Home Page

Stefan's Florilegium

hotel-events-msg



This document is also available in: text or RTF formats.

hotel-events-msg – 3/13/09

 

Holding SCA events in hotels and universities. Reviews. Suggestions.

 

NOTE: See also these files: demos-msg, evnt-stewards-msg, evnt-stwd-cltn-art, gate-guards-msg, privvies-msg, tokens-msg, event-rev-msg, SCA-Demos-art, reservations-msg.

 

************************************************************************

NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I  have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I  have done  a limited amount  of  editing. Messages having to do  with separate topics  were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the  message IDs  were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make  no claims  as  to the accuracy  of  the information  given by the individual authors.

 

Please  respect the time  and  efforts of  those who have written  these messages. The  copyright status  of these messages  is  unclear at this time. If  information  is  published  from  these  messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

    Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                          Stefan at florilegium.org

************************************************************************

 

Date: Sun, 19 Dec 1999 23:08:20 -0800

From: Anne-Marie Rousseau <acrouss at gte.net>

Subject: RE: OT? hotel events was SC - FW:[STEPS] Period Food at 12th Night 2000!

 

hey all from Anne-Marie

Zoe asks:

>I sure will do for you all. btw, is having events in hotels a common thing?

>Or is this mainly an AnTir thing?

 

In An Tir, anyway, we used to have 12th night at some place, and

traditionally with a feast. Problem was once the event started drawing a

thousand or so bodies, finding a site that could seat that many for court,

and meetings, much less a place to cook for that many.

 

about 6? years ago, I autocrated the first An Tir 12th night at a hotel. It

was a horrible depressing thing for me...a medieval event in a hotel! hmph!

it didnt help that my friends thought it horribly funny and ran around with

"12th night con" buttons! *sigh*... I had to deal with naked people in the

hottub (peers even) who were stressing out the salesmen on the second

floor, the neo goth wanna be teenages smoking in the lobby so no one

couldget by without running a gauntlet of smoke, the hotel restaurant who

didnt belive me when I said that we'd have 1200 and so only had food for a

couple hundred, the former kindom seneschal who ran up a bar tab in three

figures and then wandered away, causing the hotel manager to have kittens

and call me in a lather (he wandered back...never occured to him that

anyone would mind...), the hotel trainee that double booked half the hotel

for Saturday night...(probably didnt help that I came home from 10 days in

Cozumel to do the event, either...)

 

but I digress :).

 

in any case, the model worked, People liked it becuase they could wander

into court and go back to their rooms and party into the night without

having to drive anywhere. I was told that the West has done it this way for

years. Personally, I hate it, its the most unmedieval setting you could

possibly have an event in, and people act goofy at hotels for some reason,

but it is awfully convenient, and I commend Adiantum for asking the hotel

to serve medieval style meals in an effort to put a bit of a medieval

patina on an otherwise very modern event!

 

(see, I knew I could fit in a food reference :))

- --AM, who's bringing the treats to the Laurel meeting and guess what! is

bringing period food :)

 

 

Date: Mon, 20 Dec 1999 00:16:53 -0800

From: "Laura C. Minnick" <lcm at efn.org>

Subject: Re: OT? hotel events was SC - FW:[STEPS] Period Food at 12thNight 2000!

 

Anne-Marie Rousseau wrote:

> hey all from Anne-Marie

> Zoe asks:

> >I sure will do for you all. btw, is having events in hotels a common thing?

> >Or is this mainly an AnTir thing?

 

Also in the West, I understand.

 

> in An Tir, anyway, we used to have 12th night at some place, and

> traditionally with a feast. Problem was once the event started drawing a

> thousand or so bodies, finding a site that could seat that many for court,

> and meetings, much less a place to cook for that many.

 

This is, of course, the problem for many of our events- outdoor too.

Some of the bigger ones are maxing out and going to reservations-only-

for _outdoor_ events. Ahh... the perils of growth!

