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horseradish-msg – 1/28/09

 

Period use of horseradish. Recipes. Candied horseradish root.

 

NOTE: See also the files: onions-msg, garlic-msg, mustard-msg, spices-msg, sauces-msg, leeks-msg, ginger-msg, cinnamon-msg, herbs-msg.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I  have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I  have done  a limited amount  of  editing. Messages having to do  with separate topics  were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the  message IDs  were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make  no claims  as  to the accuracy  of  the information  given by the individual authors.

 

Please  respect the time  and  efforts of  those who have written  these messages. The  copyright status  of these messages  is  unclear at this time. If  information  is  published  from  these  messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

    Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                          Stefan at florilegium.org

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Date: Fri, 3 Apr 1998 23:11:21 -0800

From: "Anne-Marie Rousseau" <acrouss at gte.net>

Subject: Re: SC - Garden time

 

> On the same line, Horseradish recipes?????  Please?

 

There's a recipe for a horseradish sauce in the German corpus. Horseradish

root, vinegar, a bit of sugar and spice, if memory serves. Tasted just like

the non-cream style stuff out of the jar.

 

- --AM

 

 

Date: Fri, 3 Mar 2000 14:49:35 -0500

From: Christine A Seelye-King <mermayde at juno.com>

Subject: SC - Digby's Horseradish Mustard

 

> Digby has a Ginger horseradish mustard sauce: can someone get that

> for me?

>

> Caointiarn

 

Here you go -

 

From Sir Kenelme Digby's Closet Opened

"To Make Mustard

 

<snip - see mustard-msg>

 

        And here is another plain horseradish sauce.  

 

"Sauce of Horse Radish

 

        Take Roots of Horse-radish scraped clean, and lay them to soak in

fair-water for an hour.  Then rasp them upon a Grater, and you shall have

them all in a tender spungy Pap.  Put Vinegar to it, and a very little

Sugar, not so much as to be tasted, but to quicken (by contrariety) the

taste of the other."  

 

        Christianna

 

 

Date: Sat, 11 Nov 2000 18:50:23 -0500

From: harper at idt.net

Subject: SC - Sauces

 

I went to a baronial potluck today.  As a contribution, I brought a

loaf of bread, sliced roast beef, and three sauces.  One was the

Cider Sauce from Granado which I posted recently.  Another was

the horseradish sauce from Nola, and the third was a garlic sauce

from Granado.  They were all well received, though the Cider Sauce

was probably the most popular.

 

I've posted the translation for the Horseradish sauce before, but

here's the redaction:

 

                     *  Exported from  MasterCook  *

 

                         Horseradish-Honey Sauce

 

Recipe By     : de Nola #157

Serving Size  : 20   Preparation Time :0:05

Categories    : Sauces                           Spanish

                Vegan                           Vegetarian

 

  Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method

- --------  ------------  --------------------------------

   1      slice         italian bread -- toasted lightly

   4      oz            horseradish -- finely grated

     1/2  cup           honey

     1/4  cup           water

     1/2  teaspoon      black pepper

   3      tablespoons   white wine vinegar

 

Peel and finely grate the horseradish root.   Place in the container

of a blender or food processor.  Soak the toasted bread in the

vinegar.  Add to the horseradish.  Blend a moment until mixed.  

Add the remaining ingredients, adjusting as necessary for taste.

Add just enough water to make a smooth sauce that is not too thin.

 

CAUTION: avoid breathing in the fumes from the sauce.

 

Just before serving, heat the sauce on low heat until warm.  Do not

boil.

 

For a hotter sauce, wait 3 minutes before adding the bread and

vinegar to the horseradish.  For a less fiery sauce, add the vinegar

promptly after grating the horseradish.

 

If fresh horseradish root is unavailable, take a 6-oz jar of prepared

horseradish.  Empty the contents into a mesh sieve, and press

lightly with a spoon to drain off the excess liquid. Reduce added

vinegar to 1 tablespoon.  Proceed as above.  However, this method

produces a much milder sauce.

 

                   - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

<snip of Garlic Sauce with Walnuts and Almonds - see sauces-msg >

Lady Brighid ni Chiarain

Settmour Swamp, East (NJ)

 

 

Date: Wed, 18 Apr 2001 23:41:32 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - horseradish root

 

Robin Carroll-Mann wrote:

> On 18 Apr 01,, Stefan li Rous wrote:

> > Recently I saw whole horseradish root. How would you use this? I assume

> > not in mead :-). What would you do to go from fresh horseradish root

> > to horseradish sauce? Any period recipes for fresh horseradish? I don't

> > remember many that use horseradish at all.

>

> Well, there's the honey-horseradish sauce from de Nola.

> Guaranteed to put a spring in your step.  :-)

 

There's also a horseradish-laced mustard in Digby, FWIW. Wonderful

stuff. IIRC, you cut the root into chunks and let them steep in the

prepared mustard for a week or so. I don't recall if they are supposed

to be removed for service. Of course, Digby is post-period.

 

The simplest horseradish sauce (and the most common today, I'd say) is

found, I believe, in several period sources (possibly with a little

sugar added) as grated horseradish root in a little vinegar.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2001 07:40:20 -0600From: Sue Clemenger <mooncat at in-tch.com>Subject: Re: SC - horseradish rootIIRC, (not enough coffee yet this a.m.) one of the recipes in Rumpoldtis for pickled beets, and it has horseradish in it.

- --Maire

 

 

Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2001 09:50:32 -0500From: "Michael Gunter" <countgunthar at hotmail.com>Subject: SC - non-member submission - Re: Horseradish Root>Stefan said:>Recently I saw whole horseradish root. How would you use this? I assume>not in mead :-). What would you do to go from fresh horseradish root>to horseradish sauce? Any period recipes for fresh horseradish? I don't>remember many that use horseradish at all.Be as careful with fresh horseradish as you would with jalapenos. The recipesI've seen using horseradish call for finely grating it and adding vinegar. Thefumes off the horseradish while being grated is nearly as potent as jalapenofumes and much worse than chopped onions. I believe I saw a recipe in Welserinor Rumpolt yesterday using a horseradish root to stir the mustard. If I havetime, I'll double check.Liadan

 

Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2001 10:57:12 -0400From: Elaine Koogler <ekoogler at chesapeake.net>Subject: Re: SC - horseradish rootYes, what I used was "store-bought", though it was made by the Amish and sold in one of their markets.  So it was as close to home-made and period as you could probably get and still purchase it!I have never made my own horseradish, but would suspect you'd do something like peel the root, chop/grind/shred it into VERY small pieces, then age it with some kind of liquid...my guess would be some kind of white vinegar.  (I say vinegar because I know it can bring out the hot in things...if you add it to Chinese mustard or wasabi, it makes them hotter than using water). Kiri

 

Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2001 15:06:21 From: "Vincent Cuenca" <bootkiller at hotmail.com>Subject: SC - Re: horseradish rootThe "traditional" British preparation is to peel the root like a carrot, grate it finely and mix with unsweetened whipped cream, IIRC.Here's the raw data from de Nola:Parsley       Take parsley and remove the little stems; and remove the leaves carefully and clean them, and grind the leaves thoroughly in a mortar; and once they are well ground toast a large piece of bread, and soak it in white vinegar; and grind it with the parsley; and once it is well ground add a little pepper to the mortar; and mix it well with the parsley and the bread: and then add honey, which should be dissolved, to the mortar; stirring it constantly and well until the honey is incorporated with the sauce; and if the sauce is very thick, thin it with a little watered vinegar, so that it does not get too sour; and once this is done take two smooth pebbles from the sea or a river; and put them in the fire, and when they are well colored and red, add them to the mortar with some tongs in such a way that they cool there: and once all this is done check its flavor, and do this in a way that it tastes a little of pepper, and a little sour and sweet and of parsley; and if any of these flavors are lacking balance them.Sauce of Horseradish and of Clary Sage        A sauce can be made from the root of the horseradish and from sage leaves in the same way as parsley.Let us know what you come up with!Vicente

