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grape-leaves-msg - 11/8/10

 

Using grape leaves in cooking. Recipes. Sources. How to prepare fresh grape leaves.

 

NOTE: See also the files: ME-feasts-msg, wine-msg, lamb-mutton-msg, wine-cooking-msg, fd-Turkey-msg, fd-Greece-msg, fd-Byzantine-msg.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

   Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                         Stefan at florilegium.org

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Date: Tue, 18 May 1999 13:26:13 EDT

From: Tollhase1 at aol.com

Subject: Re: stuffed grape leaves (was Re: SC - rocotti and cottage chease leftovers?

 

Stuffed grape leaves.  Two recipes- one meat and the other veggie.  I have

always had lamb or meat filled.  Please note that my wife's recipe from a

Greek friend is missing and offer these two.

 

Recipe 1

 

Taken from our Immigrant Ancestors by Jeff Smith, ISBN 0-688-07590-8

 

1 pound ground lamb, [using beef instead for costs.]

1 cup long grain rice.  [also mixing brown and wild rice in]

1/4 teas ground cinnamon

7 dozen fresh grape leaves, or 1 jar [friends mother ripped out her vines

before I could get there.

1/4 teas allspice

Salt/pepper to taste

juice two lemons

 

serve with yogurt and hot lemon sauce

 

Mix lamb, rice, spices salt and pepper.

 

If using fresh leaves, try to get smaller ones {personal experience, they

work best}.  Blanch them till they change color.  Just a moment.  Drain and

cool. If using a jar, just sperate large from small.

 

Place a layer of smaller leaves in the bottom of a large heavy bottomed

kettle or sauce pot, with a cover.

 

Lay each large grape leaf on a flat surface, vein side up. Trim away stem.  [

v cut into bottom of leaf}

 

Put about a tablespoon of mixture into grapeleaf.  Form the mixture into a

cylindrical shape apx, 1/2 x 2 or three inches. Depends upon grape leaf.

 

Fold up the bottom, [stem side] up. Fold in both side.  Roll top over for

tight fit.

 

Place in Pot.  Place tightly next to each other so they won't unwrap.  About

3 or 4 layers deep. Place plate over layers.  Cover with water. Bring to

boil, then turn down to a simmer and cook, covered for one hour.  After the

first 30 minutes of cooking, add the lemon juice.

 

Recipe number 2

 

Greek Cooking, by Ruth Kershner  ISBN 0-517-239329

 

Dolmadakia

 

1 jar leaves

1 1/2 T olive oil

1 medium onion

1/2 cup pine nuts

3/4 cup wild rice

1/2 cup golden raisins

2 1/2 cups water

2 tablespoons parsley finely chopped

1/2 teas salt

fresh ground pepper

2 medium tomatoes  {obviously not period}

juice of lemon

 

First part same as above

 

Saute onions until limp.  Add pine nuts and cook 5 minutes.

Add rice, raisins and 1 1/2 cup water.  Cover and cook for 20 minutes or

until all the liquid is absorbed.  Stir in parsley, salt, pepper cinnamon and

tomatoes.

 

Fill and fold as above recipe.

 

Place in pan same as above.  Pour 1 cup water over.  Place plate over. Cook

30 minutes

 

This recipe recommends serving with lemon wedges.

 

I am making a mint yurgert dip to go with both grape leaves and meatballs.

Recipe......Add fresh mint from garden until it tastes right let it sit

overnight before serving.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Does anyone have any period sources for these.  I did not see on in the

Missanary

 

Lord Frederich

 

 

Date: Tue, 18 May 1999 14:40:27 EDT

From: CorwynWdwd at aol.com

Subject: Re: stuffed grape leaves (was Re: SC - rocotti and cottage chease  leftovers?

 

karla at silverspin.net writes:

> Anyone have any good recipes for these things?  Has anyone ever gone and

> gotten fresh grape leaves to make them with?  I've only ever had them made

> with the canned ones.

> Charlotte

 

I stuff mine with brown rice and pine nuts, seasoned with rosemary, dill,

oregano and a little salt. Most of the supermarkets and the one middle

eastern store carry jars of grape leaves. I truly think you could stuff a

canned grape leaf with shredded paper and it would taste good though.

 

Corwyn

 

 

Date: Tue, 18 May 1999 15:39:29 -0500

From: a14h at zebra.net (William Seibert)

Subject: Re: stuffed grape leaves

 

I was introduced to dolmatti (stuffed grape leaves) when I was stationed in

Greece. Grape leaves are first preserved in olive oil, then used to wrap a

stuffing made of cubed lamb and rice, both of which are ground together and

spiced (to taste by the individual cooks) before stuffing.  They are then oven

baked and served under a white sauce.

