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eggs-stuffed-msg – 1/20/08

 

Period stuffed eggs recipes and dishes.

 

NOTE: See also the files: eggs-msg, egg-storage-msg, Scotch-Eggs-msg, chicken-msg, fowls-a-birds-msg, French-Toast-art, French-Toast-msg, duck-goose-msg.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

    Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                          Stefan at florilegium.org

************************************************************************

 

Date: Tue, 21 Oct 1997 11:19:23 -0800

From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

Subject: SC - Re: eggs

 

Brid wrote:

(imagining somehow putting together all the various egg recipes and subtilties

>into one feast- tho' no one would probably ever want to see another egg

>eggain)

 

We have come across two different stuffed egg recipes: one Italian, one

Andalusian.  You hard-boil eggs, cut in half, take out the yolk and mix

with stuff, refill and fasten back together.  We haven't got a final

worked-up version for either but I can post the original recipes if anyone

is interested.

 

Elizabeth/Betty Cook

 

 

Date: Wed, 22 Oct 1997 12:25:09 -0400 (EDT)

From: Gretchen M Beck <grm+ at andrew.cmu.edu>

Subject: Re: SC - Re: eggs

 

Excerpts from internet.listserv.sca-cooks: 21-Oct-97 SC - Re: eggs david

friedman at best.com (804*)

 

> We have come across two different stuffed egg recipes: one Italian, one

> Andalusian.  You hard-boil eggs, cut in half, take out the yolk and mix

> with stuff, refill and fasten back together.  We haven't got a final

> worked-up version for either but I can post the original recipes if anyone

> is interested.

 

There is a like recipe in one of of the Elizabethan Cookbooks--The Good

Huswifes Jewel, I think.  I served them at a feast and they were quite

well received.

 

toodles, margaret

Gretchen Beck

Computing Services

Carnegie Mellon University

 

 

Date: Wed, 22 Oct 1997 15:49:32 -0800

From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

Subject: SC - Re: eggs

 

The Making of Stuffed Eggs

Andalusian p. A-24

 

Take as many eggs as you like, and boil them whole in hot water; put them

in cold water and split them in half with a thread. Take the yolks aside

and pound cilantro and put in onion juice, pepper and coriander, and beat

all this together with murri, oil and salt and knead the yolks with this

until it forms a dough. Then stuff the whites with this and fasten it

together, insert a small stick into each egg, and sprinkle them with

pepper, God willing.

 

Stuffed eggs

Platina book 9

 

Cook fresh eggs for a long time so that they are hard, then take the egg

from the shell and split it through the middle, so as not to lose any of

the white.  After you have taken out the yolk, grind up part of it with

good cheese, aged as well as fresh, and raisins; save the other part to

color the dish.  Likewise add a little finely chopped parsley, marjoram and

mint.  There are those who also put in two or more egg whites, along with

some spices.  With this mixture fill the whites of the eggs and when they

are stuffed, fry them over a gentle flame, in oil.  When they are fried,

make a sauce from the rest of the yolks and raisins ground together, and

when you have moistened them in verjuice and must, add ginger, clove, and

cinnamon and pour over the eggs and let them boil a little together.

 

The first is out of the anonymous 13th c. Andalusian cookbook (tr. Charles

Perry) in Cariadoc's cookbook collection v. 2, the second from Platina's

_De Honesta Voluptate_, 1475.

 

Elizabeth/Betty Cook

 

 

Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 21:23:05 -0800

From: "Anne-Marie Rousseau" <acrouss at gte.net>

Subject: Re: SC - quail eggs

 

Hi all from Anne-Marie

Meadhbh asks about late period uses for quail eggs.

My favorite type of egg involved fingerfood is from la Varenne, 1651,

French. Hardboiled eggs are stuffed with a mixture of their own yolks,

butter, vinegar and sauteed herbs. Deviled Eggs a la 17th century. There is

a similar recipe in Epilario including a dressing of vinegar, etc.

 

If you don't want to fuss (ie want to spend your energies on other things),

I've been known to slice them in half, and sprinkle with a good quality

dark balsamic vinegar. Looks good, tastes great. No documentation, alas,

but there you go.

 

The reconstruction for the Stuffed Eggs....oh and if you use my recipe,

please let me know. I'm sure to give permission, I just like the grins I

get from knowing my food is being eaten thousands of miles away! :) Sorry,

but my cut and paste doesnŐt work so good, so the citation footnotes didn't

make it into this message. Let me know if you need them.

 

Enjoy!

