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p-street-food-msg - 7/28/11

 

Period street food.

 

NOTE: See also the files: finger-foods-msg, fried-foods-msg, nuts-msg, eggs-msg, pies-msg, jumbals-msg, Ital-Fnl-Caks-art, pretzels-msg, wafers-msg.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

    Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                          Stefan at florilegium.org

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Date: Mon, 16 May 2011 12:25:00 -0700

From: Susan Fox <selene at earthlink.net>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Period Street Food

 

Nuts to you!  Archeological excavations of Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

revealed layers and layers of hazel nut shells on the ground.  

Apparently that's what you crunched at the theatre before popcorn.

 

Churros, if you called them "Cryspes" can be documented.   You'd have to

get some nutcase who is willing to deep fry outside though... wait, you

have one.  :-)

 

Selene

 

On 5/16/2011 12:19 PM, Mercy Neumark wrote:

<<< I wanted to get peoples' opinions as I am contemplating doing simple lunches at events for fundraisers, however I want to offer a) period food (not the sandwiches and chips that have been seen in the past few years and b) I'm looking for something different than a pastry/meat pie (forgive my spelling), meat on a stick, or sausages. Something cheap to make, tasty and unique within period that can be made either at a day event with no kitchen or with very little set up kitchen.

 

Would love the final price point at $5-6 with costs in the $2 and below.

 

--Mercy >>>

 

 

Date: Mon, 16 May 2011 14:03:05 -0700

From: David Friedman <ddfr at daviddfriedman.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Period Street Food

 

A dip along with bread--Badinjan Muhassa, say--might work.

 

I like barmakiya for something to bring to an event, and I expect it

would work for your purpose, although you might want to make it as

lots of small units rather than the larger ones in our recipe. Not

sure if that counts as a "pastry/meat pie" or not.

 

Hais.

--

David/Cariadoc

www.daviddfriedman.com

 

 

Date: Mon, 16 May 2011 17:12:42 -0500

From: Sayyeda al-Kaslaania <samia at idlelion.net>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Period Street Food

 

In _A Mediterranean Society, Vol 1._ S.D. Goitein discusses how most

urban dining in Cairo during the Middle Ages (specifically the Abbasid

and Fatimid periods) was "take out" food, since people didn't keep

kitchens in the urban living spaces during this period. Fresh fruit

would be fabulous, especially melons. This is all around p 110-30.

 

He also mentions bagels being sold in such a fashion, I believe that's

in Vol 2.

 

There's a little more about the food markets in his article "Urban

Housing in Fatimid and Ayyubid times".

 

Sayyeda al-Kaslaania

 

 

Date: Mon, 16 May 2011 18:41:04 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae at mac.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Period Street Food

 

If you need references see this paper:

Carlin, Martha. "Fast food and Urban Living Standards

in Medieval England."

 

appears in the volume:

Food and Eating in Medieval England,

edited by Martha Carlin and Joel T. Rosenthal. London: The

Hambledon Press, 1998. ISBN: 1-85285-148-1.

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Mon, 16 May 2011 21:14:49 -0700

From: Ursula Georges <ursula at tutelaries.net>

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Period Street Food

 

On 5/16/2011 3:36 PM, sca-cooks-request at lists.ansteorra.org wrote:

<<< In _A Mediterranean Society, Vol 1._ S.D. Goitein discusses how most

urban dining in Cairo during the Middle Ages (specifically the Abbasid

and Fatimid periods) was "take out" food, since people didn't keep

kitchens in the urban living spaces during this period. Fresh fruit

would be fabulous, especially melons. This is all around p 110-30. >>>

 

Late-period Istanbul had a similar system.  If you look at lists of

guilds, there are lots of people specializing in making a specific food.

Helva-makers (the sweet) and tripe-soup-sellers spring to mind.

 

Ursula Georges.

 

 

Date: Tue, 17 May 2011 07:25:14 -0700 (PDT)

From: Honour Horne-Jaruk <jarukcomp at yahoo.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Period Street Food

 

In Spain, little old ladies sat on street corners with a charcoal brazier heating a pot of oil. When a customer showed up, they'd crack an egg into it and dish it up deep-fried. I tried it- it's actually amazingly good. There's a painting, just OOP, of such a woman.

 

In England, there were carts where you could buy hot buttered barley.

 

Yours in service to both the Societies of which I am a member-

(Friend) Honour Horne-Jaruk, R.S.F.

Alizaundre de Brebeuf, C.O.L. S.C.A.- AKA Una the wisewoman, or That Pict

 

 

Date: Tue, 17 May 2011 12:09:06 -0400

From: Robin Carroll-Mann <rcarrollmann at gmail.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Period Street Food

 

On Tue, May 17, 2011 at 10:25 AM, Honour Horne-Jaruk

<jarukcomp at yahoo.com> wrote:

<<< In Spain, little old ladies sat on street corners with a charcoal brazier heating a pot of oil. When a customer showed up, they'd crack an egg into it and dish it up deep-fried. I tried it- it's actually amazingly good. There's a painting, just OOP, of such a woman. >>>

 

Because I know *someone* is going to ask. . .

 

That's "Old Woman Frying Eggs" by Velazquez:

http://www.wga.hu/frames-e.html?/html/v/velazque/01/0105vela.html

 

Brighid ni Chiarain

 

 

Date: Fri, 20 May 2011 10:58:51 -0700 (PDT)

From: Honour Horne-Jaruk <jarukcomp at yahoo.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Period Street Food

 

--- On Fri, 5/20/11, Stefan li Rous <StefanliRous at austin.rr.com> wrote:

Alizaundre earlier also said:

<<< In England, there were carts where you could

buy hot buttered barley. >>>

 

Anyone have any more info on this? Was the barley boiled,

like rice, and then butter added to it, like we often do

with popcorn? Or were these made into a sort of barley

mush/rice pudding like patty and fried? Or would the dry

kernels be raw or cooked somehow (like popcorn?) and then

buttered?

 

Stefan >>>

 

As I remember (This was fifteen years ago, and the computer where I'd stored the link is long since dead) The barley was boiled, and the standard toppers were either butter or pepper - which also says a lot about how much the price of pepper went down between the middle ages and these Elizabethan entrepreneurs.

 

Yours in service to both the Societies of which I am a member-

(Friend) Honour Horne-Jaruk, R.S.F.

Alizaundre de Brebeuf, C.O.L. S.C.A.- AKA Una the wisewoman, or That Pict

 

<the end>



Formatting copyright © Mark S. Harris (THLord Stefan li Rous).
All other copyrights are property of the original article and message authors.

Comments to the Editor: stefan at florilegium.org