drums-msg – 12/3/11

Medieval drums and percussion instruments. Replacing bohdran drumheads. Painting drumheads. Dumbek merchants.

NOTE: See also the files: instruments-msg, harps-msg, p-songs-msg, music-bib, bagpipes-msg, flutes-msg, lea-tanning-msg, trumpets-msg.

************************************************************************
NOTICE -

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the individual authors.

Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

Thank you,
    Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous
                                          Stefan at florilegium.org
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From: legowik at cme.nist.gov (Steven Legowik)
Date: 14 May 91 15:16:40 GMT
Organization: National Institute of Standards and Technology

Aoghann,

I'm not really a very musically inclined person, but I was doing a
little research on the history of the flute and stumbled across some
history on drums as well.  My lady is much more interested in them
than I was.

The general gist seems to be that drums were not used much in Europe
until very late period.  The drum was basically a middle eastern
instrument and was considered an oddity in Europe.  (which also seemed
to be the case with flutes and fifes) The first drums were the naker
and tabor.  I don't remember the dates but I think it was after 1300.
They were originally pretty much confined to military music.  (ie.
marching music) The tabor was a pretty generic looking drum (like
you'd see in a colonial fife and drum picture) and nakers were sort of
bowl shaped drums.

Drums got into the regular musical scene in the renaissance.  The
notes I have listed three drums as components of a renaissance band:
the long drum, the kettledrum, and the side drum.  (from Musical
Instruments of the World)  They appear to be pretty generic drums.
The side drum is drawn as having a square cross section.

The other book I was reading was "The History of Musical Instruments"
by Curt Sachs.  I hope I remembered the essential details correctly.
You might want to try and find the book in the library.

Hope this helps a little bit.

Stephen the Devious                     Steven Legowik
Shire of Highland Foorde                Frederick, MD
Atlantia                                legowik at cme.nist.gov


Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
Subject: Doumbek Rythym Guide
From: Eric.Smith-1 at kmail.ksc.nasa.gov (Eric C. Smith)
Date: Fri, 08 Dec 1995 13:24:50 -0500
Organization: NASA/KSC, DL-ICD-C

Unto all good folk of the Rialto does their humble servant, Maredudd ap
Cynan, send greetings.

It has been my honor and priviledge to create and have installed upon a
friends web server, a web page containing information which might be of
interest to those who play the doumbek.  The page contains, among other
things, a sheet of rythym notations.  The page is geared towards the
beginning drummer.

   http://greyhawkes.com/fun/drumming.html

[NOTE – This link has changed. The new link is: http://www.blackroot.org/drumming/drumming.html  -Stefan 8/20/06]

The original version of this sheet was developed by myself as a handout
for a couple of classes I tought at a few Trimarian events, the subject of
the class being the Basics of Doumbek Playing.  I encourage all doumbek
players, of all skill levels, to visit the page and send me your comments.

Diolch

Maredudd
--
Eric C. Smith                  Maredudd Cymysglyd ap Cynan
NASA/DL-ICD-C                  Kingdom of Trimaris
KSC, FL 32899                 Shire Starhaven
Eric.Smith-1 at ksc.nasa.gov      maredudd at blackroot.org    


From: boris at magick.net (Samuel C. Crowell)
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
Subject: Bohdran skin replacement
Date: Wed, 16 Oct 1996 01:44:14 GMT

        Could any good gentles out there be able and willing to assist an
aspiring musician?

        I was given a Coopersmith (non-tunable) bohdran with a split/cracked
drumhead. I was able to get a goatskin drumhead.  Removing the old
one was not too difficult, but I would like some advice about
preparing/stretching/affixing this new skin so that it will not be
ruined, and hopefully will be somewhere close to the proper tone.
        Any help greatly appreciated!

Master Darien Tevarson


From: cav at bnr.ca (Rick Cavasin)
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
Subject: Re: Bohdran skin replacement
Date: 16 Oct 1996 14:59:12 GMT
Organization: Bell-Northern Research Ltd.

Master Darien Tevarson asks about bodhran skin replacement:

This is something that is fairly tricky to get right.  I
once did this for a friend (I make parchment/vellum for
callig/illum/bookbinding/etc., but the skins can also be used
for drumheads/banjos/etc.) whose bodhran head had split.
I asked a number of people with more experience for advice,
and I mostly got a lot of vague handwaving, and concluded
that it is one of those things that one develops a nack for
by trial and error.

