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seaweed-msg – 4/29/09

 

Period use of seaweed as food and for other uses.

 

NOTE: See also the files: herbs-msg, salads-msg, Ireland-msg, fd-Ireland-msg, pickled-foods-msg, fd-Scotland-msg, fd-Iceland-msg.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I  have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I  have done  a limited amount  of  editing. Messages having to do  with separate topics  were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the  message IDs  were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make  no claims  as  to the accuracy  of  the information  given by the individual authors.

 

Please  respect the time  and  efforts of  those who have written  these messages. The  copyright status  of these messages  is  unclear at this time. If  information  is  published  from  these  messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

    Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                          Stefan at florilegium.org

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Date: Sun, 07 Mar 2004 00:44:40 -0500

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna  at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Period Seaweed Recipes?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks  at ansteorra.org>

 

> snipped---

> That's because they're two separate dishes. McCormick gives a recipe

> for Brotchan Foltchep (a.k.a. Brotchan Roy), saying this was

> apparently eaten by Colmcille, and he also mentions, sort of

> peripherally, that he ate a lot of dulse. I haven't been able to find

> any specific references to either food in documents even remotely

> contemporary to Colmcille (his bio by Adamnan is quite a bit later

> than Comcille himself). It may have been a tradition on Iona, I don't

> know.

>

> Adamantius (trying to remember the sauce he used for the lamb

> medallions wrapped in laver and steamed -- probably a caper butter

> emulsion...)

 

Dulse in Ireland, according to Alan Davidson, was eaten

from ancient times onward and is recorded in the 7th century

Irish laws Corpus Iuris Hibernici. It was again something that was

eaten during the famine years. (Actual Irish, Welsh, and Scots

recipes (also Cornwall) are all going to be much later, since we just don't have

the early published works from those regions. Traditional recipes

for those countries using seaweed aren't that hard to find.)

Carrageen is another variety that is cooked with and that one

I have worked with. I made a molded cream one time that was

set up with 'Irish moss'. It worked alright, but the taste wasn't all

that good. I think people expected a very sweet pudding and it wasn't.

 

Johnnae  llyn Lewis

 

 

Date: Mon, 08 Mar 2004 12:51:31 -0500

From: Lsa Kuney <lkuney  at ec.rr.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re:  Period seaweed recipes

To: sca-cooks  at ansteorra.org

 

Samphire (Crithmum maritumum) has been eaten in he Southwest of England

from at least medieval times.  It is now called Sea Fennel and is eaten

pickled.  In German it is called "meerfenchel", and in Italian "Herba di

San Pietra".  It grows on rocky cliffsides and is mentioned in King

Lear.  Both Gerard and Culpepper speak of it in their writings.  It

makes a very unique and aromatic pickle.  I saw it mentioned in modern

Cornish recipes when I lived there.  I will try to locate some recipes,

but since it is pickled fresh, I am unlikely to locate an American source.

 

Halima

Raven's Cove

 

 

Date: Tue, 09 Mar 2004 10:09:46 -0500

From: "Sayyida Halima al-Shafi'i of Raven's Cove" <lkuney at ec.rr.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] samphire

To: sca-cooks  at ansteorra.org

 

Here are some links to samphire...sorry I don't have time to summarize

for a post about it, but the kind referred to in medieval documents is

Rock samphire, which grows to this day in Cornwall (where I lived) and

other rocky, coastal place in Europe, and rarely in Australia.

 

(http://www.riverhouse.com.au/factsheets/rock_samphire.html,

http://www.oldcity.demon.co.uk/eastanglia/country/samphire.html)

 

and you can buy jars of it pickled.

 

There is a kind of samphire that grows in North America, apparently

known as salicornia (marsh samphire) on the coasts of oceans,

(http://eat.epicurious.com/dictionary/food/index.ssf?ARROW_UP=3420) but

I have no experience with it.

