with a nice scrap of trim or

velvet ribbon in your livery colors?  Or several unique beads (bought or

made) in a little velvet bag?  Or a couple-three yards of nice fabric

(like if you find a killer sale of remnants of raw silk or something).

One nice one that I saw at Outlandish was small baskets with little jars

of herb bruise cream, smell-good stuff, etc. Or little wooden boxes

(bought or made) either empty or filled with Stuff. How about bags of

"gold coins"-those yummy chocolate ones.  Or baskets with fresh baked

herb bread? Or little ceramic bowls of appropriate colors? Or handmade

little wood covered blank books (tres cool).  

 

Just my 89 cents worth.....<G>

 

Ms. Aidan

 

 

From: powers at colon.cis.ohio-state.edu (william thomas powers)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Largesse list

Date: 8 Sep 1997 16:37:00 -0400

Organization: The Ohio State University, Department of Computer and Information Science

 

Silver is nice; 1 ounce ingots are not very expensive---close to $5

(not when compared with the time involved in X-stitch and other crafts)

 

Then the recipient can go get them cast or worked into something or

trade it for something else---the joys of specie

 

wilelm the smith---will work for silver, gold, negotiable debentures, land

 

 

From: powers at woodstock.cis.ohio-state.edu (william thomas powers)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Largesse list

Date: 8 Sep 1997 22:00:57 -0400

Organization: The Ohio State University, Department of Computer and Information Science

 

>> Silver is nice; 1 ounce ingots are not very expensive---close to $5

>> (not when compared with the time involved in X-stitch and other crafts)

>> Then the recipient can go get them cast or worked into something or

>> trade it for something else---the joys of specie

>Ooh! Good idea! Aren't copper and brass also pretty affordable, and

>useful? Ooh ooh, ideas running rampant.....

 

Copper and brass are cheaper; however they don't seem to have the

same impact as an ounce of fine silver----unless you are presenting

them to an artisan who uses them.

 

Another suggestion: go to a pawn shop and ask to look through their

"silver scrap"  I bought 10 oz this way once and had a gracious

plenty of rings, etc.  Also check with a coin dealer for old

silver coins, I got around 50 once for scrap price, (I was making

a cross out of 40 pieces of silver for a pastor who was moving away...)

some of them still showed Queen Victoria on their worn surfaces.

 

wilelm the smith

 

 

From: william thomas powers <powers at cis.ohio-state.edu>

To: Mark S. Harris

Subject: Re: Largesse list

Date: Tue, 9 Sep 1997 06:42:43 -0400 (EDT)

 

> Did you melt the rings down into ingots or present them as rings?

 

Yes; some of the jewelry I used as-is and others I re-cast.  

(a couple of rings became my wedding rings when I got married!)

 

> Interesting ideas.

 

I used to cast the "prizes" for our shire's events--usually a simple

object indicating the event: a sword for the tourney, an anvil for the

anvil toss, a spoon for the head cook of the feast, etc.  Not very large

but something different than a silverplate goblet...

 

wilelm

 

 

From: Kathleen Marshall <bookworm at u.washington.edu>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Largesse list

Date: Mon, 8 Sep 1997 18:09:31 -0700

Organization: University of Washington

 

On Mon, 8 Sep 1997, Holly Cochran wrote:

> > > I need some ideas (a list) for largesse **other than** alcholic

> > > beverages and embroidery & cross

> > > sttich, etc. since I don't do hand work.

Are these items you want to *give away*? If so, although you specified

"other than ... cross stitch ..." how about giving skeins of that new DMC

metallic floss? Just because you don't do it yourself doesn't mean others

wouldn't like receiving raw materials.

                                       Saewynn Silfrhrafn

                                       Town Crier Herald, An Tir

mka: Kathy Marshall

   Seattle, WA

   bookworm at u.washington.edu

 

 

From: capncarp at aol.com (CapnCarp)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Largesse list

Date: 11 Sep 1997 16:21:28 GMT

 

Russ Gilman Hunt wrote:

>don't forget to ask for baby food jars, especially for ointments and

>beads

>and such.  

 

Buy  a HUGE amout of Mineral Oil, which is the basis for baby oil, divide

it into smaller containers with lids(baby food jars?), add cloves, or mint

or other scents to macerate in the oil.  Result: massage oil!  

 

Note: this takes quite a bit of time, so start now.

 

Good luck,

Geoffrey Soulspeeder

 

 

From: tierna at agora.rdrop.com (Britt )

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Largesse list

Date: 16 Sep 97 10:29:26 GMT

Organization: RainDrop Laboratories/Agora(sm)

 

Maridonna requests:

> I need some ideas (a list) for largesse **other than** alcholic

> beverages and embroidery & crosstitich, etc. since I don't do hand

> work.

 

Beads, bells, colourful cords, trim, sewing accessories, recipes,

music, get someone to strike a period-style commemerative coin,

marbles (some can be quite versatile and beautiful), impliments

of artistic use to the recipient (find out what materials they

use in their work), empty bottles of decorative bent (a local

Baron got a fish-bottle as a gift recently, his Baroness got a

necklace-perfume bottle), books, garb accessories (belts, pouches,

laces...), drinking vessels, candles, candle lanterns, oil lamps,

small containers (wooden or metal or bone boxes) or perhaps a nice

salt cellar.

Look for what the little, useful things the potential recipients employ

then try to find variants or decorative additions to them (a lady I know

wears several keys from her belt - and people are regularly giving her

more; she could use the ring as a cudgel by now).  One of my most

cherished gifts was from my lady mother upon my appointment as shire

A&S minister - a small metal mirror with an engraved back done in the

style of one found in Switzerland at an archaeologic dig.  It cost her

$5 at a local import shop.

 

- Teceangl  (who loves to give things to folks, whether they want them or not)

 

 

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

From: bq676 at torfree.net (Kristine E. Maitland)

Subject: Re: Largesse list

Organization: Toronto Free-Net

Date: Tue, 16 Sep 1997 15:41:59 GMT

 

Don Hicks (don-andrea-hicks at postoffice.worldnet.att.net) wrote:

: I need some ideas (a list) for largesse **other than** alcholic

: beverages and embroidery & crosstitich, etc. since I don't do hand work.

: Can anyone help, please?

: Maridonna

 

I think I can, signora.  I went to my local linens shop (Ling's in

Toronto) and bought a box of handkerchiefs (I get mine for $11.50 CDN for

10). They are handembroidered (some have crochet detailing) and are

great for handing to people as small tokens/favours.

