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puddings-msg – 6/27/13

 

Medieval puddings. recipes. custards.

 

NOTE: See also the files: rice-pudding-msg, bread-pudding-msg, desserts-msg, almond-milk-msg, aspic-msg, bread-msg, gingerbread-msg, Sugarplums-art, wassail-msg, sausages-msg, custards-msg.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

   Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                         Stefan at florilegium.org

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From: ELDREDGE at ucf1vm.cc.ucf.EDU (Catherine Elizabeth)

Date: 4 Jun 91 19:07:09 GMT

 

I have received a few replies asking for my pudding recipes.  I am

including documentation information and author's and personal notes on

each pudding, so this is a longer posting than I usually like to send.

 

Source:

_Elinor_Fettiplace's_Receipt_Book:__Elizabethan_Country_House_Cooking_;

Spurling, Hilary; New York: Viking, c1986; ISBN 0-670-81592-6.

   I highly recommend reading this book.  The introduction alone (38 pages)

gives a wonderful feel for the both the foods and the period.

 

page 46:

"To Make a Bagge Pudinge

   Take thicke Creame and make yt somwhat hotter then bloud warme, then

take hafe a dossen egges and beate them well and mingle them with yor

Creame then ad to yt a little parsely and winter savory cut very smale and

som nutmegges suger and a little salte then put to it as much Crumes of

bread and fine flower as will make yt thicker then Batter for pan-Cakes,

then wett yor bagge in cold watter and put yt in and when yor water boyles

put him into yt, yt must not bee boyled  with meate but alone in fayre water"

 

3 eggs, beaten

2 tbsp flour (rounded)

1 cup fine white breadcrumbs

1 pint cream (warmed)

1/4 cup chopped fresh herbs

nutmeg (1 pinch grated nutmeg)

salt and pepper

 

Add the flour and breadcrumbs to the beaten eggs and beat together very well.

While stirring, add the warmed cream.  Add the salt & pepper, chopped herbs,

and a generous grating of nutmeg.  Grease a heatproof 1 1/2 quart dish and

pour in the batter. Cover with two layers of aluminum foil, securely tied.

Lower it into a saucepan containing enough boiling water to come half way

up the sides.  Simmer it gently for about 1 hour 15 minutes. Serve at once

or the pudding will flop.

 

Mrs Spurling recommends half cream and half milk, all milk for a rich meal.

She also varies the herbs depending on the meat.  Parsley & winter savory or

mint with lamb, chives and a sage leaf or two with pork, thyme and marjoram

with almost any meat.

 

I have NOT made this pudding, yet.

 

 

page 47:

"For a Pudding

   Take twelve eggs & breake them, then take crumbs of bred, & mace &

currance & dates cut small, & some oxe suet small minced & some saffron,

put all these in a sheepes Mawe, & so boile it."

 

12 eggs

2 lb breadcrumbs

2 lb suet, minced

5-6 lb dried fruit

 

Mix the ingredients together. Line a *large* pan with aluminum foil and butter

the foil.  Put the pudding mix into the pan and cover with more buttered foil.

(I let the foil touch the pudding.)  Put the pan into another pan with about

1 inch of water in it.  Bake at 350F for approx. 2 hours. (I start checking

 

I start checking at 1 hour and then every 15 minutes by sliding a butter knife

into the middle of the pudding until it comes out clean.  Add water to the

second pan as needed to keep the level up.  This recipe will serve 40.  I serve

it with hard sauce (equal parts butter and sugar beaten to a cream with sherry)

 

I use 2 1-lb loaves of bread and make the crumbs in my food processor, I also

process the suet to make it as "small minced" as possible.  You can use Crisco

instead of suet, but the taste and texture (at least on your tongue) are

completely different.

 

I made this recipe for Twelfth Night a few years ago.

 

 

page 211

"To make a pudding

   Take the top of the morning milke, & a good deal of grated manchet and

some flower, but not so much flower as bread, then put in three egg yolks

& whites, some cloves & mace, & a little salt, some great Reasins, a good

piece of butter melted, so temper all this well together, let it bee somewhat

thicker than batter, so bake it, & serve it."

 

2 pints thick creamy milk, or milk mixed with cream

1 cup breadcrumbs

2 tbsp flour (rounded)

3 eggs

1/4 tsp ground cloves (2-3 cloves)

1/4 tsp ground nutmeg (mace, if you have it)

1 tsp salt

1/4 cup butter (melted)

1/4 cup raisins

brown sugar

 

Mix together the milk (less 2 tbsp) with the breadcrumbs in a saucepan over low

heat. Mix the flour and the reserved milk into a paste and add to the milk

mixture. Heat to a gentle simmer.  Beat the eggs until they are thick and

frothy, and stir them into the warm mixture.  Add the ground cloves and nutmeg,

salt, melted butter, and raisins.  Remove from the heat and let stand 20

minutes. Bake in a well buttered dish 45 to 50 minutes at 350F.  Dot with

butter and sprinkle with brown sugar as it comes out of the oven. Let the

topping melt and soak in a little before serving.

 

I have *not* made this pudding.

 

I hope this will help some of the gentles who are interested in a period

replacement for the ubiquitous potato.  As a small note, don't forget the

turnip -- very nice mashed with milk and butter (yum).

--------------

Lady Catherine Elizabeth Anne Somerton                Mrs Cynthia Eldredge

Barony of Darkwater, Trimaris                         Orlando, Florida

 

 

From: ELDREDGE at ucf1vm.cc.ucf.EDU (Catherine Elizabetj)

Date: 10 Jun 91 17:44:22 GMT

 

It has been brought to my attention, thank you Cariadoc, that I should

point out to inexperienced readers some facts about the pudding recipes

I posted last week.

 

1. The detailed recipes (quantities, times, & temperatures) are the

   work of the modern editor.

2. Notes that start or mention "I" mean me, Catherine Elizabeth.

3. Also, you are free to interpret the original recipes (the ones in

   quotation marks) by your own judgement.  The editor has no special

   information that make her versions authoritative.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

Catherine Elizabeth Anne Somerton         Mrs Cynthia Eldredge

Barony of Darkwater, Trimaris             Orlando, Florida, USA

 

 

From: jtn at nutter.cs.vt.edu (Terry Nutter)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Feast Menus

Date: 17 Nov 1993 16:46:58 GMT

 

Greetings, all, from Angharad ver' Rhuawn.

 

Brother Crimthann asks,

>We're also

>talking about using the bread removed from the loaves to make bread pudding

>for dessert; I'm pretty sure that the pudding itself is period England

>(dates anyone?) but what about the ingredients: sugar, raisins, cinnamon,

>etc?

 

There are bread-based puddings, but they aren't much like

modern bread puddings.  On the other hand, bread is one

of the three great thickeners of the high middle ages in

Europe (the others being ground almonds and rice flour).  

Use it to thicken your stew, as Cariadoc suggested.

 

If you want pointers to period bread-based puddings, let

me know.

 

-- Angharad/Terry

 

 

Date: Fri, 1 Aug 1997 07:08:13 -0500

From: L Herr-Gelatt and J R Gelatt <liontamr at ptd.net>

Subject: Puddings

 

Congratulations, Tibor. This looks yummy!

 

>It says make a stiff pudding.  That means that I'd probably start with

>everything but the cream, and dilute as needed.  I'd have to figure this by

>eye. Right now, I don't know how big a tench is!  Do I need one cup, or one

>gallon of stuffing?

>I'd beat the yolks, gently, just to mix them up, add herbs and spices to

>taste, and the fruit.  I'd probably grab about half as much bread, in volume

>as I have egg liquid (should be about a quarter cup with the currants and 3

>eggs) and add enough cream after it is all mixed, to make a dough that is

>just this side of runny.  Pour that pudding into the fish belly, rub the

>fish with butter, season with the salt, pepper and a little nutmeg, and bake

>in a closed casserole dish.  Probably 20 minutes at 300, or so.  (I'd want

>a cooler oven, and a longer time, so the pudding can set.  The fish is

>already parboiled, so it won't require much cookery.)

 

I seem to recall that older "pudding" recipes come in three consistencies:

Quaking, which means barely held together by starchy ingredients, so that it

is jiggly on the plate.

Semi soft, which would be more like what you think of a dessert pudding,

slightly more solid.

Extremely dense, such as Figgy Pudding or Cambridge Pudding.

 

Now that you brought it up, I am wondering which consistency was intended

here? I think you're right to err on the side of "light". I am extremely

fond or savory puddings. I must try your recipe redaction!

 

Aoife--now definately late.

 

 

Date: Tue, 4 Nov 1997 02:01:58 +0000

From: "Robin Carroll-Mann" <harper at idt.net>

Subject: Re: SC - Re: White, Dafair, Flour & Semolina

 

And it came to pass on  4 Nov 97, that Christina van Tets wrote:

> 4) Is there a (period) semolina pudding (cold) which uses dates,

> spices and rosewater?  I seem to be devising one but thought it not

> unlikely that a recipe already existed.

 

Does it have to be semolina?  There's a Spanish pudding-like recipe

called "Ginestada" which is made with rice flour and almond milk (or

goat milk).  When the mixture is half-cooked, add sugar, a little

saffron dissolved in rosewater, as well as pine nuts and quartered

(slivered) almonds and dates.  Cook well.  Egg yolks may be added

towards the end of cooking, but are not required.  I did not add any

when I tried this dish, which came out rather like an Indian "firni"

- -- sweet, pleasant, and a little bland.  The recipe says to sprinkle

the finished dish with sugar and cinnamon, but then, the "Libro de

Guisados" says to sprinkle nearly *everything* with sugar and/or

cinnamon, and de Nola comments in some other recipe that it can be

omitted, since food should be cooked according to your lord's taste.

 

The quantities listed for "five dishes" are: 2 ounces of rice flour,

one ounce sugar, almond milk from a pound and a half of almonds.  

Amounts are not given for the other ingredients -- I opted for a

ginestada that was fairly thickly studded with dates and nuts.

 

Lady Brighid ni Chiarain of Tethba

Barony of Settmour Swamp, East Kingdom

mka Robin Carroll-Mann *** harper at idt.net

 

 

Date: Tue, 04 Nov 1997 09:46:52 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Re: White, Dafair, Flour & Semolina

 

Christina van Tets wrote:

> 4) Is there a (period) semolina pudding (cold) which uses dates,

> spices and rosewater?  I seem to be devising one but thought it not

> unlikely that a recipe already existed.

 

I have a vague recollection of an Italian blancmange sort of stuff made

by mixing still-warm, cooked semolina with hot stirred custard and dried

fruit, and poured into a mold to set. I further have a vague

recollection that something very similar is in either Epulario or

Platina, except that I currently have neither source on hand to check.

Anybody else want to look into this? Failing that, there is almost

certainly some sort of hulwah in one of the Islamic sources, that comes

pretty close to what you describe.

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Tue, 04 Nov 1997 20:48:14 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Mortrewes

 

Christi Redeker wrote:

> Can anyone tell me what Mortrewes are?  I have no references with me at work to look them up.  Thanks!

>

> Murkial

 

Mortrews, mortrellus, mortrewes, are all spoonable dishes best described

as savory puddings made from boiled meat, poultry, or fish, ground in a

mortar (hence the name, apparently), mixed with some of the cooking

broth, and thickened with bread crumbs, or perhaps rice flour as a

substitute. Extra thick dishes, with bread crumbs added till the dish is

"stondyng" and/or could be sliced, would have been "Double Mortrews". In

my opinion this could be one of the dishes that gave rise to the myth

about excessively spiced medieval meat dishes. But darn it, it isn't the

meat, it's the %$# at #$% bread crumbs. I had similar experiences with

haggis, which just seems to eat up the seasonings without noticeable

effect.

 

Early in my time as an SCA cook, I was told by Baron Salaamallah (he of

mustard soup fame) that mortrews was perhaps the only medieval European

dish that it was impossible to make taste good. After finally having

mastered haggis (more or less) I might be willing to take it on.