 

Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2001 11:39:29 -0400From: "Robin Carroll-Mann" <rcmann4 at earthlink.net>Subject: Re: SC - horseradish rootOn 19 Apr 01,, Elaine Koogler wrote:> And the recipe for that is......??????> > KiriI thought I'd sent it to the list previously, but maybe not.  Vincente has kindly provided the translation of the original, which does not differ significantly from mine, so I'll just add my redaction:4 ounces  horseradish root, peeled and finely grated1 slice           Italian or French bread, crusts trimmed, toasted3 tablespoons    white wine vinegar1/2  cup               honey1/4 cup               water1/2 teaspoon   black pepperPeel and finely grate the horseradish root.   Place in the container of a blender or food processor.  Soak the toasted bread in the vinegar.  Add to the horseradish.  Blend a moment until mixed.  For a hotter sauce, wait 3 minutes before adding the bread and vinegar to the horseradish.  For a less fiery sauce, add the vinegar promptly after grating the horseradish.  Add the remaining ingredients, adjusting as necessary for taste.  Add just enough water to make a smooth sauce that is not too thin.  Just before serving, heat the sauce on low heat until warm.  Do not boil.If fresh horseradish root is unavailable, take a 6-oz jar of prepared horseradish. Empty the contents into a mesh sieve, and press lightly with a spoon to drain off the excess liquid.  Reduce added vinegar to 1 tablespoon.  Proceed as above.  This is not as pungent as sauce made from fresh horseradish root.Important note: Horseradish fumes are very strong.  Work carefully in a well-ventilated area.  If your skin is sensitive, you may wish to wear gloves while handling the horseradish root.

Lady Brighid ni ChiarainSettmour Swamp, East (NJ)

 

Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2001 12:12:47 -0700

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

Subject: Re: SC - horseradish root

 

Kiri wrote:

>And the recipe for that is......??????

>

>I apologize if you've already published it, but I had to ask ;-)

 

Yep, she did - i see she has reposted it. And i used it at my Boar

Hunt - so there's also my version of her version of de Nola on line at

http://witch.drak.net/lilinah/menu.html

 

My mother bought a Cuisinart way back when (the 70's? the 80's?) and

then hardly ever used it. So last summer i took it home with me and

used it at the feast.

 

We washed then peeled the horseradish. Probably a good idea to wear

thin rubber gloves when handling it... Then i fed it into the food

processor, after i cut it in large-ish bits. I would have liked it

more finely grated - i probably just didn't use the right blade - i

*think* i have all my mom's blades, but no book on what to use for

what, so i was just kinda guessing.

 

Doing it in a machine makes it much easier on whoever is preparing it

- - less harsh stuff on the hands, fewer fumes in the face.

 

Now, i have a question: how does horseradish become milder? With

mustard, it's the passage of a few days. Is it the same with

horseradish?

 

I made it on site that afternoon and served it with the roast pork

legs around 7 PM, along with recipes from Lady Brighid for Spiced

Apple Cider Sauce and Garlic Nut Sauce.

 

Anahita

 

 

Date: Thu, 19 Apr 2001 13:24:55 -0700 (PDT)

From: Chris Stanifer <jugglethis at yahoo.com>

Subject: Re: SC - horseradish root

 

- --- Elaine Koogler <ekoogler at chesapeake.net> wrote:

> On most blenders there is a grate cycle, so you

> could possibly use one of those

> as well.  I think if I were using a food processor,

> I'd probably try using the

> chopping blade as it seems to chop things up pretty

> well.

 

The best way to use horseradish (according to a

horseradish afficianado...me) is to peel it to remove

the tough "bark", and then simply shred it with a box

grater, much as you would a chunk of cheddar.  I can't

vouch for the need to wear gloves or eye protection,

since I am not sensitive to these kinds of things

(onion, jalapenos, horseradish...t'aint no thang).

 

Balthazar of Blackmoor

 

 

Date: Sun, 22 Apr 2001 23:52:54 -0400

From: "Robin Carroll-Mann" <rcmann4 at earthlink.net>

Subject: Re: SC - horseradish root

 

On 22 Apr 01,, LrdRas at aol.com wrote:

> I followed your redaction until  this part. The original recipe says to drop

> to red hot stones into the mixture and then allow to cool. I may be wreong

> but I was wondering why you decided to serve the sauce warm?

 

Ah.  Here we have a difference of choice of words between two

translations.  Vincente's translation, which was the one posted,

used the word "cool" in reference to the stones. Mine says:

"take two smooth pebbles from the sea or river, and cast them in the fire,

and when they shall be quite ruddy and red, cast them with some tongs

in the mortar in such a manner that they are extinguished there, and when

all this is done taste it for flavor..."

 

The Spanish is "que se amaten alli". "Amatar", according to the

1726 RAE dictionary means

1. An archaic form of the verb "matar", 'to kill'

2. To put out and to extinguish the fire, the light, thirst, hunger, etc.

 

"Se amaten" is the reflexive form of the verb, so a more literal

translation would be "so that they [the pebbles] extinguish

themselves there..."

 

I took this to mean that the heated pebbles will lose their red glow

and transfer their heat to the sauce.  Since there is no instruction

to let the sauce sit until it is completely cool, I assumed it would

be served warm.

 

Now, obviously, the pebbles do cool off in the process of being

dunked in the sauce.  Vincente, would you care to jump in and say

how you read this?  Anyone else?

 

> Also if I am not

> mistaken the original also indicates that the suace is to be thinned with

> diluted vinegar as opposed to water alone.

 

My redaction calls for 3 TBS white wine vinegar -- although I

recommend reducing that quantity if one is using prepared

horseradish from a jar, as that already contains vinegar. I think you

may have missed that line.  If something got lost in the cut and

paste, let me know, and I will repost.

 

> I am looking forward to your responce.

 

I would appreciate your comments on the culinary side of this.  

Although I have heard of cooking with heated rocks, I understood it

was a technique that was used in cultures/situations where

cooking vessels that could be put on a fire were not available.  This

is the only example I have seen in late-period cuisine. Why might

this technique be used, rather than setting the pot over some

embers?

 

> Ras

 

Lady Brighid ni Chiarain

Settmour Swamp, East (NJ)

 

 

Date: Mon, 23 Apr 2001 10:27:14 -0400

From: "Robin Carroll-Mann" <rcmann4 at earthlink.net>

Subject: Re: SC - horseradish root

 

On 23 Apr 01,, Philip & Susan Troy wrote:

> I wonder if perhaps the hot-rock thing in this recipe has to do with

> protecting the ultimate consumer against off-flavors in reactive containers.

>

> Adamantius

 

Maybe, but when Nola wants a non-reactive pot, he usually seems

to specify earthenware.  A recipe for pickled eggplant, for instance,

instructs the cook to use vessel of earthen ware and *not* of iron.  

For some recipes he calls for a new pot that has never been used,

or one that has been recently glazed or tinned.

