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Period onion soups.

 

NOTE: See also the files: soup-msg, onions-msg, leeks-msg, broths-msg, thickening-msg, stews-bruets-msg, porridges-msg, root-veg-msg, serving-soups-msg.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I  have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done  a limited amount  of  editing. Messages having to do  with separate topics  were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the  message IDs  were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make  no claims  as  to the accuracy  of  the information  given  by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time  and  efforts of  those who have written  these messages. The copyright status  of these messages  is  unclear  at this time. If information  is  published  from  these  messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

   Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                         Stefan at florilegium.org

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Date: Fri, 17 Oct 1997 13:06:16 -0600 (MDT)

From: "Jamey R. Lathrop" <jlathrop at unm.edu>

Subject: Re: SC - A.P.B. : Have You Seen This Recipe?

 

Good day to all, from Allegra Beati, who's WAY behind on this list.

 

On Sun, 5 Oct 1997, Philip & Susan Troy wrote:

> Within the last two weeks or so I ran across what seemed like a

> wonderful vegetarian vegetable recipe which seemed like a lovely pottage

> for SCA use. Trouble is, I can't remember the source or even the name of

> the dish.

>

> It is for a thick pottage made from sweated (sauteed but unbrowned)

> sliced onions, in a seasoned almond milk base, boiled until slightly

> thick, and garnished with fried "onion rings" made from an egg pasta

> dough, cut into circular shapes.

>

> Suspected sources include Taillevent's Viandier, Le Menagier de Paris,

> Chiquart's Fait du Cuisine, and all of Curye On Inglysche. Possibly the

> Two Fifteenth-Century Cookbooks, but less likely than the others...

 

As it happens, I included this one in the recipes our local cookery group

is going to do at a redaction party tomorrow.  It's from CURYE ON

INGLYSCH, Part II:  DIUERSA SERVICIA.

 

      88. For to make a porrey chapeleyn, tak an hundred onyons o[th]er

an half, & tak oyle de olyf & boyle togedere in a pot; & tak almande mylk

& boyle yt & do [th]ereto.  |  Tak & make a [th]ynne paast of dow, & make

[th]erof as it were ryngis.  Tak & fry hem in oyle de olyue or in wyte

grees & boil al togedere.

 

Hope this helps,

 

Allegra Beati                   Jamey Lathrop

Barony of al-Barran              jlathrop at unm.edu

Outlands

 

 

Date: Thu, 01 Jan 1998 13:47:11 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: SC - Long: Da whole onion soup deal, including porrey chapeleyn

 

> As it happens, I included this one in the recipes our local cookery group

> is going to do at a redaction party tomorrow.  It's from CURYE ON

> INGLYSCH, Part II:  DIUERSA SERVICIA.

>

>         88.  For to make a porrey chapeleyn, tak an hundred onyons o[th]er

> an half, & tak oyle de olyf & boyle togedere in a pot; & tak almande mylk

> & boyle yt & do [th]ereto.  |  Tak & make a [th]ynne paast of dow, & make

> [th]erof as it were ryngis.  Tak & fry hem in oyle de olyue or in wyte

> grees & boil al togedere.

>

> Allegra Beati                           Jamey Lathrop

> Barony of al-Barran                     jlathrop at unm.edu

> Outlands

 

A simple, small-scale redaction.

 

Porrey Chapeleyn (approx. 4 servings?)

 

3 cups blanched almonds

3 pounds large yellow onions

salt and pepper

1 cup all-purpose flour

4 Tbs. good olive oil, like the really green extra-virgin stuff,

otherwise you might as well

                       use vegetable oil

deep-frying oil, maybe two or three cups

water

 

Start by making the pasta dough for the garnish. Add a pinch of salt,

and a Tbs. of your olive oil to the cup of flour. Add only as much cold

water to your flour as you need to make a stiff dough. Knead until it is

no longer sticky. It should be elastic, smooth, and have a bit of a

shine to it; this may take 15 minutes or so. Just hold tight and think

of England ;  ). When done, cover the dough and let it rest. (Cheaters

can use won-ton wrappers and a cookie cutter, I guess.)