 

STUFFED EGGS: This version tastes very similar to the familiar modern

deviled egg (sans paprika, of course). There is an earlier version in

Epilario , but la Varenne updates it by omitting the very medieval sauce of

vinegar and spices and using instead fresh herbs to flavor. These eggs

travel well and are an easy and elegant potluck or tourney dish. Prepare

the egg yolks and put into a zip lock bag, and put the halved egg whites

into another. When you're ready to serve, snip off one corner of the bag

with the yolk stuffing in it and fill the egg halves by squeezing the

plastic bag like a pastry bag.

 

1. Eggs farced [la Varenne #1 p294]

Take sorrell, alone if you will, or with other herbs, wash and swing them,

then mince them very small, and put between two dishes with fresh butter,

or passe them in the panne; after they are passed, soak and season them;

after your farce is sod, take some hard eggs, cut them into halfs, a

crosse, or in length, and take out the yolks, and mince them with your

farce, and after all is well mixed, stew them over the fire, and put to it

a little nutmeg, and serve garnished with the whites of your eggs which you

may make brown in the pan with brown butter.

 

Our version:

2T butter

1 T dill, minced

6 hardboiled eggs

2 green onions, minced

1 pinch salt

1 tsp fresh savory, minced

1 tsp fresh sorrell, minced

1 T balsamic vinegar

pinch nutmeg

 

Cut eggs in half longwise, and remove yolk. Sautee savory, sorell, green

onion and dill in 1 T of the butter. Add the vinegar, salt, nutmeg and rest

of the butter. Mix the egg yolks with the sauteed herb stuff, and stir over

low heat till smooth and thick. Fill the egg white halves and serve. If you

wish, you may fry the egg white halves in brown butter before filling, but

we found that this makes them rubbery.

Makes 12 filled egg halves, with some leftover stuffing goop. Oh darn.

 

 

From: Christina Nevin <cnevin at caci.co.uk>

To: "SCA-Cooks (E-mail)" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

Date: Mon, 4 Mar 2002 10:22:23 -0000

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Imaginary list

 

>Maybe we should think about the things we ought to have more of...

>More egg dishes that aren't custard... <snip>

>oil-poached eggs on toast with an oniony mustard

>sauce made from the frying oil. And the list goes

>on and on.

 

Three years ago I did the Stuffed Eggs recipe from Liber de Couina,

basically hardboiled eggs stuffed with cheese, spices, yolk and fried. They

were immensely popular and none of them survived to make it back to the

kitchen. Here's the recipe:

 

stuffed_eggs Stuffed Eggs - Liber de Couina  (Medieval Kitchen #118)

Eggs: to prepare for stuffing. To make stuffed eggs, cut each one in half

when it has been well cooked and [is] thus hard. Then remove the yolk and

take marjoram, saffron, and cloves and mix with the yolks of those eggs; and

mash it thoroughly, adding a little cheese. For each eight eggs, add one raw

egg. This done, fill the egg whites with this mixture. And fry in good pork

fat, and eat with verjuice.

 

Lucrezia

 

 

Date: Wed, 06 May 1998 12:51:58 -0700

From: cassie <cassie at sally.nas.nasa.gov>

Subject: e: SC -Gentle education, was Help thinking up a class...

 

<snip>

So here is my documentation on the Andalusian Stuffed Eggs:

- --

Cassandra Baldassano            cassie at nas.nasa.gov

Sterling Software               (650) 604-6007 or (800) 331-8737 x6007

Supporting:                     M/S 258-6

Systems Control                 NASA Ames Research Center

Database Administration         Moffett Field, CA 94305-1000

***********************************************************************

 

Stuffed Eggs

 

This recipe for stuffed Eggs comes from An Anonymous Andalusian Cookbook of the

Thirteenth Century, which has only the english translation of the recipes;.  They taste very similar to a deviled egg. I entered this recipe for the Silver Spoon, Spring Investiture A.S. XXXII. The amount of herbs and spices I use make this recipe mild, increase these ingredients according to your own taste.

 

Translation of Original Recipe:

 

Take as many eggs as you like, and boil them whole in hot water; put them in cold water and split them in half with a thread. Take the yolks aside and pound cilantro and put in onion juice, pepper and coriander, and  beat all this together with Murri, oil and salt and knead the yolks with this  until it forms a dough. Then stuff the whites with this and fasten it together, insert a small stick into each egg, and sprinkle them with pepper, God Willing.

 

Redaction:

 

8 eggs

1/4 tsp. cilantro

2 tsp. onion juice

1/8 tsp. pepper

1/4 tsp. Murri and pinch of salt

   or 1/4 tsp. salt

2.5 Tbs. oil

 

Cook eggs, split and remove yolks. Combine yolks with remaining ingredients. Stuff egg white with yolk mixture. Place egg whites together, secure with toothpick, sprinkle with pepper.