 

I figured that there had to be something about this method of

heating (and I do think this is a sauce served warm) that is different

from heating it over a fire or in an oven.  I know that cooking

reduces the bite of horseradish.  Maybe this sudden-shock method

affects the flavor less than a gradual, lengthy warming over coals?

 

Lady Brighid ni Chiarain

Settmour Swamp, East (NJ)

 

 

Date: Tue, 24 Apr 2001 07:09:49 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - horseradish root

 

rcmann4 at earthlink.net wrote:

> On 23 Apr 01,, LrdRas at aol.com wrote:

> > I will try the recipe  and see what differences there are in the 2 techniques

> > (rocks or  heating over a fire). I suspect the the rocks would caramalize the

> > sugars and add a nutty taste that would not be apparent with simple  stove

> > top heating.

>

> Wonderful!  This is not a method that I feel confident trying.  I look

> forward to your report.

 

I wonder if perhaps suitably cleaned and seasoned, large steel ball

bearings might be good to experiment with. They might be somewhat less

liable to crack and shatter suddenly than some river stones.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Tue, 24 Apr 2001 10:44:13 -0400 (EDT)

From: Robin Carroll-Mann <rcmann4 at earthlink.net>

Subject: Re: SC - horseradish root

 

- ------Original Message------

From: Jenne Heise <jenne at mail.browser.net>

 

> << I do think this is a sauce served warm) >>

> Why do you think this is a sauce served warm? The recipe specifies

'cool'.

 

Yes, but is the sauce supposed to cool or the rocks?

- -------------------------------

 

The rocks.  Here's my translation of this recipe, since it's my redaction

we're discussing, and the exact wording has become an issue:

 

You must take the parsley and remove the roots, and strip off the leaves

very well and clean it; and grind those leaves a great deal in a mortar; and

after it is well-ground, toast a crustless piece of bread, and soak it in

white vinegar, and grind it with the parsley; and after it is well-ground,

cast a little pepper into the mortar, and mix it well with the parsley and

the bread.  And then cast in honey, which should be melted, in the mortar,

stirring constantly in one direction until the honey incorporates itself

with the sauce in the mortar; and if the sauce should be very thick, thin it

with a little watered vinegar, so that it should not be very sour; and

having done that, take two smooth pebbles from the sea or river, and cast

them in the fire; and when they shall be quite ruddy and red, cast them with

some tongs in the mortar in such a manner that they are extinguished there;

and when all this is done, taste it for flavor.  And make it in such a

manner that it tastes a little of pepper, and a little sweet-sour, and of

parsley; and if any of these things is lacking, temper [the dish] with it.

 

In the same manner as the parsley, you can also make sauce from the root of

the horseradish.  And the same from the leaves of clary sage.

 

*****

 

I've discussed the meaning of "amatar" in a previous post.  The phrase "se

amaten alli", which I have translated as "they are extinguished there"

definitely refers to the rocks/pebbles.

 

As I see it, the recipes has the following steps:

1. mix sauce

2. heat rocks to glowing

3. throw rocks in sauce (hiss, sizzle, sputter)

4. remove rocks

5. adjust seasoning as necessary

 

The question is, what kind of gap is there between steps 3 and 4?  How much

do the rocks have to cool before they can be considered "extinguished"?

Since the word used is the same one that is used to describe putting out a

fire, or turning off a light, I think the implication is that it's pretty

instantaneous.  You throw the rocks in, they lose their glow and transfer

their heat to the sauce, and then they are promptly removed.  I think if the

sauce was meant to sit until it had thoroughly cooled, that the recipe would

say so.

 

But this is my interpretation, based purely on the wording of the recipe.  I

have not tried this particular cooking technique.  Lord Ras' experiments may

give us a clearer answer.

 

Lady Brighid ni Chiarain

mka Robin Carroll-Mann

 

 

Date: Tue, 24 Apr 2001 16:16:35

From: "Vincent Cuenca" <bootkiller at hotmail.com>

Subject: SC - Re: horseradish

 

I think part of the problem here is my fault.  I mistranslated the verb

"amatar" as "to cool" rather than "to quench".  My understanding of the

process is to prepare the sauce in the mortar, and then shock it with the

hot stones.  As far as I can tell, there is nothing indicating whether the

sauce should be served hot or cold.  It seems to be a matter of personal

preference, as is much of the material in de Nola.

 

Thanks for helping me catch the error.

 

Vicente

 

 

Date: Tue, 8 May 2001 12:56:36 -0700

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] sugar and regia anglorum

 

>> > In just the last week or two, I was asking if anyone had any info on

>> > how horseradish was used in period. So far, all I think I've got is

>> > as a sauce. What can you tell me about how horseradish was used in

>> > Anglo-Ssaxon England (or elsewhere)?

>

>Something about the herbal texts I've looked at suggests to me that

>horseradish, as a

>medicament and condiment, may have come out of Eastern Europe and

>taken quite some time to make it to the hinterlands of Britain.

 

Ann Hagen, in _A Second Handbook of Anglo-Saxon Food and Drink_,

includes horseradish in a list of herbs listed in _de Villis_ and/or

the St. Gall plan. She seems to be implying that they are among the

herbs most often cited in leechdoms, but the passage isn't entirely

clear. She first says that the herbs most often cited in leechdoms

are also those referred to in other sources, then gives a list of

herbs from those two sources, including horseradish.

--

David Friedman

ddfr at best.com

http://www.daviddfriedman.com/

 

 

From: "ankica" <ankica at sprint.ca>

To: <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

Date: Sun, 19 Aug 2001 12:19:46 -0400

Subject: [Sca-cooks] horseradish

 

Horseradish is a necessity when serving any roast beef, especially Prime Rib.  It is also great with any Beef Steak.  Good on a cold Roast Beef Sandwich.

 

Depending how hot you like your Seafood Sauce,  add an amount to your taste to ordinary ketchup.  Much better and much cheaper than commercial seafood sauce.  Especially good with Shrimp in any form as a "dip".

 

Horseradish

 

1 Piece (any size) Horseradish Root

enough White Vinegar to just barely come to below the top of the Horseradish

1/2 to 1 tsp. Salt

1/2 to 1 tsp. White Sugar

 

Peel the Horseradish Root with a good vegetable peeler.

Cut in 1/2 inch pieces and place in a blender.

Add the Salt and Sugar.

Blend on high or liquefy speed and push horseradish down if necessary and blend to the consistency that you like. I find that fine is best.

(It may take a little while but I have never completely liquefied it.)

 

Caution Do not put your face over the blender to smell it!! It will take your breath away.  This recipe makes a very hot Horseradish. (After all, only masochists like Horseradish.)

 

Store refrigerated, in a glass jar with a tight lid

 

 

From: "Vincent Cuenca" <bootkiller at hotmail.com>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2003 14:11:08 +0000

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re: hot peppers

 

> And the time i put a huge honkin' raw horseradish root in a food

> processer to make a puree - whew! has to open the windows for quite a

> long time! It was for a sauce from de Nola. In addition to the

> horseradish, it included almonds and white wine with a little sugar

> and a little salt and it came out delicious and relatively mild. But

> the first step in processing it was painful, indeed.

 

Huh?  Which sauce was that?  The only horseradish sauce I remember from de

Nola is the variation on parsley sauce: vinegar, bread, water, honey, and

grated horseradish.  Sweet, sour, and pungent, and oh so good with roast

beef.