 

From "The Forme of Cury":

"46    Mortrews. Take hennes and pork and seeth hem togyder. Take the lyre

of hennes and of the pork and hewe it small, and grind it all to doust;

take brede ygrated and do therto, and temper it with thr self broth, and

alye it with yolkes of ayren; and cast theron powdour fort. Boille it

and do therin powdour of gynger, sugar, saffron, and salt, and loke that

it be stondyng; and flour it with powdour gynger."

 

Normally the very idea of a standing pottage makes me want to spew; I

think in this case the thing to do is make it as Double Mortrews, which

should end up resembling the filling of some of the French white

puddings, and not too far from what haggis is supposed to be, either.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 09:47:00 -0600

From: L Herr-Gelatt and J R Gelatt <liontamr at ptd.net>

Subject: SC - Yule Challenge

 

Well, it was MY challenge, so I guess I have to come up with something good.

 

I choose Cambridge Pudding. Yum! Perfect for very cold, blustery days,

economical, fairly easy, and gets served in my house with single cream (not

for the artery-clog conscious folks---sorry Tibor!). Ragnar will recognise

this one---his lady wife Rowan redacted it last year. We made her do it

blind, but I've given a "professional" redaction here. Rowan chose to use an

entire stick of butter in the middle, which I musy say I preferred. Cutting

this at the table gives you a chicken-kiev-like experience, when the butter

rushes out and puddles on the platter.

 

A New Booke of Cookerie, J. Murrell, 1615 (Yes, for you purists it's 15

years too late. It's close enough for ME, however. In my book---as I was

taught when I joined years ago, the SCA covers to 1650).

 

Cambridge Pudding

 

Searce grated Bread through a Cullinder, mince it with flower, minct Dates,

Currins, Nutmeg, Sinamon, and Pepper, minct Suit, new Milke warme, fine

Sugar, and Egges: take away some of their whites, work all together. Take

halfe the Pudding on the one side, and the other on the other side, and make

it round like loafe. Then take Butter, and put it in the middest of the

Pudding, and the other halfe aloft. Let your Liquor boyle, and throw your

Pudding in, being tyed in a faire cloth: when it is boyled enough cut it in

the middest and so serve it in.

 

Cambridge Pudding--Early American Cooking, Peter Pauper Press, White Plains NY

 

2 cups bread crumbs

1/2 cup white flour

1/2 cup whole wheat flower

1 cup minced dates

1 1/2 cups currants

1 teaspoon ground nutmeg

1 teaspoon ground Cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon ground pepper

3/4 cup chopped suet (chopped very fine)

1/3 cup sugar

3/4 cup milk, warmed

2 eggs

3 tablespoons butter

 

Mix the breadcrumbs, flour, dried fruits, spices, and suet until well

blended. Beat the eggs and milk together, pour over the bread mixture, and

work lightly with a spoon until well combined. Seperate the mixture into 2

halves, and form them both into rounds resembling bread loaves. (Here it

leaves out the step of putting the ball or lump of butter against the bottom

of one of the dough balls). Press the bottom side of the remaining  loaf

against the first, so that the butter is now at the center of the ball.

Place the pudding ball in the center of a large round (20") cheesecloth.

Wrap the pudding loosely, binding the ends at the top with a string.

Meanwhile bring a 4 quart pot of water to a rolling boil. Drop the pudding

in the pot, cover, and cook for 1 1/4 hours. Remove from water, unwrap

immediately, slice and serve. Serves 8

 

NOTE: I find I'd rather have it steamed (an hour is fine), but that's not

quite a period practice. Also, we found it served rather more than 8. It is

extremely rich, and very very good.

 

Aoife

 

 

Date: Thu, 08 Jan 1998 17:38:07 EST

From: melc2newton at juno.com (Michael P Newton)

Subject: SC - redaction challenge

 

to get back on the subject of cooking:

I found a pudding recipe copied from A New Booke of Cookerie, by

J.Murrell, 1615 (a little opp, but not by much)

 

Cambridge Pudding

 

Searce grated Bread through a Cullinder, mince it with flower, minct

Dates, Currins, Nutmeg,Sinamon, and Pepper, minct Suit, new Milke warme,

fine Sugar, and Egges: Take away some of their whites, worke all

together. Take halfe the Pudding on the one side, and the other on the

other side, and make it round like a loafe. Then take Butter, and put it

in the middest of the Pudding, and the other halfe aloft. Let your Liquor

boyle, and throw your Pudding in, being tyed in a faire cloth: when it is

boyled enough cut it in the middest and so serve it in.

 

Redaction Please!

 

Lady Beatrix

 

 

Date: Sun, 18 Jan 1998 13:51:34 EST

From: melc2newton at juno.com (Michael P Newton)

Subject: SC - Cambridge Pudding revisited

 

Having a period potluck to go to (we have one every quarter in our

Shire), I went ahead and used the redaction challange I put up on list to

get people talking about cooking agian. The pudding went over very well,

with several people asking me if it was going to cooked for a feast soon.

 

The redaction I used was the one which came from The Plimoth Plantation

Cookbook

 

Cambridge Pudding

 

2 cups bread crumbs (I used grated white)

1/2 cup white flour

1/2 cup wheat flour (Used just 1 cup of white flour, instead)

1 cup minced dates

1 1/2 cups currents (I couldn't find currents here in Springfield, so I                     

   used raisins instead)

1 teaspoon ground nutmeg

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

   (my kids have hidden my measuring spoons, so I use normal eating spoons, all

        tea/tablespoons are approximate)

3/4 cup suet, chopped fine

1/3 cup sugar

3/4 cup milk, warmed

2 eggs

3 tablespoons butter

 

Mix the crumbs, flour, dried fruits, spices, and suet until well blended.

Beat eggs and milk together,

( ok, this is where I paused a bit, because the orginal said to take away

some of the whites, yet this one didn't. I went ahead and put the full

two eggs in, but did the orginal mean more than two eggs and separte some

of them, if so, would that make a richer pudding? it was pretty rich as

it was. something to try next time)

pour over the bread mixture , and work lightly with a spoon until well

combined. Separate the misture into 2 halves and form them both into

rounds resembling bread loaves.

( this is where it got fun. the dough was way too wet to do this. believe

me, I tried. I ended up putting half the mix on the tea- towel, putting

the butter in the middle, and placing the other half on top, making sure

I sealed in the butter, with a spoon)

Press the bottom side of the remaining loaf agains the first, so that the

butter is now at the center of a ball. Place the pudding ball in the

center of a large round [20"]of cheesecloth.

(the cheesecloth here in Spfd is really loosely woven, so I used on of my

tea-towels, the kind which is embrioered on one of the corners, instead.

It worked perfectly)

Wrap the pudding loosely, binding the ends at the top with a string.

Meanwhile bring a 4 quart pot of water to a rolling boil. Drop the

pudding in the pot, cover,

(I didn't,since I thought the pudding had to be susbened in the water.

Instead I tied the bag to a stick so that the bottom of the pudding would

not touch the bottom of the pot)

and cook for 1 1/4 hours. Remove from water, unwrap immediately, slice

and serve. Serves 8

 

I had a lot of fun with this one, and am willing to do it again. while

the recipe said serves 8, It is awlful rich, to my taste anyways (must be

the suet), I would cut the ball smaller. Although, one ball to a table at

a feast would be impressive.

 

did anyone else try this, and if so, how did it come out for you?

Lady Beatrix

 

 

Date: Mon, 19 Jan 1998 18:54:00 -0600

From: L Herr-Gelatt and J R Gelatt <liontamr at ptd.net>

Subject: SC - Cambridge pudding

 

Having a period potluck to go to (we have one every quarter in our

Shire), I went ahead and used the redaction challange I put up on list to

get people talking about cooking agian. The pudding went over very well,

with several people asking me if it was going to cooked for a feast soon.

 

the redaction I used was the one which came from The Plimoth Plantation

Cookbook

 

Cambridge Pudding

((recipe deleted))

Lady Beatrix

 

Yes, I did this at a cook's guild thingy a while back. It's heavenly. We

served it with warm cream, and that pool of butter in the middle is

wonderful. We steamed instead of boiling since it's quicker. I agree that it

serves way more than 8.

 

The original is from: A New Booke of Cookerie, J. Murrell, 1615. A very good

version can be found (redacted and not) in Early American Cooking, Recipes

from America's Historic Sites, peter pauper Press, White Plains NY 1985. It

appears in the section entitled (surprise) "Plimouth Plantation".

 

 

Date: Sun, 31 May 1998 20:44:22 EDT

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - Yorkshire pudding.

 

CorwynWdwd at aol.com writes:

 

<< If there aren't any sources known, then

we probably won't do it at all. Any suggestions?

>>

 

Al-Baghdadi has several recipes that describe the making of flat breads with

assorted fillings which are place by the fire with a chicken hung above them

which drips it's juices onto the flatbread as it roasts. Although not exactly

"Yorkshire" pudding, it definitely has the basic intent. IIRC, there are also

a couple of recipes in Le Manegier which describe a similar process. Hope this

helps.

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Thu, 04 Jun 1998 15:48:24 PDT

From: "Sarah Oldenburg" <flidais6868 at hotmail.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Yorkshire pudding.

 

>I'm asking Good Sir. I want the recipe.

>Corwyn

 

I just found out (after I fixed my internet) that my grandma uses

pancake mix, but here is the recipie out of betty crocker.

 

Yorkshire Pudding with Roast Beff

 

   The pudding puffs high during baking, then collapses in center,

leaving high crispy edges.

 

Thirty minutes before rib or boneless rib roast is done, prepare

Yorkshire Pudding (below).  Heat square pan, 9x9x2 inches, in oven.

Remove roast from oven; spoon off drippings and add melted shortening,

if needed, to measure 1/2 cup.

 

Increase oven temperature to 425°.  Return roast to oven. Place hot

drippings in heated square pan; pour in Yorkshire Pudding batter.  Bake

10 min.  Remove roast; continue baking pudding 25 to30 min longer. Cut

pudding into squares; serve with roast.

 

6 to 9 servings.

 

Yorkshire Pudding

 

1 cup all-purpose flour*

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 cup milk

2 eggs

 

Mix all ingredients with hand beater just until smooth.

 

*Do not use self-rising flour in this recipe.*

 

Sorry, it isn't what I thought she would tell me you don't have to use

the roast beef juices either.  Just use something that will grease the

pan up (ex.  butter, margrine, crisco)  You really don't have to heat it

up the pan either.  Sorry again about this I was misleaded.

Flidais (lady not sir)(lol  :)

 

 

Date: Sun, 19 Jul 1998 15:45:56 EDT

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - Bean Bread

 

allilyn at juno.com writes:

<< What other sorts of puddings would use any kind of wheat?  >>

 

I'm not quite sure what you're asking here but bread puddings come instantlyto mind. There is also a recipe in Two Fifteenth Century Cookery Bokes" called"Cheryons" that is basically cherry juice/pulp thickened with rice flour,IIRC.

 

Ras (spelled A'aql)

 

 

Date: Sun, 19 Jul 1998 16:03:10 -0500

From: "Decker, Terry D." <TerryD at Health.State.OK.US>

Subject: RE: SC - Bean Bread

 

allilyn at juno.com writes:

<< What other sorts of puddings would use any kind of wheat? >>

 

Plum pudding which is Elizabethan in origin and Mrs. Tashis' Little Puddings from the Receipt Book of Mrs. Ann Blencowe 1694.  These are a cross between a custard and a leavened bread and most resemble brioche.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Sun, 19 Jul 1998 19:42:25 EDT

From: Mordonna22 at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - making liver pudding

 

LrdRas at aol.com writes:

>Can anyone help me with documentation for meat dishes called puddings?  