 

wajdi

 

 

Date: Tue, 18 May 1999 18:47:01 +0100

From: "Oughton, Karin (GEIS, Tirlan)" <Karin.Oughton at geis.ge.com>

Subject: RE: stuffed grape leaves (was Re: SC - rocotti and cottage chease leftovers?

 

When you use the canned/packet preserved leaves, do you soak them first to

get rid of the salt? The reason I'm asking is the one time I made dolmades

we didn't soak the leaves ( if you should) and the whole dish was

*incredibly* salty - almost to the point of inedibility.

 

k.

 

 

Date: Tue, 18 May 1999 13:51:51 EDT

From: Tollhase1 at aol.com

Subject: Re: stuffed grape leaves (was Re: SC - rocotti and cottage chease leftovers?

 

Yes, I soak them or at least rinse them.  I have also used fresh leaves.  The

Key is young small leaves.  The older ones get tuff.  And only blanch them

enough to make them plyable.

 

Frederich

 

 

Date: Tue, 18 May 1999 14:47:51 EDT

From: CorwynWdwd at aol.com

Subject: Re: stuffed grape leaves (was Re: SC - rocotti and cottage chease leftovers?

 

Karin.Oughton at geis.ge.com writes:

> When you use the canned/packet preserved leaves, do you soak them first to

> get rid of the salt?

 

I rinse them, but then, I rinse everything. Maybe I'm part raccoon. <G>

 

Corwyn

 

 

Date: Tue, 18 May 1999 21:43:57 -0700 (PDT)

From: "Peggy A. Stonnell" <izzie at vcn.bc.ca>

Subject: RE: stuffed grape leaves (was Re: SC - rocotti and cottage chease  leftovers?

 

On Tue, 18 May 1999, Oughton, Karin (GEIS, Tirlan) wrote:

> When you use the canned/packet preserved leaves, do you soak them first to

> get rid of the salt? The reason I'm asking is the one time I made dolmades

> we didn't soak the leaves ( if you should) and the whole dish was

> *incredibly* salty - almost to the point of inedibility.

> k.

 

I take mine out of the jar, and rinse them very well in a collander.  Lots

of running water.  I don't soak them, I want the salt to run away.

 

Isobel fitz Gilbert

 

 

Date: Tue, 18 May 1999 15:07:05 EDT

From: Tollhase1 at aol.com

Subject: Re: stuffed grape leaves

 

timorra asked:

>i am curious can you use any kind of grape leaf or is there only certain ones

>you can use?

>i would be interested in hearing what kind of leaf most use..or am i

>misreading something?

 

I have always used what ever I could find for free, no matter what type of

grape they produce or the canned ones if I was desperate.

 

Frederich

 

 

Date: Wed, 19 May 1999 01:49:18 EDT

From: LordVoldai at aol.com

Subject: Re: stuffed grape leaves

 

[about using fresh grape leaves]

 

don't use the older leaves, use the younger tender leaves.  blanch them in

salted water with some lemon juice for a few min., then pat dry and you

should be good to go.

 

voldai

 

 

Date: Wed, 19 May 1999 08:38:50 EDT

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: SC - grape leaves

 

lainie at gladstone.uoregon.edu writes:

<< Anyone have any good recipes for these things?  Has anyone ever gone and

gotten fresh grape leaves to make them with?  I've only ever had them

made with the canned ones. >>

 

Yes. As with many foods, they are at there best when picked and used fresh.

Leaves from any grape species like Lambrusco, Vinifera or even the southern

US Scuppernong and wild northeastern US grapes are edible.

 

Simply pick unblemished grape leaves that are of good size. Remove the coarse

leaf stem. Drop them in boiling water for 30 seconds or so to blanch and use

as you do the  bottled ones. You will be amazed at the difference in flavor

and quality. They can also be blanched and frozen for later use.

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Wed, 19 May 1999 16:49:06 CEST

From: "Christina van Tets" <cjvt at hotmail.com>

Subject: SC - vine leaves

 

There is actually a recipe for stuffed vine leaves not long out of period

(ie. 60 years or so) in the English corpus.  Lady Ann Blencowe, IIRC,

included them in her collection, headed 'To make a delma'.  You can find

this quoted in Elisabeth Ayrton's 'Cookery of England'.  Not that I'm

claiming that the earlier Poms used them;  it's just an interesting piece of

relatively useless trivia (another souvenir from the Grand Tour??).

 

BTW, the leaves are really easy to salt and mine were good for years, until

I dropped them.

 

Cairistiona nB

 

 

Date: Wed, 19 May 1999 11:46:18 -0400 (EDT)

From: Gretchen M Beck <grm+ at andrew.cmu.edu>

Subject: Re: stuffed grape leaves (was Re: SC - rocotti and cottage chease leftovers?