 

Special Notes:

 

Although the original recipe give no number of eggs to cook, I choose to redact the recipe for 8 eggs because the measurements for the other ingredients are common.

 

Murri is a salty sauce that is brewed, not unlike soy sauce or Worcestershire sauce. From the recipes noted in the An Anonymous Andalusian Cookbook of the 13th Century, it appears that Murri is nearly as commonly used as soy sauce is in Chinese cuisine. A quick recipe for Murri can be found in A Miscelleny (6th edition), by David Friedman and Elizabeth Cook. This recipe calls for quinces, which are sometimes difficult to find depending on the time of year. If you have a chance to make murri, you should have plenty of it for several other recipes.  However, if you are not able are inclined to make the murri, I recommend to substitute a 1/4 tsp. salt for the 1/4 tsp. Murri and pinch of salt. I don't

find the substitution detracts from the dish due to the strong flavors of the onion juice and cilantro.

 

Source: An Anonymous Andalusian Cookbook of the 13th Century, a translation by

Charles Perry found in A Collection of Medieval and Renaissance Recipes, edited by David Friedman and Elisabeth Cook.

 

 

Date: Wed, 6 May 1998 22:44:40 -0700

From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

Subject: Re: e: SC -Gentle education, was Help thinking up a class...

 

At 12:51 PM -0700 5/6/98, cassie wrote:

 

>Stuffed Eggs

>

>This recipe for stuffed Eggs comes from An Anonymous Andalusian Cookbook

>of the

>Thirteenth Century, which has only the english translation of the

>recipes;.  They taste very

>similar to a deviled egg. I entered this recipe for the Silver Spoon,

>Spring Investiture A.S.

>XXXII. The amount of herbs and spices I use make this recipe mild,

>increase these

>ingredients according to your own taste.

>

>Translation of Original Recipe:

>

>Take as many eggs as you like, and boil them whole in hot water; put them

>in cold water

>and split them in half with a thread. Take the yolks aside and pound

>cilantro and put in

>onion juice, pepper and coriander, and  beat all this together with Murri,

>oil and salt and

>knead the yolks with this  until it forms a dough. Then stuff the whites

>with this and fasten

>it together, insert a small stick into each egg, and sprinkle them with

>pepper, God Willing.

>

>Redaction:

>

>8 eggs

>1/4 tsp. cilantro

>2 tsp. onion juice

>1/8 tsp. pepper

>1/4 tsp. Murri and pinch of salt

>   or 1/4 tsp. salt

>2.5 Tbs. oil

 

I would take issue with your redaction on only one detail. The Andalusian

cookbook distinguishes between cilantro and coriander, apparently

representing the leaves and the ground seed of the coriander plant. This

recipes uses both. You only use one.

 

Comparing your worked out version to ours, I conclude that you are less

fond of cilantro than I am.

 

David/Cariadoc

http://www.best.com/~ddfr/

 

 

Date: Fri, 8 May 1998 08:10:55 -0700

From: "Anne-Marie Rousseau" <acrouss at gte.net>

Subject: Re: SC - deviled eggs info source

 

HI all from Anne-Marie

 

I know theres a version in Epilario, as well as one in la Varenne. Both are

very reminicent of devilled eggs.

 

- --AM

 

 

Date: Tue, 1 Sep 1998 16:12:23 -0800

From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

Subject: Re: SC - A couple of questions

 

At 9:54 PM -0500 8/30/98, Diamond wrote:

>Does anyone know if deviled eggs are period ?

 

I suppose it depends how you define deviled eggs; here are two period

recipes for stuffed eggs:

 

The Making of Stuffed Eggs

Andalusian A-24 (13th century Islamic Spain)

 

Take as many eggs as you like, and boil them whole in hot water; put them

in cold water and split them in half with a thread. Take the yolks aside

and pound cilantro and put in onion juice, pepper and coriander, and beat

all this together with murri, oil and salt and knead the yolks with this

until it forms a dough. Then stuff the whites with this and fasten it

together, insert a small stick into each egg, and sprinkle them with

pepper, God willing.

 

Stuffed eggs

Platina book 9 (15th c. Italian)

 

Cook fresh eggs for a long time so that they are hard, then take the egg

from the shell and split it through the middle, so as not to lose any of

the white.  After you have taken out the yolk, grind up part of it with

good cheese, aged as well as fresh, and raisins; save the other part to

color the dish.  Likewise add a little finely chopped parsley, marjoram and

mint.  There are those who also put in two or more egg whites, along with

some spices.  With this mixture fill the whites of the eggs and when they

are stuffed, fry them over a gentle flame, in oil.  When they are fried,

make a sauce from the rest of the yolks and raisins ground together, and

when you have moistened them in verjuice and must, add ginger, clove, and

cinnamon and pour over the eggs and let them boil a little together.