 

For something larger, I buy tablecloths (same store, though sometimes at

other linen shops in Chinatown).  I can get a small tablecloth with four

napkins for $10-15 CDN.

 

Another idea -- books.  Penguin sells mini-books for $0.99 US ($1.45 CDN)

-- you can get Beowulf or an essay by Michiavelli etc.  Put them in a

pouch and give them out.  Books were considered valuable in period and

Penguin carries a wide variety of titles from throughout period.

 

sinceremente

Inez

--

Inez Rosanera                           Kristine Maitland

cortigiana,cantana, pariole             branch assistant, lyricist, critic

Barony of Septentria                    Toronto, Ontario

Principality ofEaldormere               Canada

 

 

From: markh at risc.sps.mot.com (Mark S. Harris)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Largesse list

Date: Tue, 16 Sep 1997 00:22:21 -0600

Organization: Motorola

 

Greetings unto Geoffrey,

 

capncarp at aol.com (CapnCarp) wrote:

> Buy  a HUGE amout of Mineral Oil, which is the basis for baby oil, divide

> it into smaller containers with lids(baby food jars?), add cloves, or mint

> or other scents to macerate in the oil.  Result: massage oil!  

 

An interesting idea. If you used olive oil instead of mineral oil and

perhaps found some small bottles, instead of the glaringly modern

baby food jars, it would even be fairly period.

 

The same methods could be used to create flavored vinegars and oils for

cooking.

 

Stefan li Rous

 

> Geoffrey Soulspeeder

--

Ld. Stefan li Rous     Barony of Bryn Gwlad        Ansteorra

 

 

From: Kathi <britearrow at geocities.com>

To: markh at risc.sps.mot.com

Date: Tue, 16 Sep 1997 23:11:38 -0700

Subject: Largesse

 

Here's an idea for Largesse-  When an event is coming up, why not have

the Baron and Baroness(or King and Queen, if it's a Kingdom event), put

out a "proclomation" requesting donations from the craftspeople of the

Barony/Realm/Whatever? That way, craftspeople get a chance to show off

their wares(a little free publicity), and there are some nice prizes and

such to give out.

 

Caitlinn Ingen Brigt/Kat

 

 

Date: Fri, 19 Sep 1997 11:00:35 -0700 (PDT)

From: lifitz at wco.com (Conny Fitzsimmons)

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Arts & Sciences Awards

 

<snip>

You can never go wrong with fresh water pearls, and they are really not very

expensive.

 

You can mail order pearls from Fire Mountain Gems in Cave Junction, Oregon.

they have a toll free number 800 4232319 ( no I don't work for them just buy

a lot of stuff).   They also have a lot of other beads that are period that

are not too expemsive.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Catherine Lorraine

Arts Officer Principality of the Mists

Kingdom of the West

 

 

Date: Wed, 1 Oct 97 13:03:42 -0500

To: <ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG>

From: <cward at awd.com> "C Ward, Software Support, x3115"

Subject: Re: ANST - kingdom A&S

 

Greetings from Gunnora,

 

As a note, in either Laurels' Prize Tourneys or Nobles' Prize Tourney,

displaying artisans may give largess and constructive critiques to other

artisans, and the populace is also welcome to give largess to those

artisans whose works impress them.  That's one nice thing about this

format: everybody can get into the act.  

 

And while traditionally LPT has had very high quality largesse hand-made by

the master-craftsmen of the Laurels' Circle, not all largesse has to be a

masterwork. Some ideas for appropriate largess which I have seen given at

past LPTs have included, but are not limited to:

 

hand-made bone needles (I gave out packets of 3 to 12 needles at last LPT)

hand-carved soapstone spindle whorls (another largess item I have given)

Viking random bead necklaces (I have given these at LPT as well as

Lyonnesse)

home-made herbal soaps

embroidered pouches

leather pouches

bottles of home-brewed liquers, wines or beers

sword-length staves of rattan

home-made herbal bath salts

home-made herbal oils

home-made herbal bruise salve

inkle and tablet-woven trim or belts

two, three, four or more hand-made lampworked glass beads

actual medieval coinage, one of two coins gifted

a pouch containing tumble-polished stones

necklaces of semi-precious gemstones

SCA-style costume jewellry

a full place setting of basic wood and pewter feastgear

a hand-carved horn or wooden spoon

a small dagger with woodburned-decoration on the handle

 

 

Date: Thu, 10 Dec 1998 12:03:25 -0500

From: "Gray, Heather" <Heather at Quodata.Com>

To: "'sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu'" <sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu>

Subject: RE: Holiday Grab Bags [SCA]

 

How about _Latin for All Occasions : Lingua Latina Occasionibus Omnibus_

by Henry Beard / Hardcover / Published 1990

or the sequel, _Latin for Even More Occasions_ ?

 

Has sections on compliments, greetings, small talk, and even things for

the Roman cutpurse, such as:

 

Catapultam habeo. Pecuniam totam tuam me date.   (from memory...)

"I have a catapult. Give me all your money."

 

Fun even if you don't know Latin. :)

 

Elwynne

 

 

Date: Thu, 10 Dec 1998 15:42:10 -0800

From: "J. Kriss White" <jkrissw at earthling.net>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Holiday Grab Bags [SCA]

 

At 11:24 AM 12/10/98 -0500, Gwen wrote:

>I can think of a few things, but, they're not so interesting and yet

>generic that ANYONE can make use of them...

 

Bath salts.

Kitchen spices.

Fancy candles.

Assortment of colored cloth tapes. :-)

Blank a/v tapes.

Lantern batteries.

Propane gas canisters.

 

Lord Daveed of Granada, mka J. Kriss White,

Barony of Calafia, Kingdom of Caid

email - jkrissw at earthling.net  ||  AOL IM - jkrissw  ||  ICQ #1824702

 

 

Date: Thu, 10 Dec 1998 18:08:38 -0000

From: "Greg" <golsen at inconnect.com>

To: <sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu>, <SCA-ARTS at UKANS.EDU>

Subject: Re: Holiday Grab Bags [SCA]

 

I have found shaped soaps to be a nifty giftie.  Also try medieval games,

like king's table or landsquenet.

 

Heloise

 

 

Date: Thu, 10 Dec 1998 19:19:48 -0700

From: "K. Stowe" <ladycaviar at unidial.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Holiday Grab Bags [SCA]

 

>I'm a terrible gift shopper in general, and now I need to pick a grab bag

gift for the Canton holiday grab bag.