 

I know that in my in-laws part of the country (a part of South Carolina settled by Germans and thus called the "Dutch Fork") we make liver pudding. You take the organ meat, the tongue, some of the skin, and the well cleaned feet, and boil it with salt, pepper,  cayennes, and onions until the liver begins to disintegrate and the dish has begun to be gelatinous.  Cool it and either shape it into cakes or stuff it into the pig intestines.  When cooled and shaped, it is called liver pudding.  By the way, this can be kept a week to ten days under refrigeration or canned.  Freezing it changes the flavor of the onions to the extent that the dish is often inedible after freezing.  Same goes for onion sausage.  In my opinion, you should never freeze any dish containing onion. It can be rewarmed and served over grits or rice for a great breakfast treat.

<<smacking my lips remembering the taste.>>

 

Or sliced cold and served with mustard on brown bread for sandwiches.

 

Mordonna

 

I think I'm gonna go to the carneciera and buy some liver and kidneys

 

 

Date: Tue, 4 Aug 1998 10:49:51 +1000

From: The Cheshire Cat <sianan at geocities.com>

Subject: Re:  SC - Pretending we're at Pennsic

 

>The stew and scones sound lovely, but here in Central Caid (where it plans to

>be 107 degrees today) we need something *cold*!

 

And to finish things up, how about some rose pudding?

- -Sianan

 

Rose Pudding

Curye on Inglysch

 

Take thyke milke; sethe it. Cast therto sugur, a gode porcioun; pynes,

dates ymynced, canel, and powdour gynger; and seeth it, and alye it with

flours of white rosis, and flour of rys, Cole it; salt it and messe it

forth. If thou wilt in stede of almounde mylke, take swete crem of kyne.

 

Petals of on full-blown but unshrivelled white rose

4 Lvl Tbs rice flour (or cornflour)

11/4 cups almond milk

50g sugar

3/4 tsp cinnamon

3/4 tsp ground ginger

21/2 cups single cream

Pinch salt

10 dessert dates, stoned and finely chopped

1 Tbs chopped pine nut kernels

 

(I thought at first that the 'Thyke Mylke' mentioned might have meant sour

milk or curd cheese, however I discovered it was rich almond milk.)

 

Take the petals off the rose one by one, and snip off the end which was

attached to the seed case.  Blach the petals in boiling water for 2

minutes, then press between several sheets of soft kitchen paper and put a

heavy flat weight on top to squeeze them dry. (They may look depressingly

greyish, but blending will cure the dish's complexion) Put the rice flour

or cornflour in a saucepan, and blend it into enough of the milk to make a

smooth cream.  Stir in the reamining milk. Place the pan over a low heat,

and stir until the mixture starts to thicken.

Put in in an electric blender and add the sugar, spices and rose petals,

process until fully blended, then add and blend in the cream and salt.

Put the mix into a heavy saucepan, and stir over a very low heat, below the

boil, until it is the consistancy of softly whipped cream.  Stir in most of

the chopped dates and pine nuts and stir for 2 minute mare.  Turn into a

glass or decoratice bowl and cool.  Stir occasionally while cooling to

prevent a skin forming.  Chills.  Just before serving decorate with the

reamining dates and nuts.

******************************************************************************

Marina Denton

sianan at geocities.com

 

 

Date: Sun, 4 Oct 1998 14:55:21 +0000

From: bagbane at ix2.ix.netcom.com

Subject: Re: SC - More lamb-Black Pudding

 

From 'Dighby'

 

Take a quart of sheeps blood, and a quart of cream; ten eggs, the

yolks and the whites beaten well together: stir all this liquor very

well then thicken it with grated bread, and oatmeal finely beaten, of

each a like quantity; beef suet finely shread and marrow in little

lumps, season it with a little nutmeg and cloves and mace mingled

with salt, a little sweet-marjoram, Thyme and penny-royal shred very

well together and mingle them with the other things. Some put in a

few currents, then fill them in cleanfed guts, and boil them

carefully.

 

I do realize that the book I got this from is out of period. This is

the earliest black pudding recipie I could find.

 

Badger

 

 

Date: Tue, 15 Jun 1999 18:57:34 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: SC - Processing Suet - was: Art/Sci results

 

Melcnewton wrote:

> From: Browning, Susan W. <bsusan at corp.earthlink.net>

> >>put in a great store of Beef suet well beaten, and small shred,

> >

> >I have been wondering about how one processes beef suet.  The suet I have

> >seen usually has some meat still attached.  Do you just cut the meat off

> >and chop it?  Do you ever cook it some way?

> >

> >Eleanor d'Aubrecicourt

 

> The few times I've done this is by rendering out. In other words, you fry

> the suet until it's small hard lumps, then throw away (or feed to the dog,

> your choice) the lumps and save the melted fat. Put the fat in the

> refrigerator to harden. Either chop into bits (which it calls for in my

> Cambridge pudding recipe) or remelt if needed.

> Beatrix of Tanet

> Oakheart, Calontir

 

If the nineteenth-century instructions for various plum-pudding-type

items are any guide, I get the impression that the suet, which comes

interleafed (is that a word? it should be) with some rather tough

membranous tissue, should be chilled, or even partially frozen, and then

grated on a box grater, which removes most, but not all, of the

membranes. As far as I can tell, the entire point of using the fat in

this minimally processed form is that some of that adipose tissue (as

opposed to merely the fat contained therein) contributes greatly to the

texture of a cooked pastry or pudding, just as it might if you lard a

roast instead of basting it with rendered lard.

 

As for removing the meat attached, I should point out that most suet

comes from inside short loins of beef, which age for anything from 1-3

weeks or so before cutting and sale. The first thing that happens before

cutting is that the suet and the kidney are removed (the suet is often

sold to rendering plants) and then the rest of the loin is trimmed for

good stuff like porterhouse steaks and such. What is trimmed off the

loin is the same, more or less, as the shreds of meat attached to the

suet: meat that has been exposed to the air for as much as three weeks

or so. Give or take. It's probably a good idea to throw it away.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Tue, 15 Jun 1999 19:08:40 -0400

From: snowfire at mail.snet.net

Subject: Re: SC - Processing Suet - was: Art/Sci results

 

>If the nineteenth-century instructions for various plum-pudding-type

>items are any guide, I get the impression that the suet, which comes

>interleafed (is that a word? it should be) with some rather tough

>membranous tissue, should be chilled, or even partially frozen, and then

>grated on a box grater, which removes most, but not all, of the

>membranes.

 

When I was taught how to make suet puddings in Britain, we used to mince the

suet before using it, or buy it already minced.  I dont suppose mincing is

period though is it?

 

Elysant

 

 

Date: Sat, 27 Nov 1999 22:36:21 EST

From: Elysant at aol.com

Subject: SC - REC: Christmas pudding and hard sauce

 

>I would love to

>have you post or email me a good brit old fashioned christmas pudding recipe.  

>Don't they need a month to age? (I have never had one only seen them on TV)

 

Here's my grandmother's recipe for Christmas pudding.

(My family in Wales always has roast chicken for Christmas dinner BTW) :-)

 

CHRISTMAS PUDDING

 

8 oz breadcrumbs

8 oz flour

8 oz brown sugar

8 oz suet

8 oz currants

6 oz raisins

6 oz sultanas

3 oz mixed peel

2 teaspoons mixed spice

1 teaspoon salt

a little grated carrot

5 eggs

beer or brandy to mix

*silver sixpences (or other silver coloured coinage)

 

Everything is combined (including the sixpences years ago) in a large bowl.

The pudding mixture is then placed into a large greased earthernware pudding

basin, pressing the mixture down fairly firmly (do not fill all the way to

the top).  A circle of greaseproof (wax) paper is put on top of the cake

mixture, then a piece of cloth or foil is put over the top of the bowl, and

is tied around firmly around under the outside lip of the bowl with some

string. The pudding is then steamed.

 

I have no length of time for the steaming my grandmother's  pudding

unfortunately, but according to another British recipe book I have here,

here's how you would proceed to cook a pudding big enough to put into a 2

litre pudding basin.  It looks to be approximately the same size as the

pudding above (so far as I can tell) :-)

 

Place in a steamer two thirds full with boiling water or a saucepan of

boiling water to come halfway up the sides of the basin.  Steam for 7 - 8

hours, adding more boiling water to the pan when necessary.  Remove from the

saucepan and cool.  When cold cover with fresh greased greaseproof paper and

store in a cool place.  Steam again for 2 - 3 hours before serving.  Serve

with hard sauce.

 

The pudding is made well in advance (4 - 6 weeks) to allow time to mature.

 

*The sixpences used to put in the batter for luck.  Who ever got a sixpence

in their pudding would receive good fortune.  Then sixpences stopped being

made of silver, and were slid under the pudding on the children's plates

before they were served rather than being put into the batter.  Nowerdays

there are no sixpences.  I suspect other coins are substituted to keep the

tradition going but they are not baked in in the pudding anymore AFAIK ;-)

 

HARD SAUCE

3 oz margarine or butter

3 oz soft brown sugar

2-3 tablespoons brandy

finely grated rind of 1/2 orange (optional)

 

Cream the mangarine and sugar together until well mixed.  Beat in the brandy

a little at a time, together with the orange rind, if used.  Chill and allow

to harden before serving.

 

Elysant

P.S. One thing I didn't include on this topic (I'm sure

you're all aware though) is that oftentimes Christmas pudding is served

"flambe". Just adds to the occasion I think.

 

 

Date: Sat, 27 Nov 1999 23:14:32 EST

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: SC - Mixed Pudding Spice

 

I don't know the exact mixture that Eysant may have had in mind but this

recipe is from my files. It is of unknown origin.

 

Mixed Pudding Spice

 

Coriander seed, ground

Cinnamon stick, ground

Allspice berries, ground

Whole cloves, ground

Nutmeg, ground

Ginger, ground

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Sun, 28 Nov 1999 08:29:19 -0900

From: Anne of Bradford <rdwlist at micronet.net>

Subject: Re: SC - REC: Christmas pudding and hard sauce, OOP

 

A beloved former roommate left behind her English mother's recipe for

plum pudding, and I've been searching all over Anchorage for pudding

tins. For some silly reason I want to make pudding this year, since it

was soooo good.  She used a boxed hard sauce, but I like the idea of the

fresh (with brandy!).  Do you folks think her mom would send me a

pudding without her here?  They're a treasured item in her family... Her

recipe however is slightly different:

 

Jenny's Mom's Plum Pudding

3/4 cup sifted flour

1 tsp salt

3/4 tsp baking soda

1 tsp cinnamon

1/4 tsp nutmeg

1/2 tsp mace

1/2 lb chopped raisins

1/2 lb dried currants, chopped

1/4 lb citron, chopped

1/8 lb lemon peel

1/8 lb orange peel

1/8 lb chopped almonds

1/2 cup find bread crumbs

3/4 cup hot milk

1/2 lb brown sugar

5 eggs, separated

1/2 lb suet, chopped (go to the butcher and get kidney suet.  It should

crumble in your hands)

1/4 cup fruit juice

1/2 glass currant jelly (about 3 oz)

 

Combine the first six ingredients.  Stir in fruit and nuts.  Soften

crumbs in milk for 10 minutes.  Beat sugar into beaten egg yolks.  Add

suet and crumbs.  Stir this stuff into flour and fruit mix.  Add fruit

joice and jelly.  Mix well.  Fold in stiffly beaten egg whiltes.  Pour

into mold - leave 1 or 2" at the top.  Steam for 3 1/2 hours in hard

boiling water.  Test like a cake for doneness.  If your mold will take

only 1/2 the mix, divide the mix before adding the egg whites.  Wait to

add the egg whites until you're ready to steam the second pudding.  The

smaller molds should steam for about 2 hours.

 

This produced an amazing pudding.  I usually intensely dislike citron,

but everything melded together so well you didn't notice it at all.

Definitely worth the effort.

 

Still searching for pudding tins,

 

- Anne

 

 

Date: Mon, 29 Nov 1999 19:24:58 GMT

From: "Bonne of Traquair" <oftraquair at hotmail.com>

Subject: Re: SC - SC: RE: Christmas Pudding and Hard Sauce

 

>I've got some metallic tins that would work, ceramic as well (I've got

>quite a few kitchen toys), but it was my impression that there should be

>a lid whatever you were using.  I thought briefly about using foil over

>the tins, but feared condensation during the steaming process would ruin

>the pudding.  I'll keep an eye out for ceramic.  Thanks!