 

Vicente (the other de Nola freak on the list)

 

 

From: "Barbara Benson" <vox8 at mindspring.com>

To: <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2003 12:12:05 -0400

Subject: [Sca-cooks] (was hot peppers) now de Nola freaks - Horseradish

 

156. PARSLEY

 

PEREJIL

 

You must take the parsley and remove the roots, and strip off the leaves very well and clean it; and grind those leaves a great deal in a mortar; and after it is well-ground, toast a crustless piece of bread, and soak it  in white vinegar, and grind it with the parsley; and after it is well-ground, cast a little pepper into the mortar, and mix it well with the parsley  and the bread. And then cast in honey, which should be melted, in the mortar, stirring constantly in one direction until the honey incorporates itself with the sauce in the mortar; and if the sauce should be very thick,  thin it with a little watered vinegar, so that it should not be very sour; and having done that, take two smooth pebbles from the sea or river, and  cast them in the fire; and when they shall be quite ruddy and red, cast them  with some tongs in the mortar in such a manner that they are quenched there;  and when all this is done, taste it for flavor. And make it in such a manner that it tastes a little of pepper, and a little sweet-sour, and of  parsley; and if any of these things is lacking, temper [the dish] with it.

 

 

157. Sauce of Horseradish and of Clary Sage

 

SALSA DE RABANO VEXISCO Y DE GALLOCRESTA

 

In the same manner as the parsley, you can also make sauce from the root of

the horseradish. And the same from the leaves of clary sage.

 

Serena da Riva

freaky on just about everything

 

 

Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2003 10:34:41 -0700

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

Subject: [Sca-cooks] de Nola freaks - Horseradish

 

I wrote:

>> And the time i put a huge honkin' raw horseradish root in a food

>> processer to make a puree - whew! has to open the windows for quite a

>> long time! It was for a sauce from de Nola. In addition to the

>> horseradish, it included almonds and white wine with a little sugar

>> and a little salt and it came out delicious and relatively mild. But

>> the first step in processing it was painful, indeed.

 

And Vicente queried:

> Huh?  Which sauce was that?  The only horseradish sauce I remember from

> de Nola is the variation on parsley sauce: vinegar, bread, water, honey, and

> grated horseradish.  Sweet, sour, and pungent, and oh so good with

> roast beef.

>

> Vicente (the other de Nola freak on the list)

 

Aargh! Aargh! Aargh! Wrong feast, wrong feast, wrong feast, Will Robinson!

It was for the *German* Boar Hunt, not the Catalan course of the

Mediterranean Tour feast.

Mea culpa, mea maxima culpa.

 

The recipe is on my website, but since it's now under discussion, here

it is:

 

Horseradish sauce

Ein Buch von Guter Spise

German, 14th c.

 

2. A good sauce to make in the Fast. Item. Take horseradish and pound

it in a mortar and take almond kernels or nuts and pound them also

and pour a wine therein. Horseradish brings the stone very much, when

one eats it in the food.

 

5 cups ground horseradish root

2-1/2 cups ground almonds

4 cups dry white wine

1 TB salt

1/4 cup sugar

 

1. Grind horseradish until fairly fine.

2. Add almonds and wine.

3. Let stand overnight.

4. Season with salt and sugar, to taste.

 

NOTE: I made this a couple days ahead of time, which gave it a chance

to mellow a bit, so it wouldn't be as harsh as what i made last year.

It has a nice creamy flavor. I rather like it mixed with the

Swallenberg Sauce.

 

This was one of several sauces served with roast pork.

 

NOTES: I don't remember how much my root weighed. It was at least a

foot, if not a foot and a half long, and around 3 inches in diameter.

I washed it, heck, i scrubbed it. Then i peeled it. Then i cut it in

large chunks. I was temporarily rooming with some folks who had an

amazing super-blender (i forget the name, but it has been discussed

on this list - expensive, but WAAAY powerful), which made rapid work

of the root. The kitchen rapidly became nearly uninhabitable, before

i'd even finished grinding it, and i rushed to open all the windows

and the back door.

 

Anahita

 

 

Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2003 17:07:41 EDT

From: CorwynWdwd at aol.com

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] period horseradish sauces

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

StefanliRous at austin.rr.com writes:

> Does anyone know why this plant is called "horse"radish? Do horses like

> to eat the greens?

 

According to Laurie Lacey's Wild World of Plants, "The popular English name,

Horseradish, means a coarse radish, to distinguish it from the edible

radish...."  Can't say that I find the horse radish inedable though....

 

Corwyn

 

 

Date: Thu, 4 Sep 2003 08:33:16 -0700

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Horseradish Sauces

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

Stefan asked about the two horseradish sauces i've made. They are the

Spanish Horseradish-Honey Sauce, from de Nola, in Libro de Guisados,

1529, and German Horseradish sauce from Das Kochbuch Meister

Eberhards, mid-1th c. The recipes are below.

 

Anahita

 

---------------------

 

I made this one for my first feast, The Boar Hunt 2000, and served it

with roast pork:

 

Horseradish-Honey Sauce

Spanish, de Nola, Libro de Guisados, 1529

Translated from the original by Lady Brghid ni Chiarain

 

Perejil

(parsley)

You must take the parsley and remove the roots, and strip off the

leaves very well and clean it, and grind those leaves a great deal in

a mortar, and after it is well-ground, toast a crustless piece of

bread, and soak i in white vinegar, and grind it with the parsley,

and after it is well-ground cast a little pepper into the mortar, and

mix it well with the parsley and the bread, and then cast in honey,

which should be melted, in the mortar, stirring constantly in one

drection until the honey incorporates itself with the sauce in the

mortar, and if the sauce should be very thick, clarify it with a

little watered vinegar, so that it should not be very sour, and

having done that take two smooth pebbles from the sea or rivr, and

cast them in the fire, and when they shall be quite ruddy and red,

cast them with some tongs in the mortar in such a manner that they

are extinguished there, and when all this is done taste it for

flavor, and make it in such a manner that it tastes a little of

pepper, and a little sweet-sour, and of parsley, and if any of these

things is lacking, temper [the dish] with it.

 

Salsa de Rabano Vexisco y de Gallocresta

(sauce of horseradish and of clary sage)

In the same manner as the parsley, you can also make sauce from the

root of the horseradish and the same from the leaves of clary sage.

 

Recipe based on redaction by Lady Brighid ni Chiarain

Makes over 1 quart of sauce

 

1 lb. fresh horseradish root, finely grated

4 slices Italian bread, toasted lighty

3/4 cup white wine vinegar

2 cups honey

1 cup water

2 tsp black pepper

 

1. Wash and peel the horseradish root. Chop very coarsely.

2. Toast bread - can be done on grill - or if there's a toaster, use it.

3. Grate horseradish finely. I'm not sure if we ued the blender or

the Cuisinart. Whichever, you will probably want to grind it twice to

get it fine.

4. Soak the toasted bread in the vinegar.

5. Place horseradish in the container of a blender or food processor.

6. Add the toasted bread, crumbling as necssary.

7. Blend a moment until just barely mixed, not pasty.

8. Add the remaining ingredients, adjusting as necessary for taste -

and Watch Out! as the horseradish is STRONG!

9. Add just enough water to make a smooth sauce that is not too thin

10. Just beore serving, heat the sauce on low heat until warm. Do not

boil.

 

WARNING: Don't lean over the blender, the bowl, or the pan without

acknowledging that there will be rising horseradish fumes.

 

I think some folks thought they were having some sort of trancendent

experience when they ate this. It was quite strong but quite good and

excellent company for the pork. This would also be good with any red

meat. It would be milder if made a day or two before the feast.