 

Make some almond milk. Grind the almonds in a blender, food processor,

or mortar, until they are a slightly granular flour. Don't forget to add

a few drops of water to keep the pulp from de-emulsifying and leaking

almond oil all over the place. Add as much boiling water as your almonds

will drink up, plus another three cups. This may take six or eight cups,

but what you need is three cups of almond milk. Stir and let your

almonds steep 10-15 minutes. You may want to strain off your milk at

this point, and add more boiling water. Another strategy is to run the

almonds and their liquid through a blender, and then strain, which will

probably give you a stronger almond solution. The final product should

be pretty smooth, almost completely white (still slightly translucent)

and look a bit like skimmed milk. The goal is for it to be slightly

thick, but it can range anywhere from water to cream. Keep this on the

side.

 

Peel and slice your onions thinly, or chop finely. (I've had good

results with grating them coarsely, as you might do for curry paste).

Add your remaining olive oil to a deep cassserole pan or Dutch oven, and

heat it. When it is pretty hot, but not smoking, add your onions, stir

them, and reduce the heat until the onions begin to sort of melt in the

pan. They shouldn't brown, but will soften, and become concentrated in

flavor as well as volume. Stuir frequently, if not constantly. This may

take 15-20 minutes.

 

Add your almond milk to the pan, and stir. Raise the heat and heat,

stirring, until the liquid is simmering. Simmer for about an hour.

 

While the soup is simmering, form the pseudo-onion-ring garnish. Either

pull off chunks and roll them, with your hands, into 6-inch-long threads

no more then 1/4 inch thick, and form rings by sealing the ends with

water, or roll out like pasta dough, 1/8 inch thick, and cut with round

donut, biscuit, or cookie cutters, cutting out the center with a smaller

round cutter. A set of nested biscuit cutters is great for this, but a

standard donut cutter is good too. You get more if you have several

different size cutters, since you can cut smaller rings out of the

centers of other rings. As I said, cheaters can use wonton, egg roll, or

gyoza wrappers (which last are ideal because they are eggless: my guess

is that this is intended to be a fast-day or fish-day dish, since it

avoids meat, dairy, and eggs).

 

Dust these with an absolute minimum of cornstarch or flour, to keep them

from sticking to your board or each other, and cover with a towel. Heat

your oil in a wok, a medium-sized saucepan, or a heavy iron skillet. The

oil will need to be about an inch deep. When the surface shimmers just a

bit, but isn't smoking yet, and add two or three rings at a time. They

are done when they are golden brown. Remember they will continue to

brown after they come out of the oil, so if they are a shade lighter

than you want them, don't worry. Drain on paper towels.

 

By this time the onions should be nearly disintegrated, and the pottage

should have thickened a bit. When the soup is done, season to taste with

salt and pepper. Fanatics could use white pepper, but the more period

alternative would be ordinary black. The recipe doesn't call for any

pepper at all, but it does help.

 

Serve into bowls and top with a few "onion" rings.

 

If Lady Allegra Beati has a different redaction of this that her cooks'

group worked on, I'd love to see it. Mine is still in the experimental

stage, and is more intuitive than reasoned.

 

Good luck and enjoy!

 

Adamantius

troy at asan.com

 

 

Date: Sun, 04 Jan 1998 16:40:22 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: SC - "classical" onion soup...

 

> From: Stefan li Rous <stefan at texas.net>

> Does anyone know of a medieval onion soup that uses a meat broth?

 

Offhand, no. Some use almond milk, and many use wine or ale, but I

haven't come across one using meat stock, at least not in a quick,

cursory check through a couple of sources. If I do run across any, I'll

mention it.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Tue, 6 Jan 1998 17:23:19 -0800

From: kat <kat at kagan.com>

Subject: SC - onion soup - IP

 

Good Stefan asks:

> If not, my question still stands, Does anyone know of a medieval onion

> soup that uses a meat broth?

 

I believe (book not in front of me) that one or more of the "onyon soppes" recipes in Take 1000 Eggs (these are from Harleian MS, no?) calls for onions, water, and almond milk "made with wine or broth."  I could be wrong.

 

- kat

 

 

Date: Fri, 9 Jan 1998 13:42:09 -0400

From: renfrow at skylands.net (Cindy Renfrow)

Subject: Re: SC - onion soup - IP

 

>Kat answered my inquiry:

>Good Stefan asks:

>> If not, my question still stands, Does anyone know of a medieval onion

>> soup that uses a meat broth?

>

>I believe (book not in front of me) that one or more of the "onyon soppes"

>recipes in Take 1000 Eggs (these are from Harleian MS, no?) calls for onions,

>water, and almond milk "made with wine or broth."  I could be wrong.