 

> about 6? years ago, I autocrated the first An Tir 12th night at a hotel.

 

I was at that event, with my then SO who's Chiv- I was STOOOOOPID and

was on both outgoing and incoming retinues, had made the step-up

clothes, and when the desk staff told us that they couldn't find our

reservation (which Paul had carefully confirmed several times including

the day before and he had the confirm #s) I had a full melt-down in the

lobby. I'd been on the road for 5 hours, (Paul for 8) and I freaked out

and stared shreiking and wheezing- Paul thought I'd lost it. Oddly, they

found us a room! FAST!

 

This was, by the way, the famed event at which I had athol brose for the

first time.

 

Paul and I ended up eating at I think the local Denny's/pancake house a

few blocks away, because the hotel restaurant was always full. He

doesn't eat real food anyway.

 

What I've discovered from subsequent events is that bringing a cooler

and a box of easily (i.e. no stove) prepared food keeps us out of the

restaurant. An electric teapot helps. Last year we had a cooler full of

yogurt, pasties (chicken and rice, I think), sliced meat, cheese, juice,

milk, etc., and a box with bread and rolls, instant oatmeal, fresh

fruit. (And some brownies, of course!) We ate well, and only went out

for one dinner (in full garb- it was fun!). The gang of teenaged girls

didn't go hungry, we didn't spend alot, and I was in better temper than

I would have been.

 

'Lainie

 

 

Date: Mon, 20 Dec 1999 19:34:01 -0600

From: "RANDALL DIAMOND" <ringofkings at mindspring.com>

Subject: SC - Period Food at 12th Night 2000

 

Our Barony used to hold the main 12th night for Meridies as a huge

hotel event.  We always had a wonderful feast, even if we had to rent

a nearby church fellowship kitchen to cook the feast in and transport it

to the hotel.  Only once did we let the hotel do the cooking (to our own

recipes) and like in your experience, way, way undercooked the needed

quantity.  As Baron, I compelled the Reeve to part with some of the gate

cash with the help of my two guards, Guido1 and Guido2, and sent out

for pizza and Kentucky Fried Chicken for 500.  It was that or let the

crowd roast the autocrats in the atrium (without sauce). We now have found

a wonderful winterized camp for the event and it is a lot less stressful.

Though I do miss getting naked in the hot tub.

Have a wonderful Christmas and 12th Night!

 

Akim Yaroslavich

 

 

Date: Sun, 09 Jan 2000 22:40:58 -0800

From: Anne-Marie Rousseau <acrouss at gte.net>

Subject: SC - antir 12th night food postmortem and kudos!

 

hey all from Anne-Marie

just back from our 12th night. about 6 hrs to the south, we drove home in

rain and wind and even a spot of snow. Ah, I love An Tir in the winter! :)

 

the organizers did an OUTSTANDING job. it was th best organized 12th night

I've ever been to, including one I autocrated myself! They even got the

hotel restaurant to do medieval food, with reconstructed recipes provided

by Demetrios. I had the Islamic meal (you had to pick a cuisine, no mixing

and matching), rather than the italian or English. I got a lamb stew with

carrots and garbanzo beans, served on cous cous, with some stewed veggies

in vinegar? and a green cheesy spread for the pita bread. Dessert was a

sugar, almond and rosewater candy. Very good! even my meat and potatoes

baron liked his english food. Go figure!

 

again, major kudos to the organizers, and it warms the cockles of my little

cuisinier heart to see this kind of nice detail on what would have

otherwise been a very modern event in a hotel.

 

- --AM, who got to speak for the laurelling of her friend Janelyn. yay!

 

 

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Date: Sun, 14 Oct 2001 13:53:48 -0400

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Catering question.

From: Elizabeth A Heckert <spynnere at juno.com>

 

On Mon, 15 Oct 2001 11:17:49 -0700 (PDT) Ruth Frey <ruthf at uidaho.edu>

writes:

>      Has anyone had any experience with having an outside

>party prepare food?  Anything in particular to watch for

>or avoid?  I've eaten in this hotel's restaurant before, and

>the food was *very* good, if not terribly Medieval, so they

>are at least competent.