 

Buttons. Little daggers. Teeny bottles to put things in. Pouches. Feast

gear. Handkerchiefs. Nice tent stakes. More buttons. Yards of trim. A CD of

Renaissance music. Gloves.

 

Did I mention buttons? ;)

Ro

 

 

Date: Thu, 10 Dec 1998 23:18:13 -0500

From: "K. E. Reinhart" <keran at hancock.net>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Holiday Grab Bags [SCA]

 

Gift maybes -

Baskets $1.00 - $3.00  Salvation Army & Goodwill

Jewellery "      "       "       "

Bottles    $.50         $ Dollar store

Beads & Pearls    $.66      AC Moore

Ribbon reels  3/$1.00

Thread - gold, silver, etc.

Calligraphy pen, ink

Small bells

Blank books

goblets

 

Keran Roslin

AEthelmearc

 

 

Date: Fri, 11 Dec 1998 16:15:14 -0500

From: Carol Thomas <scbooks at neca.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Holiday Grab Bags [SCA]

 

>I'm a terrible gift shopper in general, and now I need to pick a grab bag

>gift for the Canton holiday grab bag. What can I get that would be of equal

>use to fighters/service people/A&S types? Drinkers and non-drinkers?

>Carnivores and Vegans? Pagans and Jews and Catholics? That's worth about

$10?

 

For a few pennies you could get a piece of decorated computer paper with a

blue background and a scroll on it.  Looks nice; I use it for gift

certificates.

 

Approach a few local SCA merchants, and ask them if they will honor it if

you promise to pay when it is handed in.  List the merchants on the

certificate, PUT AN EXPIRATION DATE ON IT and print very small at the

bottom how to reach you so the merchant can handle it easily, and roll it

up and wrap it.  One size fits all.

 

 

Date: Fri, 11 Dec 1998 21:00:35 EST

From: <THLRenata at aol.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Holiday Grab Bags [SCA]

 

Someone gave me a neat little giftie last night -- a cute package containing

7 flat chocolate mints. Each mint has a likeness of Henry VIII and each of his

wives.

 

I think my friend got it at Cost Plus.

 

Renata

 

 

Date: Sun, 13 Dec 1998 14:50:28 EST

From: <Gingen3 at aol.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Holiday Grab Bags [SCA]

 

Hmmm... What about feast gear - napkin ring with napkin, candle holder with

candle (and matches), Salt Cellar (salt), ...   or maybe sewing kit for simple

repairs a piece or two of trim, duct tape for field repairs, thimble, small

scissors, needle and an assortment of threads...  or maybe a basket or bag or

pocket or pouch to tote things ... How about the makings for a medieval recipe

with the recipe of course and the offer to aid in its making if desired....

Gift certificate for something you can do for them (I do Seated Massages)...

 

Lady Geva

 

 

Subject: ANST - Fw: Only 1 week

Date: Sun, 13 Dec 98 01:18:21 MST

From: "Casey&Coni" <weed at sage.net>

To: "Southern List" <southern at Ansteorra.ORG>

   , "ansteorra" <ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG>

 

Merry Christmastime, everyone!

 

I had a dear friend of mine ask me a question about what would be a good

Yule Revel gift.  As I finished up the list of the things that popped into

my head I thought perhaps there might be others out there that could use it

as well.  Tempio- like many other groups out there- limits its gift limit to

$10, so I based my list on that price.

 

Dieterich- Black Belt in Shop Long Fu

 

>>I don't think I will be able to make anything but what kinds of

>>things can SCAers use for under $10.

>Acrylic paint

>Material (esp white for veils/shirts)

>Feast gear

>Artificial sinew

>Duct Tape

>A hat

>Embroidery floss

>Needles

>Gesso

>Wood

>Books on art in the Middle Ages

>Embroidery hoops

>A belt blank

>Books on heraldry

>Books on armor

>A seam-ripper with the little light on the end

>Candles

>A lantern

>Knitted mittens

>Good paper (ask for 'elephant paper' at a paper shop)

>A piece of good leather

>Paint brushes (ten bucks can get the good ones rather than the cruddy ones)

>A length of trim

>A length of lace

>A basket

>Some ostrich plumes

>Some pheasant feathers

>A pair of good scissors (Ginghers on sale in Temple right now for half

>price)

>A tape or cd of dance music

>Sheet music for recorder

>A recorder

>A nine-mens-morris game

>Dice (no respectable late period persona would be without them)

>A nice period looking buckle

>Rivets for armor

>A strap-cutter

>A rawhide mallet

>A brick of beeswax

>A hydrometer

>A wine thief

>A package of corks

>Patterning paper

>Soap

>A nice brooch from your local Goodwill or Salvation Army

>A book on brewing or vinting

>A dremmel tool accessory pack

>A camp stool

>A deck of rennaissance style cards

>A yeast culture

>A period cookbook

>A book on basic sewing skills

>A pouch

>A body hammer

>Buttons

>Hooks and eyes

>Good thread

>Some antler

>A cows horn (for either a drinking horn or a hunting horn)

>A brass kickplate

>A yard or two of buckram

>A t-square

>A rosary

>A cross

>A cup or mug

>A sketchbook

>Tracing paper

>Blank tapes

>A brewers log

>A block of carving linoleum

>A draw knife

>A piece of rattan

>Some 550 cord

>Tentstakes

>A banner pole

>Seeds for different herbs

>Lamp oil

>Beads (especially pearls... you can get a strand or two of real freshwater

>pearls under $10)

>That should give you something to chew on.  BTW, with this list you can

>really do some neat things: imagine getting a nice brooch ($5.25) wrapped in

>a yard of nice heavy white cotton for an arming cap ($3.00) and tied off

>with a yard of trim left over from an old project ($1.50) and decorated with

>four nice buttons off a Goodwill shirt ($.25).

 

 

Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 23:05:14 EST

From: <SWRDBABE at aol.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Holiday Grab Bags [SCA]

 

Here are some cool gifts under $10 that we've used in our barony for gift

exchanges.

