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Food items shown in various period paintings. References.

 

NOTE: See also the files: books-food-msg, cookbooks-msg, painting-msg, pigments-msg, p-tableware-msg, Armenian-Ilum-art, p-graffiti-lnks.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

   Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                         Stefan at florilegium.org

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Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

From: mfy at sli.com (Mike Yoder)

Subject: Re: New World foods in period (Was: Feast Formats)

Organization: Software Leverage, Inc. Arlington, Ma

Date: Tue, 9 Nov 1993 23:15:10 GMT

 

A portrait which food aficionados would find interesting is Arcimboldo's

"Rudolf II as Vertumnus," which is reproduced in _Arcimboldo the Magnificent_.

I do not recall when the painting was done, but Arcimboldo's lifetime fell

entirely within period.

 

This picture depicts Rudolf as an assembly of vegetables, fruits, etc.; his ear

is unmistakably an ear of maize, which is a striking coincidence.  I would like

to know whether 16th C. Italian contained the equivalent of our expression "an

ear of corn."

 

I am certain this is considerably earlier than the 1597 reference to maize

which David/Cariadoc cited, but it does not indicate more than the bare fact

that maize was considered edible.  It might be, for example, that it was used

to make bread rather than being eaten boiled or whatever.

 

It might be useful to examine the picture closely and enumerate the items found

therein. But I leave this to the cooks among us to decide.

 

   Franz Joder von Joderhuebel (Michael F. Yoder) [mfy at sli.com]

 

 

Date: 6 Apr 1998 12:44:17 -0700

From: "Marisa Herzog" <marisa_herzog at macmail.ucsc.edu>

Subject: SC - corn...

 

Whether or not maize was used in period there is a beautiful italian painting

called "Summer" by Guiseppe Arcimboldo, c. 1573.  It is a "man" made entirely

of fruits and vegetables wearing a jacket woven from wheat stalks.  Included

in the painting are: various grains, artichoke, maize, eggplant, grapes,

cantelope (or very similar melon) pears, plums, peaches, scallions, garlic,

peas, cherries, raspberries, onions, possibly a cucumber, possibly a

gourd/squash, possibly a roma-style tomato, and a few other things I just

don't recognize.

Has anybody seen anything else in this vein?  Did he do a spring/winter/fall

as well?  Are there similar representations from other artists in other

countries? I am looking at a postcard.  It doesn't tell us if they were eaten

or how, but it does show that things were familiar in a certain place at a

certain time.

- -brid

 

 

Date: Mon, 6 Apr 1998 16:08:47 -0500

From: "Decker, Terry D." <TerryD at Health.State.OK.US>

Subject: RE: SC - corn...

 

I have seen a few paintings with similar themes and I believe they were

Arcimboldo's work.  If I remember correctly, some of them can be found in a

book entitled Renaissance Recipes.  While I didn't see any of Arcimboldo's

work in the most recent edition of Elizabeth David's Italian Cooking has a

many pieces of Italian Renaissance artwork with food as the subject.

 

Having maize in an Italian Renaissance painting doesn't surprise me.

Northern Italy is one of the places which took quickly to gran turco and

started using it in the polenta.

 

My wife says there are at least two different "Summers", they are parts of

complete seasonal sets and that she vaguely remembers reading that there may

be as many as four different seasonal sets.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Mon, 06 Apr 1998 18:12:38 EDT

From: geneviamoas at juno.com

Subject: Re: SC - corn...

 

Brid, are you looking for more paintings of vegetative folk and / or

collections of food stuffs from a given period?  If the latter check out

_The Kitchen_ by Vicenzo Campi (1536 - 91) in the Pinacoteca de Brera,

Milan or _The Kitchen of an Italian Villa_ attributed to Michaelangelo

Cergnozzi. The painting _Young Daughter of the Picts_ by Le Moyne de

Morgues (1533 - 1588) shows a woman heavily tattooed with flowers but not

made of them. And  in an early 17th century kitchen scene by Astolfo

Petrazzi (1579 - 1665) the headding reads "cabbages and pumpkins" but

looks to my eye like cabage and cantalope and squash... among other foods

shown. Just  found them all in Renaissance Recipes.

 

Genevia

 

 

Date: Tue, 7 Apr 1998 12:35:09 -0400

From: "marilyn traber" <mtraber at email.msn.com>

Subject: SC - archimboldo

 

http://mistral.culture.fr/louvre/francais/magazine/peint.97.htm

a nice reproduction of "summer".

margali

sorry for the french, but with me it is not a problem, and besides-you only

want to look at the pretty pictures, right?

 

 

Date: Tue, 7 Apr 1998 15:53:37 -0500 (CDT)

From: alysk at ix.netcom.com (Elise Fleming)

Subject: SC - Arcimboldo:  Was: Corn

 

Greetings. Brid asked if Arcimboldo did any other "seasons" portraits

using foods.  Yes, he did several series of the seasons.  There is an

arts book (I found mine on remainder at Waldenbooks) of just his

paintings and shows the similarity of several of his series.