> - Anne

 

foil is fine.  clamp it down with something--brocoli bands or string.

Condensation won't hurt it, but boiling water slopping over the edge and

into it will.

 

Bonne

 

 

Date: Wed, 29 Dec 1999 10:01:29 -0500

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Helzel-Jewish Sabbath sausage

 

"Sharon R. Saroff" wrote:

> Take a chicken.  Remove all the skin as one piece.  Sew the skin up one

> side to make a casing.  Mix together flour (about 1 and 1/2 cups), chopped

> onion (1 small), 2 cloves of crushed garlic, a pinch of salt, lots of

> paprika and shmaltz (chicken fat globs).  Stuff the casing and sew it up.

> Roast it with the chicken, in the pot with the Sabbath Stew

> (Cholent,dafina, Hamin) or by itself.  Sounds like a form of sausage

> doesn't it.  I am wondering how period this might be and where I might look

> for information.  My cookbooks say that it is period.

 

I think this would come under the heading of a pudding, as in white or

black puddings, since _generally_ sausages are meat-filled rather than

stuffed with starchy things, onion, and fat. With exceptions, but as a

rule this is the case.

 

I'm familiar with doing this with the neck skin of a goose or swan in

period; I think swan's-neck pudding is at least found in mid-to-late

period English sources. Unfortunately most of my food books are still in

boxes, but perhaps someone else has a recipe. I vaguely recall that the

meat from the boiled neck, with breadcrumbs and possibly blood, as well

as other stuff, is used as the filling. I've also heard of Roman Jews

making air-dried gooseneck salami, but offhand can't think of

documentaton for period usage.

 

As for the use of a whole chicken skin, this seems pretty similar to

some of the period recipes for making "two" chickens out of one, with

the chicken skin (possibly with some meat from the same bird) stuffed,

reshaped like the bird and glazed, and the carcass either padded out

with minced meat and glazed, or simply heavily glazed, with both being

roasted side-by-side. This subject came up recently in the discussions

on blowing up chickens (it blowed up real gooood!) I believe there are

references to such dishes in fourteenth-century French and English

sources. When we're all moved and unpacked I'll look for specifics,

unless someone else gets to them first.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Tue, 22 Feb 2000 19:02:24 EST

From: ChannonM at aol.com

Subject: SC - Re: sca-cooks V1 #1907

 

<< but I am looking for a protein dish

for a lactose intolerant vegetarian (in this case

meaning no fish or chicken, butter, cheese or

other dairy products).  >>

 

How about using almond milk?

There are also "cheeses of almond milk". I'm getting ready to leave the house

so here's just a cursory glance at my references.

There are several period recipes, ie

Harleian ms 4016

 

Taylours

Take almonds and grind them raw in a mortar and mix ti with wine and a little

water and d draw it through a strainer into a good stiff milk (I would

subsitute almond milk here)into a pot and cast thereto raisins of Corinth,

and great raisins, minced dates, cloves maces powder of pepper, chinnamon

saffron a good quantity, and salt and set them over the fire, and let all

boil together awhile, and mix it up with flour of rice or else grated bread,

and cast thereto sugar and salt and serve forth in manner of mortrews and

cast thereon powdered ginger in the dish.(found this one in TATEOM by Cindy

Renfrow)

 

Mortrews seem to be thickened minced dishes, as to how they are served, they

all refer to each other as in, "serve as mortrews of flesh", which says serve

as mortrews, or serve as other mortrews. Any insight here anyone??

 

Hauviette

 

 

Date: Mon, 28 Aug 2000 17:33:50 EDT

From: Seton1355 at aol.com

Subject: SC - Elderflower tart

 

Here is elderflower pudding which you could make up and put in a tart.

 

Phillipa

 

In the name of the Holy  Trinity I, Sabina Welserin, begin this cookbook. God

grant me His holy grace and wisdom and understanding and judgment with which

I through His Holy will live  here in this time and  with Him forever. Amen.

anno 1553

 

38 To make elderflower pudding

 

Take elder flowers, boil them in milk and strain them, make a firm dough from

eggs and flour and roll it into a thin flat cake, cut it into the shape of

little worms and put them into the milk, salt it and put fat into it and let

it cook

 

 

Date: Thu, 21 Sep 2000 07:20:12 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Yorkshire Pudding

 

Christina Nevin wrote:

> I have a query from a friend I hope someone can answer. My initial reaction

> was no, I think it's a Georgian invention, but if anyone could back me

> up/tell me I'm wrong, please jump in!

>

> Query:

> "Ah! That reminds me! Is the thing that we moderns call "Yorkshire Pudding"

> - a thinnish batter poured into a hot roasting pan and cooked either in the

> oven or in front of a flame till it puffs up and browns - even remotely SCA

> period? I have a modern Italian recipe for squab with veges presented in a

> "Yorkshire" pudding (though the recipe doesn't call it that) that I'd like

> to do for a small SCA dinner if I can justify it."

 

Bird-in-the-hole, eh?

 

I haven't seen any indication that any kind of baked pudding, sweet or

savory, is found in a period source. One thing to bear in mind is that

ovens seem to figure less in medieval cookery than they do subsequently,

except for obvious things like bread, pies, and tarts. For cooking them

in front of a fire, well, as I say I've seen no evidence of it. Also,

one should consider that if this dish did exist in the Middle Ages, it

certainly wouldn't be classified by a name which refers to guts, which is

basically what "pudding" means.

 

There _are_ some English baked pudding recipes (in both name and form)

beginning, I'd guess, in the late 16th, early 17th centuries, but none

quite like Yorkshire pudding, AFAIK. There may be an issue regarding the

availability of hardish wheat flours in England at whatever time we're

talking about. You need at least some gluten to get that dramatic rise.

Of course, if there is an Italian precedent, that may not matter.

 

It probably is Georgian. Anybody have a copy of Hannah Glasse handy?

 

Obligatory good research note, which I now feel obliged to insert

whenever anybody asks a question like this: as a way of learning and

teaching about period food, is it not better to research period foods

and find one that you like, rather than trying to make a food which may

be modern fit a period description?

 

Of course, gentle Lucretzia, I know this isn't your project and you

don't research in this way.

 

Adamantius, desperately seeking documentation for seafood cocktail sauce

in period...

- --

Phil & Susan Troy

 

 

Date: Sun, 11 Mar 2001 21:40:08 EST

From: Devra at aol.com

Subject: SC - Re: sca-cooks Chicken soup & quaking pudding

 

There is a nice recipe for quaking pudding in Madge Lorwin's "Dining with

William Shakespeare"

 

   From Robert May's "The Accomplish't Cook":  Slice the crumbs of a penny

manchet, and infuse it three or four hours in a pint of scalding hot cream,

covering it close, then break the bread with a spoon very small, and put to

it a pound of walnuts beaten small with rosewater in a steon mortar, and

season it with sugar, nutmeg, salt, the yolks of six eggs, a quarter of a

pound of dates slic't and cut small, a handful of currans boiled, some marrow

minced. Beat them all together and bake it.  Put to it butter, rosewater,

and sugar, and serve it up to the table."

 

Here is Lorwin' redaction:  

3 egg yolks

1 C light cream

2 Tbls sugar

2 Tbls rosewater

1/8 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon nutmeg

1 C soft bread crumbs

2 Tbsp beef marrow or butter, diced

2 Tbls currants, parboiled

6 dates, diced

1/2 C walnuts, grated

 

3 Tbls butter

2 Tbls rosewater

2 Tbls brown sugar

 

Beat the egg yolks with the cream.  Add the sugar, rose water, salt, nutmeg,

& bread crumbs, and beat until the crumbs are softened. Stir in the beef

marrow or butter, the currants, dates, and the walnuts. Cover and set aside

to allow the flavors to blend for three hours.

Pour the mixture into a quart-sized oven-proof casserole and bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes.

While the pudding is baking, make the sauce by simmering the rose water,

sugar, and butter together, stirring until the butter melts, for five

minutes. Keep the sauce warm.  Serve the pudding in the dish in which it was

baked and pour the sauce over it.

 

I've made this, and it's very pleasant (even though I don't particularly like

rosewater myself.)  After listening to the various comments on redaction on

the list, I can't understand myself why she decided to add the eggs and

flavorings before soaking the crumbs.....

Devra the Baker

 

Devra Langsam

www.poisonpenpress.com

 

 

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] black puddings

From: Kirrily Robert <skud at infotrope.net>

Date: Fri, 08 Jun 2001 00:20:55 -0400

 

>Elysant answered my question about how black pudding was packaged

>and then said:

>> To cook black pudding you slice it and fry or grill it.  Yummy :-)

>Is this how it was done in period? Do we have evidence for this? Or

>was it simply boiled?

 

Almost all the pudding recipes in "The English Huswife" (1615) mention

broiling/grilling the pudding before serving.

--

Kirrily 'Skud' Robert - skud at infotrope.net - http://infotrope.net/

 

 

From: "Hrolf Douglasson" <Hrolf at btinternet.com>

To: <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Cauldron cooking

Date: Sat, 14 Jul 2001 22:20:34 +0100

 

> .  Has anyone

> worked with the type of cauldron cooking where you cook things in pudding

> bags or in crock in the cauldron?

 

Yes regularly.

I cook both in pudding bags....especially sweet things like spotted dick ans

clootie dumpling.

Boiled suet puddings with fruit in them I use vegatarian suet to cater for

some of my group being allergic to meat.

If I use a crock in the cauldron I tend to put a cloth or trivet in the

bottom to stop the crock banging on the base.

I didn't once and ended up with a broken pot.

I tend to do this sort of recipie when I am going to be busy elsewhere and

have someone I can trust to keep the cauldron topped up with water.

I also support the cloth tied stuff in the water by tying it onto the chain

holding the cauldron. it stops it sticking to the bottom.

 

vara

 

 

Date: Mon, 26 Nov 2001 20:35:34 -0500

From: johnna holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Steamed Puddings...

 

C. Anne Wilson spends pages 315-322 of her

Food and Drink in Britain discussing puddings

and their history in England. Boiled suet

puddings took off with the invention of the

pudding cloth which she dates to a mention in

1617. Before that time they had used animal guts.

The other Tudor alternative was to do the pudding

in a pie crust in a side oven. Check for recipes

in English works beg. in the 17th century. Karen

Hess provides a full commentary to go along with

the pudding recipes contained in Martha Washington's

Booke of Cookery. See pages 101-112.

 

Johnnae llyn Lewis  Johnna Holloway

 

 

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org, sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Steamed Puddings...

From: Kirrily Robert <skud at infotrope.net>

Date: Tue, 27 Nov 2001 10:55:16 -0500

 

There are some pudding recipes from "The English Huswife" at

http://infotrope.net/sca/texts/english-housewife/puddings.html

--

Lady Katherine Robillard  (mka Kirrily "Skud" Robert)

katherine at infotrope.net http://infotrope.net/sca/

Caldrithig, Skraeling Althing, Ealdormere

 

 

Date: Tue, 27 Nov 2001 16:55:05 -0500

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

From: "Cindy M. Renfrow" <cindy at thousandeggs.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Steamed Puddings...

 

Here's one using a clay pot. The pot is broken to remove the Appraylere.