 

Elizabeth/Betty Cook

 

 

Date: Mon, 12 Jul 1999 17:21:23 -0400 (EDT)

From: Gretchen M Beck <grm+ at andrew.cmu.edu>

Subject: Re: SC - eggs?

 

I have a recipe for farced (stuffed) eggs from one of the Good Huswife's

Jewel's.  It's available at:

 

http://www.contrib.andrew.cmu.edu/~grm/wwwaway-feast.html

 

These were referred to by the kitchen crew as "Eggs in Bondage" because

we tied them up to reboil them once they were stuffed.

 

toodles, margaret

 

 

Date: Sun, 18 Jul 1999 20:50:33 EDT

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - eggs?

 

memorman at oldcolo.com writes:

<< I was wondering if anyone might have a recipe for stuffed eggs?  >>

 

The Making of Stuffed Eggs

 

'Take as many eggs as thou wilt and boil them whole in hot water, put them in

cold water and divide them in half with a thread. Take the yolks asise and

crush cilantro, put in onion juice, pepper, and coriander and beat all this

together with murri, oil, and salt and mash the yolks with this until it

becomes a paste. Then stuff the whites with this and fasten it together,

insert a small stick into each egg and sprinkle them with pepper, God willing.

Redaction by al-Sayyid A'aql ibn Rashid al-Zib, AoA, OSyc

Copyright c 1999 L. J. Spencer, Jr. Williamsport, PA

 

12 Eggs, hard-boiled and peeled

1 T Cilantro, mashed

1 tsp Onion juice

3/8 tsp Black pepper, ground

1/2 tsp Coriander seed, ground

1 tsp Byzantine murri naqi

1 T Olive oil (or more)

Salt to taste

12 round Toothpicks

Blackpepper, ground for garnish

 

Cut eggs in half, removing yolks which are placed in a seperate bowl.

Beat cilantro, onion juice, murri and olive oil together. Add salt to taste.

Add yolks, mashing mixture until it forms a smooth paste, adding more oil as

needed.Stuff yolk mixture into each egg half. Secure halves together with a

toothpick. Sprinkle lightly with pepper

 

 

Date: Tue, 20 Jul 1999 12:40:35 -0500 (CDT)

From: Jeff Heilveil <heilveil at uiuc.edu>

Subject: SC - stuffed eggs

 

Last night I tried the stuffed eggs recipe.  It was WONDERFUL.  My only

suggestion is that like the original says, cut the eggs with thread, as it

works better than any knife.

 

Bogdan

_______________________________________________________________________________

Jeffrey Heilveil                           Bogdan de la Brasov

Department of Entomology                MoAS, Barony of Wurm Wald

University of Illinois                    Bucatar-sef, Wurm Wald

heilveil at uiuc.edu                             Middle Kingdom

 

 

Date: Thu, 22 Jul 1999 02:25:46 EDT

From: Korrin S DaArdain <korrin.daardain at juno.com>

Subject: Re: SC - stuffed eggs

 

On Tue, 20 Jul 1999 12:40:35 -0500 (CDT) Jeff Heilveil

<heilveil at uiuc.edu> writes:

>Last night I tried the stuffed eggs recipe.  It was WONDERFUL.  My only

>suggestion is that like the original says, cut the eggs with thread,

>as it works better than any knife.

>

>Bogdan

 

Or use one of those cheese slicers that uses the wire and is part of a

cutting board.

 

Korrin S. DaArdain

Kitchen Steward of Household Port Karr

Kingdom of An Tir in the Society for Creative Anachronism.

Korrin.DaArdain at Juno.com

 

 

Date: Mon, 31 Jan 2000 22:44:33 -0800

From: Anne-Marie Rousseau <acrouss at gte.net>

Subject: Re: SC - green onions and stuffed eggs questions

 

hey all from Anne-Marie

 

Stefan sez:

>I am using Anne-Marie's redaction for one of my dishes this coming weekend.

yum! its always a hit here :)

 

>> 1. Eggs farced [la Varenne #1 p294]

>> Take sorrell, alone if you will, or with other herbs, wash and swing them,

>> then mince them very small, and put between two dishes with fresh butter,

>> or passe them in the panne; after they are passed, soak and season them;

>> after your farce is sod, take some hard eggs, cut them into halfs, a

>> crosse, or in length, and take out the yolks, and mince them with your

>> farce, and after all is well mixed, stew them over the fire, and put to it

>> a little nutmeg, and serve garnished with the whites of your eggs which you

>> may make brown in the pan with brown butter.

