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marrow-msg - 10/10/08

 

Getting bone marrow. Dishes with bone marrow in them.

 

NOTE: See also the files: puddings-msg, organ-meats-msg, HC-butchers-art, butchering-msg, butch-goat-art, pig-to-sausag-art, blood-dishes-msg.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I  have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I  have done  a limited amount  of  editing. Messages having to do  with separate topics  were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the  message IDs  were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make  no claims  as  to the accuracy  of  the information  given by the individual authors.

 

Please  respect the time  and  efforts of  those who have written  these messages. The  copyright status  of these messages  is  unclear at this time. If  information  is  published  from  these  messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

    Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                          Stefan at florilegium.org

************************************************************************

 

Date: Thu, 27 Nov 1997 03:32:14 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Marrow

 

James L. Matterer wrote:

>  Can anyone give me advice on the availability of marrow, or what a good

> substitute may be? The dish I'm re-creating is "A bake Mete Ryalle" from

> Austin's Two 15th c. Cookery-Books, p 55, which calls for "cromyd Marow"

> (crumbled marrow), as well as a "gobet of marow."

 

Marrow is found inside certain large bones. For practical cookery

purposes, the thing to get is a beef or veal shank bone. You can get one

from either a butcher shop or the supermarket butcher. This may involve

purchasing the actual shank (with the meat on it, in other words), or

the butcher may have stripped bones on hand. If he doesn't, see if he

has either veal shanks cut for osso bucco, or more commonly, the cut of

beef generally called "soup meat", which is just sliced beef shank, bone

and all. Beef shank meat is relatively inexpensive, and makes wonderful

stews.

 

If you explain to the butcher (assuming he is reasonable, decent, and

has the time, all of which are partially contingent on how and when you

approach him) you may be able to get stripped beef or veal shank bones,

either for free, or some very nominal fee, and the butcher might even be

willing to segment or split the bones on a bandsaw for you, to

facilitate removal of the marrow. (My experience has been that my

butcher loves to get involved in any "crazy, harebrained scheme" I care

to propose, because he gets tired of weighing out hamburger all day, and

thrives on challenge.)

 

If the bones are cut into short segments, you can go in with a

thin-bladed knife to remove the marrow, or you can blanch the bones in

boiling water for a minute or two, which will loosen the marrow to the

point where it will slip out nicely. If the bone is split, you can

pretty much go in with a spoon and scoop it out.

 

As for a substitute, I suppose the closest would be beef or veal suet,

parboiled before using. The texture would be a bit different, and the

flavor not as rich, but the effect would be somewhat similar. Suet would

probably make a better substitute for the crumbled marrow than for large

chunks. I recommend grating it.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Sat, 29 Nov 1997 06:52:19 -0500

From: margali <margali at 99main.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Marrow

 

James L. Matterer wrote:

>  Can anyone give me advice on the availability of marrow, or what a good

> substitute may be? The dish I'm re-creating is "A bake Mete Ryalle" from

> Austin's Two 15th c. Cookery-Books, p 55, which calls for "cromyd Marow"

> (crumbled marrow), as well as a "gobet of marow."

>

> Master Huen/Jim Matterer

 

if memory serves, and this early in the am on a saturday, wihthout

coffee i am bordering on amnesiac...i think a vegetable marrow in

european terms is a form of squash, and i would surmise a gobet of

marrow may refer to the real thing, winkled out of a suitable bone, beef

pork or lamb. of course the first may refer to cooked marrow which is

then crmbled up?

as to where to get it, go to the butchers or wherever you can find the

really large legbones of a cow[because if you try to get it from the

little shank sections it will take forever toget enough] and ask for

marrow bones, marrow is present in ribs and other bones, but the leg

bine segments are the easiest to get it from. unless it calls for raw

marrow, i like to roast the bones and then crack them to pull out the

whole piece at once rather than to scoop it out in bits. marrow is good

to ebnrich soup, and i have a nice attereaux recipe calling for marrow

and truffles in a nice bearnaise sauce crumbed and fried that is to die

for.

 

margali

 

 

Date: Sat, 29 Nov 1997 09:53:43 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Marrow

 

James L. Matterer wrote:

> I haven't redacted the recipe yet, but I'm assuming up to at least 1/2 cup

> of marrow per pie, with one pie feeding 6 people, meaning I'll need

> (uhm...) 20 or more cups of marrow. Now, I'm not sure of how much marrow

> to expect to extract from shank bones, etc. Is it reasonable to hope

> that a local butcher could help me obtain enough?