You pretty much have to put the skin on wet.  Assuming you
have a prepared/dried skin on hand, you want to soak it
(don't use hot water) until it is limp and stretchy.  You
then have to tack it to the rim  with enough slack that when
the hide contracts on drying, it has the right tension.  As
you might guess, this is the 'art' part of it.  Too loose,
and you'll have ripples in the skin.  Too tight, and the tone
will be too high.  Unfortunately, I have a very strong suspicion
that how much a particular skin contracts on drying will have
alot to do with how it was originally prepared by the parchmenter.
This would mean that your technique might have to change somewhat
depending on the source of the skin.

Things to remember:
Parchment/skin can generate a remarkable amount of tension when
drying. You want to make sure the heads of your nails are snug
down on the skin.  If only the shafts are holding the skin in
place, the skin could tear as it pulls out from under the nails.
Reinforcing the edge may not be a bad idea.

Clenching the nails is probably a good idea.  I've seen a skin
pull nails out of the rim.  Glueing the skin over the frame in
addition to nailing may not be a bad idea.  

I suspect that allowing the skin to dry slowly is a good idea
(keeping in mind that the skin *IS* rawhide, and *will* rot if
kept damp for a prolonged period of time).

All this should be taken with a grain of salt, as my experience is
more in making the skins than in putting them on drums.  I put a
skin on one drum, and had to take it off and put it back on several
times (over the course of a year or so) before I got it more or
less right.  

I had a more experienced luthier claim that anointing the skin with
neatsfoot oil makes it less sensitive to humidity variations.  YMMV

Hope this helps,
Cheers, Rick/Balderik


From: mittle at panix.com (Arval d'Espas Nord)
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
Subject: Re: Bohdran skin replacement
Date: 16 Oct 1996 12:02:44 -0400
Organization: PANIX Public Access Internet and Unix, NYC

>       I was given a Coopersmith (non-tunable) bohdran with a split/cracked
> drumhead.  I was able to get a goatskin drumhead.  Removing the old
> one was not too difficult, but I would like some advice about
> preparing/stretching/affixing this new skin so that it will not be
> ruined, and hopefully will be somewhere close to the proper tone.

You can find some information on the Bodhran Page

       http://www.panix.com/~mittle/bodhran

including articles on making bodhrans which should give you what you need.
===========================================================================
Arval d'Espas Nord                                         mittle at panix.com


Date: Tue, 8 Jul 1997 13:20:05 -0400 (EDT)
From: Carol at Small Churl Books <scbooks at neca.com>
To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu
Subject: Re: Painting on hide drums

At 09:13 AM 7/8/97 -0700, you wrote:
>If I use an acrylic paint, will it flake off?

There is a laurel in the East who painted bohrans (sp?) as part of her
husband's business.  She uses acylics, sometimes slightly thinned with water.  

Following her advice, I painted a figure based on the Book of Kells on one.
(Took the warrior, put a woman's head and skirt on from another figure, and
made the shield and spear into a bohran and wooden thumper.)

A friend let me practice on an old bongo.  After painting, I scraped the
paint with my fingernail and it seemed pretty firm.

Lady Carllein


Date: Wed, 9 Jul 1997 10:25:19 -0400 (EDT)
From: Varju at aol.com
To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu
Subject: Re: Painting on hide drums

<<I have been asked to help a friend of mine paint some designs on a hide
drum that he just received.>>

If you mean rawhide, when you say hide drum there are several items you can
use. Acrylic paint works well, so do leather dyes, but the color of the
rawhide will affect the color of the dye. (The darker the rawhide the darker
the final color will be.)  You can also use sharpie markers.

Noemi


Subject: Re: ANST - Drums
Date: Fri, 12 Dec 97 17:40:54 MST
From: jurgens at ghg.net (Frank D. Jurgens)

>Could someone please tell me how to keep a drum that you  are carving from
>drying out and cracking before you finish carving?
>
>*George*
>House Crane Minister of Food-[have YOU eaten?]

If you are carving this from a peice of uncured lumber, try putting it in a
sealed bag with a damp towel.  This should keep the moisture content up
until you are done.  Make sure that the bag is big enough so that when set
aside, the towel and the drum do not touch.  Basically, keeping it in any
sealed container with a source of moisture will work.