 

Alys Katharine

 

 

Date: Wed, 8 Apr 1998 16:07:13 -0500 (CDT)

From: alysk at ix.netcom.com (Elise Fleming)

Subject: SC - Food in the Arts:  Was: Corn

 

Brid (I think) wrote:

>Are there similar representations from other artists in other

>countries? I am looking at a postcard.  It doesn't tell us if they

>were eaten or how, but it does show that things were familiar in a

>certain place at a certain time.

 

There are a fair number of books of varying types with food in art.

The Dutch painters were particularly fond of still lifes with food.

It's one of the better sources for what some period confections looked

like. As I mentioned in an earlier post, I've found interesting books

at stores such as Waldenbooks and have a lovely one entitled "Still

Life" which mostly contains period art divided into sections such as

animals, foods, plants...The cover has a gorgeous glass goblet on it.

 

Alys Katharine

 

 

Date: Wed, 10 Nov 1999 04:41:06 +1100

From: Lorix <lorix at trump.net.au>

Subject: SC - FYI:  Nice "picture" web site

 

I have just found a rather nice site called

the "Web Gallery of Art".  Basically it is an

online gallery of paintings & sculptures

(useful for costuming references).  It has

provision to search by artists, countries &

time periods.

 

While I was browsing thru the artists, I

found 3 paintings from Giuseppe Arcimboldo

(b. cca. 1530, Milano, d. 1593, Milano).

Arcimboldo's most famous works are the

fantasy

paintings representing human faces and

composed from flowers, fruits, fishes and

other objects.  Sometimes these paintings

have allegoric or moral references.  There

are 3 on this site and I guess it is a form

of documentation for various seasonal fruits

& veg :-)

 

http://gallery.euroweb.hu/html/a/arcimbol/index.html

 

Lorix

 

 

Date: Mon, 6 Dec 1999 14:17:39 -0800 (PST)

From: Huette von Ahrens <ahrenshav at yahoo.com>

Subject: SC - More waffle and pancake paintings

 

Here are more paintings that show waffles and

pancakes, although most of them are post-SCA period.

 

From Katie Stewart's book "The Joy of Eating",

pages 86-87.  Unfortunately, Ms. Stewart does not give

us the name of the artist or the name of the painting,

but the painting appears to be dated 1560.  We see a

multigenerational family, grandparents, parents and

baby. Next to the grandfather is a plate of waffles,

next to the mother is a plate of pancakes.  The

grandmother is making the pancakes in the background,

using a skillet to make the pancakes.  The skillet is

suspended over the fire by a large ring attached to a

set of chains.

 

From Peter Rose's book, "The Sensible Cook", we find

these paintings:

 

Page 2: Jan Steen, "The 12th Night Feast"

Jan Steen 1626-1679.

Page 15: Willem Buytewech, "Interior" 1610.

Page 22: Jan Steen, "The St. Nicholas Celebration"

Page 77: Nicholas Maes, "The Pancake Maker"

Nicholas Maes 1634-1693.

Page 117: No artist or date: "Sweet meal"

 

Huette

 

 

Date: Mon, 6 Dec 1999 22:55:48 -0500

From: "Robin Carroll-Mann" <harper at idt.net>

Subject: Re: SC - More waffle and pancake paintings

 

And it came to pass on 6 Dec 99,, that Huette von Ahrens wrote:

> Here are more paintings that show waffles and

> pancakes, although most of them are post-SCA period.

> >From Katie Stewart's book "The Joy of Eating",

> pages 86-87.  Unfortunately, Ms. Stewart does not give

> us the name of the artist or the name of the painting,

> but the painting appears to be dated 1560.

 

There is a painting, apparently by the same artist, at:

http://www.dnaco.net/~aleed/corsets/lowerclass/images/waffles.jpg

It is identified as: "Making Waffles" by Joachim Beuckelaer, 1565.

 

Lady Brighid ni Chiarain

Settmour Swamp, East (NJ)

 

 

Date: Sun, 12 Dec 1999 19:42:33 -0500 (EST)From: alysk at ix.netcom.comSubject: SC - Food, Pottery & GlassGreetings!  The Cleveland Museum of Art is having a show of still-life paintings from the Netherlands (1550-1720) with some lovely depictions of pottery and glass, and "tons" of food - vegetable, animal, and confections.  They sell a book with all the paintings in them, including color or black/white details.  Potters and glassblowers will find quite a few examples of beautiful ware.Another book sold by the museum is _Still Life_ by Norbert Schneider and published by Taschen. On the cooks' list there was discussion of waffles.  Well, there's a period (late 1500s) painting with a round waffle that has the usual square impressions.  Another painting includes a square waffle. There are at least two pretzel pictures. One picture (from the early 1600s?) includes a grater hanging up on the wall.  This book sold for around $20, I believe.There are several examples of "pies" - big standing pies with inedible crust that is highly decorated; smaller pies with the contents spilling out; and one that shows the texture of the crust on the side as it has been broken off.  There are a number of pictures showing various sizes and types of bread.  One of the 1500s pictures shows a large knob of butter looking much like a stuffed pouch turned upside down.  In the same picture are four small pies with theshells obviously hand-made and not molded in a tin since they are unevenly round.For folk with an interest in food of all types and containers of varying materials, I heartily recommend looking at Dutch still life pictures.Alys Katharine

 

Date: Tue, 14 Dec 1999 16:15:06 -0500 (EST)

From: alysk at ix.netcom.com

Subject: SC - Re: Egg Sizes

 

Greetings! Par answered:

>Got a response from my archaeology on the issue.  A quick look revealed

>no indications of egg sizes...