 

>I have seen some recipes that call for only the white portion of green

>onions. When just the green onions are mention as here, does this mean

>the whole onion, green leaves and white bulb?

 

I tend to use pretty much just the white part with a bit of the green,

minced fairly finely. I find if I use too much green, its very woody, too

strong in flavor and doesnt work well. la varenne calls them "chibols", so

if you chose, you can use chives. Chives are pretty expensive, so I try to

cut costs by using the cheaper green onions, so I can afford the decent

balsamic vinegar and fresh sorrell.

 

>The directions say to add the egg yolks and stir until smooth. Mine still

>has little lumps of egg yolk. Is this normal? If not, what should I do next

>time?

 

It should be very smooth. Use a fork and you'll get all the lumps out.

Someone told me they did this in a food processor with great results, but I

havent tried it myself. yours is fine, lumpy doesnt really affect the taste.

 

>Anne-Marie, you serve these as stuffed-eggs. the phrase in the original

>message "and serve garnished with the whites of your eggs" makes me think

>more of chopping the whites up and sprinkling them on the yolk mixture.

>Is there a particular reason you chose to do these as stuffed eggs? This

>is what I am planning on doing since it then becomes the finger food I

>am wanting, but I'm curious.

 

I assume that they're stuffed based on the title in the original manuscript

"Eggs Farced". I would like to see the original french and see if that

phrase "garnished" could be interpreted differently...

 

>Lastly folks, how would you dice these greens? I mainly used kitchen shears

>to cut them into tiny pieces. I tried to use my chopper jar, but that didn't

>work all that well as it seemed to mush them more than chop them. Lots of

>moisture.

 

I use my super spiffo 15th century replica knife :). Alternatly a good

chefs knife and a bit of elbow grease. The herbs should be pretty fine. I

tried using a nut grinder, but it didnt work at all :(

 

>Perhaps the food processor which I will be getting in the near future with

>money my mother gifted me with for this purpose will work for this? I am

>finding the chopping and dicing of vegetables for all these dishes to be

>pretty tedious.

 

the eggs arent bad since the only thing you need to mince is the herbs. I

put them all together on the cutting board and whack away. Takes seconds

with my good knife. I do it while the eggs are hardboiling.

 

Another tip...you need to take the egg/herb stuff off the stove when you

add the last of the butter. if the butter is at room temp, you can use it

to make the mixture nice and smooth. Add vinegar to taste, and if its too

thick. Depending on the temp of the stove, etc, sometimes we need to fuss

with it a bit, adding more butter and/or balsamic vinegar to get it to the

right consistency and taste. Should be piquant, with a bit of herby

goodness :). the texture should be soft, but solid enough to pipe.

 

- --AM

 

 

Date: Tue, 14 Mar 2000 22:58:23 -0600

From: "Morgan Cain" <morgancain at earthlink.net>

Subject: Re: SC - It's not just for breakfast......

 

> > Mustard eggs are a GREAT breakfast!)

> Recipe, please?

 

Sodde Eggs:  Seethe your Egges almost harde, then peele them and cut them in

quarters, then take a little Butter in a frying panne and melt it a little

browne, then put to it in to the panne, a little Vinegar, Mustarde, Pepper

and Salte, and then put it into a platter upon your Egges.

    [J. Partridge, "The Widowes treasure," London 1585 - Leeds University,

Preston collection P/K1 1585.]

 

---= Morgan

 

 

Date: Tue, 06 Nov 2001 18:41:18 -0500

From: Elaine Koogler <ekoogler at chesapeake.net>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Sodde Egges

 

There's another one, I think, in the English version of Maestro Martino's

recipes, "Epulario".  I did it for a feast several years ago...It isn't

Sodde Egges, but a little different...and VERY tasty:

 

Recipe By Epulario, or The Italian Banquet,1568

Servings  104

Categories Eggs

 

8 2/3   dozen Eggs

2 1/4   pounds Currants

3 1/4   tablespoons Parsley

3 1/4   tablespoons Marjoram

3 1/4   tablespoons Mint

2 1/8   tablespoons salt

1 1/8   tablespoons pepper

3/4   teaspoon Saffron

2 1/2   quarts white wine

1 5/8   cups white wine vinegar

3/8   cup sugar

1/2   cup Cinnamon

1/4   cup cloves

 

1. Hardboil eggs, peel them and cut them in half lengthwise.

2. Remove the yolks, reserving 26 yolks.

3. Mix the yolks with half the currants, parsley, marjoram, mint, salt and

pepper.