 

a set of hand-dipped candles

a lantern

a set of goblets

a salt cellar (great especially for cooks)

an SCA survival kit:

       roll of duct tape

       small first aid kit

       bottle of water

       little box of chocolates or hard candies

 

Daniela

 

 

Date: Wed, 24 Nov 1999 10:24:49 MST

From: Scot and Domino Eddy <domino7 at texas.net>

Subject: BG - MORE GIFT IDEAS

To: southern at Ansteorra.ORG, bryn-gwlad at Ansteorra.ORG,

                "'burg-eltz at egroups.com'" <burg-eltz at egroups.com>

        ,         "ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG" <ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG>

 

Ok folks,

 

We've added to the list somewhat. Here is an longer list of possible

Yule gifts for the Viking gift exchange. Some of these will be around

$10 soem will be significantly under cost. If that is the case consider

making a "gift pack". For instance, duct tape is only $2-3. So why not

wrap up 1 roll of duct tape, 1 roll of fiberglass strapping tape, and1

roll of black electrical tape. That should be about $10. Or the enamel

paints the enameling guild is using are a couple of dollars each. Throw

together 2-3 bottles of paint, 1 wide brush, 1 narrow brush, and some

patterning paper. Cool, eh? Is the fabric too expensive for several

yards as a gift? How about 1/4 or 1/2 yard of wool, silk, or linen plus

a pattern pack of coifs, pouches, or gloves. Hope this helps!

 

Jovian and Zaharra

 

Leather working tools

Wood working tools

Tape or CD of Medieval music

Books from Half Price Books

e.g. Francis Gies books

        Arms and Armor book

        Art history

        Heraldry

        Medieval/Renaissance History

        etc.

Fabric (especially white for arming cap or veils)

Trim

A hat

Feast gear

Arificial sinew

Guache set - a few tubes

Oil set - a few tubes

Egg tempera set - a few tubes

Gesso

Enamel paint set (enameling guild) - a few tubes

Medieval looking glasses to paint

Paint brushes

Linoleum blocks for block printing

Lucet  for Lucet cord making

Drop spindle and wool

Wool or silk floss and needles

Embroidery hoops

Embroidery scissors

Strings of pearls or semipercious stones (yes, they can be found for

   under $10)

Mortar and Pestle

Lantern

Medieval/Renaissance Patterns

Length of ratan

Couple rolls of tape (make it a set 1 roll of each, fibreglass strapping

   tape, duct tape, black electrical tape)

Rivets

Belt blank

Set of belts (for armor, belts, etc.)

Good paper for illumination

A feast basket

Ostrich Plumes

Pair of good scissors (Ginghers)

Medival games (dice, cards, mancala (Walmart has this))

Rawhide mallet

Brick of Beeswax

A strap cutter

Hydrometer

Wine thief

Package of corks

Dremmel tool accessory pack

Auto body hammer

 

 

Date: Thu, 20 Jan 2000 08:21:50 -0700

From: "Karen O" <kareno at lewistown.net>

Subject: Re: SC - Princess favors

 

>>As Princess, you can drop all kinds of suggestions and put your name on

lots of activities, and encourage others to have these activities at their

events.<

 

I was thinking that Her Highness could distribute  small packets of

*Spices* as favors/ tokens (long pepper, cubebs, saunders, grains of

paradise ).   those "different" spices that many people  can't find readily,

and may put them off cooking period recipes.

 

Coz someone encouraged me & my cooking by giving me a small bag (5-6

pieces) of long pepper a couple years back.

 

Caointiarn

 

 

Date: Wed, 12 Apr 2000 09:40:03 -0400

From: Elaine Koogler <ekoogler at chesapeake.net>

Subject: Re: SC - Staff rewards

 

In our barony, we have a custom of giving each person who helps with an event

"pilgrm beads"...I search the bead catalogues for a bead that seems somehow to

reflect the theme of the event...we just had an event, Le Defi du Coeur, wherein

the fighters vied to reclaim "the heart of Dun Carraig".  Each person helping with the event will receive a carnelian heart stone.  Not terrifically expensive, but a memento of an event where one served!  Many of our folks wear these beads with their garb with great pride.

 

I also try to give a memento of some sort to my kitchen help when I cook outside

our barony...I'm still thinking about the one coming up this weekend........

 

Kiri

 

 

Date: Fri, 30 Jun 2000 11:23:23 -0500

From: "sdrake" <steldr at home.net>

Subject: SC - RE: gold jordan almonds

 

I'm looking for gold-dipped Jordon almonds (not gold-foil wrapped);

does anyone know of a store in your area that carries them?  --If

yes, please send a phone # (with area code) or email address.

 

- --Mistress Cordelia/Midrealm

 

Try www.candydirect.com and look in the bulk candy section - you'll have to

scroll through 2 or 3 pages to get to the the j's.  I know it says gold foil

but these are dipped.  I have not ordered from this company - just something

I found on the web while browsing the other day.  They also sell 5 lb lots

of gold chocolate coins for around $34 - for those of you who utilize such

things.......

 

Mercedes

 

 

From: "willowdewisp at juno.com" <willowdewisp at juno.com>

Date: February 21, 2008 11:23:22 PM CST

To: ansteorra at lists.ansteorra.org

Subject: [Ansteorra] Largess ideas long

 

I do not know if you have thought of this but one of the duties of the petite nobility i.e.: Lords and Ladies, is to support our "ruling" nobles. All nobility are supposed to give out Largess. This is doubly true for ruling Baron and Baroness and Kings and Queens.

 

Part of our personas is giving our nobles gifts so they can give them back out. This is how the Courtly Game is played. Just before Gulf War and big events are times when Territory nobles need things and I hope this list will inspire you.

Remember your territory B&B might like Baskets to give as gifts as much as your King and Queen

 

Here is a list of things you might want to give your local and kingdom nobles.

I combined list off Stefan's Florilegium  http://www.florilegium.org I have added ideas of my own. If anyone has any good ideas please send them to me to add to list.

 

Note cards with medieval designs or local or kingdom ensign on it or sometime that suggest the group

Table linens  

Feast ware/candlesticks/other table ware

Handmade or bought candles

Fabric/trims/etc

Garb

SCA-style costume jewelry

Pins with local group's ensign or Kingdom ensign

Scented bath salts, home-made herbal bruise salve, home-made herbal oils, home-made herbal soaps

Peacock or other feathers

Lots and lots of chocolate, candy coins are great

Knives

Chairs/benches

Banners

Handkerchiefs with a painted or needle work symbols on them

Engraved glass items with medieval designs and mottos

Platters and plates and bowls with designs that reflect local or Kingdom groups or jobs Herald's trumpets or bardic harps or

Belt pouches in kingdom or local groups colors (filled with "gold" chocolate coins) these were called Alms bags and are period. Embroidered pouches

Leather pouches are also good

Period looking Bottles but please remember officially we can not give out alcohol

Matching ceramic mugs

Candle holders (IF you like to wood burn or painting you can find wooden ones at craft stores

Quartz crystals

Amber

A small mirror

Books

Book cover

Books that heralds or bards can put their papers in and read from. These can be made by getting a handsome book cover at a thrift store and decorating it.