 

Diego Velazquez did two still lifes with eggs where you can see the approximate

size. "Old Woman Poaching Eggs" (1610) was mentioned earlier by someone. The

egg is cradled in the woman's hand and would seem to be about a "large" size,

although it might be as small as a "medium", but no smaller. He also did "Christ

in the House of Martha and Mary" (1618) where the eggs are in a shallow dish.

Martha's hands are not too far away and the egg looks like it would comfortably

fit in her fist, about the same size as in the previous still life.  Again, it

looks more like a "large".

 

Alys Katharine

 

 

Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2000 18:42:21 -0500

From: "Daniel Phelps" <phelpsd at gate.net>

Subject: SC - Re:Turkeys

 

Was written:

>Turkeys are also accurately depicted in an early 17th

>century painting by Joseph Heinz the younger hanging in

>the Museo Davia Bargellini in Bologna, in a 16th century

>manuscript in the Museo Civico in Padua and in Bernardo

>Strozzi's "The Cook".  All of these turkey paintings are in

>Gillian Riley's "Rennaissance Recipes -Painters and Food"

>Pomegrante Artbooks, San Francisco, 1993.  If someone

>on the list has access to more detailed sources for these

>paintings and can get exact dates for the works, we would

>have an excellent basis for co-oborating the widespread

>use of turkey in Italy from the early middle of the 16th century.

 

Regards turkeys Fernando Braudel in "The Structures of Everyday Life"

Civilization & Capitalism 15th-18th Century Vol. 1 page 189 says:

 

"Turkeys came from America in the 16th century.  A dutch painter, Joachim

Buedkalaer (1530-73) was probably among the first to include one in a still

life, today in the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam."

 

I seem to remember other references that suggest that they were reasonably

common domestic fowl in England post 1550.  Common enough that records exist

of them being driven to market and prices quoted.  If there is enough

interest I will research this further and find the specific references in my

collection.  Please remember that with this fowl there is some historical

confusion with the Guinea Hen.

 

Daniel Raoul

 

 

Date: Tue, 16 Apr 2002 09:43:01 -0400

From: johnna holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

To: "sca-cooks at ansteorra.org" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Pineapple--Kiri's pineapple

 

A picture of Kiri's pineapples that she mentioned

earlier this month can be found here:

http://www.nga.gov/exhibitions/2002/slideshow/slide-163-4.htm

They were painted by Jacopo Ligozzi (1547-1626) who was invited

by the second grand duke of Tuscany, Francesco I (1541-1587)

to join his court. "Seventeen of Ligozzi's works are displayed,

the largest number ever seen outside of Italy. Among them are

the first known drawing of a pineapple from South America,

the American Century Plant newly brought from Mexico, and

Mourning Iris and Spanish Iris."

So we don't have to wait for the exhibition catalogue.

 

Johnnae llyn Lewis  Johnna Holloway

 

 

Date: Wed, 03 Mar 2004 08:57:30 -0800

From: Elaine Koogler <ekoogler1 at comcast.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Food paintings

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Check out Gillian Riley's "Painters &

Food: Renaissance Recipes"...lots of paintings that include foods!

 

Kiri

 

 

Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 15:59:23 -0500

From: Christina L Biles <bilescl at okstate.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] tart crust question

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

> <http://worldart.sjsu.edu/VieO42870$10084*778063>;

Olwen said:

***Anyone else think the smaller round item is a sandwich?  Nice tart

crust.

 

Nah. It's a roll. They show up in tons of these Dutch still life pics.

Whole, cut in half, torn - they are one of the most common elements I  

have

found.   I have seen a 1680s? pic of a woman eating slices of cheese

betwen slices of roll/bread, which totally cracked me up, that being my

default lunch at events.   If you are interested I can run up into the

stacks tomorrow to grab the book & scan the picture.

 

-Magdalena

 

 

Date: Wed, 14 Jul 2004 17:32:49 -0500

From: "Terry Decker" <t.d.decker at worldnet.att.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] tart crust question

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Wrong time and place for a bagel.  I would say it is a small loaf of manchet

quality bread in a shape the French refer to as a galette (small cake).

Galettes with fruit baked into them are common for special occasions.  In

this case, the slight green and yellow coloration along the edge give the

appearance that the loaf has been cut and filled with something.  This could

be a problem with the image as it appears on the screen, so a high quality

photo reproduction or a look at the original would tell us more.

 

The loaf is also similar to baked brie.

 

Bear

 

> Actually it looks like a bagel with the dough risen up to close the whole in

> the middle to me. I don't see anything between the bread either.

> Elewyiss

 

 

Date: Mon, 14 Feb 2005 11:47:04 EST

From: Devra at aol.com

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re:Dutch cooking

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

   Has anyone mentioned 'Sensible Cook' by Peter Rose (1600-ish book

from New Netherlands) and 'Matters of Taste' - great Dutch paintings

from period showing food, with recipes also by Peter Rose.