 

>However, my question was more to the overall soup base and not just

>whether it had some meat broth in it. This one appears to me, not

>having ever made it, to still end up being a white/cream base rather

>than a brown, meat one. I imagine there is a better, more precise way

>to phrase the question than I initially did.

>

>Stefan li Rous

 

Hello! Here are the recipes for onion soups from Take 1000 Eggs:

 

Harleian MS. 279, Potage Dyvers

xxx. Soupes dorroy. Shere Oynonys, an frye hem in oyle; [th]anne take Wyne,

an boyle with Oynonys, toste whyte Brede an do on a dysshe, an caste

[th]er-on gode Almaunde Mylke, & temper it wyth wyne:  [th]anne do [th]e

dorry a-bowte, an messe it forth.

 

Laud MS. 553

17 Soupes dorrees.  Nym oynons, mynce hem, frie hem in oille de olyue:  nym

oynons, boille hem with wyn, tost whit bred, & do it in dishes/ and cast

almand mylke theron, & ye wyn & ye oynons aboue, & gif hit forth.

 

Harleian MS. 279 - Potage Dyvers

xxxiij. Oyle Soppys.  Take a gode quantyte of Oynonys, and mynse hem not

to smale, an sethe in fayre Water:  [th]an take hem vp, an take a gode

quantite of Stale Ale, as .iij. galouns, an [th]er-to take a pynte of Oyle

fryid, an caste [th]e Oynonys [th]er-to, an let boyle alle to-gederys a

gode whyle; then caste [th]er-to Safroune, powder Pepyr, Sugre, an Salt, an

serue forth alle hote as tostes, as in [th]e same maner for a Mawlard & of

a capon, & hoc qu¾re.

 

Harleian MS. 4016

130 Oyle soppes.  Take a good quantite of oynons, and myce hem, no[3]t to

smale, & seth hem in faire water, And take hem vppe; and then take a good

quantite of stale ale, as .iij. galons, And there-to take a pynte of goode

oyle that is fraied, and cast the oynons there-to, And lete al boyle

togidre a grete [while];  and caste there-to Saffron and salt, And [th]en

put brede, in maner of brewes, and cast the licour there-on, and serue hit

forth hote.

 

Cindy Renfrow

renfrow at skylands.net

Author & Publisher of "Take a Thousand Eggs or More, A Collection of 15th

Century Recipes" and "A Sip Through Time, A Collection of Old Brewing

Recipes"

http://www.alcasoft.com/renfrow/

 

 

Date: Sun, 11 Jan 1998 11:26:15 +0000

From: "Robin Carroll-Mann" <harper at idt.net>

Subject: SC - Onion Soups

 

I didn't keep the originals, hence don't remember the details, but I

know there was some discussion recently of onion soup.  Someone (I

think) wanted to know if there were any onion soups based on a meat

stock, and there was also some lively debate about "French"

onion soups topped with bread and cheese.  Here is a translation of

a recipe from the 1528 edition of the "Libro de Guisados".  I have

not tried redacting this one (I'm a better researcher than cook, I'm

afraid), but if anyone would like to play with it, please do.

 

Potage of Onions Which They Call "Cebollada"

 

Take peeled onions which are well washed and clean and cut them in

thick slices, and cast them in a pot of boiling water, and then

having let them come to a boil once or twice, take them out of the

pot and press them between two wooden chopping boards and then fry

them gently with good fatty bacon or with bacon grease, stirring with

a little shovel and moving it about in the frying pan with the

aforementioned little shovel which should be of wood.  And if the

onions dry up, cast in some good fatty mutton broth until the onions

are well cooked.  And then take almonds which are well peeled and

white and grind them well in a mortar and then dissolve them in

good mutton broth and pass them through a woolen strainer and then

cast the almond milk in the pot with the onions and mix it well, and

cook them well until the onions are cooked in the almond milk, and

cast good grate cheese from Aragon in the pot, and stir well with a

stirrer as if they were gourds, and when they are well mixed with the

cheese and you see that it is cooked, prepare dishes, first casting

into the pot a pair of egg yolks for each dish, and upon the dishes

cast sugar and cinnamon if you wish; and it is good.

 

Lady Brighid ni Chiarain of Tethba

Barony of Settmour Swamp, East Kingdom

 

 

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 22:44:39 -0800

From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

Subject: SC - Onion Soup--Correction

 

I made another try at the recipe I posted the other day and realized I had left out one step in the directions I posted.  So here is the corrected and updated version.