 

You'll need from 10-20 marrow bones. The ten estimate assumes you get

most or all of the marrow from each bone. Sometimes it can be tricky.

 

Perhaps if you ask him now, he could begin stockpiling bones in the

freezer for you. The problem with using bones larger than shank bones is

that very few butchers are dealing now with the real, old-fashioned

primary cuts of meat anymore, so there are fewer and fewer halves of

beef and veal, or even steamship rounds (whole, on the [thigh] bone)

from which marrow can be got. More and more butchers are getting in what

used to be called secondary cuts, which wouldn't include some of those

really large bones. You might find you need to contact a wholesale

butcher for that, and a wholesale butcher might not consider such a

project a good use of his time and premises, when he can sell those

bones (which few people usually want) to tallow rendering plants (marrow

is mostly fat anyway).

 

I suggest you start making phone calls and, if necessary, in-person

visits. If you have access to a good local butcher, ask his advice,

especially if you have developed a good working relationship with him.

 

Warning: semi-frivolous advice follows...but not TOO frivolous...

 

Is there any way you can work some shank meat into the rest of your

menu? If you told your butcher that you need 10 veal or beef shanks

(beef will be less expensive, but there may be more meat on 10 beef

shanks than you can use; I'd guess a total of about 50 or 60 pounds, off

the bone) he'd probably get them for you without blinking an eye, and

bone them, trim them, AND crack the bones however you want. And shank

meat makes excellent stew meat and braised roasts.

 

Just a thought. Good luck!

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Sat, 29 Nov 1997 17:00:10 -0500

From: margali <margali at 99main.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Marrow

 

Alderton, Philippa wrote:

> OK, Margali-the-spoon-tease, where's the recipe? When you wake up, of

> course.

>

> : i have a nice attereaux recipe calling for marrow

> : and truffles in a nice bearnaise sauce crumbed and fried that is to die

> : for.

> :

> : margali

 

to make it easier, get a set of those canape cutters, they cut out

little squares, circles and other funky shapes.

6" bamboo skewers, soaked in water

a bowl of fine bread crumbs, i recommend brioche, for the eggy sweet taste

a bowl of cold bearnaise sauce

a deep frying pot-fry baby is ok, i have a nice tefal roti

 

take the whole truffle, slice thinly into rounds, 'cookie cut' in a round shape

take cooked whole marrow that has been chilled to firm up, slice into

1/4 or 1/3" slices, "cookie cut" into rounds as well.

i suppose you could substitute a portobello for the marrow for those veggies amoung us

thread the truffle and marrow rounds onto a skewer, roll in the sauce,

then in the crumbs and drop into the hot oil.

 

after the crumbs have browned nicely[this is on the order of fried ice

cream] take out and carefully replace the bamboo skewers with actual

atteraux skewers if you have them.

 

attereaux are garnishes classically, which became hors-d'oeuvres.

use a really fancy mold to make a polenta or rice mold, stick these in

decoratively and serve to the table as an assiette voulonte, or if you

have the really small bundlet mold[they make a 3"dia mini bundt without

a hole in the middle] you could make the mini mold of soubise of rice,

cut the skewer short, so it fits nicely on top of the rice lump, pipe a

thickened paste of peas or artichoke base[not the pickled heart, but the

actual freshly cooked base in season] around the bottom and around where

the skewer is stuck in, and add little savory mini madelaines[scallop

shell shaped sponge cookies] decoratively...whatever floats your boat.

 

i suppose if you were real poor, you could substitute portobellos

brushed with olive oil infused with truffles for the truffles...

 

margali

 

[you can make almost anything into an attereaux, just trim it

decoratively onto thin rounds or squares, layer a bunch of different

things together roll in a white sauce and then crumbs and deep fry. yes,

i have actually even peeled cock's combs and used them. yecch.]

 

 

Date: Tue, 02 Dec 1997 08:12:59 -0500

From: margali <margali at 99main.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Marrow, now longer post

 

Morgan wrote:

 

> > > : margali wrote:

>

> > attereaux are garnishes classically, which became hors-d'oeuvres.