 

     Devra

 

Devra Langsam

www.poisonpenpress.com

 

 

Date: Mon, 14 Feb 2005 14:57:57 -0500

From: Jenn Strobel <jenn.strobel at gmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Re: Dutch Cooking

To: alysk at ix.netcom.com, Cooks within the SCA

        <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

On Mon, 14 Feb 2005 14:46:15 -0500, Elise Fleming <alysk at ix.netcom.com>wrote:

> Odriana wrote:

>> Peter Rose also did a book that

>> is a survey of pictures done in the 16th/17th centuries (time period

>> could be off, i'm working from memory) featuring food. It's an

>> expensive, but very nice book.

> Do you have the title or ISBN?  Is it still in print?

> Alys Katharine

 

It's called "Matters of Taste" and you can get details from Peter

Rose's website: http://www.peterrose.com/books.html.

 

I've had the privilege of thumbing through it and it's just an

amazingly beautiful book.

 

Odriana/Jenn

 

 

Date: Mon, 28 Feb 2005 00:28:19 -0500

From: Daniel Myers <edouard at medievalcookery.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Odd looking things in paintings

To: SCA Cooks <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

In the paintings below, there are these things that look something (but

not completely) like a baby brie cut in half.  Any ideas what they are?

 

Here they're on the tray on the table

http://www.rijksmuseum.nl/images/aria/sk/z/sk-a-3.z

 

There's only one here - leaning on a pitcher - I'd think it was a

mushroom cap, but the inside doesn't look right.

http://www.rijksmuseum.nl/images/aria/sk/z/sk-a-4821.z

 

At the butcher's, lower center - there's one white, one beige, and two

that are reddish-brown (if it's brie then Yuck!).

http://www.wga.hu/art/a/aertsen/butchers.jpg

 

Any ideas?

 

- Doc

 

 

Date: Mon, 28 Feb 2005 11:02:07 -0500

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Hoogsteder & Hoogsteder

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Those that like the Flemish and Dutch paintings of foods

arranged on plates may like browsing through

the website featuring Hoogsteder & Hoogsteder  who deal

in Dutch and Flemish artworks.

http://www.hoogsteder.com/

They have a journal and there are a number of interesting articles

including one

on Fish Still Lifes by Dutch and Flemish Masters from 1550-1700.

from #10.

Volume 1 has an article on a Clara Peeters' still life.

Volume 7 has an article entitled An immigrant in Amsterdam

How Johannes Bouman of Strasbourg became a Dutch painter.

There's also one there on 12th Night.

 

http://www.hoogsteder.com/journal/journal.aspx?no=9 has

several articles on drinking in various paintings.

Drinking habits in the seventeenth century Dirty water

Drinking peasants, drunken gentlemen Drinking companies in art

Drink and grapes

Symbolism in still lifes and genre scenes

 

Johnnae llyn Lewis

 

 

Date: Mon, 28 Feb 2005 11:08:13 -0500

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re: Odd looking things in paintings

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Daniel Myers wrote:

>> In the paintings below, there are these things that look something

>> (but not completely) like a baby brie cut in half.  Any ideas what

>> they are?

>> 

>> Here they're on the tray on the table

>> http://www.rijksmuseum.nl/images/aria/sk/z/sk-a-3.z

> I think cheese here.

>> There's only one here - leaning on a pitcher - I'd think it was a

>> mushroom cap, but the inside doesn't look right.

>> http://www.rijksmuseum.nl/images/aria/sk/z/sk-a-4821.z

> I think that's just a roll of bread myself. The cheeses here are stacked

> behind in the pile. Take a look at the work titled The Baker-- it's on

> the front cover

 

of Matters of Taste.  www.peterrose.com/lectures.html

<http://www.peterrose.com/lectures.html>;

or see the page: www.rnw.nl/culture/html/taste021031.html

<http://www.rnw.nl/culture/html/taste021031.html>;

 

>> At the butcher's, lower center - there's one white, one beige, and

>> two that are reddish-brown (if it's brie then Yuck!).

>> http://www.wga.hu/art/a/aertsen/butchers.jpg

> It turns out that Aertsen's The Meat Stall is a much commented on

> painting. There's more than 10 pages

 

devoted to this work in Honig's Painting and the Market in Early Modern

Antwerp. (Yale, 1998).

There are a number of elements in this painting. The Holy family

pausing on the Flight to Egypt is shown in the background landscape.

 

I thought cheeses here although after looking at some other works, Ithink the darker brown ones might be the rusks, although perhaps flat blood puddings might better fit in with the scene of a butcher's shop. Peter Rose in Matters of Taste identifies similiar looking flat foodstuffs as rusks, such as those that are pictured in Clara Peeters Still Life with Crab, shrimp, and lobster. It was on the web as it was in the Albany show, but it's been taken down. It's in the book on page 109.

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Mon, 28 Feb 2005 15:41:30 -0500

From: "Elise Fleming" <alysk at ix.netcom.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re: Odd looking things in paintings

To: "sca-cooks at ansteorra.org" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Greetings. The "odd looking things" pointed out in this painting (Here

they're on the tray on the

table...http://www.rijksmuseum.nl/images/aria/sk/z/sk-a-3.z) look just like

the items in Pieter Aertson's "Meat Pantry of an Inn, with the Virgin

Giving Alms".  The art book that I have says that they are "pies".  The

pastry appears to be hand-shaped rather than done in a pan or form.