 

Harleian MS. 279 - Leche Vyaundez

xxvij. Appraylere.  Take [th]e fleysshe of [th]e lene Porke, & se[th]e it

wel: & whan it is so[th]e, hew it smal; nym [th]an Safroun, Gyngere,

Canel, Salt, Galyngale, old chese, myid Brede, & bray it smal on a morter;

caste [th]in fleysshe in to [th]e spicery, & loke [th]at it be wil

y-ground, & temper it vppe with raw Eyroun; [th]an take a longe Pecher, al

a-bowte ouer alle [th]at it be ransched; [th]an held out [th]in grece, &

fulle [th]i Pechir of [th]in farsure, & take a pese of fayre Canneuas, &

doble it as moche as [th]ou may ceuyr [th]e mou[th]e with-al, & bynd it

fast a-bowte [th]e berde, & caste hym to se[th]e with [th]in grete

Fleysshe, in lede o[th]er in Cauderoun, for it be wyl so[th]in; take [th]en

vppe [th]in Pecher, & breke it, an saf [th]in farsure; & haue a fayre

broche, & broche it [th]orw, & lay it to [th]e fyre;  & [th]an haue a gode

Bature of Spicerye, Safroun, Galyngale, Canel, & [th]er-of y-now, & flowre,

& grynd smal in a morter, & temper it vp with raw Eyroun, & do [th]er-to

Sugre of Alisaunder y-now; & euer as it dryit, baste it with bature, &

sette forth in seruyce.

 

Cindy

 

 

Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2003 13:14:22 -0400

From: "Carol Eskesen Smith" <BrekkeFranksdottir at hotmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] fish sasages recipe please

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Phil (and the world), I have it - and here it is!

Regards,

Brekke

 

White Pudding of Fish

 

Master Gideanus Tacitus Adamantius

 

 

This recipe was, essentially, developed by committee consisting of  

Gideanus Tacitus , Countess Brekke Franksdottir, Lord Audric Eisenherz,  

and lady Morgaine of Lynne.  It is a synthesis combining aspects o  

various 17th century English white pudding recipes (from sources like  

Dawson, Markham, and Digby) with a Norman recipe, probably 18th-19th  

century.  Unlike most sausages, they are not designed for long shelf  

life.  However, they can be frozen after their preliminary poaching.  

The same mixture can also be cooked as a loaf, in the oven.

 

Serves 8 or more

5 slices firm white bread, crusts removed

1.5 Cups heavy cream

0.75 pound skinless, boneless Cod fillet

0.75 lb sea scallops

6 egg whites or 3 wole eggs

Salt

White pepper

Fresh grated nutmeg

Approx. 6 feet pork sausage casing, soaked ½ hour.

 

Start a large pot of salted poaching water going.  It should taste of  

the salt.

 

Meanwhile, in a food processor, whiz the bread slices into crumbs.  You  should have about 2 cups or so.  In a bowl, stir ½ - ¾ C cream into the  

bread crumbs, until they are moist and beginning to soften.  Let them  

sit while you grind the cod and scallops. Rough chop them in the food  

processor set on pulse.  Use a reubbr spatula every so often to scrape  

down the sides of the food processor bowl, making sure there are no  

large chunks left.  Add the soaked bread crumbs and process, adding  

the eggs or whites in increments, until the mixture is a puree.  Add  

the remaining cream while continuing to puree.  Add about 1 rounded  

teaspoon of salt, 1 rounded ¼ tsp white pepper, and 1 level ¼ teaspoon  

of salt.  Try grinding/grating the spices onto a sheet of foil or paper  

to measure.  Make sure the mixture is smooth.

Stuff the mixture into casings (We recommend this not be the first  

sausage recipe you try; a little experience goes a long way on this  

one).  Use either a piston-driven sausage stuffing machine, which pumps  

the mixture into the casing, or a large-bre funnel, using gravity and  

the handle of a wooden spoon to push the fish through.  Tie sausages  

off in 4 - 6 inch lengths, or make loops like kielbasa.  When picking  

them up, support them evenly, like a baby. Unlike most sausages, they  

are heav but not stiff enough to support any of their own weight, and  

it is easy to tear the casings if you overstress them.

 

Making sure the pot of water is at no more than poaching heat (160° F.,  

with small bubbles on the sides and bottom of the pot, steam ut no  

bubbles rising, for those without thermometers)  GENTLY place the  

sausages in the water.  Don't let the water reach anything but a low  

simmer.  Boiling is RIGHT OUT!  They will explode and you'll have cream  

of fish soup, and a not very good xample of it, either!  Poach the  

sausages for about 20 minutes. Eat immediately or reheat in the water,  

the oven, or with butter in a saute pan over medium heat.

 

A more Scandinavian, but also more modern, method is to cook the  

mixture as a loaf or s dumplings, forming little balls with two wet  

spoons and lowering them gently into the poaching water.  Cook as loaf  

in a 350° oven, with the pan inside another pan, with boiling water  

coming ¾ up the side of the loaf pan, for about 1 hour and 20 mnutes,  

or until an inserted knife comes out clean.  For dumplings, poach the  

balls till they float, and leave them to simmer gently for two or three  

minutes after they are floating.  Remove with a slotted spoon.

 

   ----- Original Message -----

   Fom: Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius

   To: Cooks within the SCA

   Sent: Friday, June 20, 2003 1:19 PM

   Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] fish sausages recipe please

 

   On Friday, June 20, 2003, at 10:07 AM, Olwen the Odd wrote:

> I was reading horugh the illusions food section in the Florilethingy

> and saw a post from Adamantius about fish sausages.  If you are here,

> could you please post the recipe and any special notes on technique?

 

   This is a staple of modern Normandy, although I can think of at least

   one white pudding recipe that involves a meatless filling stuffed into

   a sturgeon gut (Ising Puddings, in, I think, John Murrell) from

   in-or-near-peiod, so I imagine dishes like this did exist in regional

   cuisines if not in Ye Olde Offysshyll Periode Courte Cookery. Of

   course, this is speculation on my part.

 

   As I recall the last time we did this, we used cod, scallops, a small

   amount of hite bread (fresh crumb, no crust) soaked in heavy cream,

   and egg whites. A little chervil, I think. Pork casings, although there

   are other options for those wishing to avoid the meat aspect. They come

   out a beautiful ivory white if you don'tuse any shellfish that turn

   pink when you cook them. I would advise against using frozen seafood

   for this; it releases a lot of water in the cooking process, which

   affects the texture.

 

   Countess Brekke may have the recipe closer to hand at the moment;

   perhaps she can post if she gets this message before I find my copy.

 

   Adamantius

 

 

Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2003 22:55:12 -0400

From: Angie Malone <alm4 at cornell.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] fish sausages recipe please

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> I was reading thorugh the illusions food section in the Florilethingy and

> saw a post from Adamantius about fish sausages.  If you are here, could

> you please post the recipe and any special notes on technique?

> THLady Olwen the Odd

 

Olwen,

 

     I was reading some of the latest postings and saw yours about fish  

sausage.

 

Mistress Catalina Alvarez from my group did a feast sometime ago with  

Fish sausage that I remember  were very tasty.

 

Here's the url: (I searched google, and found the url)

http://lemur.cit.cornell.edu/~jules/fish_sausage.html

 

          Angeline

 

 

Date: Mon, 23 Jun 2003 20:07:06 -0400

From: "Carol Eskesen Smith" <BrekkeFranksdottir at hotmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] fish sausages recie please

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

OOPS! Phil's right; just check the context.  So much for my  

proof-reading; my sausage hanout's had it like that for over a year!

Regards,

Brekke

   ----- Original Message -----

   From: Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius

   To: Cooks within the SCA

   Sent: Saturday, June 21, 2003 4:10 PM

   Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] fish sausages recipe please

 

 

   On Saturday, June 21, 2003, at 01:14 PM, Carol Eskesen Smith wrote:

 

 

     Add about 1 rounded teaspoon of salt, 1 rounded ¼ tsp white pepper,  

and 1 level ¼ teaspoon of salt.

 

 

   Hey, cool feature of Mac Mail! (And about time I discovered one,  

oo!) Select a passage and hit "reply", and that's exactly what you  

get, properly formatted and part of the thread. No pasting needed. Who  

knew? Maybe I just never tried this before.

 

   But I digress...

 

   See above. Brekke, are you sure this is corrct? Could that last  

rounded 1/4 teaspoon be nutmeg? It seems unlikely that salt was used  

twice in this way.

 

   IIRC, didn't we serve this on top of a bed of sauteed watercress to  

give the proper Ostgardrian green and white?

 

   Adamantius

 

 

Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2003 11:59:32 -0700

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Re: Home From Great Western War

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

It was "An Eastern Sweet" from the Anonymous Andalusian Cookbook -

made at the event of almond milk, apple juice, pomegranate

"molasses", white sugar, rice flour, and rosewater.

 

Here is the recipe:

This is given to feverish people as a food and takes the place of

medicine. Take sweet, peeled almonds and pound them fine. Then

extract their milk with a sieve or clean cloth, until it becomes like

milk. Add pomegranate and tart apple juice, pear juice, juice of

quince and of roasted gourd, whatever may be available of these.

Prepare them like the juice squeezed from the almonds and like the

mixture of white sugar. Put in a glazed earthenware tinjir and light

a gentle fire under it. After boiling, add some dissolved starch

paste and when it thickens, put together rose oil and fresh oil and

light under it a gentle fire until it thickens. Then take off the

fire and take it out. If the stomach is weak, add rosewater mixed

with camphor.

 

This was very yummy - a translucent not-quite pudding - rich, sweet,

tart, and highly flavorful.

 

Anahita

 

 

Date: Sun, 14 Mar 2004 19:56:05 -0800

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Re: [EK] recipe suggestions?

To: SCA-Cooks <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Rodgrod med Flode - Red Berry Pudding with Cream

6 servings

 

4 cups red currants-- traditional but hard to

come by, so one can substitute fresh or frozen

strawberries and/or raspberries

[Anahita notes: maybe even lingonberries would

work - aren't they like tiny relatives of

American cranberries?]

3 cups water

1 cup sugar

3/4 cup potato starch (or substitute cornstarch)

1/2 cup cold water

Small amount of sugar for sprinkling

Cream, as desired

 

Put water and berries in a pot. Bring to a boil

and cook until the seeds separate from the fruit.

Strain through cheesecloth or a fine sieve.

Pour the red berry juice back into the pot and return to a boil.

Add sugar, stirring until the sugar is dissolved.

In a small bowl, mix the potato starch with cold water until it is

syrupy/

Add it to the berry juice, constantly stirring.

As soon as it thickens, remove from the heat and

pour into individual glass dishes.

Sprinkle with sugar to prevent a skin from forming.

Let cool.

Top with whipped cream.

 

 

Date: Mon, 9 Aug 2004 21:31:45 -0400

From: Sharon Palmer <ranvaig at columbus.rr.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Irish Festival Feast Report

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> On Sun, 8 Aug 2004 23:22:29 -0400

>  Sharon Palmer <ranvaig at columbus.rr.com> wrote:

>> Littiu - Oat Pudding

> any chance of a recipe?

 

It's not my recipe but one from our Authenticity

Officer, Tigernach mka Stephan Hayes

--- My working recipe was:

Oat Pudding (Littiú)

2 c coarsely ground oats (run lightly through a food processor)

2 c milk, 1/2 tsp salt or to taste, egg yolks (optional), butter

Heat milk to the simmering point without boiling,

so that small bubbles form around the rim of the

pot. Add oats and salt. If you wish to make it

even richer, you can add the egg yolks, well

beaten, to the mixture.  Pour the mixture into

greased bowl or fireproof dish, and set it,

covered, by the fire for about 45 minutes,

turning it regularly so that it cooks evenly and

solidly.  Or bake at 300°.  As it cooks, it will

pull away from the bowl a bit.

 

---- And the original:

The other thing I think you're looking for is

'Littiú", which is described as a porridge but to

my mind is more like a steamed pudding.

 

Ingredients:

Oats , coarsely ground (I have used rolled oats

mashed up in a mortar, or run lightly through a

food processor for this).