> > use a really fancy mold to make a polenta or rice mold, stick these in

> > decoratively and serve to the table as an assiette voulonte, or if you

> > have the really small bundlet mold[they make a 3"dia mini bundt without

> > a hole in the middle] you could make the mini mold of soubise of rice,

> > cut the skewer short, so it fits nicely on top of the rice lump, pipe a

> > thickened paste of peas or artichoke base[not the pickled heart, but the

> > actual freshly cooked base in season] around the bottom and around where

> > the skewer is stuck in, and add little savory mini madelaines[scallop

> > shell shaped sponge cookies] decoratively...whatever floats your boat.

>

>   HUH???  There are just too many weird terms here . . .I have >NO IDEA <

> what you are talking about.  And I would hope I'm not the only barbarian in

> this circle.   In  > much < simpler english, Por favor, explain this

> paragraph.  Esp. the following terms:  Attereaux, Assiette voulonte,

> bundlet mold,  soubise.

>

>         Caointiarn

 

attereaux-think of them as miniature shishkebobs with a european format.

stack about 3-6 inches of sliced whatever, thread onto a bamboo skewer.

roll in a cold whitesauce, then into crumbs. deep fry til crispy and

golden brown. these are used as a garnish stuck into things. they make

cute gold, silver and brass skewers with fancy ends to use in place of

the skewer after the frying.

 

assiette voulonte-literally a flying dish, a small dish to be served

between courses or several of them as a 'high tea' sort of thing. if you

like, think of it as an hors d'oeuvre between courses.

 

bundt mold-that 9" round mold with a swirly top and a hole down the

center-look in the baking isle for boxes of bundt cake mix, they show a

finished one. there is a placque out that makes 2" diameter mini bundts,

called a bundtlet mold or you can find them in flea markets occasionally.

 

soubise-cook rice in stock with chopped onion and green peas, I also

like to crumble in bacon, but that is just plain decadence.

 

Hope this helps- I am classically trained, and much of this stuff isnŐt

common to nouvelle cuisine or standard american resturant cooking

 

margali

 

 

Date: Fri, 9 Jan 1998 16:07:11 -0600

From: L Herr-Gelatt and J R Gelatt <liontamr at ptd.net>

Subject: SC - Crustade Lombard revisited

 

Greetings, all! In light of the recent debate over Lombardy Custard, I just

found a modern redaction for it in a book that was an Xmas Present,

Christmas Feasts by Lorna J. Sass. Thought you'd like to see it, even though

it completely ignores the directions for drawing through a strainer until it

is stiff (the part we had trouble interpreting). She adds spices not in the

original and does not dust with sugar or salt before baking, either. She

claims, however, "This spicy, fruited custard was served at king Richard

II's feast given with the Duke of Lancaster on September 23, 1387. it is one

of my favorite medieval dishes and always makes a hit with the guests. With

the combination of marrow and fruits, it seems another early variant of

mincemeat." it would seem, based on that statement that although the recipe

dates to the 15th century, the dish itself is a good bit older. I think I

prefer the final redaction the list assisted Cindy Renfrow (Mistress

Sincgiefu) with,  over this one for accuracy.

 

The original:

 

Take gode creme, & leuys of Percely, & Eryoun, the yolkys & the whyte, &

breke hem therto, & strayne throwe a straynoure tyl it be so styf that it

wol bere hym-self. Than take fayre Marwe & Datys y-cutte in ij or iij  &

Prunes & putte the Datys on the Prunes & Marwe on a fayre Cofynne y-mad of

fayre past & put the cofyn on the ovyn tyl it be a lytel hard. Thanne draw

hem out of the ovyn. Take the lycour & putte ther-on &fyll it uppe & caste

Sugre y-now on, & salt; then lat it bake togederys tyl it be y-now; & if it

be in lente, let the Eyroun & the Marwe out & thanne serve it forth.

(Harleian Ms. 279, British Library 15th century).

 

Lombardy Custard (copyright, L. J. Sass)

9-inch uncooked pie pastry shell

15 each pitted prunes and dates, cut into small pieces

2 tablespoons raw bone marrow, crumbled*

3 tablespoons finely minced parsley

1 cup heavy cream

2 tablespoons brown sugar

2 eggs lightly beaten

Pinch salt

3/4 teaspoon dried orange peel

1 teaspoon cinnamon

Pinch mace

 

Preheat oven to 425 degrees.

Bake the pie pastry at 425 degrees for 10 minutes. Set aside to cool.