Aertson paints at least two different kinds, but they are the same culinary

item (I think!) as in the picture cited above.  While I can't swear that

they are custard, they look custard-y.

 

While the second picture in question

(http://www.rijksmuseum.nl/images/aria/sk/z/sk-a-4821.z) doesn't ask about

the cheeses, similar cheeses are throughout Dutch paintings.  The one art

book comments "the dark cheese in the stack might be sheep's cheese,

colored with sheep's feces".  Have a nice lunch!

 

Alys Katharine

 

 

Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2005 21:10:38 -0500

From: "Martin G. Diehl" <mdiehl at nac.net>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Found another Art archive (plus a minor excursion

        into   Mathematics)

To: sca-cooks <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>, SCA-East

        <sca-east at indra.com>,  settmour_swamp <settmour_swamp at yahoogroups.com>

 

I noticed yet another Internet Art Archive (YAIAA) ...

 

"The Artchive";

http://artchive.com/ftp_site.htm

 

Some examples ...

 

Piero di Cosimo; "The Discovery of Honey";

c. 1505-1510; Oil on panel; Art Museum, Worcester, MA

http://artchive.com/artchive/P/piero_di_cosimo/cosimo_honey.jpg.html

[ob food reference]

 

Piero di Cosimo (1462-1521) -- short bio

http://artchive.com/artchive/P/piero_di_cosimo.html

[yet another ob food reference]

 

Durer, Albrecht; "A Young Hare";

1502; Watercolor and gouache on paper; 25 x 23 cm

http://www.artchive.com/artchive/D/durer/hare.jpg.html

 

Durer, Albrecht; "Portrait of Michael Wolgemut";

1516; Oil and tempera on panel; 29 x 27 cm

http://artchive.com/artchive/D/durer/wolgemut.jpg.html

 

[this might not be the same Wolgemut as we see at Pennsic <g>]

 

Durer, Albrecht; "Melencolia I";

1514; Engraving; 24 x 19 cm;

http://artchive.com/artchive/D/durer/melencol.jpg.html

 

[Note: "Melencolia I" contains the first magic square to

be seen in Europe, cleverly including the date 1514 as two

entries in the middle of the bottom row.  There seems to be

some math mystery about the polyhedron in the picture.

More about math later in this message (u r warned)]

 

Durer, Albrecht; "Self-Portrait at 26", 1498

http://www.artchive.com/artchive/D/durer/self26.jpg.html

 

Albrecht Durer (1471-1528)

http://artchive.com/artchive/D/durer.html

 

Quoting from the preceding link,

 

        It is, however, the self-portraits of Durer that

        give us the greatest insight into his character

        and beliefs. The first, drawn when he was just 13,

        depicts the soft features of a young boy, sketched

        with great confidence and skill.

 

        Durer was rightly proud of his achievement and

        years later he added the inscription:

 

               'This I drew, using a mirror; it is

               my own likeness, in the year 1484,

               when I was still a child.'

 

After a 'little distraction' (TM) (read about it further

along in this message), I found this set of drawings ...

I should say, this *spectacular* set of drawings.

 

Drawings (1484-1499) by Albrecht DÜRER

http://gallery.euroweb.hu/html/d/durer/2/11/1/

 

Albrecht DÜRER, "Self-Portrait at 13";

1484; Silverpoint on paper, 275 x 196 mm;

http://gallery.euroweb.hu/art/d/durer/2/11/1/01self13.jpg

 

Hmmmmmmmm .. what kind of hat is that?  Is that a pocket?

[ob garb reference]

 

While looking for a good image of the Albrecht Durer

"Self-Portrait at 13", I got a 'little bit' sidetracked

when my buddy Google claimed that he saw a reference to

Albrecht Durer in "The MacTutor History of Mathematics"

archive. This is a "collection of over 1000 biographies

and historical articles of a mathematical nature"

 

A Renaissance Artist ... in a site about the history of

Mathematics ... I'll just look for a few minutes to see

what's going on ... then finish this eMail.  Time passes.

 

(Side note ... Mathematicians are just a little strange ...

the home page of the site claims 'over 1000 biographies'

and this folder, "Index of /~history/Mathematicians";

http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/Mathematicians/

lists 1,718 files which seem to be names ... presumably

names of mathematicians.  No matter how you count it,

1,718 > 1,000 ... so who am I to complain?)

 

That site includes Albrecht Durer as one of the 1,718

names listed in their History of Mathematics.

 

"The MacTutor History of Mathematics";

http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/

 

Mathematics History Topics Index;

http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/Indexes/HistoryTopics.html

 

Mathematics History Indexes of Biographies (conveniently

divided into Chronological _and_ Alphabetical indexes);

http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/BiogIndex.html

[ob Historical Name Research]

 

"Albrecht Durer" (as a Mathematician!);

http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/Mathematicians/Durer.html

 

Albrecht Durer, the Artist ... also a Mathematician ... OK, so

Google wasn't pulling my leg ... at least, not this time.  <g>

 

I hope that you will enjoy reading this and looking at the

images as much as I enjoyed putting it together for you.