Milk

Salt to taste

Egg yolks (optional)

Butter

 

Method:

Heat a quantity of milk to the simmering point

without boiling, so that small bubbles form

around the rim of the pot.  Remove the pot from

the heat. Take an equal volume of the coarsely

ground oats, and makes them with the milk, adding

a bit of salt.  For 2 c. of oats I use about one

half teaspoon of salt. If you wish to make it

even richer, you can add the egg yolks, well

beaten, to the mixture.  When the batter is

smooth, pour the mixture into greased bowl or

fireproof dish, and set it, covered, by the fire

for about 45 minutes, turning it regularly so

that it cooks evenly and solidly.  In a regular

kitchen, you could simply put this in a low oven

(300°).  As it cooks, it will pull away from the

bowl a bit.

 

It can be cut in wedges in the bowl, or turned

out onto a plate.  It's delicious as is, savory

with salt, and scrumptious when accompanied by

rich cream and drizzled honey.  I imagine it

could be used as a side dish with gravy as well.

I have also thought of cutting up the bowl of

this into cubes sprinkling it liberally with bits

of butter and hard cheese, and setting it to bake

by the fire. The dish is described in books of

monastic rules, and is prescribed in the Brehon

law as the appropriate food with which noble

hostages and foster sons are nourished by right.

 

Notice that this is radically different from a

porridge.  In ordinary porridge, the proportions

are four volumes of water to one of oatmeal,

while this one is equal volume is of milk and

oatmeal.  It sets up quite firmly. Too fine an

oatmeal makes for a gluey product.

 

Tigernach mac Eóghain ua Áeda

 

 

Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 00:00:00 -0500

From "Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius"

        <adamantius.magister at verizon.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Re plum pudding

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Also sprach Devra at aol.com:

>         Lorna Sass (Dinner with Tom Jones) cites a Hannah Glasse recipe for

> this, but I seem to remember (in her historical Christmas feast book) a

> somewhat earlier recipe for a plum porridge...

>     Devra, with a mind like an old attic

 

Hannah Glasse has recipes for both plumb pudding (her spelling) and

plum porridge (the latter being a barley gruel enriched and sweetened

with dried fruit, spiced with mace). As I recall, what Sass says in

her Chrstmas Feasts book is that Plum Pudding predates the 19th

century (and Hannah Glasse seems to prove this), but that it was not

until the 19th century that the plum pudding supplanted the plum

porridge as a widespread Christmas tradition in England. Neither recipe contains plums, BTW.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 12:16:18 -0500

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Plum Pudding

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Alan Davidson mentions that the College Puddings

(made of suet, breadcrumbs, and dried fruits) named

after the Cambridge and Oxford colleges go back to at least 1617.

He mentions C. Anne Wilson as the source. So onto

Wilson and the source eventually becomes J. Murrell's

cookbook of 1617 wherein is found

"A Cambridge Pudding" which calls for minced dates, flour,

spices, etc. tyed in a faire cloth and boiled until done.

Ivan Day is going to be putting up information on English Puddings

but the spot is empty as yet.

http://www.historicfood.com/English%20Puddings.htm

 

Less helpful is OED.

OED only takes plum pudding back to

1711 Vind. Sacheverell 75 This is just as proper as I had a good

Plumb Pudden to day with a Mixture of Flower and Raisins.

This association of plums and puddings merged into the term plum pudding

seems to be early 18th century. Adding Christmas in brings in the other  

element.

 

Jennifer Stead seems to agree with most sources as she says that

the very rich plum laced puddings were only associated

with Christmas late in the 17th century. Sara Paston-Williams

goes for 19th century for Christmas plum pudding tradition beginning.

Now adding the flaming custom--- Davidson is more

helpful here. He says Mrs. Beeton promoted it in the

1860's, so it's probably only mid 19th century.

 

Johnnae

 

The source for all things 12th Night in England as concerns cakes by  

the way is still Cakes and Characters by Bridget Ann Henisch.

The fact that it came out in 1984 and never sold well

in this country shouldn't deter you from reading it annually before

contemplating the season.

 

 

Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 09:45:29 -0800 (PST)

From: Huette von Ahrens <ahrenshav at yahoo.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] plum pudding

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Here is what the Oxford Companion to Food says'

under the category 'Christmas pudding':

 

Christmas pudding, the rich culmination of a long

process of development of 'plum puddings' which

can be traced back to the early 15th century.

The first types were not specifically associated

with Christmas.  Like early mince pies, they

contained meat, of which a token remain in the

use of suet.  The original form, plum pottage,

was made from chopped beef or mutton, onions and

perhaps other root vegetables, and dried fruit,

thickened with breadcrumbs, and flavoured with

wine, herbs, and spices.  As the name suggests,

it is a fairly liquid preparation: this was

before the invention of the pudding cloth made

large puddings feasible.  As was usual with such

dishes, it was served at the beginning of a meal.

When new kinds of dried fruit became available

in Britain, first raisins, then prunes in the

16th century, they were added.  The name 'plum'

refers to a prune; but it soon came to mean any

dried fruit.

 

In the 16th century variants were made with

white meat such as chicken or veal; and gradually

the meat came to be omitted, to be replaced by

suet.  The root vegetables also disappeared,

although even now Christmas pudding often still

includes a token carrot.  The rich dish was

served on feast days such as All Saints' Day,

Christmas, and New Year's Day.  By the 1670s,

it was associated with Christmas and called

'Christmas pottage'. The old plum pottage

continued to be made into the 18th century, and

both versions were still served as a filling

first course rather than a dessert.

 

Not all plum puddings were rich, festive, or

ceremonial.  Plum duff, essentially a suet

pudding with less fruit and other enrichment,

remained popular for centuries.

 

Even before Christmas pudding had attained its

modern form, its consumption on Christmas Day

had been banned by Oliver Cromwell.  This was

not simply a sign of his Puritan attitudes.  The

Christian Church everywhere was conscious that

Christmas was merely a veneer of the old Celtic

winter solstice fire festival celebrating the

'rebirth' of the sun after the shortest day,

21 or 22 of December.  This is still frankly

celebrated in the Orkneys with the rite of Up

Helly A, when a ship is burnt.  Signs of paganism

keep emerging: for example the Yule Log, a huge

log which is kept burning for all twelve days of

the festival, and is still commemorated in the

traditional French log-shaped Christmas cake.

Other relics are the candles on the Christmas

tree (imported from Germany in the time of Prince

Albert), and the flaming pudding itself. There

had been a similar official attitude in Scotland

towards the consumption of the Black Run on

Twelfth Night.

 

What currently counts as the traditional

Christmas pudding recipe has been more or less

established since the 19th century. Usual

ingredients are: suet, brown sugar (not always)

; raisins; sultanas; currants; candied peel;

breadcrumbs; eggs; spices such as cinnamon,

nutmeg, and cloves, or allspice or mixed spice;

and alcohol (e.g. stout, rum, brandy). Optional

ingredients include flour, fresh orange or lemon

peel, grated carrot or apple, almonds. The

result is a remarkably solid pudding which has

to be boiled for many hours then preferably left

to mature for up to a year and reboiled on the

day.  A large pudding resists this treatment

better than small ones--though few are as large

as the one made in Devon in 1819, which weighed

over 400 kg (900 lb).

 

The pudding is traditionally served with rum or

brandy butter (US hard sauce) made from butter,

sugar, and spirit.  It is topped with a sprig of

holly and set alight with rum or another spirit.

This part of the tradition is still widely

observed, but recipes for the pudding itself

have been evolving in the direction of something

lighter and more digestible.

 

The shape of the pudding is traditionally

spherical, from being tied up in a floured

pudding cloth.  Most modern puddings are made

in a basin covered with layers of foil and

greaseproof paper.

 

Huette

 

 

Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 13:22:13 -0500

From: Daniel Myers <edouard at medievalcookery.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] plum pudding

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

On Nov 22, 2004, at 12:45 PM, Huette von Ahrens wrote:

> Here is what the Oxford Companion to Food says'

> under the category 'Christmas pudding':

 

[snip]

 

>Christmas pudding, the rich culmination of a long

> process of development of 'plum puddings' which

> can be traced back to the early 15th century.

 

[snip]

 

> When new kinds of dried fruit became available

> in Britain, first raisins, then prunes in the

>16th century, they were added.

 

Eh?  No prunes in England before the 16th century?  I think that may be

in error.

 

TARTLETES. XX.VIII. IX. Take Veel ysode and grinde it smale. take harde

Eyrenn isode and yground & do þerto with prunes hoole. dates. icorue

pynes and Raisouns coraunce. hool spices & powdour. sugur. salt, and

make a litell coffyn and do þis fars þerinne. & bake it & serue it

forth.

[Forme of Cury (1390)]

 

This was one of 6 recipes calling for prunes in Forme of Cury.  There

are also recipes n Liber cure cocorum and Two Fifteenth-Century

Cookery-Books that call for prunes as well.

 

Raisins were also in use before the 15th century.  I'd hazard a guess

that both long pre-date even the most primitive plum pudding.

 

- Doc

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=--=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

   Edouard Halidai  (Daniel Myers)

   Cum Grano Salis

 

 

Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 10:35:04 -0800 (PST)

From: Huette von Ahrens <ahrenshav at yahoo.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] plum pudding

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

--- Daniel Myers <edouard at medievalcookery.com> wrote:

> On Nov 22, 2004, at 12:45 PM, Huette von Ahrens wrote:

>> Here is what the Oxford Comanion to Food says'

>> under the category 'Christmas pudding':

> [snip]

>> Christmas pudding, the rich culmination of a long

>> process of development of 'plum puddings' which

>> can be traced back to the early 15th century.

> [snip]

>> When new kinds of dried fruit became available

>> in Britain, first raisins, then prunes in the

>> 16th century, they were added.

> Eh?  No prunes in England before the 16th

> century?  I think that may be in error.

 

Hmmm.  I was just copying what was prnted.

I took it to mean that prunes were added to

plum pudding in the 16th century, not that

they weren't known until the 16th century.

But, you are right, the wording is confusing.

I will have to find my Penguin edition of the

OCF and see if this was changed or not.

 

The article was written by Ralph Hancock,

"an encyclopedist with a special interest in

food history and food science."

 

Huette

 

 

Date: Fri, 17 Dec 2004 15:59:41 -0500

From: "Lonnie D. Harvel" <ldh at ece.gatech.edu>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] figgy pudding?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Actually it looks kind of like bread pudding, using leftover pastry and

breads, but it is boiled in the final stage instead of being baked.

 

  From //Le Viandier de Taillevent, //James Prescott trans.

 

63. Slices.

Take figs, raisins, boiled almond milk, hot water pastries, flat cakes

and white bread crusts cut into small cubes. Boil your milk, add saffron

(to give it colour) and sugar, and boil everything together until it

becomes thick enough to slice. Put it into bowls.

 

Aoghann

 

 

Date: Fri, 17 Dec 2004 21:19:35 -0500

From: "Lonnie D. Harvel" <ldh at ece.gatech.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] figgy pudding?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Chris Stanifer wrote:

> --- "Lonnie D. Harvel" <ldh at ece.gatech.edu> wrote:

>> 63. Slices.

>> Take figs, raisins, boiled almond milk, hot water pastries, flat cakes

>> and white bread crusts cut into small cubes.

> I'm assuming there is supposed to be a comma between water and

> pastries, correct?

> William de Grandfort

 

Well, this is not actually the figgy pudding of the carol fame, I was

just kidding (because of the figs).

 

I don't know if the comma you suggest is needed. I assumed they were

talking about "hot water pastries". The basic Pate a Choux uses boiling

water, as do many others. However, I am not sure how early these were

used. The only reference I have is:

 

According to Claude Juillet in *Classic Patisserie: An A-Z Handbook*,

        "In 1533, when Catherine de Medici left Florence to marry the Duke of

Orleans who was later to become Henry II, King of France from 1547, she

brought with her to France her entire court, which included her chefs.