Hand-made bone needles last LPT)

Viking random bead necklaces

Sword-length staves of rattan or better yet spear length

Inkle loom

Two, three, four or more hand-made lampworked glass beads

Actual medieval coinage, one of two coins gifted

A full place setting of basic wood and pewter feastgear

Hand-carved horn or wooden spoon

A small dagger with wood burned-decoration on the handle

A hat

Feast gear

Artificial sinew

Gauche set - a few tubes

Oil set - a few tubes

Egg tempera set - a few tubes

Gesso

Enamel paint set (enameling guild) - a few tubes

Medieval looking glasses to paint or engrave especially if they have covers.

Paint brushes

Linoleum blocks for block printing

Lucent for Lucent cord making

Drop spindle and wool

Wool or silk floss and needles

Embroidery hoops

Embroidery scissors

Strings of pearls or semiprecious stones (yes, they can be found for

   under $10)

Mortar and Pestle

Lantern

Medieval/Renaissance Patterns (If you want to make it seem to be a period gift make a decorated period folder to put them in)

Length of rattan

Couple rolls of tape (make it a set 1 roll of each, fiberglass strapping

tape, duct tape, black electrical tape)

Rivets

Belt blank

Set of belts (for armor, belts, etc.)

Good paper for illumination

A feast basket

Pair of good scissors

A pair of period looking scissors .Many Asian grocery stores have them

Medieval games (dice, cards, mancala (Walmart has this)) (Thrift store sometimes have nice sets. Glass sets are period. You can wood burn or paint a nice board on wood.

Brick of Beeswax

Little boxes

Wooden comb

 

Other things I have found useful is anything that starts someone off on a new craft or Art. Anything that opens someone eyes to the wonder of History. Something a persona can use i.e.: Norse drinking bowl,

 

Things period nobles gave out

Ginger bread cookies Queen Elizabeth

Gloves

Fancy spoons

Salt cellars.

Glass items

Brooches

Glass rings

Rings in general

Bracelets

Early Period Arm bands

Fur

Cloaks (light dress cloaks are fun.

Clothing

Amour

Candles

Candies (good to put in the boxes)

Golden sash and silken girdle, and samite, and other exotic goods to Peter of Bois

 

One of my favorite things that Kings received in period are polar bears and elephants.

 

 

From: george basore <murray_kinsman at yahoo.com>

Date: February 22, 2008 1:10:34 PM CST

To: ansteorra at lists.ansteorra.org

Subject: [Ansteorra] favorite largess

 

  I have a tale to tell, my favorite given.

 

It happened at Red Tape, when his majesty Mahdi was

crowned for the second time.

 

Let me digress, to explain that the favors I give

out to show affiliation with, membership in, or as a

sign of respect from my clan (Clann Haddock) is a

particular design of dagger.

 

To show our respect for his Majesty, I presented him

with my personal dagger, explaining the I had carried

it at every event I had attended, in the then- 6 1/2

years in the SCA.  He was overwhelmed by the history

of the dagger, and was concerned the I would miss it,

so I explained that from then on, I wear the dagger

that was my mother's, before she passed from this

life.

 

He does me great honor as he still wears it.

 

Ld Adm Robert Haddock:; Ansteorran Royal Navy, Ret.

 

 

Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2008 11:05:49 -0500

From: Michael Gunter <countgunthar at hotmail.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Largesse

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

> I'm new to SCA- can someone explain largesse within SCA?

> Freda

 

Largess is basically a gift. It can be grand or as small

as a ribbon. "Largess" is primarily given from someone of

higher rank to one of lesser. "Gifts" are given from lower

or equal station.

 

Often Largess is given to someone who does something

to impress one of higher rank. It is often associated with

the Crown or Territorial Personages but anyone can give

largesse. So a Duke may give a ring or other momento to

a new fighter that impressed him on the field. A Baroness

my give a beaded ribbon to a young girl who has attended

her well.

 

Frequently Laurels bring little tokens to A&S competitions

to give to the entrants. This is Largesse.

 

Elizabeth and I just went to the Dallas Gem and Jewelry

show this weekend and bought a couple hundred dollars

worth of stuff to hand out during our reign. Mainly rings

because we both love the history and cool factor of

the Crown removing a ring from His/Her own hand to gift

to someone.

 

Gunthar

Prince Ansteorra

 

 

Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2008 12:29:16 -0400

From: "Kingstaste" <kingstaste at comcast.net>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Largesse

To: "'Cooks within the SCA'" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Largesse is stuff you keep on hand to give away as gifts.  Kings and nobles

and peers will often give out largesse when someone does something that

pleases them.  In period, there are many references to Kings as

"ring-givers", meaning the king took a ring off of his hand and presented it

to someone for a noteworthy deed.  

 

When I go to A&S competitions, I take small trinkets (sometimes small

packets of period spices) with my card attached so that I can leave them for

the artisans that impress me.  When I had my Laurel's vigil, I had created

pins with a variation of my device on it to give to everyone that attended

my vigil room and my ceremony.  

 

You could draw a correlation between giving largesse and throwing out beads

at a Mardis Gras parade, I suppose ;)

 

Christianna

 

 

Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2008 11:40:53 -0500

From: "Sisuile Butler" <sisuile at gmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Largesse

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

In the current context -

 

A reign being an expensive proposition, many people aid the Crown in this

gift-giving by providing the Crown (or barony) works. In addition to largess

given to members of the populace as atta-boys, the crown is also expected to

provide suitably cool presents for royal cousins whom they are visiting or

who are visiting their kingdom, or who they would like to bribe to fight

with them in the next war. The populace often helps with supplying materials

for these baskets. For example, I am starting to re-ramp up my largess given

to the crown, and so this reign I have a dozen small bottles of cordial and

am planning to braid a few yards of seal tags. I know that soap, jams and

jellies, herbs, woven trims, wooden toys, etc. have all been made and

donated to the Crown for distribution as They see fit.

 

-Sisuile Buitilier

 

 

Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2008 13:09:06 -0500

From: Michael Gunter <countgunthar at hotmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Largesse

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

<<< So it would be appropriate for me to gift

some jars of jam etc to the Crown or my

local baron? >>>

 

Any kind of largesse is welcomed by people who

have to hand it out. Although I suggest that

we have plenty of soap and candles

thankyewverymuch.

 

<<< How would I do this? >>>

 

Put it in nice jars or period looking pots. Make

sure it is sealed well.