 

Potage of Onions Which They Call "Cebollada"

Libro de Guisados, 1528, tr. Robin Carroll-Mann

 

*Take peeled onions which are well washed and clean and cut them in thick slices, and cast them in a pot of boiling water, and then having let them come to a boil once or twice, take them out of the pot and press them between two wooden chopping boards and then fry them gently with good fatty bacon or with bacon grease, stirring with a little shovel and moving it about in the frying pan with the aforementioned little shovel which should be of wood.  And if the onions dry up, cast in some good fatty mutton broth until the onions are well cooked.  And then take almonds which are well peeled and white and grind them well in a mortar and then dissolve them in good mutton broth and pass them through a woolen strainer and then cast the almond milk in the pot with the onions and mix it well, and cook them well until the onions are cooked in the almond milk, and cast good grated cheese from Aragon in the pot, and stir well with a stirrer as if they were gourds, and when they are well mixed with the cheese and you see that it is cooked, prepare dishes, first casting into the pot a pair of egg yolks for each dish, and upon the dishes cast sugar and cinnamon if you wish; and it is good.

 

*Lady Brighid ni Chiarain of Tethba,

Barony of Settmour Swamp, East Kingdom

 

1 lb 10 oz onions

1 slice bacon = 1 oz

2 3/4 c lamb broth from 2 oz lamb fat and trimmings

1/2 c almonds

2 1/2 oz parmesan cheese

4 egg yolks

1 t sugar

1/8 t cinnamon

 

Put lamb trimmings in 4 c water and simmer an hour or so for broth. Blanch almonds (put into boiling water briefly, remove, and squeeze almond out of brown skin). Peel and slice onions.  Grate cheese.  Separate eggs.  Grind almonds fine and use 2 c of the lamb broth to make almond milk from them, straining through cheesecloth.  Bring 4 c water to a boil; add sliced onions, bring back to a boil, let boil a minute or two and then remove from heat and drain.

 

Squeeze the onions between  two wooden boards and drain off the juice.  

Cut up bacon and fry in pot for a couple minutes, then add onions and fry together for 10 minutes; add 1/2 c broth and cook another 5-10 minutes.  

 

Add almond milk, simmer about another 10 minutes.  Stir in grated cheese; as soon as it is melted, add egg yolks, stir them in and remove from heat.  Put into serving bowl, mix cinnamon and sugar and sprinkle over the top.

 

Elizabeth/Betty Cook

 

 

Date: Sat, 21 Feb 1998 11:16:50 -0500 (EST)

From: Stephen Bloch <sbloch at adl15.adelphi.edu>

Subject: Re: SC - Onion Soups

 

Brighid (or Robin) wrote:

> ...  Here is a translation of

> a recipe from the 1528 edition of the "Libro de Guisados"....

>

> Potage of Onions Which They Call "Cebollada"

>

> Take peeled onions which are well washed and clean and cut them in

> thick slices, and cast them in a pot of boiling water, and then

> having let them come to a boil once or twice, take them out of the

> pot and press them between two wooden chopping boards and them fry

> them gently with good fatty bacon or with bacon grease, stirring with

> a little shovel and moving it about in the frying pan with the

> aforementioned little shovel which should be of wood.  And if the

> onions dry up, cast in some good fatty mutton broth until the onions

> are well cooked.  And then take almonds which are well peeled and

> white and grind them well in a mortar and then dissolve them in

> good mutton broth and pass them through a woolen strainer and then

> cast the almond milk in the pot with the onions and mix it well, and

> cook them well until the onions are cooked in the almond milk, and

> cast good grate cheese from Aragon in the pot, and stir well with a

> stirrer as if they were gourds, and when they are well mixed with the

> cheese and you see that it is cooked, prepare dishes, first casting

> into the pot a pair of egg yolks for each dish, and upon the dishes

> cast sugar and cinnamon if you wish; and it is good.

 

Even in translation, this looks very much as though it was copied from

the 14th-c. Catalan _Llibre de Sent Sovi_, which says (our translation):

 

95 Cebada or Porada (onion or pea pottage) with milk

Take peas or onions, wash them well, cut them not too small, and make

sure not to put in any green.  And put them in water to soften until

morning. And then wash them twice in hot water and once with cold.