Seven years later in 1540, her head chef, Panterelli, invented a hot,

dried paste with which he made gateaux. He christened the paste /pâte à

Panterelli./

 

The original recipe changed as the years passed, and so did the paste's

name. It became known as /pâte à Popelini,/ which then became /pâte à

Popelin./ Popelins were a form of cake made in the Middle Ages and were

made in the shape of a woman's breasts. A /patissier/ called Avice

perfected the paste in the middle of the eighteenth century and created

choux buns. The /pâte à Popelin/ became known as /pâte à choux,/ since

only choux buns were made from it. [And choux buns were the same shape

as small cabbages. /Choux/ is the French word for cabbages.] Antoine

Carême in the nineteenth century perfected the recipe, and this is the

same recipe for choux pastry as is used today."

 

Since the recipe I quoted is from the 14th century, the above would not

really apply.

 

Aoghann

 

 

Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 09:10:44 EDT

From: KristiWhyKelly at aol.com

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] cakes

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

Have you seen  the recipe for carrot pudding in John Evelyn's book  

_Cook_?

 

  #221 A Carrot Pudding

 

Take a topeny#loafe grate it halfe this quantity of Carots grated being

first scraped 6 Eggs leave out 3 whites one pint of new milk half a pound of

Butter neere halfe a pound of sugar a little salt some grated Nutmeg mingle all

well together butter a pann putit in bake it well.

 

I can post my redaction if you are interested.

 

The pudding turns out very much like a dense coffee cake.  I was  thinking of

posting a question of adding raisins to the recipe on this list.

 

Grace

 

 

Date: Tue, 17 May 2005 18:08:27 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] cakes

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

KristiWhyKelly at aol.com wrote:

> Have you seen  the recipe for carrot pudding in John Evelyn's book  

> _Cook_?

 

This is Christopher Driver's volume titled

John Evelyn, Cook which was published by Prospect Books

in 1997. It's the first publication of Evelyn's culinary manuscript.

(Just in case anyone was wondering.)

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Wed, 18 May 2005 08:06:46 -0500

From: "Terry Decker" <t.d.decker at worldnet.att.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] cakes

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> I too, would be interested in seeing your redaction, although I think I've

> figured most of it out, with the exception of just how big, and of what,

> is a 'two-penny' loaf. (Take a topeny#loafe...). I've also got no idea how

> long to bake it, but I imagine there are similar modern recipes. I thought

> puddings were usually boiled, though.

> Stefan

 

A two penny loaf is a loaf that can be purchased for two pence.  Under the

Assize of Bread, the weight of the loaf varied by the market p at  of the

grain and the quality of the flour.  For example, in 1329 a two penny loaf

of white bread would have been 7 pounds 10 ounces a voirdupois.  It would

have been somewhat less in the latter half of the 17th Century when Evelyn

was cooking.

 

Puddings can be boiled, steamed or baked.  Most of the ones I've encountered

that are close to Elizabethean call for a pudding cloth and boiling.  This

recipe, however, is over fifty years later and consideration must be given

to how much the French culinary traditions influenced Evelyn.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Fri, 20 May 2005 21:37:21 -0500

From: "Terry Decker" <t.d.decker at worldnet.att.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] cakes

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

From: "Nancy Kiel" <nancy_kiel at hotmail.com>

>  I thought steamed puddings were later than our time period...you don't see

>  the technique even in the 18th century really, although I have a vague

>  recollection of trying custards in little cups in a bake kettle/Dutch oven

>  with water.....

 

You can steam a pudding in a pudding cloth and the instructions in some

cases are unclear as to whether the pudding is to be immersed or not.  

As a practical point it may not matter, but I haven't tried any experiments

To see if it does.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Sun, 22 May 2005 19:27:21 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Puddings was cakes

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> OK, now you've made me curious.  I always understood "steaming" of

> puddings to be putting your filled, closed pudding mold into a pot of

> boiling water, but not submerging it completely.  snipped

> Nancy Kiel

 

Ivan Day has puddings on his website---

http://www.historicfood.com/English%20Puddings.htm

"Some Interesting English Puddings" includes

puddings in skins

puddings boiled in a cloth

dripping pan puddings

baked puddings

with colour pictures!

 

Wilson is also rather good to read on puddings.

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Tue, 7 Jun 2005 12:16:05 -0500

From: "Terry Decker" <t.d.decker at worldnet.att.net>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] A Note on Steamed Puddings

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Since there was a bit of question on when doughs began being steamed rather

than boiled, I can say that it occurred in Antiquity.  "Erneum" is a pastry

similar to Cato's "placenta." It was made in an earthenware jar which was

boiled in a copper cauldron, a method similar to some of the later pudding

recipes.  To extract the cake, the jar was broken.

 

This doesn't mean that the method was used in period, just that it was known

before period.

 

The information is given in C. Anne Wilson's "I'll to Thee a Simnel Bring"

from PPC 19, 1985.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 11:09:09 -0500

From: "Terry Decker" <t.d.decker at worldnet.att.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] A Note on Steamed Puddings

To: "Jenn Strobel" <jenn.strobel at gmail.com>,     "Cooks within the SCA"

        <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> I'm not familiar with Cato's "placenta" so I looked around a bit and

> found the original recipe and some discusson on it, but i'm not

> entirely clear as to how one would "build" it.  Has anyone actually

> made this recipe and have any insight?

> Odriana

 

It's a fairly complex construction. There is a hard outer pie shell

enclosing soft dough balls (tracta) surrounded by a filling of cheese and

honey.  You might try thinking of it as dumplings in a honey and cheese

tart.

 

Take a pie or cake pan, roll out the hard dough larger that the pan. Put

the rolled out dough in the pan, letting the excess hang over the edges.

Put a layer of dough balls in the pie shell and surround them with filling.

Repeat with a second layer of dough balls.  Fold over the excessdough to

form a top crust.  Bake.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Tue, 25 Apr 2006 12:25:57 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Puddings was sausages

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

To all those that were interested in sausages and stuffing them

into casings and such... Something new is up on Ivan Day's site--

Puddings--

http://www.historicfood.com/English%20Puddings.htm

If you go down the page you will see large pictures of two

items being one a funnel and one a forcer.

These exact items are what we used when we made the rice puddings in forms

recipe from Markham. They are actually quite good, esp. with cream.

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Sat, 5 Jul 2008 12:23:52 -0400 (EDT)

From: Susan Fox <selene at earthlink.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Subject: Re:  English Food

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

<<< I don't have the recipe here but my biggest hit is my auntie's

Yorkshire pudding. There is nothing that can bet that and it is

medieval in my book. Also people cannot believe how cheap it is.

Suey >>>

 

David/Cariadoc wrote:

By "medieval in my book" do you mean you have a medeval recipe for

it, you conjecture it is medieval, or you think it feels sufficiently

medieval not to spoil the ambiance?

-------

 

I suspect she meant the second or third.  However, Yorkshire Pudding does not seem to appear in cooking literature until 1737.  Which is too bad, it is indeed cheap and yummy.  Americans just don't have enough excuses to eat drippings!

 

Some documentation is here:  http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodpuddings.html

 

Susan/Selene

 

 

Date: Sun, 06 Jul 2008 19:46:45 -0400

From: Sandra Kisner <sjk3 at cornell.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] yorkshire pudding

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

"There _are_ some English baked pudding recipes (in both name and form)

beginning, I'd guess, in the late 16th, early 17th centuries, but none

quite like Yorkshire pudding, AFAIK. There may be an issue regarding the

availability of hardish wheat flours in England at whatever time we're

talking about. You need at least some gluten to get that dramatic rise.

Of course, if there is an Italian precedent, that may not matter.

 

It probably is Georgian. Anybody have a copy of Hannah Glasse handy?

 

Adamantius"

 

From Randolph C. Williams' reprint of the 1796 edition of Hannah Glasse

(long s retained):

 

p. 190

A Yorkfhire Pudding.

Take a quart of milk and five eggs, beat them up well together, and mix

them with flour until it is of a good pancake batter, and very fmooth; put

in a little falt, some grated nutmeg, and ginger; butter a dripping or

frying pan and put it under a piece of beef, mutton, or a loin of veal that

is roafting, and then put in your batter, and when the top fide is brown,

cut it in fquare pieces, and turn it, and then let the under fide be brown;

then put it in a hot difh as clean of fat as you can, and fend it to table hot.

 

Phew - all one sentence!  So this isn't a (modern) "put the batter in a pan

full of hot dripping and bake it" recipe, but something similar to older

recipes of catching the juice dripping from meat as it roasts, but with

batter in the pan instead of bread.  Also OOP, but older than I had been

aware the name was in use.

 

Sandra

 

 

Date: Fri, 11 Jul 2008 14:27:46 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae at mac.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] yorkshire pudding

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

These are batter or dripping puddings and I have to wonder if they might

not have made their way out of a recipe like this one for spit roasted pudding--

because Gervaise Markham  in his 1623 Countrey Contentments and later in his

English House-vvife of 1631 says:

 

To roast a pudding on a spit.

 

To roast a pudding vpon a spit, you shall mixe the pudding before spoken

of in the legge of Mutton, neither omitting hearbes, nor saffron, and

put to a little sweete butter and mixe it very stiffe: then fold it

about the spit, and haue ready in another dish some of the same mixture

well seasoned, but a great deale thinner, and no butter at all in it,

and when the pudding doth beginne to roast, and that the butter

appeares, then with a spoone couer it all ouer with the thinner mixture,

and so let it roast: then if you see no more butter appeare, then baste

it as you did the Pigge, and lay more of the mixture on, and so continue

till all be spent: And then roast it browne, and so serue it vp.

 

Eventually, you get tired of the basting and just cook the pudding

beneath the spitted roast.

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Mon, 7 Jul 2008 00:34:56 -0700

From: Lilinah <lilinah at earthlink.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] yorkshire pudding

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

Sandra posted, in reply to Adamantius:

<<< From Randolph C. Williams' reprint of the 1796 edition of Hannah Glasse

(long s retained):

 

p. 190

A Yorkfhire Pudding.

Take a quart of milk and five eggs, beat them up well together, and mix

them with flour until it is of a good pancake batter, and very fmooth; put

in a little falt, some grated nutmeg, and ginger; butter a dripping or

frying pan and put it under a piece of beef, mutton, or a loin of veal that

is roafting, and then put in your batter, and when the top fide is brown,

cut it in fquare pieces, and turn it, and then let the under fide be brown;

then put it in a hot difh as clean of fat as you can, and fend it to

table hot.

 

Phew - all one sentence!  So this isn't a (modern) "put the batter in a pan

full of hot dripping and bake it" recipe, but something similar to older

recipes of catching the juice dripping from meat as it roasts, but with

batter in the pan instead of bread.  Also OOP, but older than I had been

aware the name was in use. >>>

 

OK, i am mystified (What?! Again?!)

 

The only way i have ever known to make Yorkshire pudding is to mix

eggs, milk, flour, and seasonings and put it in a pan on a rack

beneath a roast so the drippings fall into it. I don't remember where

i got the recipe i used, but i know it didn't have all the spices

that Hannah put in hers. Still, it was tasty.

 

I did this back when i was learning to cook (and it was a rather

small roast) in the winter of 1967 and had my first apartment (in

Manhattan). Meant i had some cleaning to do in that oven, but it was

an interesting experiment. I only ever had eaten roast beef and

Yorkshire pudding in the spring of 1962 in London at Claridge's, all

rich woods and Victorian atmosphere...

 

I had no idea that people have been just baking batter mixed with

drippings on its own! That seems like... like... well, like

cheating...

 

But, thanks for posting the recipe, Sandra. If i ever decided to do

another roast at home, i'll give it a try with all those extra spices.

--

Urtatim (that's err-tah-TEEM)

the persona formerly known as Anahita

 

 

Date: Tue, 08 Jul 2008 09:27:41 +1200

From: Antonia Calvo <ladyadele at paradise.net.nz>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] yorkshire pudding

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Lilinah wrote:

<<< The only way i have ever known to make Yorkshire pudding is to mix

eggs, milk, flour, and seasonings and put it in a pan on a rack

beneath a roast so the drippings fall into it. I don't remember where

i got the recipe i used, but i know it didn't have all the spices that

Hannah put in hers. Still, it was tasty.