 

Excerpts from internet.listserv.sca-cooks: 18-May-99 Re: stuffed grape

leaves (w.. by LordVoldai at aol.com

> YES!!! soak the leaves to romove the brine

 

Oh blah!  Don't do that -- the briny taste adds a really nice accent to

the grape leaves.

 

toodles, margaret

 

 

Date: Wed, 19 May 1999 11:48:15 -0400 (EDT)

From: Gretchen M Beck <grm+ at andrew.cmu.edu>

Subject: Re: SC - RE: stuffed grape leaves

 

Excerpts from internet.listserv.sca-cooks: 19-May-99 SC - RE: stuffed

grape leaves by Stefan li Rous at texas.net

> Canned grape leaves?!!! I'd have never even guessed to look for these.

> Anyone else tried these and fresh grape leaves? How do they compare?

> Is there some other use for these other than in dolmades?

 

You can't do this with the canned leaves, but Platina has a recipe for

either grape leaves or grape tendrils done pretty much like boiled

greens.

 

toodles, margaret

 

'p.s. For whatever reason, I tend to find bottled grape leaves around

the olives in larger grocery stores.

 

 

Date: Wed, 19 May 1999 10:13:12 -0600

From: "Stapleton, Jeanne" <jstaplet at mail.law.du.edu>

Subject: RE: stuffed grape leaves (was Re: SC - rocotti and cottage chease leftovers?

 

Excerpts from internet.listserv.sca-cooks: 18-May-99 Re: stuffed grape

leaves (w.. by LordVoldai at aol.com

> YES!!! soak the leaves to romove the brine

 

Oh blah!  Don't do that -- the briny taste adds a really nice accent to

the grape leaves.

 

toodles, margaret

 

       Count me as someone else who would like to remind

       everyone that "too salty" is a matter of *personal*

       taste.  Anything someone says is "too salty" is

       likely to have me running to try is, as a bonafide

       sodium chloridaholic.

 

       This soaking could explain why I've had some really

       bland (and therefore to me inedible) dolmades at

       feasts, and really flavorful ones at Greek restau-

       rants...

 

Berengaria

 

 

Date: Wed, 19 May 1999 09:58:58 -0700

From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

Subject: RE: stuffed grape leaves (was Re: SC - rocotti and cottage chease leftovers?

 

At 9:56 AM -0700 5/18/99, karla at silverspin.net wrote:

>And I think the recipe is period as well, as this lady frequently brings really

>interesting period things to events and then shares them with lots of

>people.

 

That would be interesting if so; off hand I can't think of any period

recipes for stuffed grape leaves. Aside from recipes, has anyone seen

period mentions of them?

 

David/Cariadoc

http://www.best.com/~ddfr/

 

 

Date: Wed, 19 May 1999 13:57:44 -0700

From: kat <kat at kagan.com>

Subject: SC - grape leaves period??

 

In the translation of Sabina Welserin located at

http://www.best.com/~ddfr/Medieval/Cookbooks/Sabrina_Welserin.html

 

there is a recipe for quail cooked by wrapping them in grape leaves to keep in the moisture...

 

       - kat

 

 

Date: Wed, 19 May 1999 22:58:38 -0400

From: renfrow at skylands.net (Cindy Renfrow)

Subject: Re: SC - Potluck part two....

 

<snip>

>So far nobody has offered evidence that any stuffed grape leaves are

>period, although there seems to be a slightly out of period reference to

>them--recipe so far unknown (i.e. hasn't been posted; I assume someone

>knows it).

>David/Cariadoc

 

There is a reference to stuffed *fig* leaves in Athenaeus, but not grape

leaves:

"...visions of tender-flaked barley cakes, wheat bread, fine meal cakes,

octopuses, entrails, suet, sausages, soup, beets, stuffed fig leaves, ..."

 

Gulick's edition, Vol. 2, Book IV, p. 105.

 

Cindy Renfrow

renfrow at skylands.net

 

 

Date: Mon, 8 May 2000 18:30:43 EDT

From: RButler96 at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - Dolmas, Dolmades

 

I am in possession of a translation of a 12th century "cookbook".  The general references to a grape leave wrapped delicacies make me think that perhaps this would be an early forerunner. I would be happy to provide the reference location if you would like.  My local college library was able to locate a copy for me.

 

Khadijah bint Mika'il al-Zarqa'

mka Rebecca Butler

 

 

Date: Mon, 8 May 2000 22:13:03 EDT

From: RButler96 at aol.com

Subject: SC - Period cookery recipes

 

Since I have had so many inquiries, I felt it necessary to share this on the

list.

 

A Baghdad Cookery Book

al-Baghdadi 1229

Translated in "Islamic Culture" (a journal)

the January 1939 edition

 

Be patient when requesting it.  One of the Ivy League schools has a hard

copy, and U of F has a microfiche copy that I have a print out of the

complete thing.  It's about 40 or 50 pages, and details many recipes, and

some great stories of the time.  It's basically one man's favorite dishes.  