Then you can do anything from making a big

presentation by your group to just going up

in person when they aren't busy and offering

the gift to just leaving it on the Thrones.

 

Another suggestion would be to contact their

Head of Entourage and giving it to them if you

don't want to make a big deal out of it.

 

<<< Freda >>>

 

Gunthar

 

 

Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2008 15:15:55 -0400

From: "Elise Fleming" <alysk at ix.netcom.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Largesse

To: "sca-cooks at ansteorra.org" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

To add to the comments that Count Gunthar gave Freda:

 

Be sure to include your name and address somewhere with the gift.  While

not every Crown is "wise enough" <smile> to write a thank-you note for

gifts, it is impossible to do so when the giver's contact information isn't

there.

 

And, yes, avoid soaps and candles!   You might consider avoiding perfumed

hand/body lotions unless you know that the recipient is out of that kind

and really likes it.  Kings don't get much of that but queens often do!

 

[Countess] Alys K., with too many soaps, candles and lotions!

 

 

Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2008 16:56:13 -0500

From: Colin MacNachtan <colin at mccr.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Largesse

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

On Tuesday 14 October 2008, tudorpot at gmail.com wrote:

<<< So it would be appropriate for me to gift some jars of jam etc to the ?

Crown or my local baron? How would I do this? >>>

 

Our local Barony sometimes holds a Land Court as a local event, where the

Baron and Baroness give out (fictional) land to their subjects.  Then in

subsequent years these subjects are encouraged to "pay taxes" with some bits

of largesse the Baron and Baroness can then use as they find the need.

 

It is of course all done in fun and is a nice opportunity for some persona

play, and is a nice way to keep the largesse coffers stocked.

 

Colin MacNachtan

Barony of Bryn Gwlad, Ansteorra

 

 

Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2008 12:22:36 -0700

From: Lilinah <lilinah at earthlink.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Largesse

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

sisuile wrote:

<<< Also, as was under discussion in this house last night, *Label Them*.

Contents, ingredients, and, if you would like, who from/who made it. >>>

 

Definitely label it - name of item, full list of ingredients, who

made it (it's good for them to know for a variety of reasons - no

false modesty here), and *when it was made*.

 

The date really can matter. Some things keep well. Some things

improve with age. Some things need to be eaten within a comparatively

short time.

 

Several of us once spent the night at a certain duke's house, and he

and his lady took down a HUGE number of cordial bottles that they

have been gifted with over the years, but not tried. They hadn't yet

tried them because of some previous experiences when some they had

tried were... how shall i say... less than delicious.

 

So the whole bunch of us guinea pigs sat around taking little sips,

separating the ones that were worth trying again from the ones that

tasted like medicine or worse, saving the duke and duchess from

sullying their lips... and guts :-0 More than one person tasted each

one, since different people have a different sense of taste and

different preferences.

 

If it's something that should be used in a fairly short period of

time, specify the dates as well. If you've made a cordial that is not

yet fully aged, say so on the label and specify the date at which you

think it will be worth drinking - that is month, date, and year - not

just "in 3 months" since the royals may discover the bottle at a

future time and not know 3 months from when.

 

And your name on the item is good, since someone may ask you for more :-)

--

Urtatim (that's err-tah-TEEM)

the persona formerly known as Anahita

 

 

Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2008 16:45:43 -0400

From: "Elise Fleming" <alysk at ix.netcom.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Largess

To: "sca-cooks at ansteorra.org" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Daniel wrote:

<<< Hmmmm... while it would not do for everyone upon request of my Queen some

years back I did hand tied rosaries with velvet bags and notes regarding the

orginal reproduced. One for each of the kingdoms with the cords knotted in

thier colors. That and some others in a different style for her to hand

out. It seemed a period thing to do. >>>

 

Yes, you did, and I still have mine which I proudly wear with my

15th-century Flemish clothing!  I **love** it!

 

Alys K.

 

 

Date: Mon, 10 Aug 2009 07:59:53 -0500

From: Judith Epstein <judith at ipstenu.org>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Largesse: What to avoid.

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

1. I LOVE feeding people, so I hate to say it, but avoid food items  

for largesse.

 

If someone comes to eat at your table, they can ask what ingredients  

are involved. Before they come to eat with you, they can ask if you  

keep kosher/halal/Hindu vegetarianism/vegan/other religious/ideology-

based dietary practices. They can ask if your foods are gluten-free,  

nut-free, egg-free, or whatever allergies and sensitivities they have  

to honor. If you say "No, we're omnivores," or "I'm not sure what's in  

it anymore -- I made the basic spice blend a couple months ago from a  

recipe I found online, and I just threw it all together," then the  

person knows that, with obvious regret, they can't eat by you, so  

they'll explain, and no harm done.

 

But largesse is a gift from the heart, and one that would be very hard  

to refuse without hurt feelings for both the giver and recipient. Even  

something as simple as salt can be problematic for some. The same,  

unfortunately, goes for those beautiful wooden cups that came from  

Goodwill -- since they're secondhand, neither the giver nor the  

recipient knows what has been in those cups before, and someone's  

allergies could be activated in a dangerous way.

 

2. Religious items

 

Crosses and rosaries are a very Period gift, but avoid them unless you  

are certain that they are appropriate to both the persona and the  

modern person. For the religious Christian these are a marvelous gift.  

A person of a different faith might find them problematic, since  

bearing the symbol of another faith might be against the dictates of  

their own religious convictions. For the non-religious SCAdian, too,  

this could be an issue -- not for the recipient of the cross, but for  

Christians, who surely don't deserve to see the symbol of the faith  

they take seriously, being worn or used as a mere costume element, and  

possibly being worn (and the wearer being mistakenly identified as a  

Christian) in a situation that could cause embarrassment for those who  

do profess Christianity.

 

3. Modern items

 

Batteries will probably get used in modern life, but if the  

recipient's campsite is totally non-electric/Period, they won't be  

useful in the hobby that we share. Ditto for mini-propane tanks,  

replacement lantern bulbs, and so on. Of course, a mini-first aid kit  

or sewing/repair kit would be a very good exception to this rule, but  

for the most part, modernity shouldn't be part of what we do for each  

other -- unless, of course, the gift is a ride to and from the next  

event!

 

Other thoughts?

 

 

Date: Mon, 10 Aug 2009 09:58:04 -0400

From: Gretchen Beck <grm at andrew.cmu.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Largesse: What to avoid.