If you are using uncured (green) wood, you will have a problem with it
cracking as it dries out after you are finished.  Depending on the
orientation of the grain, it may also deform out of shape.

Leofric Ealdricson

(Frank Jurgens
jurgens at ghg.net)


Subject: Re: ANST - Drums
Date: Fri, 12 Dec 97 18:46:11 MST
From: sucram3 at juno.com (marc d mckeeman)
To: ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG

On Fri, 12 Dec 1997 16:25:42 -0600 lliatwork <lliatwork at MCIONE.com> writes:
>Could someone please tell me how to keep a drum that you  are carving
>from drying out and cracking before you finish carving?

First offf what kind of wood are you using?

I have found using linseed oil while the carving is being done, helps
keep the wood from drying and spliting.

again it depends on the wood.
apprentice to Master Edward D'Orleans. (peace be unto his name)
mu'sad
translater to the light of the land
Omar ciam


Subject: RE: ANST - Drums
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 97 11:25:14 MST
From: John Ruble <ulf at urocor.com>
To: "'ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG'" <ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG>

>Could someone please tell me how to keep a drum that you  are carving from
>drying out and cracking before you finish carving?

Linseed oil helps, but will alter the characteristics of the wood when
you go to carve it.  It penetrates the wood at different depths
depending upon how long you left the oil on before wiping off the
excess, as well as how "open" the wood is.  As it cures, it hardens.  So
after a day or two, you will discover the wood is slightly harder to
carve near the surface, but still soft underneath.  Be careful with your
knife pressure.  Remember also that treating the wood with anything will
alter its ability to take stain.

The best bet is always to start with sound, well-cured wood.  At the
very least, try to keep the piece in a controlled environment so it
doesn't swell and shrink repeatedly with humidity changes.

Ulf Gunnarsson


Subject: Re: ANST - mustering at gulf wars
Date: Wed, 18 Feb 98 01:52:36 MST
From: Charlene Charette <charlene at flash.net>
To: ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG

Keith Hood wrote:
> Speaking of the sound of an army, for real moral effect in a march to the
> battlefield we could use a serious war song.  Anyone out there with a
> good knowledge of period music have suggestions?

Don't know about war songs, but Arbeau (the French dance manual) is almost
half military drumming instruction.

--Perronnelle


From: Arval d'Espas Nord <mittle at panix2.panix.com>
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
Subject: Re: Drums
Date: 18 Mar 1998 22:58:42 GMT
Organization: PANIX Public Access Internet and Unix, NYC

James Ackerson <jamesa at uwyo.edu> wrote:
> I want to get my wife a bodran, bodrahn...however you spell it.  I was
> just wondering if anyone out there would have some advice on where to
> look, what to look for, and how to avoid not so good instruments.

Visit my Bodhran Page, http://celtic.stanford.edu/instruments/bodhran/

      Arval


From: armorbug at aol.com (ARMORBUG)
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
Subject: Re: Drums
Date: 19 Mar 1998 04:30:53 GMT

>I want to get my wife a bodran, bodrahn...however you spell it.  I was
>just wondering if anyone out there would have some advice on where to
>look, what to look for, and how to avoid not so good instruments.
>
>Roderick

Lark in the Morning, a company that specializes in hard to find instruments,
has a webpage at http://www.larkinam.com.  They have several models to choose
from, starting at $25.00 and going up to $400.00.  


From: Arval d'Espas Nord <mittle at panix2.panix.com>
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
Subject: Re: Drums
Date: 19 Mar 1998 16:38:56 GMT
Organization: PANIX Public Access Internet and Unix, NYC

> Lark in the Morning, a company that specializes in hard to find instruments,
> has a webpage at http://www.larkinam.com.  They have several models to choose
> from, starting at $25.00 and going up to $400.00.  

If you want to order a drum by mail, Lark in the Morning is not a bad
company to use.  And if you are a new bodhranist who needs a drum to learn
on, this isn't a bad way to go.  MidEast Manufacturing is another good
choice.

At any higher level, you really want to examine and play any drum before you
buy it, and you want to deal directly with the drum-maker.  