 

If I recall correctly (and I am dredging this wwaaaayyyy up from the

depths of my poor brain), there is a literary reference to samphire in

one of Louisa May Alcott's books, in which the child means to say

"vampire" and instead says "samphire" thereby inviting ridicule from

someone for comparing someone to a pickle.  This is post period but

shows that samphire is still alive and kicking.

 

Halima

Raven's Cove

 

 

Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2008 11:58:58 -0400

From: "Elaine Koogler" <kiridono at gmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Period Japanese or other oriental soup

      recipes

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

On Sat, Aug 23, 2008 at 10:50 PM, Sharon R. Saroff <sindara at pobox.com>wrote:

<<< My son is seeking to make a soup with seaweed but I am not sure if this is

period.  Does anyone have any period recipes?

 

Sindara >>>

 

Dame Hauviette d'Anjou (Channon Mondoux) forwarded a couple of documents to

me that include references to soups made with sea weed in both the early

Irish and Viking cultures.  Included was the following information in one of

the documents, a feast at Carrick Fergus:

 

*Dulse Stew*

 

I was inspired by a recipe in *Traditional Irish Recipes*, written by John

Murphy and hand scribed by Margaret Batt. Although the book is laden with

recipes containing potatoes, I found it to be significant in true to form

early recipes (such as the one for Dulse Stew, see below) . Murphy notes

three early sources ; "The Complete confectioner, or the whole art of

confectionary made plain & easy" (H. Glasse, Dublin 1742), "The Lady's

Assistant for Regulating and Supplying her Table" (Charlotte Mason,

Dublin1778) and

J. Mc Waters, "Cheap Recipes & Hints on Cookery Collected for Distribution

Amongst the Irish Peasantry in 1847". Although not in period, these early

sources indicate some history for these recipes. I suspect the origin of

some of these recipes go back much further than the dates sited above.

 

In a discussion on the SCA Cooks List, Master Adamantius, writes that the

soup known as brotchan foltchep is traditional Irish cooking and is

"apparently of much greater antiquity, having been mentioned and described

in the writings of St. Colmcille, c. 597 C.E. There's no telling how the

original differs from this, though. I am assuming that Colmcille's dish was

a bit more austere".

 

I found the same recipe in Traditional Irish Recipes, by John Murphy as

follows

 

*Brotchan Foltchep*

 

*parsley

2lb leeks

2 pints milk

knob of butter

2 oz oatmeal

salt & pepper*

 

*Boil the milk with oatmeal until cooked. Add the butter and mix in the

chopped leeks. Cool gently for one hour. Season to taste and garnish wiht

chopped parsley*

 

**In addition the same source provided the dulse recipe,

 

*Stewed  Dulse*

 

*dulce

butter

milk

salt & pepper*

 

*Cut the dulce from the rocks at low tide. Spread on shingle to dry in the

sun. Wash well to remove sand and grit. Place in a saucepan with milk,

butter, salt & pepper, and stew for three to four hours until tender. Serve

with oatcakes.*

 

The lack of quantities and the simplicity of instruction, leads me to

believe this is one of the recipes found in those early sources. Further

research is necessary to ascertain that as a fact. **

 

*Corccain's Dulse Stew*

 

*25 gm  dried dulce or 1/4 cup packed (available in most health food stores)

3 leeks chopped (including as much of the green as you can)

1 lb mushrooms sliced

3/4 cup salted butter

2 quarts whole milk

2 cups cream

2 tsp sea salt

1 1/2 tsp fresh ground black  pepper*

 

*Melt the butter in a dutch oven. Saute leeks and mushrooms till just

softening, let the butter brown.   Remove from heat and add the milk and

cream and return to heat. Reduce heat to low. *

 

*Rinse the dulce briefly in cold water, then chop. Add dulce to the pot.

Simmer for  30 to 40 minutes. Do not let the pot hard boil. Season with

salt and pepper. Serve slightly less than hot.  Serves 12 large servings or

20 small.

*

I hope this helps....