4. Chop 26 of the whites very finely and blend with yolk mixture.

5. Add saffron and blend.

6. Stuff the mixture back into the remaining egg whites and fry in olive oil

until lightly browned.

 

Sauce:

1. Blend remaining egg yolks, wine and vinegar together, and place in a pan.

2. Add sugar, cloves, and cinnamon and bring to a low boil. Add a little

water if it gets too thick.

3. Add remaining currants and serve over eggs.

 

Original:

 

Seeth new Egs in water untill they be hard, then peele them and cut them in the middle, and take out the yolks, and doe not breake the white, and stampe some part of those yolks with a few Currans, Parsely, Margerum and Mint, chopped very small, with two or three whites of Egs, with what spice you thinke good. And when they are mixed together colour it with Saffron, and fill the Egges therewish, and frie them in oyle; and with a few of those yolkes which remain unstamped with a few Currans, and stampe them well together, and thereto Sugar, Cloues, and good store of Sinamon, let this sauce boyle a little, and when you will send the Egges to the Table, put this sauce upon them.

 

Sorry...the expanded version for the feast is the only version I have at the

moment, but thought you might enjoy seeing it, even in this state!

 

Kiri

 

 

Date: Tue, 05 Mar 2002 12:05:10 -0500

From: Elaine Koogler <ekoogler1 at comcast.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] overstuffed eggs?

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

I did a similar kind of thing, though from a different recipe (from

Epulario.."To dresse and fill Egges").  While the recipe called for deep

frying the filled eggs, I was cooking for a large crowd and needed something

easier and faster.  So I used a technique my lord had shown me from a modern

potato pancake recipe.  I put a thin layer of oil on cookie sheets that have

a lip around all 4 sides.  I then put the sheets into the oven until the oil

was hot.  Then we placed the eggs on the sheets and returned them to the

oven for a few minutes.  We then pulled them out and turned them.  Worked

like a champ!!

 

Kiri

----- Original Message -----

From: "Chip" <jallen at multipro.com>

To: <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

Sent: Tuesday, March 05, 2002 11:49 AM

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] overstuffed eggs?

 

> > hardboiled egg, pulls out the yolk, mixes it with more stuff

> > including more egg and cheese then says to stuff it back in the

> > place where only the hard boiled egg yolk was originally.

>

> > How is it all supposed to fit?

>

> You'd make them as a large batch, not one at a time. You make a mess

> of mixture, fill the eggs to slightly overflowing, and get left with

> some mixture left over.  Fry it and eat it and say 'yum'.

>

> > Deep frying an open egg like this would seem to be rather messy.

>

> Not as bad as you'd think.  I just dunked them in the Fry Daddy.  The

> mixture stayed in the yolkhole fairly obediently. The whole thing

> blistered and browned and was very interesting.

>

> I tested this recipe for a feast last fall.  Results were tasty even

> though I didn't have verjus.  I had to strike it from the menu, though

> for being too labor intensive considering all the other things I had

> to do (fried things tend to dislike waiting).  Done up ahead of time &

> fried just before presentation, it should work.  Just my .02 baraks.

> _____________________________________________________________________

> Iyad ibn al-Thu'ban ibn Bisharo

> Shire of Easaraigh, Kingdom of Meridies   www.easaraigh.org

 

 

Date: Mon, 07 Feb 2005 09:31:16 -0500

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Midrealm News Regarding Cooks

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at anseorra.org>

 

Terri Morgan wrote:

>> . . .  Especially the stuffed eggs with bacon (yum).

> This sounds intriguing. I'm doubting that it's "period for the SCA",  

> but still - does anyone happen to have a recipe for it?

>

> hrothny

 

Here's what is posted on the website.

http://www.dragonsmark.org/candlemasXVIII.html

 

Johnnae

 

Feast Menu - Tastes of the Tudor

 

Head Cook: THL Rachaol MakCreith

 

Appetizers

 

Fricasee

Eggs and Collops - recipe

Eggs, cream cheese, parsley, thyme, pepper, ginger, bacon slices.

 

Fricasee

Eggs and Collops

Anonymous Venetian, XLVII

 

10 hard cooked eggs

2 egg yolks

6 oz. cream cheese, softened

1 tbs parsley, fresh, minced

1 tbs thyme, fresh, minced

1 tsp pepper, fresh ground

1 tsp. salt

1/2 tsp ginger, powdered

1/2 stick butter

3 tbs olive oil

10 bacon slices

 

     1. Remove the shells from the hard cooked eggs, and carefully remove

the yolks. Reserve the whites for stuffing. Place the hard-cooked yolks,

fresh yolks, and cream cheese in the bowl of a mixer or food processor,

and pulse until smooth. Add herbs and spices, and mix. Fill the egg

halves, leveling the top.