    Arval


From: Dwight Hall <dwihall at ix.netcom.com>
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
Subject: Re: Drums
Date: Thu, 19 Mar 1998 16:45:11 -0700

>I want to get my wife a bodran, bodrahn...however you spell it.  I was
>just wondering if anyone out there would have some advice on where to
>look, what to look for, and how to avoid not so good instruments.

try ftp://celtic.stanford.edu/pub/instruments/Bodhran.making

Since this is one of the easiest of all drum designs to build yourself,
why not get right into the "authenticity mode" with a great
do-it-yourself project.  Hardwood should cost about 8 bucks and you can
get a full goatskin at Tandy Leather for $24 or so.


From: David Korup <drumfest at bellsouth.net>
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
To: Shawn Johnson <shawnjoh at uoguelph.ca>
Subject: Re: Natural Drum Heads Needed

Shawn Johnson wrote:
> I'm looking to purchase some natural drum heads (goatskin, calfskin) for
> a product I'm developing.  I need the cheapest wholesale price I can
> find, so that I can keep the price of the product down.  The prepared
> skins need not be of the best quality.
>
> -Robyn Whystler

Shalom Alechem, Greetings from Sir Daveed Shmuel ben Rachon:

I would suggest that you contact Mid-East Manufacturing for prices on
goatskin drum heads. They can accommodate drums heads ranging in size
from standard 12" to 14" on up to perhaps 22". Here is their basic
contact info.

Mid-East Manufacturing, 7694 Progress Circle, West Melbourne, Fl 32904;
407-724-1477, fax: 407-952-1080; web site: www.mid-east.com;
email: stevek at mid-east.com

Should you need larger sizes, you can contact Mr. Polanski at United
Rawhide in Chicago, 773-276-1177. He can provide goat, kip, calf, as
well as other types of animal rawhide.

I hope that this is helpful for you. Are you making dumbeks? Please
contact me via my email: drumfest at bellsouth.net or by phone at
704-544-2212. I am always interested in hearing about new drum makers
and their drums.

Until later...Alechem Shalom...Daveed


From: druid at princeton.crosswinds.net (The Well of Latis)
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
Subject: Re: Natural Drum Heads Needed
Date: Sun, 10 May 1998 23:32:55 GMT

<sunshinegirl at steward-net.com> wrote:

>Tandy Leather used to sell me rawhide at a good discount.  Of course, I had
>to cut out the drum heads myself.  They had split hides that were fairly
>nice, regular hides, and goatskin.
>Melandra of the Woods
>
>Shawn Johnson <shawnjoh at uoguelph.ca> wrote
>>
>> I'm looking to purchase some natural drum heads (goatskin, calfskin) for
>> a product I'm developing.  I need the cheapest wholesale price I can
>> find, so that I can keep the price of the product down.  The prepared
>> skins need not be of the best quality.
>>
>> -Robyn Whystler

I have used large rawhide bones from the local pet shop a few times.
They work fairly well if you soak them in hot water for a few hours
and unroll them.

Sparrow (Alex)


Date: Mon, 25 May 1998 11:18:25 EDT
From: freyja1 at juno.com (Timothy A Whitcomb)
To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu
Subject: Re: Doumbek making

>Does anyone know of a resource for making doumbek's.I can figure out by
>looking at them how to throw one but I wonder if the sound changes from
>clay body to clay body.

[I would certainly think so. Since the density of clay can vary from type
to tpe, that would have an effect; much like the diffrence between metal
and wood drum bodies. Maturing range of the clays would have a difference
too.]

I usually throw with stoneware.
>More importantly how does one attach the head?

[The nicest ceramic drum I have ever seen had clay lugs (very sturdy!!)
around the body and the head was lashed down. The worst was glued on.]

>I have seen them made with the inside glazed and not glazed. Does it
>make a difference?

[Again, I would think so, but experiment. I am sure you would want to
make more than one anyway, just to attain mastery of the form.]

>Tegan

Hroar


From: Larry Johnson <ljohnsn1 at idt.net>
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
Subject: Re: Rope Tension Drums
Date: Mon, 22 Feb 1999 23:56:14 -0800

stevega at earthlink.net wrote:
> Does anyone have any advice, or url links, on stretching the skin (drum head)
> on a medieval or Renaissance marching drum.  I am trying to make my first
> "period" drum.  I enjoyed the fighting at Estrella, but I think we needed
> more drums!