 

---------------------

 

I made this one for my third feast, The Boar Hunt 2001:

 

Horseradish sauce

Das Kochbuch Meister Eberhards, mid-15th c.

Translated by Alia Atlas

 

2. A good sauce to make in the Fast.

Item. Take horseradish and pound it in a mortar and take almond

kernels or nuts and pound themalso and pour a wine there in.

Horseradish brings the stone very much, when one eats it in the food.

 

5 cups ground horseradish root

2-1/2 cups ground almonds

4 cups dry white wine

1 TB salt

1/4 cup sugar

 

1. Grind horseradish.

2. Add almonds and wine.

3.Let stand overnight.

4. Season with salt and sugar, to taste.

 

NOTE: I made this a couple days before the feast. This gave the sauce

a chance to mellow a bit, so it wouldn't be as harsh as what i made

last year. It had a nice creamy flavor. I thought it ws delicious.

 

NOTE: Making this was rather, uh, eye-opening. I used a large fresh

whole horseradish root. I borrowed a Vita-Mix from my house mates.

Washed and peeled and rinsed the root and cut it in large chunks.

Then i dropped them in the Vita-Mix and n seconds it was very finely

grated. Then i added the wine. I also had to open all the doors and

windows in the kitchen and the back of the house because of the

really intense fumes (and it was winter and very cold). A blender or

a food processor couldn'tdo this job - i used a food processor to

make the de Nola horseradish last year and it was no where near as

finely processed. But then, a blender or food processor won't release

as many fumes, either.

 

NOTE: Salt seems to be left out of the list of ingredents in a

number of German recipes - salt won't be mentioned until the last

sentence, which will say "And don't over-salt it". So cooks might

well have added salt to this recipe. I added the sugar to balance the

flavors. I've estimated the amount of sugari used as I added it by

taste. I didn't add it because i like sweet sauce, because I don't

like sweet things much. Naturally, you can leave it out.

 

 

Date: Thu, 4 Dec 2003 23:05:46 -0500

From: "Robin Carroll-Mann" <rcmann4 at earthlink.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] appetizers- menu (long)

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

On 4 Dec 2003, at 9:29, Harris Mark.S-rsve60 wrote:

> Has anyone tried candying horseradish root?

 

I haven't.

 

> Wonder if it was done in period?

 

Yes.  The 14th century Catalan confectionery manual, "Libre de totes

maneres de confits" has a recipe for preserved horseradish root. The

horseradish is peeled and boiled in salted water.  (I imagine this would take

some of the bite out of it.)  Then it's soaked in cold water for 9 days to

remove the salt.  Finally, it's boiled in honey or sugar syrup.

 

The original recipe is here:

http://www.staff.uni-marburg.de/~gloning/confits.htm

(recipe #8)

 

Brighid ni Chiarain *** mka Robin Carroll-Mann

Barony of Settmour Swamp, East Kingdom

 

 

Date: Fri, 05 Dec 2003 13:49:08 +0000

From: "Vincent Cuenca" <bootkiller at hotmail.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Candying horseradish

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

>Has anyone tried candying horseradish root? Wonder if it was done in

>period? Or mustard-seed comfits? Since sugar was expensive, I imagine you

>used it with expensive imported spices not the local mustard seed.

>

>Stefan

 

Hee hee hee...

 

>From the "Llibre de Totes Maneres de Confits":

 

CAPITOL .VIIJ.e PER CONFEGIR LO RAVE GUALESCH

Pendreu lo rave gualesch e reu lo e feu lo net be ab aygua. E apres telar l

eu menut tot, e apres metreu lo al foch ab aygua  e metreu hi un bon puny de

sall e bulla tant que sia ben mol.  E apres treureu lo n e metreu lo en

aygua freda .viiij.o jorns mudant  tots jorns l aygua. E, com sia be

deselat, aureu fussa vostra  mell, e, ben escumada axi com dit es, metreu lo

ab la mel o axerop  e bulira ferm tro que lo axerop sia fet que fassa fills.

E a mester  en una llr. de rava galesch .j. llr. de mel.

 

Chapter Eight To Candy Horseradish

Take the horseradish and scrape it and make it clean with water.  And then

chop it all finely, and then put it on the fire with water and add a good

handful of salt and boil it enough so that it is very soft.  And then take

it and put it in cold water for nine days, changing the water each day.  

And, once all the salt is removed, have your honey made, and, well skimmed

as it is said before, add it all to the honey or syrup and boil it rapidly

so that the syrup is done when it makes threads. And for one pound of

horseradish one pound of honey is enough.

 

 

I keep threatening to make this stuff and take it to the Horseradish

Festival in Collinsville, IL.

 

Vicente

 

 

Date: Tue, 22 Mar 2005 20:11:26 -0500

From: Daniel Myers <edouard at medievalcookery.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Horseradish sauce

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

On Mar 22, 2005, at 7:55 PM, Robin Carroll-Mann wrote:

> I'm doing a little project on horseradish, so I perused the

> Florilegium file.  I saw one recipe for a horseradish sauce with

> almonds and wine, posted by Urtatim (the Cook Formerly Known as

> Anahita).  It was supposedly from the Buch von Guter Speise, but I

> have searched the print translation by Melitta Adams, and the online

> translation by Alia Atlas, and I cannot find the recipe.

 

I didn't find one in Guter Speise, but there is one in Libre del Coch:

 

156. PARSLEY

You must take the parsley and remove the roots, and strip off the

leaves very well and clean it; and grind those leaves a great deal in a

mortar; and after it is well-ground, toast a crustless piece of bread,

and soak it in white vinegar, and grind it with the parsley; and after

it is well-ground, cast a little pepper into the mortar, and mix it

well with the parsley and the bread. And then cast in honey, which

should be melted, in the mortar, stirring constantly in one direction

until the honey incorporates itself with the sauce in the mortar; and

if the sauce should be very thick, thin it with a little watered

vinegar, so that it should not be very sour; and having done that, take

two smooth pebbles from the sea or river, and cast them in the fire;

and when they shall be quite ruddy and red, cast them with some tongs

in the mortar in such a manner that they are quenched there; and when

all this is done, taste it for flavor. And make it in such a manner

that it tastes a little of pepper, and a little sweet-sour, and of

parsley; and if any of these things is lacking, temper [the dish] with

it.

 

157. Sauce of Horseradish and of Clary Sage

In the same manner as the parsley, you can also make sauce from the

root of the horseradish. And the same from the leaves of clary sage.

 

- Doc

 

 

Date: Tue, 22 Mar 2005 22:20:22 -0500

From: "Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius"

        <adamantius.magister at verizon.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Horseradish sauce

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Also sprach Robin Carroll-Mann:

> I'm doing a little project on horseradish, so I perused the

> Florilegium file.  I saw one recipe for a horseradish sauce with

> almonds and wine, posted by Urtatim (the Cook Formerly Known as

> Anahita).  It was supposedly from the Buch von Guter Speise, but I

> have searched the print translation by Melitta Adams, and the online

> translation by Alia Atlas, and I cannot find the recipe.

>

> Urtatim?  Anyone?

 

Caterina's website has the recipe here:

 

http://cs-people.bu.edu/akatlas/Feasts/feast2_3_96_doc.html

 

Urtatim may have typed in the wrong source; according to Caterina,

it's from Das Kochbuch Meister Eberhards (followed by Caterina's

adaptation):

 

#2 A good sauce to make in the Fast

 

      Item. Take horseradish and pound it in a mortar and take almond

kernels or nuts and pound them also and pour a wine there in.