 

    Ehh-(shudder, shudder, twitch, twitch!)  Bad memories of sekanjabin

flavoured with mint-flavoured pekoe tea.  We said--mint tea, meaning

Celestial Seasonings, they heard (mint) Tea!

 

   If the staff is willing to use y'all's recipes, I would see if you

could get them to consider coming to a tasting party, so they will have

some idea of what you want.  As with spinning, Moderns have a rather

distorted idea of medieval food, not at all helped by the proliferation

of Ren Faires in the last few years.

 

   Elizabeth

 

 

Date: Mon, 15 Oct 2001 14:05:39 -0500

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

From: Nicolas Steenhout <vavroom at bmee.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Catering question.

 

Request a meeting with the chef.  Don't settle for the catering

coordinator, meet with the executive chef.  If you have dishes you want

them to make, bring recipes.  Talk to the guy/gal. Likely, s/he'll get a

kick out of doing something special and out of the ordinary, with enough

notice, they can plan purchasing, work plan, etc.  I doubt that you'd be

able to actually have someone in the kitchen helping, likely it's a Union

shop (most hotels are).

 

Don't hesitate to outline every requirement you have. Will you have dishes

that are free of certain ingredients (mushroom, garlic, onion, peanuts,

whatever).  Will you have vegetarian dishes in your courses?  Define what

you want/need/expect.

 

That would be my suggestion.

 

Muiredach mac Loloig

Rokkehealden Shire

 

 

Date: Mon, 15 Oct 2001 15:33:55 -0400

From: Tara Sersen Boroson <tsersen at nni.com>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Catering question.

 

Ooh, interesting question!  I've never been to a feast done this way,

though I've heard of them; So, I can't give you tried and true advice.

But, this is what comes to mind.

 

Take them the recipes *well* in advance, and ask them to prepare a

sample meal for you.  If it's a large menu, you can have them do only

the more unusual or complicated items.  They shouldn't balk at that -

it's a common demand for wedding catering.  Most caterers won't charge

you for it, though some may charge you a normal meal price.

 

Make sure they have written instructions for anything you expect in

terms of service that may be different from normal wedding or conference

type catering.

 

If you have any requests from feast attendees for allergy

considerations, make sure they go to the chef in writing. Make sure

that he and his staff understand that these are *allergies* and not

preferences, and to handle all food accordingly.

 

As Muiredach said, they probably won't allow one of your people into the

kitchen to actually *help*.  Even if they're not union, insurance

restrictions can get wierd.  But, they might allow someone in to

supervise and act as a resource if any staff member has questions.  It's

worth asking.  At the very least, make sure you assign a point person

who is familiar with all the recipes who can be grabbed from the crowd

and badgered if there are any questions or problems.

 

-Magdalena

 

 

Date: Mon, 15 Oct 2001 19:30:04 -0500

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

From: Nicolas Steenhout <vavroom at bmee.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Catering question.

 

>At the very least, make sure you assign a point person

>who is familiar with all the recipes who can be grabbed from the crowd

>and badgered if there are any questions or problems.

 

Good point.  Do remember, however, that most of the food will have been

prepped the day before, well before anyone shows up.

 

Muiredach mac Loloig

Rokkehealden Shire

 

 

Date: Mon, 15 Oct 2001 18:20:02 -0400

From: johnna holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Catering question.

 

Ruth Frey wrote:>

>         Has anyone had any experience with having an outside

> party prepare food?  Anything in particular to watch for

> or avoid?

-------------------------------------

You might want to carefully check the contracts

on the actual catering. How many to serve at what price?