 

Kiri

 

 

Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2008 23:01:39 -0700

From: David Walddon <david at vastrepast.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Period Japanese or other oriental soup

      recipes

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

What about Welsh Laver Bread? Seaweed loaf.

I was just in Cardiff for business and they sell it everywhere and  

claim that it is one of the oldest food products of Wales.

I have some modern recipes but wonder how old it really dates to.

 

Eduardo

 

 

Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2009 17:19:38 -0500

From: moramarsh at aol.com

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] dulse?

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

 

From: Kathleen A Roberts karobert at unm.edu

<<< does anyone have any experience with dulse? i am going to try working with it but thought i might see if i can deflect any potential problems. ;) >>>

 

My experience with Dulse was not pleasant. I used it in a spice blend and found it oversalted everything to the point of killing any flavors. I tried to decrease the amount but even a pinch or two didn't help.

 

It is a great medicinal herb but again you have to get past the saltyness.

 

All my usages were with dehydrated product. Maybe fresh would be better.

 

Mora

 

 

Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2009 18:08:53 -0500

From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae at mac.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] dulse?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Irish moss or Carragheen yes.

Dulse no.

I did a cream once with the former. Taste was strange.

Authentic stuff, but hardly edible.

 

Johnnae

 

Kathleen A Roberts wrote:

does anyone have any experience with dulse?  i am going to try working

with it but thought i might see if i can deflect any potential

problems. ;)

 

cailte

 

 

Date: Thu, 08 Jan 2009 16:53:44 -0500

From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae at mac.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] dulse?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

It's defined on the web as "dark purple edible seaweed of the Atlantic

coasts of Europe and North America [syn: Irish moss, carrageen,

carageen, Chondrus crispus]"

 

There's a chapter titled "Sea Vegetables" in Cowan & Sexton's Irish

Traditional Foods (1997). It covers dulse or dillisk, carrageen moss, sloke,

and kelp. They are also mentioned in Brid Mahon's Land of Milk and Honey.

 

I created the cream for a contest at an Irish themed event. The contest

required it be Irish and have some sort of historical connection with

Ireland.

As you recall Ireland is one of those countries where they started

publishing cookery books very very late, so no there is not a pre 1600

printed Irish recipe.

 

I did have an authentic Irish recipe from an older Irish cookbook. As I

recall you steeped the moss in a heavy cream and added sugar. Would have simmered it until it thickened and then it was molded in a shamrock mold.

It set up and unmolded very easily. It was a pretty dish... pale green.

Tastewise-- not so good.

 

And my collection of Irish books are mostly boxed, especially those that

I would have had available in 1979-80.

So no I can't tell you which book it came out of. I suspect that if I

had them available I could find it, but that's not an option.

There is a website here with recipes and more information on Irish Moss

and the North American angle.

http://www.virtualmuseum.ca/Exhibitions/PrinceEdwardIslandHarvest/moss_e/recipe02.html

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Thu, 08 Jan 2009 16:07:00 -0700

From: "Kathleen A Roberts" <karobert at unm.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] dulse?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Johnna Holloway <johnnae at mac.com> wrote:

<<< There's a chapter titled "Sea Vegetables" in Cowan &

Sexton's Irish Traditional Foods (1997). >>>

 

i have that one.  and like all cookbooks, they tend to

tell you how to cook it, but not the potential pitfalls. ;)

 

Did you know ancient ireland had laws for who and how much

dulse could be harvested?  much the same as with fishing

areas.  i guess you can see i am getting edu-macated in my

research for the upcoming class: Legends, Lawyers and

Landfills, Documenting Early Irish Food.

 

From what i have heard, perhaps dulse is best used as

seasoning and not an ingredient!