Horseradish brings the stone very much, when one eats it in the food.

 

      Ingredients:

          8 tsp sour white wine

          2 Tbsp ground horseradish root

          4 tsp ground almonds

      Directions:

          Grind and mix all ingredients together to form sauce.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Tue, 22 Mar 2005 20:06:29 -0800

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Horseradish sauce

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

Lady Brighid ni Chiarain wrote:

> I'm doing a little project on horseradish, so I perused the Florilegium

> file.  I saw one recipe for a horseradish sauce with almonds and wine,

> posted by Urtatim (the Cook Formerly Known as Anahita).  It was

> supposedly from the Buch von Guter Speise, but I have searched the print

> translation by Melitta Adams, and the online translation by Alia Atlas,

> and I cannot find the recipe.

 

Hmm-mmm, i don't know how i did that. It's

actually from Das Kochbuch des Meisters Eberhard,

and i must have found the translation i used at

http://cs-people.bu.edu/akatlas/Feasts/feast2_3_96_doc.html

 

That's Alia Atlas's site

 

-------

 

Here's the original German from Thomas Gloning's invaluable site:

Das Kochbuch des Meisters Eberhard (15. Jh.)

http://staff-www.uni-marburg.de/~gloning/feyl.htm

 

<<R2>>

Ein gutte salsen zu machen in der fastenn.

Item nym merrich vnd zusto§ den in einem mo:erserr

vnd nym mandelkernn oder nu§ vnd zusto§ die auch

vnd geu§ ein wein dar an. Merrich bricht den

stein garr serr, wenn man in isset in der kost.

 

-------

 

I'll have to correct that page... Thanks for pointing it out!

 

Sorry for the confusion.

--

Urtatim, formerly Anahita

 

 

Date: Tue, 22 Mar 2005 23:54:37 -0500

From: Barbara Benson <voxeight at gmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Horseradish sauce

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> Lady Brighid ni Chiarain wrote:

>> I'm doing a little project on horseradish, so I perused the

>> Florilegium file.

 

Greetings,

 

You may already have this one, but just in case here is a recipe from

Rumpoldt:

 

  Beet Sauce

Ein New Kochbuch. Marx Rumpolt. 1581, Transcribed by Dr. Thomas

Gloning; Translated by Gwen Catrin von Berlin.

3. Rote Ruben eyngemacht mit klein geschnittenen Merrettich/ Aniss/

Coriander/ und ein wenig Kuemel/ sonderlich wenn die Ruben

geschnitten/ gesotten mit halb Wein und halb Essig.

 

Red beets preserved with small cut horseradish/ anise/ coriander/ and

a little caraway/ special if the beets are cut/ marinated in half wine

and half vinegar.

 

Serena da Riva

 

 

Date: Tue, 12 Apr 2005 17:09:51 -0400 (GMT-04:00)

From: Robin Carroll-Mann <rcmann4 at earthlink.net>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Candied horseradish

To: EKCooksGuild at yahoogroups.com, sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

This past Saturday at Emmaus Fair (an A&S display event), I brought in

my redactions of 3 horseradish recipes.  One was the honey-horseradish

sauce from de Nola, which I have made before, and is in the

Florilegium.  One was a German horseradish sauce for Lent --

horseradish pounded with almonds and white wine.  Strong, but not very

interesting.  The third was a recipe that has fascinated me ever since

I first read it -- candied horseradish from the 14th c. Catalan

confectionary manual.  Below is the original, my translation, and

redaction with notes.  Disclaimer: I translated the recipe using a

Catalan dictionary, plus my knowledge of French and Spanish cognates.

I believe I have gotten all the essential details right, but would

appreciate correction from anyone who knows more than I.

 

CAPITOL .VIIJ.e PER CONFEGIR LO RAVE GUALESCH

Pendreu lo rave gualesch e reu lo e feu lo net be ab aygua.

E apres telar l eu menut tot, e apres metreu lo al foch ab aygua

e metreu hi un bon puny de sall e bulla tant que sia ben mol.

E apres treureu lo n e metreu lo en aygua freda .viiij.o jorns mudant

tots jorns l aygua. E, com sia be deselat, aureu fussa vostra

mell, e, ben escumada axi com dit es, metreu lo ab la mel o axerop

e bulira ferm tro que lo axerop sia fet que fassa fills. E a mester

en una llr. de rava galesch .j. llr. de mel.

 

Chapter VIII -- To Conserve Horseradish

Take the horseradish and pare it and clean it very well with water.  

And then cut it very small, and then set it on the fire with water and

put there a good fistful of salt, and boil it until it is quite soft.

And then remove it and place it in cold water for 9 days, changing the

water every day.  And when it is well de-salted, have your honey

prepared, and well-skimmed as has been said, cast it [the horseradish]

in the honey or syrup and boil it hard until a syrup is made which

forms threads.  And for one pound of horseradish, one pound of honey is

needed.

 

Libre de totes maneres de confits (Catalan, 14th c.)

http://staff-www.uni-marburg.de/~gloning/confits.htm

 

Notes: I took a horseradish root, peeled it, and cut it into 2/3 inch

cubes.  I boiled it in salted water until it was fork-tender.  I

drained and rinsed the horseradish cubes, and put them in a large jar

of cold water in the refrigerator.  For 9 days I changed the water

daily (though I forgot once or twice).  I drained the horseradish, and

placed it in a saucepan with an equal weight of honey.  I simmered this

mixture until the honey reached the thread stage on a candy thermometer

(230-235å¡ F).

 

The boiling and soaking process took almost all of the "bite" out of

the horseradish.  I had expected something similar in intensity to

candied ginger, but the result was much milder.  It could well have been

candied turnip, or some other such root vegetable, though there was a

discernable horseradish taste.  The honey flavor was quite distinct,

and I would like to try the recipe again with a sugar syrup.

 

Brighid ni Chiarain

Barony of Settmour Swamp, East Kingdom

 

 

Date: Wed, 13 Apr 2005 22:43:54 -0400

From: Robin Carroll-Mann <rcmann4 at earthlink.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Candied horseradish

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Stefan li Rous wrote:

> Mistress Brighid gave her translation of a period candied horseradish

> recipe:

>

>> Chapter VIII -- To Conserve Horseradish

>> Take the horseradish and pare it and clean it very well with water.

>> And then cut it very small, and then set it on the fire with water and

>> put there a good fistful of salt, and boil it until it is quite soft.

>

> Interesting. I made this recipe a few months ago using the translation

> provided by Vincente (which can be found in the horseradish-msg file

> in the Florilegium).

>

>> Chapter Eight To Candy Horseradish

>> Take the horseradish and scrape it and make it clean with water.  And then

>> chop it all finely, and then put it on the fire with water and add a good

>> handful of salt and boil it enough so that it is very soft.

>

> A little bit different in wording and perhaps thus affecting the

> interpretation. I took "chop it all finely" to mean finely diced,

> about 1/16 inch cubes.

 

Subtleties of wording are difficult.  We're accustomed, in modern

cookbooks, to very precise directions, and we know there is a difference

between chopping, and dicing, and mincing, etc.  The verb in the

original Catalan is "telar", which means "to cut". In the 1520 Catalan

edition of de Nola's Libre de Coch, "tallar" is used to refer to

carving, cutting meat into walnut-sized pieces, and cutting chicken into

serving pieces.  By itself, "tallar" tells us nothing.  The crucial part

is "menut tot", which I translated as "very small" and Vincente rendered

as "finely".  I honestly don't know what would be the right degree of

smallness.  My cubes were all 1/2 inch or smaller, which was small

enough to cook through, and to let the honey thoroughly penetrate the

horseradish.