And then put it to cook with plenty of grease, and cook well for the

third part of a day.  And leave it for a morning, and don't stop

stirring it.  And when it is nearly done, put in good goat's milk,

according to [?] whether cebada or porada, and good aged cheese; and if

you don't have goat's milk, use almond milk.  And this goes in the

cebada or porada.  And cook until thick as for squash.  And when thick,

remove the pot from the fire, and manage it until it stops boiling.

And then [...?] beaten eggs, and mix them in bit by bit.  And when you

dish it out, if you wish, gild it with finely ground cinnamon and good

white sugar, and put this above and below the dishes, because [...?]

 

We conflated the "onion" and "pea" versions of the dish in our

redactions, which we eventually used as a "vegetarian alternative" for a

feast a year ago.  Here's the better of our two redactions.

 

Make almond milk: 4 cups water and 1 cup of almonds.  Let settle and

strain. Wash 1 lb (2 cups) dried split peas (the package says they

don't need soaking).  Put in crock-pot on high (10:15 AM) with 6 cups

water, 1 T vegetable bouillon, 6 T butter.  An hour before serving, add

strained almond milk and 10 oz. grated cheddar cheese and heat through

without boiling.  Just before serving, beat 5 eggs at room temperature

(Joy of Cooking says 1 yolk/cup to thicken, but this should be pretty

thick already), gradually stir in some broth, and add back to the

soup. Sprinkle with cinnamon sugar at the table.

 

                                       mar-Joshua ibn-Eleazar ha-Shalib

                                                Stephen Bloch

                                          sbloch at panther.adelphi.edu

 

 

Date: Sun, 14 Nov 1999 17:23:38 -0500

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - New to the list with questions

 

Jo Marie Friedel wrote:

> Does anyone have a recipe for a medieval onion soup? ( I have lots for

> modern versions but no medieval ones).

 

My favorite is porrey chapeleyn, 14th-century English. It calls for lots

of onions (presumably chopped or sliced, but the recipe doesn't say)

sauteed slowly (my inclination is that they should brown not much, or

not at all), and the onion "puree" is thinned down with some almond milk

and cooked until it's a rich oniony "cream" soup. This is garnished with

deep-fried pasta crunchies, made from flour and eggs (yolks?), rolled

out and cut in the shape of onion rings.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Thu, 7 Mar 2002 06:30:41 -0500

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] onion soup not period?

 

Also sprach Stefan li Rous:

>You're not the first to ask about this. I asked a very similar question

>here some time ago. Most of the period onion soups we have are, I think,

>white soups in an almond milk or similar base. I think the darker, broth

>based onion soups show up later. I'm not sure that we came to a

>conclusive answer. If someone can point me to some early in period,

>dark onion soups, I'd like to hear about it.

 

In general, one of the big limitations on soups in period Europe is

likely to be an effective absence of brown stocks. While I could see

the bones from roast meat going into the stockpot (hopefully not

after being among the scented rushes and chewed by dogs), the kind of

caramelization of the bones required for a good brown beef or veal

stock doesn't seem to be happening in period, AFAIK.

 

>This is hardly a comprehensive survey of onion soups and may well be

>subject to some type of bias such as folks not giving dark, broth

>based period soup recipes because the white ones are more different

>than the "ordinary" onion soups of today. My wife does make a

>modern white-based onion soup which she got from a modern cookbook,

>so these are still around.

 

It is, among other cultures, an Irish thing, to make a milk-based, or

a milk-and-white-stock-based, onion soup.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Fri, 1 Oct 2004 23:15:43 -0400

From: "Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius"

      <adamantius.magister at verizon.net>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re: [Sca-cooks) onion soup...

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Also sprach BeckysQuilt at aol.com:

> I would like to use bread bowls for service. I was thinking of your standard

> French onion but I am open for suggestions. Period would be nice but my

> priorities are presentation and something people will really eat. Us

> Ansteorrians

> are hungry people. Oh, and I will have an industrial kitchen to work in.

> I have done smaller feasts before and helped in many larger ones but this is

> my first bid for a big event.

 

Okay, let's start with the (or rather, a, as in, one of many) period

recipes.

 

PORREY CHAPELEYN [MS D, ff. 86r-96v, ~c. 1381 C.E.]

"For to make a porrey chapeleyn, tak an hundred onyons o(th)er an

half, & tak oyle de olyf & boyle togedere in a pot; & tak almond mylk

& boyle it & do (th)ereto. Tak & make a (th)ynne paast of dow, & make

(th)ereof as it were ryngis. Tak & frye hem in oyle de olyue or in

wyte grees & boil al togedere."