Cut-off dates? Do you collect the checks or do people

book directly? What happens if the storm of the century

just occurs on that same weekend? Do they care about

the noise factor of a medieval feast with noise going

on next door to a wedding or anniversary party? These

aren't food concerns, but they can certainly add to the

event concerns. (Make sure that everyone knows not to

bring food in )

 

Johnnae llyn Lewis  Johnna Holloway

 

 

From: "Karen O" <kareno at lewistown.net>

To: <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

Date: Mon, 15 Oct 2001 17:56:05 -0600

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Catering question.

 

> Greetings!  It's beginning to look like our local group will be hosting a

large event at a hotel/confrence center <>  They *do* require that all food

be prepared by them <> but {are}quite open-minded about having us provide

recipes and some more exotic ingredients (galangal, etc.).<

 

        One of our Coronations was like this  -- the Chef was very

interested and had attended a couple of the local  cooks guild meetings, to

be as "accurate" as he could. Not too bad. Bring recipes, be enthusiastic,

let them see the "fun" of the Challenge,  {and all of the other more

practical suggestions}.

 

    What really surprised/impressed the hotel staff was the announcement to

"ready for Feast".  Clearing  the room that's been set up for Court &

change it to eating arrangements, and HUNDREDS of guests are clearing out

the chairs, and pulling down/setting up tables; efficiently &

well-organized.  The catering staff was in a tizzy coz they thought the

changeover {by their own personnel} would take an hour . . . . .

 

    Caointiarn

 

 

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Date: Mon, 15 Oct 2001 19:45:41 -0400

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Catering question.

From: Morgana Abbey <morgana.abbey at juno.com>

 

In this part of the world, most large sites have those bloody catering

contracts.  Some caters are really cool, love the recipes, want to play

(one did a happy dance over the medieval view of salad). The

others--ugh.  Beware the "institutional" cooks.

 

If these people are really jazzed, you should be fine.

 

Morgan LeCoeur

 

 

From: "Hrolf Douglasson" <Hrolf at btinternet.com>

To: <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Catering question.

Date: Tue, 16 Oct 2001 08:16:27 +0100

 

Our wedding was like this and was a great sucssess.

We got the catering manager hooked with period menus and reeled in the chef

with spices he couldn't get hold of normally.

a 2oz bag of saffron was bribary enough to do the saffron bread and we said

he could keep the left overs.

they even got hold of bread trenchers to use.

we kept a hand on the tiller during the planning stages and had a sample

menu for a treat one evening. It was there first themed wedding and now they

do lots!!!

 

We also appointed a point man to deal with any problems coming out of the

kitchen.

There was only 1....they forgot to send someone out to carve the suckling pig.

They even added a remove course when the ladies left their seats for the

tables to be re-arranged for dancing.

 

Vara

 

 

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Date: Mon, 15 Oct 2001 06:57:43 -0400

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Catering question.

From: Elizabeth A Heckert <spynnere at juno.com>

 

On Tue, 16 Oct 2001 09:02:12 -0400 Elaine Koogler

<ekoogler at chesapeake.net> writes:

>I haven't personally dealt with it, but know that several events were

>held at the Red Lion Inn in Blacksburg, VA with their staff fixing the

>feast.  Generally, it was pretty good, but non-period things kep

>creeping in (like tomatoes in the salad), so you might want to keep a

>close eye on just what they're doing!

 

     That's where the dreaded (and nasty!) sekajabin came from, Kiri!  It

was un-memorable, apart from the glitches, neither very good, nor

improperly cooked.  We were youngsters, and it was the only way Black

Diamond could host the really big kingdom events at that time.

 

    Elizabeth (Black Diamonder from 'the depths of time')

 

 

Date: Fri, 03 Dec 2004 14:46:21 -0500

From: "Lonnie D. Harvel" <ldh at ece.gatech.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Vigil in a Hotel

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Usually, when a hotel says "no hot food" they mean that you cannot serve

hot food. So you will have no need for heating anything.

 

Whatever...

 

This past April I hosted the Con-Suite for Costume Con for about 4 days.