 

Most of the other candied fruits and vegetables in the same cookbook are

preserved whole, or in slices (the gourds are to be cut in thick

slices).  So, I don't get the feeling that mincing is called for -- just

small enough to cook through.  IMO.  As I said, I haven't studied

Catalan, and I may be missing something.

--

Brighid ni Chiarain

Barony of Settmour Swamp, East Kingdom

 

 

Date: Thu, 14 Apr 2005 01:28:03 -0400

From: Bill Fisher <liamfisher at gmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Candied horseradish

To: Robin Carroll-Mann <rcmann4 at earthlink.net>,  Cooks within the SCA

        <sca-cooks at ansterra.org>

 

On 4/12/05, Robin Carroll-Mann <rcmann4 at earthlink.net> wrote:

> The boiling and soaking process took almost all of the "bite" out of  

> the horeradish.  I had expected something similar in intensity to

> candied ginger, bu the result was much milder.  It could well have  

> been candied turnip, or some other such root vegetable, though there  

> was a discernable horseradish taste.  The honey lavor was quite  

> distinct, and I would like to try the recipe again with a sugar syrup.

>

> Brighid ni Chiarain

> Barony of Settmour Swamp, East Kingdom

 

Mmmmm....horseradish....

 

Yeah, cooking horseradish does take most of the bite out of it.  If you were to grate the root and fry it, it becomes sweet.  I've used it as a crust for

chicken that way.  Very nice.

 

Boiling it, makes it another boiled root with very little taste left,

especically if it calls for boiing it until it is soft.

 

The water changig would also carry away a good bit of the taste as it

"de-salted" the already boiled root.

 

If you wanted to eschew that part of the recipe and cut the peices

smaller and just blanch them, you would come up with a more

interesting outcome.  It wouldn't be true to the

original recipe, but I think it would be interesting and worth trying.

 

Cadoc

 

 

Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2005 23:44:37 -0400

From: Robin Carroll-Mann <rcmann4 at earthlink.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Candied horseradish

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Stefan li Rous wrote:

> Brighid replied to me with:

>> Most of the other candied fruits and vegetables in the same cookbook are

>> preserved whole, or in slices (the gourds are to be cut in thick

>> slices).  So, I don't get the feeling that mincing is called for --  

>> just small enough to cook through.

>

> Interesting. This reinforces the argument that the pieces were bigger

> than diced pieces. I was not aware of this other information. Part of

> the disadvantage of working from a single recipe rather than a family

> of them.

>

> Is there any indication of how the gourds are sliced? One way, in

> parallel stripes across the "equator" of the gourd would give rings,

> while cutting them in the pole to pole direction would most likely be

> done in strips. Gourds are hollow, right? Or at least the part we are

> candying here?

 

I think the gourds mentioned here are the green gourds found in Asian

grocery stores, or something similar.

http://www.specialtyproduce.com/spNetwork.ASP?

Item=396&WCI=Frameset&WCE=Main

 

I'm having trouble reading it, but I *think* it says to make the gourd

into wheels (cross-section slices I suppose), and then cut it into wide

and good slices.  Then, cut off the rind and remove everything inside

except the firm white flesh.  Green gourds on the inside are rather like

zucchini or eggplant -- there is a seeded area, and the more mature the

gourd is, the larger the seeds are.  This may wind up in chunks or

cubes, rather than the rounds I was originally envisioning.  The next

step is to layer the gourd pieces with salt, and press them for 2

weeks.  That will draw out the moisture and compress the pieces.  So, I

don't think we're starting with pieces that are very small.

 

> Horseradish, as well as ginger, can be a bit "stringy". This likely

> gets worse the bigger the pieces of the root are. I wonder if the

> seven (nine?) days of soaking are also to soften some of these strands

> as well as the leach out some of the horseradish taste.

 

Could be, but remember the recipe starts with parboiling the horseradish

pieces until very soft.  The soaking may soften it a little more, but

not much, as far as I could judge.  I did cut some of the chunks smaller

after the soaking, and didn't observe that they were significantly

different in texture.

 

> I'm sure there is at least some leaching of the horseradish taste

> wanted, other wise they wouldn't have you change out the water so

> much. Just put the horseradish in the water and let it sit.

>

>> IMO.  As I said, I haven't studied

>> Catalan, and I may be missing something.

>

> Possible. But I doubt it.

 

I'd still be happier if someone who knows the language could comment.

--

Brighid ni Chiarain

Barony of Settmour Swamp, East Kingdom

 

 

Date: Fri, 5 Aug 2005 06:01:34 -0700 (PDT)

From: Sandra J. <kieralady2 at yahoo.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re: Horseradish sauce

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

Horseradish sauce

<2> Ein gutte salsen zu machen in der fastenn. Item

nym merrich vnd zusto§ den in einem mo:erserr vnd nym

mandelkernn oder nu§ vnd zusto§ die auch vnd geu§ ein

wein dar an. Merrich bricht den stein garr serr, wenn

man in isset in der kost.

To make a good sauce for Lent. Take horseradish and

pound it in a mortar and take almonds or nuts and

pound those, too, and pour some wine to it.

Horseradish breaks the stone very well if it is eaten

with your diet

From:Master Eberhard's Cookbook. 15th C. cookbook and

dietetics from Landshut. translated by

Volker Bach

 

Kind Regards,

Clara von Ulm

 

P.S. Header from online book:

****************************************

*** Das Kochbuch des Meisters Eberhard (15. Jh.)

*** Textgrundlage:

*** A. Feyl: Das Kochbuch Meister Eberhards. Diss. Freiburg i.B. 1963

*** Einrichtung: gescannt und 1 mal Korrektur gelesen

*** Thomas Gloning *** Kennzeichnung der Textelemente:

*** T = Titel; R = Rezept; U = †berschrift oberhalb eines Rezepts

*** o:e = o mit Ÿbergesetztemm e; v:: = v mit Ÿbergesetztem Doppelpunkt usw.

*** Die Silbentrennung wurde aufgehoben

*** Copyright:

*** To the best of my knowledge, this text is 'gemeinfrei' according

*** to German law. You may use this electronic version for private and

*** scholarly purposes, as long as this header is included.

*** Please make sure, that you do not violate the laws of your country

*** by downloading this electronic version.

 

 

Date: Fri, 5 Aug 2005 10:13:47 -0700

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Horseradish (was salsa sans capiscums?

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

Ranvaig asked:

>  Does anyone have a period recipe for horseradish Sauce?

 

I've got two on my website - go to the Dining Niche page and look

through the menus.

http://home.earthlink.net/~lilinah/diningniche.html

 

One was a Spanish recipe that Brighid translated, from El Libro de

Guisados, 1529

http://home.earthlink.net/~lilinah/2000_Boar_Hunt/2000-2nd.html#horseradish

 

One is in the German feast, from Das Kochbuch des Meisters Eberhard,  

15th C.:

http://home.earthlink.net/~lilinah/2001_Feasts/2001-Boar_Hunt/2001-3rd.html#horseradish

--

Urtatim (that's err-tah-TEEM)

the persona formerly known as Anahita

 

 

Date: Thu, 13 Apr 2006 23:38:33 -0700 (PDT)

From: Huette von Ahrens <ahrenshav at yahoo.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] horseradish in period

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

--- Cat Dancer <pixel at hundred-acre-wood.com> wrote:

> Was horseradish as we know it--plain roots grated into vinegar--

> served in period, or was it always mixed with something else?