 

... if I'm off target with this sort of message or report,

I certainly hope you'll let me know sooner than later.

 

Vincenzo

 

 

Date: Wed, 16 Mar 2005 12:32:22 -0500

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Found another Art archive

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Those with academic access to networked databases ought to

search ARTSTOR which is the newest of these image databases.

The ARTstor Library's initial content will include approximately 300,000

images covering art, architecture and archeology. ARTstor's initial

software tools will support a wide range of pedagogical and research

uses including: viewing and analyzing images through features such as

zooming and panning, saving groups of images online for personal or

shared uses, and creating and delivering presentations both online and

offline. This community resource will be made available solely for

educational and scholarly uses that noncommercial in nature.

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Thu, 08 Sep 2005 12:27:16 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Still Life with Sweets and Pottery, 1627

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>,

        SCA_Subtleties at yahoogroups.com

 

I was doing an image search today and came

across this one

http://www.nga.gov/cgi-bin/pinfo?Object=45891+0+none

 

It's too good to pass up and it's easy to get to since it's in the

National Gallery of Art. There are a number of detail images too.

 

Still Life with Sweets and Pottery, 1627 by Juan van der Hamen

 

Doughnuts anyone?

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Mon, 12 Sep 2005 21:06:58 -0700 (PDT)

From: Kathleen Madsen <kmadsen12000 at yahoo.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re: Food on Plates

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

Both cheeses have the traditional shape and rind of a

gouda, however the one on the right has what looks

like cumin and caraway seeds - which would make that

Leyden. The left one is definitely an aged gouda

which is probably about 2-3 years old.  We have a 4

year version that we carry that is darker and

grainier, it no longer crumbles like this image,

rather it breaks into shards.

 

Both dutch cheeses, and both made in late-period,

which fits what you've got painted on the canvas and

the area the artist is from.

 

Hope this has helped,

Eibhlin, who is a cheesemonger and corp. buyer of

cheese and charcut. in real life.  ;)

 

 

Ok folks---

 

Picture One

http://www.nga.gov/exhibitions/2005/claesz/claesz_ss1.shtm

 

The question has arisen on another list as to the

cheeses?

 

The fruits in question I think are mainly currants.

 

Any ideas on the cheese?

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Wed, 14 Sep 2005 19:45:33 -0400

From: ranvaig at columbus.rr.com

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Food on Plates  Pieter Claesz

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> Picture One

> http://www.nga.gov/exhibitions/2005/claesz/claesz_ss1.shtm

> The question has arisen on another list as to the cheeses?

> The fruits in question I think are mainly currants.

 

Click the + to expand the picture.

 

The plate has little wild strawberries and some white currants.   The

basket has red, black, and white currants, larger green gooseberries,

more strawberries, cherries, and strawberry leaves.

 

Ranvaig

 

 

Date: Tue, 05 Dec 2006 12:01:23 -0500

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Feast of St Nicholas Breads and Cakes

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>,

        "mk-cooks at midrealm.org" <mk-cooks at midrealm.org>

 

It seems the season and the right day to share this one with the list.

 

Jan Steen's Feast of Saint Nicholas

I know that it is circa 1663-65, but it shows a number of interesting

baked items.

The artwork may be seen here-

http://www.wga.hu/frames-e.html?/html/s/steen/page1/

Click on the image to get a larger image to look at.

 

What's great is that by using this page--

http://www.rijksmuseum.nl/aria/aria_assets/SK-A-385?

page=1&lang=en&context_space=&context_id=

 

from the Rijksmuseum one can read about various items portrayed

in the painting. [Also check out "Leiden Baker Arend Oostwaert and His

Wife Catharina Keyzerswaert" which is also part of the Rijksmuseum

collection.]

One can get the image to enlarge so you can examine all the details.

 

Included in this Feast of St Nicholas are

gingerbread, honey cake, nuts, waffles and apples from the tree. The

large ginger cake is a matchmaker or 'hylickmaker' [A Hylickmaker is a

kind of large cake decorated with candied peel and pieces of orange.

Hylick means marriage. It was therefore an ideal gift for a person who

was about to propose. This type of cake was also eaten on St Nicholas

day, because of the saint's association with marriage.]

 

Leaning against the table is a gleaming duivekater [A

'duivekater' is a diamond-shaped loaf baked for festive occasions.]

 

The little girl holds a container from which can be seen a sucker

on a stick in the form of a rooster.

 

The child near the chimney is holding a delicacy that is still eaten

around 5 December: a gingerbread man in the shape of St Nicholas. In the

seventeenth century, the baking of St Nicholas figures was banned in

many Dutch cities. In Utrecht, for example, an ordinance passed in 1655

forbade 'the baking of likenesses in bread or cake'.

There's even a mention of the The second St Nicholas Feast that was also

the work of Jan Steen.

 

So Happy December 5th Everyone,

 

Johnnae llyn Lewis

 

 

Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2008 23:58:44 -0500

From: "otsisto" <otsisto at socket.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Can you identify the food?

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

-----Original Message-----

http://www.wga.hu/frames-e.html?/html/t/toeput/index.html

 

I sent this as a looky here, neat painting, have fun.