I went to a search engine, http://www.excite.com and entered "making+rope+
tensioned+drum and found this URL http://www.bongocentral.com/rope.htm
I know the drums represented on the site are not period, but rope tension is
rope tension, you can adapt the method for your own drum.

Yours aye,
Labhran MacIain


From: "Steve Gurzler" <macsen at worldnet.att.net>
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
Subject: Re: Rope Tension Drums
Date: 25 Feb 1999 02:42:47 GMT
Organization: Compaq

Greetings Tristan,

You might try looking at the Dover pubication "Orchesography" in which
Arbeau has a chapter on drums and construction.  There are also I believe
drum kits available through the Early music shop in England.  They have a
web site but I don't have it here.  Good luck.

You should play it for dancing too!   :)

Cheers,
Deonna


From: "Jason L. Parish" <jlparish at montana.com>
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
Subject: Re: bodhran question
Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2000 12:16:51 -0700

Lee Ann Schemel wrote:
> i am curious about the Bodhran, is it hard to play, I am not very
> musical, but I like drums, I was thinking about buying a kiddie one from
> Lark in the Morning and starting to practice on my own.  Any suggestios
> would be appereciated, you may e-mail me too.
>
> Eibhlin

Lord Morgan Glynndwr, humble denizen of the Kingdom of Artemesia:

    Greetings! I have played the Bodhran for a few years now and I think
you will find it to be quite easy to learn the basics.  Even without a
musical backround you will find that the drum itself will help you
learn...they are just too addictive to put down!
    I would suggest, however, that instead of purchasing the kiddie models
you should spend the extra cash and buy a high-quality, natural goat-skin
head model.  Also, if you enjoy the deeper tone that the Bodhran produces,
you should try to find one that is at least 16 to 18 inches in diameter or
greater.
    There are a number of books available that are great resources for
trying to learn.  One of the better booklets that I have found is entitled
"Power Bodhran Techniques".  The name of the author eludes me at the moment
but you should be able to track it down with relative ease.  To hear the
Bodhran in use, try any of the Chieftains albums or most any other good
Celtic music groups.  And, invariably, you will usually find one or two
Bodhran players at any good size event who will be more than happy to assist
you in your playing.


From: mittle at panix.com (Arval d'Espas Nord)
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
Subject: Re: bodhran question
Date: 24 Mar 2000 16:02:40 -0500
Organization: PANIX Public Access Internet and UNIX, NYC

> i am curious about the Bodhran, is it hard to play, I am not very
> musical, but I like drums

Drop by my Bodhran Page, http://www.ceolas.org/instruments/bodhran.

At the risk of disappointing you, I must warn you that just about
everything about modern bodhran playing is purely modern.  Drums of the
same basic construction may have existed in period Ireland (or may not),
but as best I've been able to determine, the styles of play used today were
all invented in the 20th century.

But don't let that discourage you: It's a lovely instrument when played
well, and well worth the effort it takes to learn to do so.
===========================================================================
Arval d'Espas Nord                                         mittle at panix.com


From: Barbara Webb <b.h.webb at stir.ac.uk>
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
Subject: Re: bodhran question
Date: Mon, 27 Mar 2000 13:16:34 +0100
Organization: Psychology Department, Stirling University

Lee Ann Schemel wrote:
> As I told Arval who also Replied, My persona does not want
> to play the harp, don't want to lug a harp around.  

I'm not sure why you drew the conclusion from Arval's pointing
out that current bodhran technique is modern (and not, as far as we
know, medieval) that he was suggesting you'd have to play harp
instead...Drums are certainly medieval- maybe finding out some of
whats and hows of medieval drumming would be of interest? The only
references I know are:

Blades, James.  Early percussion instruments : from the Middle Ages to
the Baroque / James Blades and Jeremy Montagu.  1976

Montagu, Jeremy.  Making early percussion instruments.  1976

I'd be interested if anyone can suggest further sources, particularly
any that discuss technique rather than just construction (Montagu
is not very inspiring in his suggestions of what rhythms to play).

By all means go ahead and enjoy modern bodhran playing too...

Caitlin de Courcy

(As a harpist I find a bit bizarre the concept that my 'persona'
might want or not want to play the harp - maybe I should tell my
persona that if it wants to play harp, it can do the practice?)