There are a couple that resemble dolma.

 

My Lord husband and I recently presented a feast taken from this publication,

and it went over absolutely beautifully.

 

   Khadijah bint Mika'il al-Zarqa'

 

 

Date: Thu, 29 Jun 2000 10:03:30 +0200

From: "Cindy M. Renfrow" <cindy at thousandeggs.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Re: Roman Recipes LONG

 

>> Or flat bread to wrap the food in- the original souvlaki, falafal, gyros

>> sandwich etc. Even food like barley can be served in bread bowls.

>And when we discussed bread bowls further back no one could point to

>bread bowls being period as food containers. Anyone have any evidence

>for this being done in period, now?

 

Yes. In Athenaeus' Deipnosophistae (III. 125-126vol 2, pp 83-85, 1928

edition), from a string of disjointed quotations:

 

"Give me a mystilÍ [ed.- a piece of bread used in lieu of a spon]; for I

will not use the word mystron..."

 

And then:

 

[Athenaeus quoting Nicander] "'But when you prepare a dish of fresh-killed

kid or lamb or capon, sprinkle some groats in a hollow bowl and pound them

well, then stir in a fragrant oil, well mixed.  When the broth is boiling

hard, pour it over the meal, put the lid on the pan, and smother it; for

when it is stewed in this way, the heavy meal swells up.  Serve it when

mildly warm in hollow mystra.' [Athenaeus speaking] In these

terms...Nicander indicates the use of pudding and barley-groats , directing

that a broth of lamb or kid or fowl be poured over it.  To repeat his

words: pound the groats in a mortar, mix oil with it and stir it in the

broth when it begins to boil.  When, after these preliminaries, the mixture

actively boils up again, it should be stirred with the ladle without adding

any other ingredient; simply spoon it off as it is, to prevent any of the

rich fat at the top from boiling over.  That is why he says 'put on the lid

and cover the boiling liquid'; for the meal swells up then it is smothered

in this way.  Finally, when it has cooled to a mild heat, eat it with

hollow pieces of bread."

 

 

He mentions earlier (p. 105), in a list of comestibles served at a feast,

"stuffed fig-leaves".  The editorial note says "[spelled in greek letters]

thrion, a dish often mentioned by the comic poets, consisting of eggs,

milk, flour, honey, cheese, and lard in a  wrapping of fig leaves.  Cf. the

modern Greek dish dolmades, made with grape leaves.

 

Cindy

 

 

Date: Sun, 09 Dec 2001 11:08:37 -0500

From: Elaine Koogler <ekoogler at chesapeake.net>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] dolmas

 

This is not a period recipe, but comes from a lovely Greek cookbook produced by

the Women's group of a Greek Orthodox church...don't have the book down here

right now, so can't remember the name of the church.  I have made these

numerous times and they've been well-received:

 

Stuffed Grapevine Leaves with Avgolemono Sauce (Dolmades me Avgolemono)

Yield--6 - 8 servings

 

1 1/2 lbs. ground beef or lamb

1 1/2 C. chopped onion

1 C raw converted rice

salt and pepper to taste

1 tsp. dried mint leaves or 3 Tbsp. chopped fresh mint.

1/4 cup chopped fresh dill

1/4 cup water

1 lb. jar grape leaves

3 cups hot chicken stock

1 Tbsp. butter

Avgolemono Sauce (recipe below)

 

Combine meat, onions, rice, salt, pepper, mint and dill.  Add water and mix

well.

 

Drain brine from jar of grape leaves and wash leaves well.  Put one heaping

tablespoon of meat and rice mixture in center of leaf's dull side and roll

leaf tightly, folding edges over and rolling toward point of leaf.

 

Cover bottom of an ungreased Dutch oven or casserole with torn leaves.

Arrange rolls in layers.  Pour hot chicken stock over rolls and dot with butter.

Cover with a heavy plate to keep rolls from opening as rice puffs.  Cover

casserole and cook over low heat for 1 hour.

 

There should be some liquid left in casserole for Avgolemono Sauce.  If dry

when cooking time is up, add 1 cup water and simmer for a few minutes longer.

Remove from heat and keep covered. Measure liquid and prepare the sauce.  To

serve, remove to plate and pour sauce over dolmades.

 

Avgolemono Sauce (Saltsa Avgolemono)

 

Yield--2 cups

 

3 eggs

1/2 tsp. salt (optional)

6 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice

1 cup boiling chicken stock (from cooking dolmades)

 

In a saucepan, beat eggs until frothy. Gradually add lemon juice and hot liquid, stirring constantly.  Add salt and simmer over very low heat, stirring constantly, until mixture has thickened. Do not allow mixture to come to a boil.