Linr the pie crust with the dried fruits. Distribute the marrow and parsley

evenly over the fruit.

Combine the remaining ingredients in a bowl. (The spices are not called for

in the original recipe, but make a delicious addition.) Beat until

thoroughly blended. pour the mixture over the fruits in the crust.

bake at 375 degrees for 30 to 40 minutes, or until the custard is set up and

the top is brown.

Let the crustade cool for about 5 minutes before serving.

 

* Ask your butcher to hack open a beef bone so that you can easily get at

the marrow.

 

Those who were following this thread---what do you think?

 

Aoife (hey, at least it's not Cuskynoles!).

 

 

Date: Thu, 15 Oct 1998 12:47:57 -0400

From: renfrow at skylands.net (Cindy Renfrow)

Subject: Re: SC - Tartys in Applis-NEW recipe-enjoy

 

>Along similar lines, has anyone found a good way to get large amounts of

>marrow.  The butchers I've talked to around here (admittedly, not many)

>just look at me funny when I ask for marrow bones. The recipes that call

>for marrow (apple pie among them) are sooo much better when actually

>made with marrow...(although, due to the problem mentioned above, I

>usually substitute butter :-()

>

>toodles, margaret

 

Hello!  I just ask for a large soup bone *for the dog*. Usually no problem

getting one at no charge, & the butcher will even cut it in sections for me.

 

Cindy

 

 

Date: Tue, 20 Oct 1998 19:46:42 PDT

From: "Clarissa Baker" <clarissa_baker at hotmail.com>

Subject: SC - Re:Marrow recipe, oop but barely

 

Marrow pasties, Mrs Silvester Gardner, 1763

 

Cut half a pound of marrow in little Lumps, and throw Salt upon them;

skin shred six apples small and mix them therewith; to which, add a

quarter of a pound of Sugar.  Season with beaten Mace, Cinnamon, and

Nutmeg; mix half a pound of currants ready washed and plumpt, well with

all the other ingredients, with Sack, Rose Water, or Orange Flower

Water, to make them into turn-over Pasties with Puff Paste

 

 

Date: Fri, 21 Jan 2000 01:10:28 -0600

From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Marrow

 

At 11:12 PM -0600 1/20/00, RANDALL DIAMOND wrote:

>My question is have any of y'all served marrow bones

>at SCA feasts, at head table for instance, or ever

>have rendered the marrow for cooking oil purposes.

>I find that it freezes and keeps well , though hell may

>freeze over before I lose my allotted 70 pounds and can

>have it (occasionally) again.  Any good period data on

>marrow dishes would be appreciated.

 

"Caboges," from _Two Fifteenth Century Cookery Books_, uses marrow

bones, and is an old favorite of mine. The recipe says to knock out

the marrow at the end and serve it with the caboges, but I've also

served it with the marrow bones.

 

David Friedman

Professor of Law

 

 

From: "Terry Decker" <t.d.decker at worldnet.att.net>

To: <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Marrow

Date: Wed, 10 Oct 2001 20:22:25 -0500

 

The problem is genus Cucurbita is of New World origin.  The Cucurbita

replaced the Langenaria, or bottle gourds, on European tables beginning in

the 16th Century.

 

The OED places the first use of marrow as referring to a cucurbit in 1816.

Thus pre-17th Century cooking references to marrow are almost certainly

referring to bone marrow.

 

Bear

 

>Yes, British vegetable marrows are part of the

>marrow/zuchini group of Summer squashes or

>cucurbita pepo. Alan Davidson notes that the

>British have for some time taken to growing them

>to extreme sizes and dimensions for contests and

>exhibitions.

>

>Johnnae llyn Lewis Johnna Holloway

>

>Linda Peterson wrote:

>> We're discussing marrow and it's use in puddings and rissoles. I think

>> it's refering to bone marrow, but someone suggests squash. Can anyone

>> expound on which is most likely and if the brittish vegetable marrow is

>> really what we think of here as an overgrown zuchinni? Mirhaxa

 

 

Date: Wed, 10 Oct 2001 14:37:14 -0700

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Marrow

 

>Mark.S Harris wrote:

>>Mirhaxa asked:

>>>We're discussing marrow and it's use in puddings and rissoles. I think

>>>it's refering to bone marrow, but someone suggests squash. Can anyone

>>>expound on which is most likely and if the brittish vegetable marrow is

>>>really what we think of here as an overgrown zuchinni?