 

Going left to right.

 

There appears to be either a leaf or a lime on the lower left corner next to

what appears to be an orange (or could it be a grapefruit?). The pink thingy

looks to be a flower (rose?) the platter contains peaches and grapes. I had

not thought of apricots but in comparison to the peaches on the other

platter, I see that as a slim possibility as the leaves in front of the

platter are grape and the others could pass as apricot leaves as peach

leaves tend to be narrower (grew up with apricot and peach tree in the back

yard). Two figs are on the left of the table near the server's pants. At

first glance I thought the item in the upper left was a cheese round but on

the right side of it, there seems to be a stem so it is a melon. The head

cook? is handing the server a plate of red cherries. Between the front two

platters are cherries. On the second front platter you have peaches and

pears. Behind the platter are some figs, peach and peach half. Pomegranates

on the right front corner with a platter of two types of figs behind them.

The table cloth appears to be covering a Persian rug, which to my

understanding, the rugs were first used as table covers before they were

used as rugs in the Mediterranean and European households (has anyone heard

different?)

 

The table in the front has two wine decanters. A platter and matching

decanter of which I think (once upon a time I read somewhere) this would

have been filled with water. The set would have been used to wash hands, aka

finger bowl.

 

To the right of the set is a pomegranate and to the right of that a pear and

possibly a piece of the pomegranate rind.

The boy server is carrying a platter of figs.

 

Thank you for answering and hope you had a bit of fun.

 

On a side note, I found this rare seed site when looking for Italian Melons.

Thought some may be interested.

http://rareseeds.com/seeds/Melons-European

 

De

 

 

Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2008 01:35:25 -0400

From: "Robin Carroll-Mann" <rcarrollmann at gmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Can you identify the food?

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

On Wed, Sep 3, 2008 at 12:58 AM, otsisto <otsisto at socket.net> wrote:

 

<<< There appears to be either a leaf or a lime on the lower left corner next

to what appears to be an orange (or could it be a grapefruit?). >>>

 

More likely a pomelo, ancestor of the grapefruit.  Grapefruits are an

18th c. hybrid.

--

Brighid ni Chiarain

 

 

Date: Wed, 03 Sep 2008 07:44:08 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae at mac.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Can you identify the food?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Pomelos are introduced later too.

Their skin tends to be more greenish.

Like Bear, I would guess it's a Citron. I've seen both.

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2008 15:57:20 -0500

From: "Terry Decker" <t.d.decker at worldnet.att.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Can you identify the food?

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

On Wed, Sep 3, 2008 at 7:44 AM, Johnna Holloway <johnnae at mac.com> wrote:

> Pomelos are introduced later too.

> Their skin tends to be more greenish.

> Like Bear, I would guess it's a Citron. I've seen both.

 

<<< I am 95% sure that there is a recipe involving pomelos in Granado

(1599). I'll check when I get home.

--

Brighid ni Chiarain >>>

 

Pomelo is a 19th century English variant of the 17th Century Dutch

"pompelmoes" or "pompelmousse."    Granado may have a recipe with pomelos,

but you might want to double check original usage and translation in the

Spanish.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Thu, 4 Sep 2008 00:58:01 -0400

From: "Robin Carroll-Mann" <rcarrollmann at gmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Can you identify the food?

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

I dug out my copy of Granado (a modern transcription in Spanish), and

found I was mistaken.  The word is not "pomelos" but "toronjas". I

can't find the magnifier for my micro-print edition of Covarrubias,

but I think "toronja" is a variety of citron.  In any case, it is

*not* a pomelo.  I apologize for jumping in before I check my

information.

--

Brighid ni Chiarain

 

 

Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2008 06:42:04 -0500

From: Elise Fleming <alysk at ix.netcom.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Divinity-like candy from Nostradamus

To: sca-cooks <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Stefan asked, and Talana answered, a question about Nostradamus's pine

nut candy.  Years ago the Cleveland Museum of Art displayed a painting

that I thought contained a depiction of this sweet.  The painting was

"Still Life with Sweets", 1622, by Juan van der Hamen, a Spanish

painter. (He's also listed on other art works as Juan van de Hamen y

Leo'n". Amica, on the internet, includes this in their description:

"The rectangular cakes on the plates are made of almonds and hazelnuts;

the white squares are concoctions of pine nuts and sugar."

 

You can find an image online at:

http://www.clevelandart.org/explore/

 

Type in either the painter's name or the title of the painting.

 

Alys Katharine

 

 

Date: Thu, 31 Dec 2009 14:53:40 -0500

From: chawkswrth at aol.com

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Flemish Art

 

I was cruising through the WGA Art Gallery and came across Pieter Aertsen, who was active during the 16th Century. Flemish painters always take an interesting look at life under the stairs. There are several paintings of Market places, kitchens and the cook.

These have so many suggestions of what they ate, how they dressed....

 

http://www.wga.hu/index1.html

 

Helen

 

 

Date: Wed, 13 Jan 2010 07:14:38 -0700

From: edoard at medievalcookery.com

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] digital libraries on culinary history ...

 

From: emilio szabo

<< While exploring some sources to answer some questions about Italian  

works, I was doing some browsing and came across another online digital archive.