 

Blender or Food processor method:  Add eggs to container and blend on high speed until frothy, at least 2 minutes. Add salt and lemon juice, and blend 1 minute longer.  With motor running, slowly add hot liquid. When all liquid is blended, return to pot and simmer on low heat, stirring occasionally, until thickened.

 

Kiri

 

 

Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2004 12:44:29 -0700 (PDT)

From: Huette von Ahrens <ahrenshav at yahoo.com>

Subject: RE: [Sca-cooks] Verjus

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

--- "Laura C. Minnick" <lcm at jeffnet.org> wrote:

> Nota bene: the blooms on the plum tree directly behind my window are

> beginning to sag, but I can see the grapevine from her, and there's leaves

> sprouting- maybe the size of a teaspoon, but

> soon bigger! Can anyone say dolmades? ;-)

> 'Lainie

 

Dolma, more correctly.

 

According to the Oxford Companion to Food [and

this entry was written by Charles Perry];

 

Dolma : vegetales stuffed in the East

Mediterranean style.  There are two main

categories: those with meat stuffings (usually

extended with grain), which are served hot, often

with a sauce such as broth thickened with lemon

juice and eggs; and those with rice stuffings (often enriched with nuts, raisins, or pulses), which are served cold, dressed in oil.  The

latter are also known as yalanji dolma (Turkish

'yalanci' or 'counterfeit'; namely meatless.)

 

In Turkey, a distinction may also be made between

dolma ('stuffed thing') made from a hollowed-out

vegetable (aubergine, courgette, sweet pepper, or

tomato; less often potato, artichoke, cucumber,

carrot, or celery), and sarma ('rolled thing'),

where the filling is rolled in an edible leaf,

such as vine leaf or cabbage.  A sort of sarma

may also be made from separated layers of boiled

leek or onion rolled around a stuffing.

 

Dolmas are vernacular food in Turkey, the

Balkans, the southern Caucasus, Iran, Central

Asia (where the word differs in form according to

the Turkish lnguage: dolama in Turkmen, tulma in

Tatar), and in Egypt, the Fertile Crescent, and

Arabia.  Kaldomar ('cabbage dolmas') have long

been part of Swedish cuisine also, as an

unplanned consequence of Charles XII's sojourn in

Turkey after his defeat by the Rusians at the

battle of Poltava.  When he returned to Sweden in

1715, he was followed by his Turkish reditors

--and their cooks--who remained until 1732.

 

This distribution, as well as the name dolma

itself, indicates that this dish belongs to the

court cusine of the Ottoman Empire. Vegetables

had been stuffed before Ottoman times, but only

sporadically.  For instance, the ancient Greek

'thrion' was a fig leaf stuffed with sweetened

cheese, and some medieval Arabic cookbooks give

recipes for aubergine stufed with meat (and

also, curiously, for the reverse; chunks of

cooked aubergine coated with meat like a Scotch

Egg.  However, it was in Istanbul that stuffed

vegetables were first treated as a regular

culinary genre.

 

The Ottoman origin is somewhat obscured by the

fact that in some countries stuffed vegetables

may be referred to by a native name meaning

'stuffed', such as 'yemistos' (Greek) or 'mahshi'

(Arabic).  Indeed, some Arabic dialects rarely if

ever use the word 'dolma'.  Nevertheless, the

signs of Turkish origin are clear.  In places as

remote as Kuwait and Damascus, instead of "mahshi

waraq'inab" (stuffed vine leaf) one may say

"mahshi yabraq" (in Kuwait, "mahshi brag") which

comes from the Turkish 'yaprak' (leaf).

 

Huette

 

 

Date: Sat, 14 Aug 2004 22:20:18 -0400

From: Patrick Levesque <pleves1 at po-box.mcgill.ca>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Stuffed grape leaves

To: "Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>"

        <sca-cooks at asteorra.org>

 

The historical backing is very flimsy, but you can find recipes on the

Gode Cookery website as well:

http://www.godecookery.com/byznrec/byznre.htm

 

Petru

 

 

Date: Sun, 15 Aug 2004 06:10:37 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Stuffed grape leaves

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

To Make a Delma.

Take the Lean meat of Loyn of mutton and as much beef Suet,

shread it small as for force meat. Then put the smae quanity of

Rice boyld tender, season it with sweet herbs, salt & pepper, & a

little nutmeg; then mix it all together and brake in one or two

eggs according to the quantity of your meat. Then take Cabbage

or vine leaves and dip them in hot water, then role the meat in ye

leaves about the bigness of a small Cucumber, and tye them with

course thread, put them into a stewpan with gravey, put them over

a gentle fire cover'd. Let them stew till they be thoroughly done,

then take them out and take off the thread, thicken the gravey

the yolk of an egg and pour it over your meat.  page 29.