>>

>>Without seeing the recipes, from previous discussions here, I would

>>say it is almost certainly bone marrow.

>

>Yeah, I'd have to agree, especially since a) isn't zucchini is new

>world squash? and b) the marrow provides shortening in various baked

>goods, similar to suet, but with a richer flavor

 

and c)

 

An whan thou seruyst yt inne, knocke owt the marw of the bonys, an

ley the marwe ij gobettys or iij in a dysshe, as the semyth best, and

serue forth.

 

(Caboges in _Two Fifteenth Century Cookery Books_)

--

David/Cariadoc

http://www.daviddfriedman.com/

 

 

From: Devra at aol.com

Date: Wed, 12 Dec 2001 14:15:23 EST

To: <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re: marrow bones

 

"Eggs, eggs and marrow bones

Will make your oldman blind.."

     -----old song

 

In either To the King's or To The Queen's Taste there is a LOVELY rice pudding recipe which uses marrow...  They say it's good warm, and it certainly is.  Four of us sat on my front steps one day, tasting it 'while it cooled' until it was all gone.  The addition of pepper to the usual spices adds a little snap that is brought out by eating it hot to warm.  Cool, the pepper is sort of subdued...

 

Devra (at work, or I'd quote the recipe)

 

 

Date: Wed, 12 Dec 2001 20:16:06 +0100

From: UlfR <parlei at algonet.se>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] marrow bones

 

Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com> [2001.12.12] wrote:

> Anyway, you've got to do the marrow-filled beef birds from Taillevent.

 

How about doing the deer marrow pasties from Grewe? Might work with the

beef marrow, even if the deer ones should give more flavour.

--

UlfR                                                 parlei at algonet.se

 

 

Date: Fri, 14 Dec 2001 10:21:42 +0100

From: UlfR <parlei at algonet.se>

To: SCA-Cooks maillist <SCA-Cooks at ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] marrow bones

 

Stefan li Rous <stefan at texas.net> [2001.12.13] wrote:

> I would appreciate both of these recipes being quoted here, when someone

> gets the chance.

 

                  20 A Pasty of Deer Marrow (K17, D15)

    Boil deer bones; crack them open when they are cold. Make a dough of

    wheat flour and water. Out on it (i.e., spread over the rolled pastry)

    salt, pepper, and cinnamon, and the marrow from the bones; make a pastry

    of it (i.e., roll it up and pinch it closed; cf recipie 30) and bake it

    in an oven.

 

I have never tried this recipie, with any kind of marrow. The recipie 30

that is refered to in Grewes composite translation is the famed

"Icelandic chickens". I think I have some beef marrow in the freezer (not

very much, but enough for a small sample), and this is odd enough

that I want to try it. A cold water crust with spiced fat. Certainly not

health food...

 

UlfR

 

 

Date: Tue, 03 May 2005 17:57:29 -0400

From: "Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius"

        <adamantius.magister at verizon.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Marrow substitute

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Also sprach Volker Bach:

> I haven't got terribly much experience with this, but I found a few recipes

> that require melted beef marrow. I'm wondering - marrow is kind of hard to

> come by in these post-BSE days, so what could I use as a substitute?

> Is there anything?

>

> Giano

 

Rendered beef suet (don't let it brown) should do the trick, the kind

of hard fat from around the kidney or inside the loin. In a pinch,

the fat (rendered) from a rib roast or steak would do it. Marrow is

almost all fat, but it has a rich, meaty flavor, even when melted.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Wed, 04 May 2005 09:18:44 -0500

From: "Michael Gunter" <countgunthar at hotmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Marrow substitute

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

Strangely enough I've had no problem getting marrow. I just

go to the local supermarket and ask for shin bones cut

lengthwise. I've never had any difficulty getting this done.

And it's usually pretty cheap.

 

Gunthar

 

 

Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2008 08:31:12 -0700

From: Dragon <dragon at crimson-dragon.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] properly prepared marrow?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Stefan li Rous wrote:

Back on June 6, Dragon commented:

<<< Laura C. Minnick wrote:

Organ meats/offal, or marrow. And I haven't the courage to eat eel.

---------------- End original message. ---------------------

 

Marrow properly prepared and spread on a glorious piece of bread is

heavenly. >>>

 

So what is the proper way to prepare marrow for this? And is there a

particular marrow you have in mind? Beef? Chicken? something else?