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

--On Monday, August 10, 2009 7:59 AM -0500 Judith Epstein

<judith at ipstenu.org> wrote:

<<< 1. I LOVE feeding people, so I hate to say it, but avoid food items for largesse.

 

If someone comes to eat at your table, they can ask what ingredients are involved. >>>

 

Food largesse should be handled just like an item sold at the grocery

store. Always, always, always, list full ingrediants, and package it to

avoid cross contamination. Other than that (and that some people are leery

about eating something whose origins they don't know, I don't see a problem

with food based largese.

 

Now, one thing that is true -- don't give alchohol (most people feel it is

extremely foolhardy to drink from an unsealed container of unknown origin),

and don't give anything that can "go bad" without refrigeration.

 

<<< 2. Religious items

 

Crosses and rosaries are a very Period gift, but avoid them unless you

are certain that they are appropriate to both the persona and the modern

person. >>>

 

Again, why?  Often the purpose of largesse is not to give the royalty

something to where, but to give the royalty something they can distribute

to their people.  While I would not go overboard on these, I think rosary

beads (especially in some of the period variants) are lovely largesse.

 

<<< 3. Modern items >>>

 

See above. I've had royalty comment that some of the best largesse they

have received were little traveling toothbrush/paste kits (great for

handing out to their people, or for helping with last minute travel needs

for themselves or the folks traveling with them). If this is what the

given can provide, I don't see why they should be encouraged not to give it

if they like.  Same for stamps, gas cards, sewing kits (although I'll

admit, you can make some lovely period sewing kits), batteries, etc.

 

I asked some royals a few years back what they would prefer not to receive

in largesse baskets, and their replies were:

 

1. Homemade alcohol (see above).

2. Soap. By the 2nd week of the reign, soap in largesse baskets if like

zuchinni at the height of the season.

3. Smelly things not well sealed in a bottle. Speaking of allergies, this

can be a big problem (imagine putting the rose scented incense in the

basket going to the queen whose eye's swell shut at the smell of

roses...and something like this will permeate the basket and everything in

it).

 

Anyhoo, that's my two cents worth.

 

toodles, margaret

 

 

Date: Mon, 10 Aug 2009 09:13:42 -0500

From: Judith Epstein <judith at ipstenu.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Largesse: What to avoid.

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

On Aug 10, 2009, at 8:58 AM, Gretchen Beck wrote:

<<< Food largesse should be handled just like an item sold at the grocery

store. Always, always, always, list full ingrediants, and package it to

avoid cross contamination. Other than that (and that some people are leery

about eating something whose origins they don't know, I don't see a  

problem with food based largese. >>>

 

As someone who lived vegetarian for a decade, keeps kosher, and  

regularly hosts family and friends with some serious allergies, I can  

tell you that even if someone lists what they actually put into the  

mixing bowl, they don't list everything that was being cooked in the  

room at the same time. Glutinous wheat flour dust, hanging in the air  

while someone makes biscuits on one side of the kitchen, CAN make a  

difference to someone with Celiac disease, if you're making them a  

"gluten free" item on the other side of the kitchen. For someone whose  

allergies could hospitalize them if they eat something that isn't  

certified gluten free/egg free/nut free/et cetera, a gift of food can  

be dangerous -- all the more so when it's carefully labelled with the  

ingredients (that go into the actual recipe) versus the possible  

contaminants (that were in the air, or that may linger in a cooking  

pot even after the pot is washed).

 

Too, the recipient may have other restrictions that the giver  

(firsthand or more distantly, as from the originator to the royal to  

the baron to the bard) won't necessarily be able to take properly into  

account. If someone says "I keep kosher," that still may mean  

something different, unless the item is certified by a reputable  

kashrut certification agency. For one of my family members, "I keep  

kosher" means that there's no actual pork or shellfish in the  

ingredients list; for another, it means that, plus no mixing of meat  

and dairy. For some it means that meat and dairy are cooked on  

separate dishes, but served on the same dishes (and the dishes are  

washed in the same sink, using the same sponge). For me, it's a LOT  

more extensive, so even if someone tells me "This is kosher," I am not  

always able to trust that statement to mean the same thing that I mean  

when I say it. Just listing the ingredients isn't always enough.

 

Judith / no SCA name yet

 

 

Date: Mon, 10 Aug 2009 10:29:57 -0400

From: Gretchen Beck <grm at andrew.cmu.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Largesse: What to avoid.

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

--On Monday, August 10, 2009 9:13 AM -0500 Judith Epstein

<judith at ipstenu.org> wrote:

<<< I am not always able to trust that statement to mean the same thing that

I mean when I say it. Just listing the ingredients isn't always enough. >>>

 

Agreed. And for people with serious restrictions, it's not enough. But, for

the majority of the folks receiving the largesse, or their retainers, or

their friends (or the other folks likely to benefit from the content of the

largesse basket), listing the ingrediants should be sufficient...same as

listing the ingrediants going into a feast.

 

But, I don't see throwing out the baby because one person in a thousand

might have a problem with the bathwater.

 

toodles, margaret

 

 

Date: Mon, 10 Aug 2009 08:01:24 -0700 (PDT)

From: avrealtor at prodigy.net

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Largesse: What to avoid.

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

This is one reason why it is always a good idea for sitting Royalty (or Landed Baronage) to post any restrictions on the kingdom website. It can be explained more fully& in detail.

 

A good example: We have our likes and dislikes posted on the Baronial page. My husband can't stand cheese (I know misguided fellow)? and I on the other hand don't like seafood in any form. So it is there for people to see. Now if one doesn't look, not much help I know.

 

Modern items, can be handy and not everything we do in the SCA is seen at events. Getting gift card for gas is always great, or postage stamps for thank you cards.? On occasion I have given very modern items that might have a special meaning to the recipient. Like A stuffed griffin for a new Baroness who also happens to own Griffin Dye Works.? Again this goes back to the "wish list" that can be maintained on a website.

 

As for alcohol: It is not allowed as an "official gift" from an officer. Nor can any SCA funds be used to purchase it, except for cooking. How we handle this in Caid is usually the alcoholic presentation is given outside of Court, as a personal gift. The SCA wide rules do exclude giving presentation as an official duty of an officer, but it was decided to handle it in this manner to avoid any confusion or problems.

 

-Muiriath

 

 

Date: Mon, 10 Aug 2009 11:10:45 -0400

From: Audrey Bergeron-Morin <audreybmorin at gmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Largesse: What to avoid.