 

The Receipt Book of Ann Blencowe. This is from the Adelphi Limited edition

from 1925 which I own. The manuscript carries a date of 1694, but Ann was

born in 1656 and married in 1675. I suspect that this was compiled for one

of her daughters upon a marriage. The mss remained in the family and the 1925 edition is the first time that it was published. There was another edition done

later, but it's not as nice as this one. Neither is very available.

 

Johnnae llyn Lewis

 

 

Date: Sun, 15 Aug 2004 10:22:4 -0700

From: "Wanda Pease" <wandap at hevanet.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Ann Blencowe Recipe Book: was: Stuffed Grape

        Leaves

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

The recipe book is currently available from Provincial Press Books for

$21.00   for those who might be interested.   - Regina

 

http://www.provincialpress.us/index.html

~*~

http://www.provincialpress.us/Books%20for%20the%20Tade.htm

 

The Receipt Book of

Mrs. Ann Blencowe

 

 

Anno Domine 1694

 

Introduction by George Saintsbury   ~   Preface by Leander W. Smith

 

With an Essay by Robert de Berardinis

 

         So accustomed are we to using the term ‘receipt book’ as a synonym

or ‘accounting ledger’ that we pass by those early tomes wherein the

homemakers of yesteryear wrote their instructions for the preparation of

food and the curing of ills. Such are the contents of this book.” So reads

the preface to this collectable volue. The manuscript on which the first

edition is based was compiled in the year 1694 in England’s Parliamentary

jurisdiction of Brackley. Mrs. Blencowe, née Anne Wallis, was born in 1657,

into a family of upper middle-class society.

 

        The complation contains over eighty “Household Receipts.” Sack

Posset, Shaking Pudding, Pickled Walnuts, Flummery, Hashed Calves Head,

Hodge Podge, Sillabub, Rabbit Pie, and “Pickle Lila” {Piccalilli} are

samplings. Among some sixty entries in the section named “historical Receipts”

are: For the Green Sickness, For Shrunken Sinews, Drink for the Spleen, High

Spirited Pills, Blessed Pills, The King’s Evil – and Horse Dung Water, which

was prescribed for “women in labor for Agues and feavers and distemper.”

 

      An essay on George Saintsbury, the renowned early twentieth-century

literary critic and connoisseur, who provided an introduction for the first

edition in 1925, details the man’s passion for fine wines. Comments by one

of today’s well-known experts on the world of wine are featured.

 

Reprint.  77 pages, 8½ x 11. Wrappers. Item no. BL2. $21.00.

 

 

Date: Sun, 15 Aug 2004 13:14:46 -0700 (PDT)

From: Huette von Ahrens <ahrenshav at yahoo.com>

ubject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Stuffed grape leaves

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> The Receipt Book of Ann Blencowe. This is from the Adelphi Limited edition

> from 1925 which I own. The manuscript carries a date of 1694, but Ann was

> born in 1656 and married in 1675. I suspect that this was compiled for one

> of her dauhters upon a marriage. The mss remained in the family and the 1925

> edition is the first time that it was published.

 

I would say that this recipe makes dolma way out

of period for Europe, but possibly speculatively

in period for the Middle East.  The problem being

that 100years can see a lot of change within

a region, even in the Middle East.  I believe

that the Ottoman Empire chefs started a lot of

traditional foods that we associate with Middle

Eastern foods today, but that aren't really

appropriate for the SCA time frame.  I suspect

that dolma could be one of these.  I know that

baklava is another.

 

Huette

 

 

Date: Sun, 3 Oct 2004 15:48:37 -0400

From: Avraham haRofeh <avrahamharofeh at herald.sca.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] frozen dolmas

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> I am thinking about doing some grape leaves, stuffed with rice, minced

> raisins, parsley & mint for war. Has anyone ever tried freezing these?

 

I haven't done so, but it sounds like they ought to freeze fine. Just be

certain to heat them thoroughly (steaming would work well) so the starches

in the rice will uncrystallize - if you don't, the rice will be like little

rocks (assuming you use regular long-grain rice).

****************

Reb Avraham haRofeh

      (mka Randy Goldberg MD)

 

 

Date: Sun, 3 Oct 2004 17:07:24 -0400

From: ranvaig at columbus.rr.com

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] frozen dolmas

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> Thanks!  I hadn't thought of serving them warm, just thoroughly

> defrosted.  Although I have used long grained rice, my preference is

> for medium grained rice, as I cannot seem to find short grained

> among my usual haunts.  It is gooier by nature, and I tend to cheat.

> Cook the rice, make the filling, stuff the leaves, sprinkle with

> lemon water & bake 15 minutes at 350 (or nuke 2 minutes with less

> water for just a few in a hurry).  I had too much trouble with

> exploding dolmas on the stove....