     2. Melt the butter and oil in a large skillet over medium heat.

Place the eggs, top down in the pan, and fry until golden brown.

     3. Fry the bacon until crisp, drain, then halve each. Serve each egg

with a slice of bacon criss-crossed on top.

 

 

Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2005 07:49:50 -0800 (PST)

From: Louise Smithson <helewyse at yahoo.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Stuffed egg recipe was re: Midrealm News

      Regarding Cooks

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

There was a little license with this recipe.  The original is from the

Libro di cucina the anonymous venetian cookbook from the 14th/15th  

century, so they are period food (see below).  For feast ease the  

stuffing was made with the cooked egg yolks, cream cheese, a little  

sour cream to loosen, fresh thyme, fresh parsley, ginger, salt and  

pepper.  We didn't add raw egg yolks and fry them to make it easier for  

a feast (frying over 300 egg halves would have been a bit much).  The

crispy bacon sprinkles were purely a way of making people eat them, you  

could leave that bit off, but they worked well with the eggs).   Sorry

I don't have amounts, but the recipe went something like. Buy hard  

boiled shelled eggs from Sams club (what a find, amazing things, and  

not badly priced either), cut eggs in half put yolks in a huge bowl.  

Break up yolks, add about 4lb cream cheese, a bunch of chopped parsley,  

a couple tablespoons fresh thyme.  Salt, pepper and ginger to taste,  

sour cream to loosen and mash/mix with hands until smooth.

 

Helewyse

 

XLVII Stuffed eggs

If you want to make stuffed eggs.  Take the eggs and put them to boil

and make sure that they are hard cooked.  When they are cooked pull  

them out (of the hot water) and put them n cold water.  Peel and slice

(the eggs) in half and remove the yolk (reserve).  Take the fattest  

sweetest cheese that you have.  Take the best herbs that you have, peel  

them (from the stalk) wash and grind them together in a mortar.  When

they (te herbs) are well ground take the egg yolks, the cheese and  

spices and put them in the mortar with the good herbs.  Grind all these  

things together to make a fine paste and temper (mix) with raw eggs  

until it is good (has the right consistency).  Menwhile put a frying  

pan over the fire.  Take the egg halves and stuff with the paste (of  

egg yolks and cheese) and put them to cook (in the frying pan).  When

they are cooked remove from the pan and powder them with sugar before

serving them hot t the table.  And if you want to serve them savory  

take them (without sugaring them), etc.

 

 

Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2005 01:30:03 +0100

From: henna <hennar at gmail.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Devilled Eggs (was: Out of the food topic

      altogether    rant Authenticitypolice)

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Anyway, there are lots of recipes for stuffed eggs in the pre-1650

corpus, but the Andalusian one is the only one I've found that doesn't

call for frying the stuffed eggs in lard before serving.

 

Ghecloven nonnen te maken.

Neempt eyeren ende sietse wel hert. Dan doet hen af haer scellen ende

peltse ende soe snijtse overmydts in de helicht ontwee. Dan neempt die

doderen van den selven eyeren ende stoodt dye in eenen morselle al

ontwee. Maer eerst so doet er luttele soferaens in, caneel ende

ghimbare, savie, petercelie. Ende wylt men, men doet er oock inne

pepere ende appelen. Dan stoot alle dat voerscreven staet wel ontwee

tesamen ende vult daermede dat witte vanden eyeren, daer ghi die doren

uutghetrocken hebt. Dan so bact dye eyeren in raeptsmout oft in

botere. Ende alst ghebacken es, dan stroyt ment met caneelpoedere ende

brootsuicker tegader gheminghelt opt vulsele. Ende als ghi deze eyeren

ter tafel dient, soe legtse in de schotelen metten openen opweerts, te

wetene metten vulsele opweerts.

 

(not my translation, from

http://www.coquinaria.nl/english/recipes/2histrecept.htm)

"Split nuns" (Stuffed eggs)

Have eggs and boil them very hard. Then take of the shell and peel

them and cut them in half lengthwise. Then take the yolks of these

eggs and grind them in a mortar. But first you add some saffron,

cinnamon and ginger, sage, parsley. And if so desired, one may add

pepper and apples. Then grind all the aforementioned well together and

stuff the whites of the eggs from wich you took the yolks with it.