From: mittle at panix.com (Arval d'Espas Nord)
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
Subject: Re: bodhran question
Date: 29 Mar 2000 10:24:23 -0500
Organization: PANIX Public Access Internet and UNIX, NYC

Thanks for your courtesy Eibhlin.  No apology was necessary, no offense was
taken.

> I really do not think there is a wrong way to play a bodhran is there?

Badly? Seriously: There are techniques that work well and ones that don't.
Unfortunately, we simply don't know how the drum was played (if it was
played at all) in medieval Ireland.  The earliest evidence of any kind that
I've seen of the bodhran is a late 19th century photograph of an
Irish-American ceili band.  The drummer is holding his tipper in roughly
the way I would if I were standing ready to play; but we can't conclude
much from that.  This photo was startling: I had previously believed that
the introduction of the bodhran into performance music came only in the
mid-20th century.  I still think it is probably true that it was mostly
used as a noise-maker before this century.

If you're interested in medieval percussion, there are plenty of
possibilities better-documented than the bodhran.  The book recommended
here a few days ago would be a good starting point.
===========================================================================
Arval d'Espas Nord                                         mittle at panix.com


From: Dana Lewis Hawkes <danad at tidepool.com>
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
Subject: Re: Snare drums
Date: Tue, 04 Apr 2000 00:00:44 -0700

Malachias Invictus wrote:
> What period did snare drums come into use?  I figure that it is not within
> the SCA period, but I was curious if anyone happens to know.
>
> Malachias

Actually, I have a book called 'Making Early Percussion Instruments' by Jeremy
Montagu in which he talks about some tabors and nakers having a gut snare.


From: Josh Mittleman <mittle at panix.com>
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
Subject: Re: Snare drums
Date: 4 Apr 2000 15:10:27 GMT
Organization: PANIX Public Access Internet and UNIX, NYC

> What period did snare drums come into use?  I figure that it is not within
> the SCA period, but I was curious if anyone happens to know.

Oh, absolutely within period.  Certainly by the 14th or 15th century in
Italy and France.  I'd guess that it's much earlier.  The early examples
I've seen seem to have a single strand of gut stretched across the _upper_
side of the drumhead.

     Arval


From: Nils K Hammer <nh0g+ at andrew.cmu.edu>
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
Subject: Re: Snare drums
Date: Tue,  4 Apr 2000 16:15:12 -0400
Organization: Csd Education - Phd, Carnegie Mellon, Pittsburgh, PA

I assumed they were modern, but then someone showed me a picture in the
Orchesography book with them.

nils


From: mittle at panix.com (Arval d'Espas Nord)
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
Subject: Re: Bodhran Purchasing
Date: 7 Apr 2000 13:04:07 -0400
Organization: PANIX Public Access Internet and UNIX, NYC

> Does anyone know of a reliable online or mail order source that
> provides high quality bodhrans?

There's a list of pretty nearly all the major bodhran makers and vendors at
my Bodhran page, http://www.ceolas.org/instruments/bodhran/.  The
information there will give you an idea of what's available and how much it
costs. What you want to buy and how much you'll need to pay will depend on
just what you mean by "high quality".  For a professional-quality, tunable
bodhran, expect to spend $400.  Anything under $100 is a toy, perhaps good
for a novice to use to learn to play.  In between, quality varies
unpredictably. If you'd like me to recommend a few drummakers, drop me a
line direct.
===========================================================================
Arval d'Espas Nord                                         mittle at panix.com


From: "Kensei" <harpbard at nospam.2xtreme.net>
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
Subject: Re: Bodhran Purchasing
Date: Sat, 08 Apr 2000 08:30:29 GMT

ulric <ulricthefoxNOulSPAM at onebox.com.invalid> wrote:
> All of this discussion of Bodhrans has really stoked my desire
> to go out and buy one.
>
> Does anyone know of a reliable online or mail order source that
> provides high quality bodhrans?
>
> I have looked on E-Bay, but there really is no telling what
> those drums sounds like or what the quality of construction is
> like.

Try http://www.larkinam.com/MenComNet/Business/Retail/Larknet/Bodhrans
Quite a selection, their 18" diameter double row tacks BOD006 $60.00, has a
good full deep sound and good quality - but you can go up to $450 for a
profesional model if you chose.