 

Instead of cooking the rice, pour boiling water over it and let it

soak for 20 mins or so, then drain and use in your dolma.  The rice

will swell, but not over cook when you cook the dolma.

 

Frozen dolma won't be quite as good as fresh, but still fine.  I've

frozen fresh grape leaves, it wont hurt them.

 

Ranvaig

 

 

Date: Sun, 3 Oct 2004 20:57:27 -0400

From: ranvaig at columbus.rr.com

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] frozen dolmas

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

I use the recipe from A Book of Middle Eastern Food by Claudia Roden

But I double the recipe for a 1 lb jar of leaves, I'd always have too

many leaves left over

Fresh young leaves.. picked in the spring are even better.

 

1 lb jar of grape leaves (50-60)

3/4 c rice

2-3 tomatoes, skinned and chopped

1 large onion, finely chopped

2 1/2 T parsley, finely chopped

2 1/2 T mint, finely chopped

1/4 tsp gnd cinnamon

1/4 tsp gnd allspice

pepper to taste

3-4 cloves garlic, sliced

1/2 c olive oil

1/2 c water

1/4 tsp saffron (optional)

1 tsp sugar

juice of a lemon, or more

 

Put the grape leaves in a bowl and pour boiling water over them, let

soak 20 min, drain.

Put the rice in a bowl, pour boiling water to more than cover, let

soak 20 min, drain

Mix rice with tomatoes, onion, parsley, mint and spices, adjust

seasoning.

Line the bottom of the pan with a few torn or tough leaves.

Stuff the leaves and roll up, pack tightly in the pan.  Put the

garlic here and there.

Mix the oil, water and saffron, pour over the leaves.

Put a small plate on the top (I've never needed to do this).

Cover the pan and simmer gently for 2 hours, until thoroughly cooked.

Add water as needed, a cup at a time. Cool in the pan before turning

out. Serve cold.

 

 

Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2008 03:47:48 -0400

From: ranvaig at columbus.rr.com

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Grape Leaves

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

<<< Does anyone have a tried and true recipe for preserving grape leaves?

I am sure I can find TONS of them on the internet and in my library but if anyone has one they have tried I would appreciate it.

I have not grapes this year on my one year old vines but lots of leaves! >>>

 

Its a little late in the season now (unless you are in the Southern hemisphere). You want to pick them in spring as soon as they have gotten big enough, while they are still a lighter green.  By now they will be tougher.  I'd let your little vine get as much energy as it can for next year.

 

Years ago, I lived at a house with a huge wild grape vine, growing to the top of a telephone pole. I've never canned them, but have had good luck freezing them. Blanch them in boiling water, then make a stacks of 25 or so and freeze them flat in a plastic bag with the air squeezed out.  When you want to use them, let them defrost, then pour boiling water over them again.

 

Ranvaig

 

 

Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2008 19:44:10 -0700 (PDT)

From: charding at nwlink.com

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Grape Leaves

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

<<< Does anyone have a tried and true recipe for preserving grape leaves?

I am sure I can find TONS of them on the internet and in my library

but if anyone has one they have tried I would appreciate it.

I have not grapes this year on my one year old vines but lots of leaves!

 

Eduardo >>>

 

after picking the leaves (we try to pick leaves that would be shading the

tiny bunches of grapes), we rinse them and trim off the stems, stack them

in piles of 10 to 15 leaves, roll them and tie them off with some hemp

twine, blanche them in a medium salt brine, put them in quart jars, fill

with the brine, add some lemon juice to the brine and process in a water

bath for 15 min.

 

Maeva

 

 

Date: Sat, 4 Sep 2010 08:24:07 -0400

From: Elaine Koogler <kiridono at gmail.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] 16th c. Safavid dulma-ye kalam (stuffed

        cabbage       leaves)

 

There is a recipe in Dame Hauviette's "A Celebration at the Serayi" for a

period version of dolmas that does use grapevine leaves. She devised the

recipe from a 16th c. travel diary by a German visiting Turkey.  The

description of the dish in the diary is pretty specific, even to specifying

that "wine leaves" were used.  However, it does not use rice as one of the

ingredients but does describe how the leaves are wrapped around the filling

as well as the completed item being boiled in water.

 

Kiri

 

On Fri, Sep 3, 2010 at 9:05 PM, <lilinah at earthlink.net> wrote:

<<< The subject of dolma comes up here occasionally, so here is more "food for

thought"...

 

From the Safavid Persian cookbook, "Maddat al-khayat, resala dar elm-e

tabbaki" (The substance of life, a treatise on the art of cooking), dated to

1594/5 and written by Ostad Nurollah, the head chef of Shah Abbas I (r.