 

cailte

 

 

Date: Thu, 08 Jan 2009 18:44:34 -0500

From: "Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius" <adamantius1 at verizon.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] dulse?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

On Jan 8, 2009, at 6:07 PM, Kathleen A Roberts wrote:

<<< From what i have heard, perhaps dulse is best used as seasoning and  

not an ingredient! >>>

 

As far as I know, it was used as a [main] ingredient. I suspect you  

need to work with the fresh stuff to get a sense of what the early  

Irish were doing; it might be a bit like tasting dried raisins and  

concluding grapes have a peculiar, very sweet, slightly oxidized  

flavor...

 

My go-to source for a recipe like this would be Malachi McCormick, who  

says, honestly, that he couldn't find any traditional written recipes  

for dulse, so he provides us with one he made up, also using dried  

dulse, reconstituted and mixed with watercress in a salad.

 

I could swear, though, that someplace I have a recipe that starts with  

the dulse-ey equivalent of, "First steal two chickens", as in, first  

collect some dulse off some rocks at the seashore, etc.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Thu, 08 Jan 2009 19:27:49 -0500

From: Gretchen Beck <grm at andrew.cmu.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] dulse?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

--On Thursday, January 08, 2009 6:44 PM -0500 "Phil Troy / G. Tacitus

Adamantius" <adamantius1 at verizon.net> wrote:

<<< I could swear, though, that someplace I have a recipe that starts with

the dulse-ey equivalent of, "First steal two chickens", as in, first

collect some dulse off some rocks at the seashore, etc. >>>

 

This is the closest I could find. From An Historical Account of Peterhead,

from the Earliest Period to the Present Time: Comprehending an Account of

Its Trade, Shipping, Commerce, and Manufactures, Mineral Wells, Baths, &c.

with an Appendix, Containing a Copy of the Original Charter of Erection,

Together with All the Bye-laws and ...

By James Arbuthnot

Published by Printed by D. Chalmers, 1815

 

p 37

Dulse, or Dilse

 

This fucus is found in considerable quantities all along our coast and of

different colours, and sizes, in the leaf. The short purple-leaved dilse is

esteemed the best; the large gillard, or green-leaved dilse, appear to

contain fully as much saccharine matter as the other, but they are not so

tender...The best short dilse comes from Boddom and Longhaven: the less

they are exposed to the rays of the sun, they taste the better. They are

generally eaten here fresh: some people roast them, and they eat tollerably

well. The plan used in roasting dilse is as follows:--They are put into a

plate, and the lower ends of a pair of tongs are heated in the fire until

they assume a red appearance; they are then squeezed with this until they

are properly done, which is known by their assuming a dark olive green

appearance.

 

The New and Complete American Encyclopedia: Or, Universal Dictionary of

Arts and Sciences; on an Improved Plan: in which the Respective Sciences

are Arranged Into Complete Systems, and the Arts Digested Into Distinct

Treatises; Also the Detached Parts of Knowledge Alphabetically Arranged and

...

Published by John Low, 1807, notes

 

The palmatus, the palmated or sweet fucus, commonly called dulse or dilse,

groaws plentifully on the sea coasts...The inhabitants, both of Scotland

and England take pleasure in eating this plant; and women of weak habits

often recover an appetite by eating it raw...They sometimes eat it raw, but

esteem it most when added to ragouts, oglios, etc, to which it gives a red

colour; and, dissolving, renders them thick and gelatinous. On the Isle of

Skye, it is sometimes used in fevers to promote a sweat, being boiled in

water with butter...the dried leaves infused in water exhale the scent of

violets.

 

The pinnatifidus, the jagged fucus, or pepper dilse, is frequent on sea

rocks which are covered by the tides..This species has a hot taste in the

mouth, and is therefore called pepper ilse, in Britian. It is often eaten

as a salad, like the preceeding

 

Columbian Cyclopedia

Published by Garretson, Cox & Company, 1897, notes

 

...It is eaten raw or roasted, and with vinegar. IN Iceland, it is

sometimes boiled in milk. It is an important plant to the Icelanders, and

after being washed and dried, is stored in casks, to be eaten with

fish...The name Dulse is given in the sw of England to another sea-weed,

Iridaea edulis,...whih has an undivided obovate or wedge shaped, flat,

expanded frond, very succulent, tapering to a short stalk and of a dull

purple color. It is eaten either raw or pinched between hot irons -- Pepper

Dulse...another of ...has a pungent taste, and is used as a condiment when

other sea weeds are eaten.