 

"For to make a porrey chapeleyn, take a hundred onions or a half, and

take olive oil and boyle together in a pot, and take almond milk and

boil it and add thereto [to the onions]. Take and make a thin paste

of dough, and make rings out of it. Take them and fry them in olive

oil or lard, [add to the soup], and boil all together."

 

For eight servings (in the East we usually do tables of eight, and

the number is pretty easy to multiply out to whatever number you

need), you'd need:

 

Three large onions, sliced

1 ounce olive oil

1.5 quarts thick, blended almond milk (made from 1.5 cups blanched

almonds and about 7 cups water)

salt to taste (it'll be bland without it)

pepper (optional)

 

Oil for frying

 

1 cup flour and enough water, eggs, a combination, or almond milk to

make a stiff pasta-type dough

OR ~1/4 package wonton wrappers, cut into rings with concentric biscuit

cutters

 

Slice the onions and wilt them in the olive oil, without browning too

much, over a low heat. At the same time, heat the almond milk to a

boil and simmer until slightly thickened, stirring regularly. Pour

over the onions and simmer until the onion slices are extremely soft

and the soup is slightly thickened.

 

While the soup simmers (or you can do this part in advance), make,

roll, and cut out your dough (or wonton wrappers, or other stiff,

thinly-rolled, premade dough), and fry them in hot oil at about

325-350 degrees. Drain and reserve; add them to the simmering soup

before serving. An additional garnish of sliced chives or scallions

looks nice...

 

 

You can then take the same basic quantities for this soup and make a

similar, modern, Irish white onion soup.

 

IRISH ONION SOUP (adapted from a recipe in one of Malachi McCormick's

books)

 

3 large white onions, sliced

2 oz butter

2 Tbs flour

3/4 pint milk

2 pints white chicken stock

salt and pepper

2 egg yolks (optional)

 

Melt the butter over low heat and sweat the onion slices until they

wilt and begin to soften (again, you don't want them to brown). Stir

in the flour and cook for a few more minutes, stirring frequently,

then stir in the stock and the milk. Whisk or stir until the flour is

incorporated into the liquid, and simmer until the soup is slightly

thickened, and the onions are very soft. Season with salt and pepper

(fanatics can use white pepper) and finish, if you want, by putting

the two egg yolks in a bowl, beating them, adding some of the soup to

the yolks and mixing completely, then returning them to the pot, off

the heat. Heat gently until the soup thickens slightly further. Do

not boil after the yolks have been added.

 

For French onion soup, you'd take those same three large onions,

slice them, and saute them to caramelize. I find it helps to deglaze

the pan with a little splash of water, wine, or stock every so often

to keep the juices from browning too fast. The stock would normally

be brown beef or veal stock, or a mixture. The soup usually isn't

thickened, except with onion juices. Ideally, you'd make round

croutons, such as a round of French bread, fried or toasted, then top

with grated Parmigiano or Gruyere cheese, which you then melt in a

hot oven or under a broiler. Float the toasts over the soup before

serving. Cheaters just float a piece of toast, add the cheese, and

broil the whole thing in an oven-proof crock. (NB: chopped fresh

thyme is a terrific addition to this soup.)

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Sat, 2 Oct 2004 10:04:05 -0400

From: Jane Boyko <jboyko at magma.ca>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re: [Sca-cooks) onion soup..and the feast

      experience    (long)

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

On 02/10/04 09:15 am, Elaine Koogler wrote:

> Marina wrote:

>> As to onion soup.  I too have a favourite recipe from Sculley's "Early

>> French Cookery" p 104  called Onion-Pea soup.  I get requests for this

>> soup on a regular basis to the point I am pointing out to people that

>> there are other great onion soup recipes and just soup recipes that they

>> may be interested in having.  If you want I will be happy to post the

>> recipe.

>

> Of course we want the recipe.

 

This soup has made it into my regular "hearty soup to serve on a cold

weekend" repertoire for my husband and myself.

 

Onion-Pea Soup (serves 10) (Early French Cookery p 104)

 

First you need to make a pea puree.  (see p. 63 of EFC)

 

Since I really do not like pea soup or white peas I now choose to make the pea

puree with split green peas.  The white peas provide a different flavour and

appearance.

 

1 c. split green peas (or white peas)

2 c. water.