 

http://www.academiabarilla.com/academia/gastronomic-library/ext/digital-book/year.aspx

 

The World of Academia Barilla >>>

 

Ok, so I was browsing through this site just to see what was there, and

I came across something interesting.

 

There's a page full of "Gastronomic Prints", and about halfway down is

one titled "La grigliata - The Grill" - I can't link directly to the

image, but here's the page of prints.

http://www.academiabarilla.com/academia/gastronomic-prints/browse-gastronomic-prints-collection.aspx?q=XVI

 

What I find notable about it is that the woman on the right side of the

image is holding what appears to be a bratwurst in a split roll.

Popular wisdom is that sausages were first served in rolls around the

1890s, but if I'm seeing what I think I'm seeing then the practice dates

back to at least the 1600s.

 

- Doc

 

 

Date: Wed, 13 Jan 2010 09:19:44 -0500

From: Robin Carroll-Mann <rcarrollmann at gmail.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] digital libraries on culinary history ...

 

On Wed, Jan 13, 2010 at 9:14 AM,  <edoard at medievalcookery.com> wrote:

<<< What I find notable about it is that the woman on the right side of the

image is holding what appears to be a bratwurst in a split roll.

Popular wisdom is that sausages were first served in rolls around the

1890s, but if I'm seeing what I think I'm seeing then the practice dates

back to at least the 1600s. >>>

 

The English caption says that this is a woman selling grilled

vegetables. Can someone translate the German caption?  It may shed

more light on what's happening.

 

Brighid ni Chiarain

 

 

Date: Wed, 13 Jan 2010 10:53:03 -0700

From: James Prescott <prescotj at telusplanet.net>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] digital libraries on culinary history ...

 

<<< There's a page full of "Gastronomic Prints", and about halfway down is

one titled "La grigliata - The Grill" - I can't link directly to the

image, but here's the page of prints.

 

http://www.academiabarilla.com/academia/gastronomic-prints/browse-gastronomic-prints-collection.aspx?q=XVI

 

What I find notable about it is that the woman on the right side of the

image is holding what appears to be a bratwurst in a split roll.

Popular wisdom is that sausages were first served in rolls around the

1890s, but if I'm seeing what I think I'm seeing then the practice dates

back to at least the 1600s. >>>

 

Sure looks like a hot dog stand to me.

 

Text:

 

Hier wird um wenig geld ein gute Wurst, gebraten, womit dem Hunger

wird doch nicht dem durst geraten, den einer leschen Kan nach

hertzens wunsch dar auf an einem solchen Ort wo wein u bier zu kauff.

 

Partial speculative translation (WARNING: I do not speak German):

Here for not much money a good sausage, roasted, with which Hunger

will be converted to thirst, to quench which one's heart's desire

is a place where one can also buy wine and beer.

 

Thorvald

 

 

Date: Sat, 20 Nov 2010 12:20:52 -0500

From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae at mac.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Interesting Book

 

On Nov 20, 2010, at 12:07 PM, Daniel & Elizabeth Phelps wrote:

<<< Just came across an interesting book that is now out in paperback.  

"Taste and Temptations, Food and Art in Renaissance Italy" by

John Variano.  Anyone read it and have an opinion?

 

Daniel >>>

 

It's not bad. I think it needed more art. It fits in well with the  

other Food in Art books.

 

My review in part said

"rather marvelous literary work. For those that like to read about art  

and history (in this case food in art.). it's very satisfying. For  

those that would rather look and want lots of pictures, perhaps less  

satisfying. 75 listed illustrations-many quite small and not in color."

 

You may be able to get a used or discounted copy of the hardback if  

you look.

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Sat, 12 Mar 2011 12:00:11 -0500

From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae at mac.com>

To: sca_Subtleties at yahoogroups.com, Cooks within the SCA

        <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Tate Britain up on Google Art

 

Google has their new art project up. I don't know that anyone has  

mentioned that there are works with food up!

It promises to be a really good site if they keep adding to it. You  

can zoom in very very close for details!!! Use the plus and minus  

signs in the upper left of the screen. Click and drag to observe  

different areas of a painting.

For now the following museums are included in the project:

 

Alte Nationalgalerie, Berlin - Germany

Freer Gallery of Art, Smithsonian, Washington DC - USA

The Frick Collection, NYC - USA

Gem?ldegalerie, Berlin - Germany

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, NYC - USA

MoMA, The Museum of Modern Art, NYC - USA

Museo Reina Sofia, Madrid - Spain

Museo Thyssen - Bornemisza, Madrid - Spain

Museum Kampa, Prague - Czech Republic

National Gallery, London - UK

Palace of Versailles - France

Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam - The Netherlands

The State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg - Russia

State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow - Russia

Tate Britain, London - UK

Uffizi Gallery, Florence - Italy

Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam - The Netherlands

 

I have to admit that I am intrigued by looking at baskets of bread in  

some of the Dutch works myself. Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam - The  

Netherlands has:

Feast of St Nicholas; Still Life with Turkey Pie; Still Life with a  

Silver Jug;

 

Worth a browse on a now rainy afternoon

 

Johnna

 

<the end>



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