 

toodles, margaret

 

 

Date: Thu, 08 Jan 2009 20:16:06 -0500

From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae at mac.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] dulse?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Alan Davidson has recipes and a full description

in his book North Atlantic Seafood. see page 254.

Eating it fresh is described as 'chewing on a salted rubber band.'

If you search Google books under Irish Dulse recipes, you can look at

the page.

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2009 12:30:47 +0000

From: "Daniel Schneider" <macbrighid at campus.ie>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Sca-cooks Digest, Vol 33, Issue 17

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

 

From what I can remember from when I lived in Ireland, people didn't cook dulse, they cooked with carageen (Irish moss), which has a much less pronounced flavour. Dulse would be washed off, dried (and sometimes lightly roasted), and then eaten sorta like crisps. It's a snack that takes a little getting used to, but it's *so* worth it- all salty and oceany-tasting, and a really neat texture; starts off slightly crispy, then gets soft and chewy as it rehydrates. mmmmm!

 

Dan

 

 

Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2009 15:38:38 -0500

From: ranvaig at columbus.rr.com

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] dulse?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

<<< From _The Cookin' Woman, Irish Country Recipes_ published 1949, by Florance Irwin, who was a cooking teacher in Ireland just after the turn of the century. Some of her recipes come from 18th century cookbooks. Not period, but her descriptions of Irish Country Life are very entertaining. >>>

 

Since the recipe says to add salt, I don't think the dulse could have been that salty.  Its possible that dulse you purchase today is seasoned, meant to be eaten as is.  Both recipes say to wash the dulse before cooking it.

 

Chapter 14 Sea Vegetables and Oatmeal:  The Irish have always used sea vegetables - Dulse, Carrageen Moss, and Sloke.  They contain iodine and other sea salts, magnesium, sodium, etc.

 

Dulse (Rhodemenia Palmata) This is cut from the rocks at low tide and spread to dry on the shingle in the sun.  When dry it is sold at fairs and markets all pver the country, a halfpenny worth of dulse being a popular purchase.  It was supposed to be good for killing worms in children.

 

Fried Dulse (Glenarm) Wash the dulse in sea water.  Heat butter in a pan and fry the dulse until it turns colour.

 

Stewed Dulse (Portaferry recipe 100 years old at least (in 1949))  Wash freshly gathered dulse to remove sand and grit.  Put in a saucepan with milk, salt and pepper and stew till tender.  It take 3-4 hours.  Use as a supper dish with oatcakes or brown bread.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palmaria_palmata

... it is relatively low in sodium and high in potassium.

 

Ranvaig

 

 

Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2009 13:59:20 -0700

From: "Kathleen A Roberts" <karobert at unm.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] dulse?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

ranvaig at columbus.rr.com wrote:

<<< From _The Cookin' Woman, Irish Country Recipes_ published

1949, by Florance Irwin, who was a cooking teacher in

Ireland just after the turn of the century. Some of her

recipes come from 18th century cookbooks. Not period, but

her descriptions of Irish Country Life are very

entertaining. >>>

 

sounds like a good book to have. ;)  aren't they all?

 

i found packaged dulse at the local whole foods (ethnic

section).  several ounces for $4.99 and it is packaged in

maine.  what the heck, it's dulse in new mexico.  i am

ahead of the game.  i found several employees at whole

foods exceedingly helpful, not like the previous wild oats

folks.

 

husband watched the purchase with the same look that

fiesty gets when he sees the cat-carrier coming out.

terrified resignation, i guess you would call it....

 

i will be experimenting with it soon.  too expensive for a

dish at a feast, but i think i can add it to things.  we

shall see.

 

cailte

 

<the end>



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