The welcome room had a microwave, so we used theirs as needed. Wal-mart

has cheap microwaves for $59, they take a while to heat something. Food

was kept hot in either my commercial chafing dish (of which I only have

one) or in the disposable ones I picked up at Sam's Club. You can get

half-pans with the disposable chafing sets, so you can put two warm

dishes in each. Each night when we went full swing, I had my commercia

round one and two disposable ones with one divided in half. This allowed

me to have four warm items at a time. We averaged about 100 folks an

evening.

 

Aoghann

 

lilinah at earthlink.net wrote:

 

> As i've already posted to this list, i'm preparing food for a Laurel

> Vigil which will be held during our Kingdom Twelfth Night (on Friday

> before all the courts, plays, competitions and displays). Our Twelfth

> Nights are often held in hotels, so there will be no on-site cooking.

>

> In fact, it turns out that i'm cooking for Vigils for *two* Laurels

> who are sharing the food and welcome room. The hotel has said "no hot

> food" - so i am having this visual image of filling up a bath tub with

> steaming water and warming food in plastic baggies. I have a new crock

> pot and will probably borrow another one or two for warm beverages.

>

> As i've posted to the list, it's Andalusian/Arabic and Spanish, but

> since i've gotten the "go ahead" from the second to make her food, i

> may toss in some English recipes, since she is interested in both

> Outre Mer and English culture. I'll probably make a cheese tart or

> two, since most of the Spanish that is suitable for making finger

> food, and for serving in a hotel bedroom, is sweet, and i want to have

> a balance of sweet and savory. Hmm-mmm, maybe i'll serve some cheesy

> goo in a crock pot to keep it gooey...

>

> Keeping food cool isn't a big problem as we can bring in coolers. But

> heating food is tricky.

>

> Anyone have any other suggestions for warming food in a hotel room

> besides crock pots and the bath tub? I don't own a microwave (and

> neither does one of the Laurels) and furthermore, i don't know if they

> use too much current to use safely in a hotel room...

>

> Anahita

 

 

Date: Fri, 03 Dec 2004 11:46:22 -0800

From: Susan Fox-Davis <selene at earthlink.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Vigil in a Hotel

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Anahita asks:

> Anyone have any other suggestions for warming food in a hotel room

> besides crock pots and the bath tub? I don't own a microwave (and

> neither does one of the Laurels) and furthermore, i don't know if they

> use too much current to use safely in a hotel room...

 

Toaster ovens.  "Hot Water Heaters" for anything pourable.  I have even

used bread machines, and won't that drive the vigilantes crazy?

 

To bring from home:  anything that keeps food cold will keep it hot,

just don't make anything hot enough to melt plastic.

 

Other than that:  what do you really =need= to serve hot, rather than

room temperature?

 

Selene

 

 

Date: Fri, 03 Dec 2004 15:39:42 -0500

From: Wildecelery at aol.com

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Hotel room food heating

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

A "hot pot" with a large tin can...

 

When I first moved to Vt, the house we were purchasing fell  

through...instead of a week or two in a B&B ( the only hotel near my  

work) we ended up at 2 months..

 

  I had my old college hot-pot...so I inverted a wide, empty, clean tin  

can (I believe it was from fruit) in the hot pot.  When the hot pot was  

mostly filled with water and turned on, the can acted as a

"burner"...this allowed me to make soup, scrmbled eggs, and a few  

other things...not idea...but it worked.

 

-Ardenia

 

 

Date: Fri, 3 Dec 2004 16:03:12 -0500

From: Gaylin Walli <iasmin at comcast.net>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re: Food in a hotel room

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

On Friday, December 3, 2004, at 03:08  PM,

sca-cooks-request at ansteorra.org wrote:

 

> Keeping food cool isn't a big problem as we can bring in coolers. But

> heating food is tricky.

 

Not that tricky if you have the coolers, actually. boiling hot water in

the "cooler" keeps the cooler as hot as a low temp oven when it works

properly. Caterers use this trick frequently. The keys are getting a

GREAT cooler to do the job, finding boiling hot water, and not opening

the cooler at all, even "just to check to make sure things are ok."