 

<snip!>

 

I had no idea that people have been just baking batter mixed with

drippings on its own! That seems like... like... well, like cheating...

 

But, thanks for posting the recipe, Sandra. If i ever decided to do

another roast at home, i'll give it a try with all those extra spices. >>>

 

You don't mix it with the drippings, actually.  You just put some of the

fat dripping in a pan and pour the batter on top of it

--

Antonia di Benedetto Calvo

 

 

Date: Wed, 6 Aug 2008 12:58:14 -0500

From: "Alexandria Doyle" <garbaholic at gmail.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] A pudding in egges

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

I came across two receipts that I'm curious about and am looking for

clarifications. The sources are as follows:

A Book of Cookrye,  by A. W., London, 1591.  Originally published

1584. STC 24897 -- Early English Text microfilms reel 1613:9.

Transcribed by Mark and Jane Waks

 

Found at http://jducoeur.org/Cookbook/Cookrye.html

 

Receipt #1

A Pudding in Egges.

Take and boyle your Egges hard, and blanch them, and cut off the

Crowne of them, and take then of the yolks and chop them, Beetes

boyled, and yolkes of hard egges, grated Bread, and Corance, Salte

Sugar, Sinamon, and Ginger, and then put the yolkes of rawe Egges, and

mingle them altogither, then put in your Egges, then for your broth

take a little Mutton broth, Corance, Dates, Sugar, a little salt and

butter, thicken it with yolks of Egs, vergious and a little sugar, so

serve it in.

 

receipt #2

A Pudding in a Cowcumber.

Take your Cowcumber and cut out all the meat that is within it, then

take a Liver of a Lamb or Pigge, and Grapes or Gooceberies, and grated

bread, pepper, salt, Cloves and mace, and a little suet, and the

yolkes of three Egs, and mingle altogither and put in the Cowcumber,

and let your broth boile or ever you put it in: the broth must be made

of Mutton broth, Vinagre, and Butter, strained bread, and Salt, and so

serve it out.

 

Because these recipes were in the section with boiling things, I'm

assuming that once the egg or cucumber is stuffed it is then boiled?

 

If one doesn't have mutton broth, what is a good substitute?

 

If one doesn't have suet, what is a good substitute?

 

I have beef liver in the freezer, but no lamb or pig's liver.  Would

that be an okay substitute?

 

I've not made anything like these before but I'm quite curious...

 

alex

 

 

Date: Wed, 06 Aug 2008 19:59:11 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae at mac.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] A pudding in egges

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Alexandria Doyle wrote:

I came across two receipts that I'm curious about and am looking for

clarifications. The sources are as follows:

A Book of Cookrye,  by A. W., London, 1591.  Originally published

1584. STC 24897

Found at http://jducoeur.org/Cookbook/Cookrye.html

 

Receipt #1

A Pudding in Egges.snipped

 

receipt #2

A Pudding in a Cowcumber.snipped

 

Because these recipes were in the section with boiling things, I'm

assuming that once the egg or cucumber is stuffed it is then boiled?

 

Maybe simmered gently might be better.

If one doesn't have mutton broth, what is a good substitute?

 

How about beef stock? Or get lamb bones and make a lamb stock.

If one doesn't have suet, what is a good substitute?

 

Ask at the local meat market if they have suet. It may be available.

I have beef liver in the freezer, but no lamb or pig's liver.  Would

that be an okay substitute?

 

That would be a start and use up something you already have.

I've not made anything like these before but I'm quite curious...

 

alex

----------

 

Here are some other pudding recipes for comparison sake:

 

This is an excerpt from *A NEVV BOOKE of Cookerie*

(England, 1615)

The original source can be found at Thomas Gloning's website

<http://www.uni-giessen.de/gloning/tx/1615murr.htm>;

 

A Liueridge or Hogges Pudding. BOyle a Hogges Liuer well, let it be

through colde: then grate it like Bread: grate Bread, take new Milke,

the fat of the Hogge minst fine, put it to the bread, and the Liuer, the

more the better, deuide it into two parts. Take store of drye Hearbes,

that are very well dryed, mince them fine, put the Hearbes into one

part, with Nutmeg, Mace, Pepper, Annisseedes, Rose water, Creame, and

Egs, wash the skinnes, and then fill them vp, and let them boyle enough.

To the other sort put Barberryes, sliced Dates, Currins, new Milke and

Egs, worke them as the other.

 

This is an excerpt from *A NEVV BOOKE of Cookerie*

(England, 1615)

The original source can be found at Thomas Gloning's website

<http://www.uni-giessen.de/gloning/tx/1615murr.htm>;

 

A Pudding stued betweene two Dishes. TAke the yolkes of three Egges, and

the white of one, halfe a dozen spoonefuls of sweet Creame, a Nutmeg

grated, a few Cloaues and mace, a quarter of a pound of Beefe Suit minst

small, a quarter of a pound of Currens, temper it like a Pudding with

grated bread, and a spoonefull of Rosewater. Then take a Kell of Ueale,

cut it in square pieces like Trenchers, lay three spoonefuls of the

batter vpon one side, then roule it vp in the Cawle: pin one side ouer

the other with two small prickes, and tie each end with a threed. You

may put two, three, or foure of them in a Dish, then take halfe a pinte

of strong Mutton broth, and halfe a dozen spoonefuls of Uinegar, three

or foure blades of large Mace, and an Ounce of Sugar. Make this broth to

boyle vpon a Chafingdish of coales, and then put in your Pudding: when

it boyles couer it with an other Dish, and let it stue a quarter of an

houre longer. Turne them for burning, then take vp your Pudding, and lay

it vpon sippets, and poure the broth vpon the toppe. Garnish your Dish

with the coare of a Lemmon, and Barberryes: serue them hot, eyther at

Dinner or Supper.

 

This is an excerpt from *A NEVV BOOKE of Cookerie*

(England, 1615)

The original source can be found at Thomas Gloning's website

<http://www.uni-giessen.de/gloning/tx/1615murr.htm>;

 

To make a Pudding in a Frying-panne. TAke foure Egges, two spoonefuls of

Rosewater, Nutmeg grated, Sugar, grated Bread, the quantitie of a penny

Loafe, halfe a pound of Beefe Suit minst fine: worke them as stiffe as a

Pudding with your hand, and put it in a Frying-pan with sweet Butter,

frye it browne, cut it in quarters, and serue it hot, eyther at Dinner

or Supper. Jf it be on a fasting day leaue out the Suit, and the

Currens, and put in two or three Pomewaters minst small, or any other

soft Apple that hath a good relish.

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Sat, 13 Feb 2010 10:54:14 -0800 (PST)

From: Raphaella DiContini <raphaellad at yahoo.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Experimentation results for Amidono d' amido

 

Thank you all so much for your feedback and help. I went to my local grocery store that carries Bob's Red Mill products, but sadly they didn't have any wheat starch as it was a very limited selection. I then went to a local Asian supermarket (which was an adventure this close to Chinese new year) and while they didn't have any wheat starch, they did have rice starch so this first set of experiments was using that. There are still some questions, but I think I'm off to a good start.

 

Here's the translation I've been working from to start things off:

I. (1) Amidono of starch {Almond milk pudding}

If you want to make starch dish for 12 people, take two pounds of almonds and one pound of amido/starch. And half of sugar and take ? of peeled pine nuts and half a quarter (1/8th) of cloves, and take the almonds well peeled and well crushed, and temper them with clear water well boiled and separate the milk and set it to boil, of that that remains raw put to soften the starch.? When the milk has boiled enough, temper the starch and put it into and mix thick for serving, and put in enough sugar, and dust with scrapes of sugar and cloves and whole pine nuts.? And if you want to make it for more persons or for less, make it like this to this same recipe and it is a perfect food.

 

Using the weights kindly supplied by Antonia and others I recalculated the amounts given for a 1/4 recipe using the Troy pound.

 

6 oz Almond

3 oz Amido/ starch

1.5 oz sugar (I used superfine baker's sugar)

1.5 oz peeled pine nuts

.5 oz cloves

 

I started with a water based almond milk and left roughly half out, which I mixed with the rice starch. Once the almond milk had boiled I poured that into the starch/almond milk mixture and then back into the pan to slowly bring it back up to temperature. At this point I was struggling with lumps quite a bit, but after managing to work most of them out added the sugar to taste leaving some for garnish and added some of the cloves and the pine nuts.

 

I wasn't very happy with this first try. The texture wasn't great and having measured out all the ingredients, but adding the sugar and cloves slowly the clove was still much, much too overwhelming. I could definitely see it's potential as it was quite tasty if visually unappealing before the clove was added.

 

The second run through was done by having measured out the calculated amounts again, but this time adding things slowly until the right balance seemed to be reached. I also realized that as this starch was already light and fluffy, having the consistency of powdered sugar that it likely didn't need the step of "softening" which greatly increased the lumpiness.

 

This time I brought all of the almond milk (6oz) to a boil and sifted the starch into it and then whisked it smooth. The resulting texture was nearly perfect. However when I reached 1 oz of the starch, it set perfectly and I chose not to try to over saturate it to add the other 2/3 of the called for amount. I then whisked in most of the sugar to taste, plated it and sprinkled it with a bit more sugar, pine nuts, and a pinch of clove.

 

The result was very well recivied. My stunt non-foodie even asked for more and there was nothing left at the end!

 

I've got some theories as to why the interpretation that seemed to work best had differnent measurements than the original. The first is the almonds/ almond milk. Not having been given the amount of boiled water used for the almond milk I used to measurement given for the almonds as a placeholder and I'm fairly certain this was the biggest miscalculation. When I make almond milk I typically will use 1 cup of skinless almonds to 3 cups of water, which yeilds 3 cups of almond milk + solids to be strained. If I were to increase the amount of almond milk by three that would put the texture just about perfect, and would increase the bulk enough that the amount of sugar wouldn't overpower the delicate flavor (but that may have been what they were aming for as sugar=prestige).

 

My theory on the completely overwhelming cloves is that they would have been more garnish, and as the description was "scrapes of sugar and cloves" that they weren't ground which difuses the flavor much more powerfully and might to some degree have been eaten around.

 

I'm still planning on doing at least one more run with this recipe using my almond milk theory, and I've had quite a bit of fun! Thank you all again for all of your input.

 

In joyous service,

Raffaella

 

 

To: SCA_Subtleties at yahoogroups.com

Subject: Re: Cupcakewurst

Posted by: "Sharon Palmer" ranvaig at columbus.rr.com ranvaig

Date: Tue May 22, 2012 8:20 pm ((PDT))

 

<<< Well I suppose the culinary precedent for this

would be a sweet pudding served in a casing. >>>

 

Rumpolt has a savory custard with bacon in a casing.

 

Ochsen 35.  Take eggs and beat them together/ let

them run through a hair cloth/ and put a good

sweet milk with it/ also bacon chopped small/

green herbs/ and a little saffron. Take the

intestines/ and tie it closed on one end/ put the

stuffing through the other into it/ and tie

closed at the other end also/ let boil to the

point (until done) as the other intestine.

 

Rice or millet in a casing

 

Ochsen 34.  Cut up the brawn two fingers wide/

and nicely long/ take beef fat/ that was cooked

well with the meat/ also green herbs/ a soaked

weck bread/ and a little onion/ chop it together/

Put it in a good beef broth and let it simmer

together. Trim the ox intestine nicely clean/ and

let the fat remain/ take a fair rice/ that is

washed clean/ turn the ox intestine inside out/

that the fat comes out/ and sprinkle it with the

rice/ turn it inside out again/ that it comes

inside/ put it in boiling hot water/ and let cook

until completely to the point (until completely

done)/ then will the rice cook in the intestine.

You can also prepare such an intestine from

millet.

 

Another custard.

 

Geiß 28  ....You can also stuff such intestines

with eggs and sweet milk/ as you usually make a

milk head (custard)/ and when you have filled it/

then poach it in a water/

 

Ranvaig

 

<the end>



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