Subject: Re: An informal survey
Posted by: "Catherine Koehler" hccartck at yahoo.com hccartck
Date: Wed Jan 13, 2010 7:49 am ((PST))

I play a djembe and also use to make drums with an African arts group. We used sonotubes (generally the 10" or 12" diameter)  I would cut them into an acceptable length and the participants would decorate them however they chose.  We then used pre-cut goatskin drum heads - stapled on and then ropes wrapped around the staples.  The sound was wonderful!  If anyone needs me to give you more specifics, feel free to contact me off list.  Perhaps we could actually offer this as a class a Gulf Wars!!!

Aine

--- On Wed, 1/13/10, Nauloera . <nauloera at gmail.com> wrote:
<<< I'm interested and I could get my hands on one of those big blue plastic
barrels that folks down in my neck of the woods use for trash barrels if
someone out there knows how to turn it into a drum (I would have absolutely
no clue). Other than that I have a wee little doumbek I've been trying to
teach myself to play... Not going so well with that. So I'd also have to
learn to play before I could use a big ol' drum.

Kitty/Manhalah the Shireless >>>


To: Gleann Abhann (mail list) <gleannabhann at yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: Looking for Drummers!
Posted by: "melinda" mlaf at sbcglobal.net maybard
Date: Tue Nov 9, 2010 6:36 pm ((PST))

From: "Barbara Easley" <barbara.easley at fedex.com>
<<< If anyone can help get some drum heads for us, I know that there were about
8 of us wanting to do this. Plastic blue barrels cut in half or thirds make
a GREAT base! >>>

Tandy leather.  Rawhide, preferably goat skin - it is thinner than cow, and,
in my opinion, sounds better - at least, the drums that I have made sound
better with the goat skin.  You will need a piece big enough to cover the
top of the barrel, plus overlap for the lacing.   Soak the rawhide in water
till it becomes pliable, cut in circle shape, punch holes at regular
intervals along edge, but far enough away from edge that the lacing won't
tear through.  I also use rawhide lacing.  How you lace it depends on the
base - if top is wider than the middle, then you can run a lace around the
middle, and take your lacing around that.  Otherwise, you might have to
drill holes in the base to run the lacing through.  Lace loosly at first,
until the head is laced around and more or less centered on the base, then
go back and tighten everything up.  As the head dries, it will tighten and
sound better and better.  I've been told that oiling rawhide drum heads will
help protect it from dew and night dampness.  Over time, with repeated
oilings, the rawhide will become transluscent and almost waterproof, but it
will be loose right after an oiling, and will need to dry a bit to tighten
up. If it does get damp, the sound will become dull, but a few minutes
carefully holding it over a hot fire usually fixes the problem, at least for
a little while.  If the rawhide gets loose during regular usage, dampen the
rawhide, then let dry, and it should tighten back up.

Melandra, who, yes, includes drum making among the various things she has
tried...


To: Gleann Abhann (mail list) <gleannabhann at yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: WAR DRUMS FOR GULF WARS!
Posted by: "Catherine Koehler" hccartck at yahoo.com hccartck
Date: Thu Nov 11, 2010 3:31 pm ((PST))

Dear Duchess and others...

I posted last year about a way to make the drums using sonotubes (contractors use them..ask for throwaways)  They are a VERY sturdy paper used for concrete columns and come in different dimensions. They are easy to cut on a saw, and easy to paint.  I actually wet the goatskins and then STAPLE them to the cardboard with a power stapler. Then I cover the staples with cord wrapped around the head.  They are incredible sounding!  I have made these for several years for an African heritage dance grant but they are just as easily medieval depending on how you embellish them.  Just thought I would throw those ideas out there for the group to chew on for awhile!

Aine

--- On Thu, 11/11/10, Barbara Easley <barbara.easley at fedex.com> wrote:
We are making them... isn't that what the SCA does? <G>

I have pickle buckets, and blue plastic barrels. I've cut the tops off, and am using different sizes of barrel to make different pitch drums. Get a goatskin from Tandy (see previous post) and some rawhide string. Cut the skin a little bigger then the head circumference. Poke holes regularly around it. Wet it down, tighten the strings evenly around it, and wait for it to dry.

I'll paint them and decorate them to hide their pickle-bucketness and barrel-ness <G>.

DRUM!!

Ilissa

<the end>



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