1587-1629)

 

Dulma-ye kalam [stuffed cabbage]

 

This is cooked by the people of Rum [Ottoman Turks] very often. In Iran it

is not well known. How it is made : Brown finely chopped meat. Then prepare

rice, which was mixed with chickpeas, onions, crushed spices and salt. Break

down the cabbage into leaves, blanch each, then wrap the chopped meat and

the rice in the cabbage leaves. Then put this into a pot, drip some clear

meat broth and melted fat into it, and let it simmer.

(my translation)

 

The Persians drank a lot of wine, and would have vine leaves available, but

they apparently are not used in this recipe.

--

Urtatim [that's err-tah-TEEM]

the persona formerly known as Anahita >>>

 

 

Date: Sat, 4 Sep 2010 11:27:07 -0700

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] 16th c. Safavid dulma-ye kalam (stuffed

        cabbage leaves)

 

Kiri wrote:

<<< There is a recipe in Dame Hauviette's "A Celebration at the Serayi" for a

period version of dolmas that does use grapevine leaves. She devised the

recipe from a 16th c. travel diary by a German visiting Turkey. The

description of the dish in the diary is pretty specific, even to specifying

that "wine leaves" were used. However, it does not use rice as one of the

ingredients but does describe how the leaves are wrapped around the filling

as well as the completed item being boiled in water. >>>

 

Yes, her recipe is based on the one from the journal of Hans

Dernschwam (Hauviette consistently leaves out the "n" in his last

name). He was in Kostantiniyye (aka Constantinople aka Istanbul) from

1553 to 1555. Hauviette described Dernschwam as a young man when he

was in Istanbul. However he was born in Bohemia in 1494 (and died in

1568), so when he was in Istanbul, he was 59 to 61. Not what I would

call a young man, but YMMV.

 

Dernschwam was not exactly a fan of Ottoman Turkish food. He begins

his section on food by saying, "the Turks eat poor miserable foods

that one shudders (to think of eating)..." He was born in Bohemia and

was a pensioned chief clerk and mining engineer for the Fuggers, the

important 15th and 16th c. German mercantile, banking, and venture

capitalist family, (much like the Welsers, who left us cookbooks ;),

who took over many Medici assets and much of their political power.

Dernschwam wasn't a cook, but he was a relatively sophisticated man,

known for his extensive library on many subjects. He may have

understood the nuances of European food, but some of his journal

descriptions show his prejudice against Ottoman food.

 

I found his original recipe on Thomas Gloning's inimitable site:

http://www.uni-giessen.de/gloning/tx/dernfood.htm

 

Item, schaffen flaisch, klain gehagt, des thut man ein loffel

voller auff ein wein plat, wigkelt man zusamen wie ein krapffen.

Daruntter hagt man auch sawere pflawmen, sewdt man allein

im wasser ab, das sol bey inen auch ein guth, herlich gericht

sein vnd hot darzw die wein pletter vberal fail.

 

Krapffen have been mentioned here recently in the discussion of

(apple) fritters. From what I have read of German recipes, and heard

in discussions of krapffen, they are made of a thin layer of dough

wrapped around a filling. Ranvaig has described them as being

somewhat like pierogi or ravioli.

 

I arrived at my translation, based on my own poor miserable knowledge

of modern German, my struggles with Dernschwan's Bohemian vernacular

spelling, and consultation with SCA cooks who actually know the

German language (some on this very list!):

 

Item, sheep meat, finely chopped, of that one puts a spoon

full on a vine leaf, one wraps/folds (it) together like a krapfen.

Thereunder one also chops sour plums, one boils them only

in water, it is considered by them [Turks] a good, lordly dish

to be and in addition (they) have vine leaves everywhere on sale.

 

(hot = hat = "have", not the English "hot")

 

Naturally, I continue to welcome improvements.

 

I am not certain if the sour plums were in the water, as it appears

to me to be, or in the dolmas with the meat. They are still put in

the center of Tabrizi kofta, a giant meatball in a savory sauce

(Tabriz is the fourth largest city in modern Iran, and the capital of

East Azerbaijan Province, a city famous for its cuisine and woven

pile rugs). On the other hand, nowadays, lemon juice and slices are

often put in the water when cooking dolma - today of grape leaves

sometimes filled with rice and meat, and sometimes rice only

(occasionally with dried currants or cinnamon or dill herb or...) -

possibly replacing those sour plums.

 

I have found the appropriate plums packaged in my local Persian

market. They are very small (the size of the plums used in Japanese

umeboshi), dark yellow fleshed (I have only found them peeled), and

quite sour. An ingredient in Shirvani's mid-15th c. cookbook and

mentioned several times in Dernschwam, they are still used today in

Azerbaijani and Persian cuisines. They are nothing like our much

larger sweet plums and are even farther from prunes.

--

Urtatim [that's err-tah-TEEM]

the persona formerly known as Anahita

 

<the end>



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