 

Cook peas until they are mushy. Drain.  Mash with a pototo masher (I didn't

have a food processor at this point and the masher worked for me) or puree

until smooth with a food processor.  The masher allows some of the peas to

maintain their shape which I find provides more texture while eating.  You

should be left with 2 cups of pea puree.

 

For the soup.

 

1 lb onions - about 4 large cooking onions (thinley sliced and chopped into

bite size pieces)

1/8 c to 1/4 c of butter

6-8 c water with vegetable boullion

2 c pea puree

1/2 c chopped flat-leaved parsley

salt and pepper to taste

3 tbsp white wine vinegar

 

Place water and boullion in pot on stove and heat to boiling.  Add pea puree.

Meanwhile saute the onions until 1/2 of them are carmelized.  Dump onions and

juices into soup pot.  Simmer for 1/2 hour.  Add parsley, wine vinegar, salt

and pepper and cook for an additional 15 minutes to meld the flavours together.

 

Serve with a crusty roll or slice of bread.

 

Notes:

 

I have found that bite size pieces work better as sometimes the longer slices

leap off of spoons and splash back into the soup or the longer slices manage

to adhere themselves to cheeks etc.

 

Scully recommends lemon juice or white wine vinegar.   I tried both and found

the wine vinegar to sharpen the flavours better then the lemon juice.  I

enjoy the flavour some much that I occasionally am known to add ww vinegar

into other soups at home I am experimenting with.

 

You will also notice the butter flavour.  Since I am lactose intolerant I have

been experimenting with olive and vegetable oil, and bacon fat, but the soup

loses some of its' intense flavour. I use between 6-8 tbsps of oil.  I have

never measured the bacon fat.  So far I prefer the bacon fat as it gives a

stronger flavour which is comparable to the richness of the butter.

 

I have also added minced garlic (1/2 large head) to the onions as they saute

for a different flavour.

 

Marina

 

 

Date: Sat, 2 Oct 2004 10:04:12 -0400

From: Stephen Bloch <sbloch at adelphi.edu>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re: [Sca-cooks) onion soup...

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

There's an onion soup recipe entitled "Soupes Dorres" in _Two

Fifteenth Century_.  The original says

 

"Nym onyons, mince hem, frie hem in oille de olyve; nym onyons,

boille hem with wyn, tost whit bred, and do it in dishes and cast

almand mylke thereon and the wyn and the onyons aboue, and gif it

forth."

 

My wife's redaction (not scaled up for your size of feast, but it

should be easy enough) calls for

3 medium white onions, sliced into rings

2 T olive oil

1 C almonds, ground

in blender or food processor

3 1/2 C white wine

3 C water to make almond

milk

1 mini-loaf white French bread

--

John Elys

(the artist formerly known as mar-Joshua ibn-Eleazar ha-Shalib)

 

 

Date: Sat, 2 Oct 2004 10:24:30 -0400

From: Stephen Bloch <sbloch at adelphi.edu>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] onion soup

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> As to onion soup.  I too have a favourite recipe from Sculley's "Early French

> Cookery" p 104  called Onion-Pea soup.  I get requests for this soup on a

> regular basis to the point I am pointing out to people that there are other

> great onion soup recipes and just soup recipes that they may be interested in

> having.  If you want I will be happy to post the recipe.

 

There are at least one or two onion/pea soups in Menagier, IIRC,

which we've made successfully at home, but not tried for a feast; I

don't remember whether those are the same ones Sculley discusses in

the book mentioned above.

--

John Elys

(the artist formerly known as mar-Joshua ibn-Eleazar ha-Shalib)

 

 

Date: Mon, 7 Mar 2005 02:23:00 -0800 (PST)

From: Pat <mordonna22 at yahoo.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Onion rings?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

XXXIX, For to make a Porrey Chapeleyn.

 

Tak an hundred onyons other an half and tak oyle de Olyf and boyle  

togederÕ in a Pot and tak Almande mylk and boyle ytand do therÕto.  

Tak and make a thynne Paast of Dow and make therof as it were ryngis  

and frye hem in Oyle de Olyve or in wyte grees and boyle al togederÕ.

 

Boy, this guy canÕt even spell it the same way twice in a paragraph.

 

Okay, let me see what  can do with this.

 

First a translation.