To: avrealtor at prodigy.net,    Cooks within the SCA

        <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

<<< As for alcohol: It is not allowed as an "official gift" from an officer. Nor can any SCA funds be used to purchase it, except for cooking. How we handle this in Caid is usually the alcoholic presentation is given outside of Court, as a personal gift. >>>

 

Ah, yes. We usually officially give a magnificent empty bottle. What

is put in the bottle after it is given is up to the concerned parties

;-)

 

 

Date: Mon, 10 Aug 2009 10:40:00 -0500

From: Michael Gunter <countgunthar at hotmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Largesse: What to avoid.

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

I think it depends on what you mean by largess.

 

Are you making gift baskets or items to be given to the Crown to use Themselves or for Them to give out?

 

BIG difference there.

 

 

Things to give a Crown for Them to hand out:

 

Nice trim, beads, strings of gems.

Elegant items that may reflect their personnas or devices.

Favors with their sigil that they can give to fighters or such.

Fans

Rings in their size. I personally loved to give people a ring off

my finger.

 

Nice daggers, axes, even swords for very special gifts.

Hand sewn items such as hankerchiefs.

Veils with nice veil pins

Perhaps spices or cooking utensils they can give to feast stewards.

 

(Things like period cooking tools, such as period knives or stoneware

are AWESOME!)

 

Silk or paper umbrellas.

Small items they can carry on their person or in a small basket.

 

 

Things to give for Them to use:

 

Gas Cards

White boards with markers

Wooden frames like used for wax tablets that fit their PDA's.

Silk or paper umbrellas.

Silk banners with their arms

A "medical pack" of things like baby powder, throat lozenges, asprin,

eye drops, sunscreen, etc...

 

Veils with nice veil pins.

Take up a collection and pay for a motel room for a night.

Every Queen loves Rose jewelry.

 

Items to enhance their personnas

 

Cloaks

Gloves

Pouches that have room for stuff.

Mini-flashlights.

 

All liquids or foods must be clearly marked as to what they are

and when they were made. And "House Targarvagen Cure-All"

don't count unless said Royals know what the hell that is.

 

Hoods, veils, keffiyas, etc...to keep the sun and rain off them and

to hopefully curb their desire to wear sunglasses.

 

A little folding chair the Queen can sit on to watch the fighting,

even a mundane one is okay if her skirts conceal it.

 

 

Things to avoid:

 

Soap

Salt

Candles

Mystery food

Anything with the Kingdom Arms on it. That makes it Kingdom

Regalia and they don't get to keep it.

 

Animals unless you know they REALLY want it.

Heavily perfumed items.

Stuff obviously from garage sales or second hand stores.

Poorly made items just because you think you have to give

them something. Trust me, most Crowns would rather get

nothing than be given stuff they would throw away.

 

Oversized items unless you know how they are going to

get it home.

 

These are just some thoughts off the top of my head.

 

[Duke] Gunthar

 

 

Date: Mon, 10 Aug 2009 10:58:19 -0500

From: Judith Epstein <judith at ipstenu.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Largesse: What to avoid.

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

On Aug 10, 2009, at 10:40 AM, Michael Gunter wrote:

<<< I think it depends on what you mean by largess.

Are you making gift baskets or items to be given to the

Crown to use Themselves or for Them to give out?

BIG difference there. >>>

 

I was talking about an item for an individual to give to another  

individual. When the item is supposed to be donated to a largesse  

"pool" to be re-gifted by royals or nobles to others willy-nilly, I  

think even more caution is warranted, especially in the food category  

and the religious item category. It's a pretty horrid offense not to  

accept something given from the heart, like largesse, but for some  

it's just as bad to accept the gift and have others see you accepting  

it. (Yes, I'm thinking of myself, here -- I couldn't accept a  rosary,  

no matter how nicely offered, because I'm not religiously permitted to  

accept that type of thing. But because it's considered such a breach  

of etiquette to refuse a gift, I'd be stuck looking very rude, because  

I would give precedence to my religious principles over SCA etiquette.  

A person who has particularly severe allergies might be in the same  

position, with regard to largesse of foods.

 

I know very well that those who offer largesse are trying to convey  

gratitude, warmth, welcome, and appreciation. They're doing out of  

kindness and magnanimity, and wouldn't dream of offering something  

that could place someone (like me, but not limited to me) in a very  

uncomfortable or socially untenable position. They wouldn't make a  

gift that could be so problematic, if they only knew that it would be  

such an issue for the recipient. I mention this in order to bring it  

to attention that a gift of this nature could provide a great social  

stumbling block for someone whose religious or health issues could  

very well require them to refuse such a gift.

 

Judith / no SCA name yet

 

 

Date: Mon, 10 Aug 2009 12:13:19 -0400

From: Elaine Koogler <kiridono at gmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Largesse: What to avoid.

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Obviously I wouldn't give my spice mixture to someone as a

gift if I knew they were observing kosher or had allergies that might be

affected. And I would have tried, as a landed Baroness, not to do this as

well. However, if someone who does keep strict kosher receives a food gift

that was probably prepared in a non-kosher kitchen, they are perfectly free

to accept the gift then pass it on to someone who has no problem with this.

I know we receive gifts from friends all the time that we cannot eat as we

(my husband and I) are diabetic.  So...we accept the gift, thank the giver

and pass it on to someone who isn't.  I see no reason why this can't work

the same way.  To put a limitation of "no food" on folks creates a problem

of what can we give...I know it does for me!

 

Kiri

 

 

Date: Tue, 11 Aug 2009 07:54:39 +1200

From: Antonia Calvo <ladyadele at paradise.net.nz>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Largesse: What to avoid.

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Judith Epstein wrote:

<<< (Yes, I'm thinking of myself, here -- I couldn't accept a  rosary, no

matter how nicely offered, because I'm not religiously permitted to

accept that type of thing. But because it's considered such a breach

of etiquette to refuse a gift, I'd be stuck looking very rude, because

I would give precedence to my religious principles over SCA etiquette.

A person who has particularly severe allergies might be in the same

position, with regard to largesse of foods. >>>

 

Except that the person with allergies has the simple option of saying

"thank you very much," handing the basket to a retainer, and *not eating

the contents*.  If they were *really* worried, they could ask a retainer

to take the basket without handling it themselves (although I've never

heard of an allergy quite that severe, unless possibly the basket had

been smeared with peanut butter, wiped, and put back into service).

--

Antonia di Benedetto Calvo

 

<the end>



Formatting copyright © Mark S. Harris (THLord Stefan li Rous).
All other copyrights are property of the original article and message authors.

Comments to the Editor: stefan at florilegium.org