>

> Margaret FitzWilliam

 

Well, according to the Penguin Companion to Food, p. 464, "Horseradish is a native wild plant of Eastern and Southeastern Europe and Western Asia. Once established, it is an ineradicable weed and it is now naturalized all over Europe and in the USA.  But its westward movement seems to have been relatively recent.  There is no certain reference to it in classical literature.

 

"Much later, the 13th-century writer Albertus Magnus describes a 'raphanus' (radish) used for medical purposes in terms which fit horseradish well.  But  the German Fuchsius, in his "Historia Stirpium" (1542), gave the first unmistakable description of horseradish root used as a condiment, and this was repeated soon afterwards by Italian and English authors.  An early English name was 'red cole'; this cannot have referred to the colour of the root, which is yellowish-brown outside and white within; but may have been given because of the fiery taste was like red-hot coals.  The name 'horseradish', which is also old, means a radish which is 'hoarse', or coarse and strong.  The French name 'raifort' also means 'strong root'."

 

Huette

 

 

Date: Fri, 12 May 2006 13:46:05 -0400 (EDT)

From: Robin Carroll-Mann <rcmann4 at earthlink.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] another horseradish question

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> I'm making horseradish for our Crown feast tomorrow, and I have a question

> about method: I have a Kitchen-Aid mixer with the food grinder attachment,

> I have some manual grinders, I have a Kitchen-Aid blender, and I have hand

> graters. I am leaning towards the blender or the mixer for ease of

> preparation--anybody have any input on which one would work better?

 

The grinder would probably be better than the blender, though the  

slicer/shredder would be better still.  I use a food processor with a  

shredding disc.  In any case, make sure you're working in a well-

ventilated area, and don't lean over the container.  The fumes from  

freshly-grated horseradish are... potent.

 

Brighid ni Chiarain

Barony of Settmour Swamp, East Kingdom

 

 

Date: Fri, 12 May 2006 11:18:30 -0700 (PDT)

From: <tom.vincent at yahoo.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] another horseradish question

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Another great tool for horseradish is a salad-shooter. Very handy for feasts.

 

Duriel

 

 

Date: Fri, 12 May 2006 18:52:18 +0000

From: nickiandme at att.net (Debra Hense/Kateryn de Develyn)

Subject: [Sca-cooks] another horseradish question

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org (Group-SCACooks)

 

<<I'm making horseradish for our Crown feast tomorrow, and I have a question

about method: I have a Kitchen-Aid mixer with the food grinder attachment,

I have some manual grinders, I have a Kitchen-Aid blender, and I have hand

graters. I am leaning towards the blender or the mixer for ease of

preparation--anybody have any input on which one would work better?

>>

 

I've used hand grinders and a kitchen-aid with grinder attached.  The  

blender is not strong enough.  You need power to grind some of those  

horseradish roots.  They are tough-fiberous roots.  Do a large grind  

blade first and then a smaller grind blade like you do for meat when  

grinding down into sausage/hamburger.  Be prepared - some of the  

roots are very, very strong - use gloves and be prepared for your eyes  

to water (much like cutting onions.)

 

The Cuisinart didn't have a fine enough shredding blade on it the one  

time I used it.

 

Kateryn de Develyn

Barony of Coeur d'Ennui

Kingdom of Calontir

 

 

Date: Sun, 14 May 2006 23:31:56 -0400

From: Jadwiga Zajaczkowa / Jenne Heise <jenne at fiedlerfamily.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] another horseradish question

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Duriel suggested:

>>>

Another great tool for horseradish is a salad-shooter.  Very handy

for feasts.

   <<<

 

> Huh? A salad shooter is one of those plastic kitchen utensils that

> you put wet lettuce and such in after washing them for salads, right?

> You wind a crack which spins the plastic drum filled with wet lettuce

> which spins off the water by centrifugal force, right?

 

Nope, that's a salad spinner. A salad shooter is a bit like a small

powered brush chopper-- it chops up whatever you feed in on the top and

shoots it out the front.

--

-- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika jenne at fiedlerfamily.net

 

 

Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2006 11:44:19 -0400

From: Jadwiga Zajaczkowa / Jenne Heise <jenne at fiedlerfamily.net>

Subject: Re: [SCA-AS] horseradish questiion

To: Arts and Sciences in the SCA <artssciences at lists.gallowglass.org>

 

<<< So this year my garden seems to be having a big horseradish year.  Anyone

have some period suggestions on how I might prepare it so it keeps and do I

need to do anything speicial before I put it in mustard? >>>

 

Well,

Brighid ni Chairain has done a period horseradish sauce and candied

horseradish.

 

The horseradish-honey sauce is on her web page, here:

http://breadbaker.tripod.com/sauces.html

 

There's a collection of horseradish information, not all of it period,

in the Florilegium file,

http://www.florilegium.org/files/PLANTS/horseradish-msg.html

 

There's a mustard in Digby that calls for stirring the mustard with a

horseradish root. The Closet Opened (sir Kenelme Digbie, KT) 1669 To

Make Mustar

 

The best way of making mustard is this: Take of the best mustard seed

(which is black) for example a quart. Dry it gently in an oven, and beat

it to subtle powder, and serse it. Then mingle well strong wine-vinegar

with it, so much that it be pretty liquid, for it will dry with keeping.

Put to this a little pepper, beaten small (white is the best) at

discretion as about a good pugil and put a good spoonful of sugar to it

(which is not to make it taste sweet, but rather, quick, and to help the

fermentation) Lay a good onion in the bottom, quartered if you will, and

a race (root) of ginger scraped and bruised, and stir it often with a

Horseradish root cleansed, which let always lie in the pot till it hath

lost its vertue, then take a new one. This will keep long, and grow

better for a while. It is not good till after a month, that it have

fermented a while. Some think it will be the quicker if the seed be

ground with fair water, instead of vinegar, putting store of onions in

it.

 

My Lady Holmsby make her quick fine mustard thus: Choose true mustard

seed; dry it in an oven, after the bread is out. Beat and searce it to a

most subtle powder. Mingle Sherry-Sack with it (stirring a long time

very well, so much as to have it of a fit consistency for mustard) Then

put a good quantity of fine sugar to it, as five or six spoonfuls, or

more, to a pint of mustard. Stir and incorporate well together. This

will keep good a long time. Some do like to put to it a little (but a

little) of very sharp wine vinegar.

 

http://www.florilegium.org/files/FOOD-CONDIMENTS/mustard-msg.html

 

There's also some recipes in the Meisters' Eberhard text in the

florilegium:

 

This is an excerpt from Das Kochbuch des Meisters Eberhard, G.

Balestriere (trans.)

To make a good sauce for Lent. Take horseradish and pound it in a mortar

and take almonds or nuts and pound those, too, and pour some wine to it.

Horseradish breaks the stone very well if it is eaten with your diet.

 

Also...

If you do not have too cold a stomach when you go to eat breakfast, you

may eat horseradish, tart or sweet cherries and other food afterwards

because these things chill you and make you moist while the season makes

you hot and dry, and they cause you to sweat, and the cherries drive out

the excess gall. But you shall not eat too much of them so that you do

not chill your stomach too much, especially if it is cold and sick at

the time.

 

Note from me:

Horseradish roots can be harvested and kept in a cool dry place for some

time.

--

-- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika jenne at fiedlerfamily.net

 

<the end>



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