 

Take a hundred and fifty onions and take Olive oil and boil together in  

a Pot.  Take almond milk and boil it and do thereto.  Take and make a  

thin paste of dough and make, as it were, rings, and fry them in Olive  

oil or lard and boil all together.

 

I think, maybe, you are to make the dough rings and fry them  

separately. Fry the onions in the olive oil, then add the almond milk  

and the fried rings and return it to the boil.   Sounds almost like  

onion gravy with donuts in it... for a hundred people?

 

Does Cury on Inglish have this one?

 

"Laura C. Minnick" <lcm at jeffnet.org> wrote:

>>>

Ok. I came across this recipe. It's posted here:

http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/foc/FoC162small.html, number XXIX, in the

middle of the page (scanned facsimile).

 

Is this a pottage? Is it more of a creamed onions? Or could it be onion

rings? I can sort of read it as any of them, but at the same time not.  It

sort of makes no sense!

 

(And now I'm really hungry for onion rins! Big, fat ones with thick slices

of onions...)

 

'Lainie

<<<

 

Pat Griffin

Lady Anne du Bosc

known as Mordonna the Cook

Shire of Thorngill, Meridies

Mndanely, Millbrook, AL

 

 

Date: Mon, 07 Mar 2005 06:16:23 -0500

From: "Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius"

      <adamantius.magister at verizon.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Onion rings?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cook at ansteorra.org>

 

Also sprach Pat:

> I think, maybe, you are to make the dough rings and fry them

> separately.  Fry the onions in the olive oil, then add the almond

> milk and the fried rings and return it to the boil.   Sounds almost

> like onion gravy with donuts in it... for a hundred people?

 

This is one of my favorite period recipes. I think the recipe is

calling for a hundred onions, or a half a hundred -- IOW, lot. We

did this here for a Crown Tourney in Northpass for... I forget, maybe

as many as 325 people? We used concentric biscuit cutters to cut

wonton wrappers into the ring shapes, fried them until crispy, and

made a thick white onion soup with the rest of the ingredients, and

added the faux onion rings at the last moment of cooking. The onions

are sauteed in liberal amounts of olive oil, but not deep-fried, and

if you cook the dish a couple of times, you find a point at which you

have the right amount of oil and onions to have the mixture boil,

mixing the oil and the onion juices into a temporary emulsion. You

then hit it with the almond milk and it becomes more stable.

 

The main point I thought the cook needed to look out for was to cook

the onions until soft and concentrated in flavor, without browning.

Almost like an onion confit... the onions also probably needed to be

nice and soft to make them easier to spoon up without the diner

wearing them. The recipe doesn't specify whether, or how, to cut them

up, but if you cook them properly, it almost doesn't matter. Leaving

them whole, if they're large, is probably a bad idea.

 

> Does Cury on Inglish have this one?

 

Yes, it's in the second book, "Diuersa Servicia", from MS D, ff.

86r-96v., published by Samuel Pege in the 18th century as "Ancient

Cookery".

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Wed, 06 Sep 2006 15:41:13 -0700

From: Maggie MacDonald <maggie5 at cox.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] period oion soups

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

At 02:27 PM 9/6/2006,Gretchen Beck said something like:

 

> Why not try the oyle sops from the two-15th C cookery books; it can be

> interpreted as an onion soup in a beer base:

>

> .xxxiij. Oyle Soppys.?Take a gode quantyte of Oynonys, an mynse hem not to

> smale, an sethe in fayre Water: ?an take hem vp, an take a gode quantite of

> Stale Ale, as .iij. galouns, an ?er-to take a pynte of Oyle fryid, an caste

> ?e Oynonys ?er-to, an let boyle alle to-gederys a gode whyle; then caste

> ?er-to Safroune, powder Pepyr, Sugre, an Salt, an serue forth alle hote as

> tostes, [leaf 11.] as in ?e same maner for a Mawlard & of a capon, & hoc

> qu?re.*

 

I did that particular oil soppys for Caid 12th night 2006.  It went over

very very well.  My biggest tip would be to seriously brown the onions in

batches if you're making very large quantities. I had attempted to brown

them by baking since I was doing a 20 lb bag of onions at one time, and it

was less than successful.

 

On the upside, this gives your local brewers a chance to shine by making

you a brew to use in the soup.  We used a very light ale, and it was just

fantastic. This was also done on a very small scale with Guinness, and that

was also pretty nice (though not every one appreciated the slight

bitterness of guinness).

 

Maggie MacD.

 

<the end>



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