 

Personally, I like the chafing dish route, whether it's disposable or

catering-worthy. But I'm really lucky in that regard. I have one of my

own and access to 4 more plus 3 roasting ovens. Spoiled? Absolutely. I

remember having a hotplate and being *darned* grateful. :) :)

 

Iasmin

 

 

Date: Fri, 03 Dec 2004 22:35:54 -0500

From: Micaylah <dy018 at freenet.carleton.ca>

Subject: RE: [Sca-cooks] Re: Food in a hotel room

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> Not that tricky if you have the coolers, actually. Boiling hot water in

> the "cooler" keeps the cooler as hot as a low temp oven when it works

> properly. Caterers use this trick frequently. The keys are getting a

> GREAT cooler to do the job, finding boiling hot water, and not opening

> the cooler at all, even "just to check to make sure things are ok."

 

Another way to keep food hot in coolers is to line to cooler with foil and

pack the dishes with thick wads of newspaper (putting newspaper on the

floor under the foil). Or if its just chickens say, line it with foil.

Place cooked chickens in and close. I don't tend to keep chicken too long

like this but a good hour or so is fine.

 

Micaylah

 

 

Date: Sat, 4 Dec 2004 01:02:04 -0500

From: <kingstaste at mindspring.com>

Subject: RE: [Sca-cooks] Re: Food in a hotel room

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

>>>

Another way to keep food hot in coolers is to line to cooler with foil and

pack the dishes with thick wads of newspaper (putting newspaper on the

floor under the foil). Or if its just chickens say, line it with foil.

Place cooked chickens in and close. I don't tend to keep chicken too

long like this but a good hour or so is fine.

 

Micaylah

<<<

 

We have used bricks for this. Wrap a brick (one with holes rather than a

solid one that might burst) in foil and heat in an oven, grill or campfire.

Place the bricks in the bottom of a cooler, then place food containers on

top.  You can put a piece of cardboard in to totally separate the bricks

from the food if you like.  This method will keep a cooler at approved temps

for holding hot foods for a couple of hours.

 

Christianna

 

 

Date: Fri, 14 Dec 2007 13:27:10 EST

From: Bronwynmgn at aol.com

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Seeking recipes for College group

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

 

wildecelery at aol.com writes:

<<Our local college SCA crew is hoping to host and event in  March. Like

most college campuses, their food service agency gets 1st dibs. They have

agreed to prepare a menu based on medieval guidelines and/or recipes, and to do a "teaser" meal for the whole campus the night before.>>

 

Sounds like fun.  We had that situation with a church where we were holding

Coronation.  They insisted their people had to cook the food.  When they saw

the recipes, they decided that we could cook the food as long as their staff

was in the kitchen to supervise.  So we stuck them in server's tabards and

made them useful.

 

<<Ideas/Suggestions/Actual  recipes , please?>>

 

My thought, to avoid wierding out both the  kitchen staff and the rest  of

the school, is to go with mostly familiar things and one or two slightly more

exotic things.  So maybe something familiar like Macrows or, for slightly  more

exotic, Losyns; sausages with mustard or a beef dish with a medieval sauce

on the side; maybe a chicken soup/stew type dish; salat; perhaps another

veggie,  maybe De Nola's spinach; and a sweet pie or period applesauce.  Mostly

familiar foods but with a different taste/texture than they are used to.

 

Brangwayna Morgan

 

 

Date: Thu, 22 May 2008 16:16:20 -0600

From: "Kathleen A Roberts" <karobert at unm.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Sign of the Times perhaps --Dinner at Crown   -

        cancelled

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

yeppers, i rarely attend 'catered' feasts unless it looks

like someone made an effort.

 

several years ago, UNM food services did an italian

coronation feast for the event held there.  everything

felt pretty institutional even with lots of banners, but

all those round tables with white cloths...