---------------- End original message. ---------------------

 

It actually could not be simpler.

 

Simmer the marrow bones in a good broth, scoop the marrow out and

spread it on bread.

 

Dragon

 

 

Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2008 09:22:53 -0400

From: "Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius" <adamantius1 at verizon.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] properly prepared marrow?

To: grizly at mindspring.com, Cooks within the SCA

        <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

On Aug 12, 2008, at 8:54 AM, Nick Sasso wrote:

-----Original Message-----

Marrow properly prepared and spread on a glorious piece of bread is

heavenly. >>>

 

So what is the proper way to prepare marrow for this? And is there a

particular marrow you have in mind? Beef? Chicken? something else?

---------------- End original message. ---------------------

 

It actually could not be simpler.

 

Simmer the marrow bones in a good broth, scoop the marrow out and

spread it on bread.  > > > > > >

 

That would be beef bones.

------

 

Veal bones, too, generally from the femur or the shank bone. Smaller  

or narrower bones (think cross-section) such as ribs won't have any  

significant amount of marrow in them.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2008 23:03:01 -0400

From: "Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius" <adamantius1 at verizon.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] properly prepared marrow?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

On Aug 12, 2008, at 10:15 PM, Stefan li Rous wrote:

<<< That would be beef bones.

------

Veal bones, too, generally from the femur or the shank bone. Smaller

or narrower bones (think cross-section) such as ribs won't have any

significant amount of marrow in them.

 

Adamantius >>>

 

Thanks. yes the size of the bones makes sense. So what about the  

larger bones of pigs or sheep? Are these two small to be worth the  

effort or is there some reason this marrow isn't as good as veal or  

beef? >>>

 

The short answer would probably be, some combination of both. Pork  

bones, and their marrow, can have a slightly sulfurous aspect to their  

flavor profile, which is why you [relatively] rarely find stock being  

made from fresh pork bones, unless it's being mixed with chicken  

bones, shrimp shells, etc. It's a popular meat for southern Chinese  

soups of a sort of country or family style, like real winter melon  

soup, which is a slightly different animal than the stuff you get in  

restaurants. I'm a heretic in this regard, and prefer the chicken or  

mixed pork, chicken and shrimp versions. My mother-in-law makes all-

pork soups frequently, and all her children love them ("Mmmmm!!! Pork  

neck bones boiled in dishwater, improperly skimmed _and_  

unseasoned!"), but I'm not really seeing the allure. I guess I'm  

spoiled, brought up by rich people (!) with questionable values, and  

generally a barbarian.

 

As for sheep bones, well, you've pretty much got to like mutton and  

lamb to appreciate their marrow, which is basically fat anyway, and  

the thing that most mutton-avoiders seem to object to most is the  

flavor of the fat, so this is probably something that carries over  

into their view on the marrow of these animals.

 

Also, as you mention, their marrow bones are smaller, and just as hard  

to saw through for somewhat less of a payday. I wouldn't be surprised,  

though, to find that I'm not the only one who passionately enjoys  

something like lamb shanks, fishing for the marrow when the meat is  

eaten.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2008 02:13:51 -0400

From: Gretchen Beck <grm at andrew.cmu.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] properly prepared marrow?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>,     SCA-Cooks

        maillist SCA-Cooks <SCA-Cooks at Ansteorra.org>

 

--On Thursday, August 14, 2008 12:53 AM -0500 Stefan li Rous

<stefanlirous at austin.rr.com> wrote:

<<< Anybody know of any evidence of these [marrow spoons] being used during our period? To a certain extent, this makes me think of a later time period, Georgian? Edwardian? But I can imagine them being used in upper crust period feasts. >>>

 

The OED has it at the end of the 17th C:

 

1693 London Gaz. No. 2853/4, 1 Sweat-meat Spoon, 1 *Marrow Spoon, 1 Ladle

and Skillet.

 

<A Register of the Members of St. Mary Magdalen College, Oxford,> notes an

object identified in a modern inventory as a marrow spoon with an

inscription dating to 1667 and another whose inscription is dated 1664.

 

I'm not sure about the heavy ball on the end though; most descriptions I'm

seeing suggest a scoop at both ends (or one describes a fork with a marrow

spoon as a handle)

 

toodles, margaret

 

<end>



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