 

one of our college guys gave them some period recipes, and

they tried to get as close as possible to them. the food

was good, and from what i am told, fairly accurate except

for the consistency of the dessert.  at least they tried.

 

cailte

 

 

Date: Fri, 23 May 2008 00:43:18 -0400

From: Avelyn Grene <avelyn at greneboke.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Sign of the Times perhaps --Dinner at Crown   -

        cancelled

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Having very recently worked in a hotel/conference center/catering

facility similar to the one where Crown is being held, I see both sides

of the problem.

 

Finding an easily accessible site in the Cincinnati area, that can hold

4-600 people, and all of the different activities  we hold for our

Spring Crown (which includes Kingdom A&S) is certainly not an easy task,

and sites that can accommodate this are few and far between, and

generally limited to fairgrounds (which require a whole lot more  work

and planning) and conference centers (at least from what I have seen in

this area).  From an SCAdian point of view, this is one of the easiest

ways to ensure that everything should work out the way you need it to,

as you have basically hired a site to do everything for you.

 

This does come with drawbacks (food wise):

 

Catering/Conference side (at least from my limited experience in Ohio):

-Catering centers of this type have preplanned menu options at preset

prices, ranging from about $20-40, for dinners from anything to simple

chicken and veggie buffets, to 4 course served duo shrimp and fillet

dinners.  These are generally for business groups (who get a bulk

discount a lot of the time) or weddings.  We are just strange people

that wear funny clothes and asked for dinner to be included.

-Most catering facilities are unbending in their menus, etc. Unless you

have an "in" with the facility (work there, are friends with the chef,

what have you), you are unlikely to have any influence on what is

served.  There are many reasons for this, which many of us can come up

with pretty easily.  Unfamiliarity of recipes, food costs, labor costs,

etc.  The food we make is foreign to them and generally more tedious

that the standard dinners they provide.

 

-The issue of bringing in food.  Facilities do not forbid outside food

just to be annoying.  True, they don't really want to have to deal with

our snack bags and juice boxes, and they would much rather we buy their

food,  but the real reason is that it is usually illegal to bring

outside food in to public serving areas (please note this does not

include private hotel rooms - you can order all the pizza you want).  

Food service licenses only cover the food bought or prepared by the

facility.  If the health inspector was to pop his head in and see a

lunch tavern, or a homemade lunch, they would be in a world of trouble

and lose their license.  Unfortunately this extends to snacks and things

as well.  (Please keep in mind these rules may not apply to all states

boards of health)

 

As far as Doc's suggestion on creating menus for catering facilities to

use:  The likelihood of a randomly picked catering facility actually

allowing such a thing is slim, but this does not mean that it is a

project not worth doing.  There are a number of people who have "ins"

with such facilities, ones which may be willing to quietly bend the

rules and cook the menus, and for those places, it would be awesome to

have a menu ready to hand to them.  Many of the chefs at some of these

places are foodies as well and would love the opportunity to dabble in

something new provided they can do it (the chefs where I worked were

some of the biggest food geeks I've ever met and were/are in constant

support of my research and cooking).  The trick is just finding the

right venue that can get away with bending the rules a bit.

 

I hope that made sense - I am usually asleep by now...

 

Avelyn

 

On 5/23/08, *chawkswrth at aol.com* <chawkswrth at aol.com> wrote:

    Here, it is a bit of both. We have only had one Event that I know of

    where the vendor insisted that their cooks do the cooking and the

    menu planning. It did not go well. They did not plan enough food and

    there were other issues.?

--

Lady Avelyn Grene

Apprentice to Master Edouard Halidai

Chronicler and Historian for Barony Flaming Gryphon

 

The Commonplace Boke of Lady Avelyn Grene

www.greneboke.com

 

<the end>



Formatting copyright © Mark S. Harris (THLord Stefan li Rous).
All other copyrights are property of the original article and message authors.

Comments to the Editor: stefan at florilegium.org