Then fry the eggs in turnipfat or butter. And when [the eggs are]

fried, sprinkle ground cinnamon and loafsugar mixed together on the

stuffing. And when you serve these eggs, put them on the serving-dish

with the open side up, that is with the stuffing up

 

They aren't fried in lard, but in butter or turnipfat :)

 

 

Date: Tue, 12 Apr 2005 20:17:08 -0400

From: Elaine Koogler <ekoogler1 at comcast.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] The Secret Life of:  Deviled Eggs

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> Caught just a bit of this late last night.  We have discussed the

> research on this show being at least better than average. Although

> the term "deviled" is from 1800 or 1900, the host (cutie whose his

> name escapes me) said that deviled eggs happened in the last half of

> the 16th century.  Anybody got period recipes?

>

> Samrah

 

I did a version of a stuffed egg for a feast several years back...it was

from an English version of Martino's recipes (/Epulario/):

 

Seeth new Egs in water until they be hard, then peele them and cut them

in the middle, and take out the yolks, and doe not breake the white, and

stampe some part of those yolks with a few Currans, Parsely, Margerum

and Mint, chopped very small, with two or three whites of Egs, with what

spice you thinke good. And when they are mixed together colour it with

Saffron, and fill the Egges therewish, and frie them in oyle; and with a

few of those yolkes which remain unstamped with a few Currans, and

stampe them well together, and thereto Sugar, Cloues, and good store of

Sinamon, let this sauce boyle a little, and when you will send the Egges

to the Table, put this sauce upon them.

 

Kiri

 

 

Date: Tue, 18 Apr 2006 10:16:38 -0700 (PDT)

From: Aurelia Coritana <aurelia_coritana at yahoo.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] egg recipes

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

For all those with an embarassing number of eggs to use, how about  

this lovely recipe from Ancient Rome? It's hard boiled eggs with pine

nut sauce, and the sauce is absolutely addictive.

 

   Ancient Roman Egg Recipe:     For medium-boiled eggs: Pepper,  

lovage, and soaked pine nuts. Pour on honey and vinegar; mix with  

garum    - Apicius     Modern Egg Recipe:     4 medium-boiled eggs

2 ounces pine nuts

3 tablespoons vinegar

1 teaspoon honey

 

Pinch each of pepper and lovage (or celery leaf)      1. Soak the  

pine nuts 3-4 hours beforehand in the vinegar.    2. Mix all the  

sauce ingredients thoroughly in a blender. This sauce should be  

presented in a sauce boat so that each person can serve himself or  

herself, since the eggs cannot be sliced and placed on a dish in  

advance.

 

-Aurelia

 

 

Date: Wed, 19 Apr 2006 11:04:11 +0200

From: Volker Bach <carlton_bach at yahoo.de>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] An embarrassment of riches...

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Am Mittwoch, 19. April 2006 07:45 schrieb Judith L. Smith Adams:

> Somebody brought hard-boiled eggs in mustard sauce to a potluck feast last

> fall - a period dish, I am told, but my informant wasn't the cook.  There

> are lots of recipes out there for mustard sauce, in-period and out, but

> does anybody have a particularly fine one in their repertoire??

>

>   Judith

 

I'm partial to this one:

 

Mustard Eggs

 

> From Marx Rumpoldt

 

Nim Eyer / die hart gesotten / unnd sauber geschelt seyn / schneidt sie

viertel weiss / oder rundt unnd dŸnn. Nimm Butter in ein Pfannen / mach sie

hei§ / und wirff die harten Eyer darein / rš§t sie wol in der Butter / und

versaltz sie nicht / thu sauren Senff / der mit Essig angemacht ist  darein /

wirffs zwey oder dreymal mit dem Senff umb in der Pfannen / gibs warm auff

ein Tisch / so ist es gut und wolgeschmack

 

Take eggs that are boiled hard and shelled cleanly, quarter them or slice them

thin. Heat butter in a pan, place the eggs in it and fry them. Do not

oversalt. Add sour mustard that is made with vinegar, stir it around two or

three times in the pan and serve it hot. That is good and tasty.

 

Redaction:

 

5 hard-boiled eggs

1 tbsp butter

3-4 tbsp mild mustard vinegar

 

Shell and quarter or slice the eggs. Heat the butter in a pan and fry the eggs

briefly, adding the mustard once they are warmed through. Stir them

vigorously until coated fairly evenly, then serve immediately, piping hot.

 

Went over well at one of our revels

 

Giano

 

 

Date: Thu, 06 Sep 2007 13:25:37 -0500

From: Anne-Marie Rousseau <dailleurs at liripipe.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Fadalat: Stuffed Eggs

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

hey all from Anne-Marie

 

on stuffed eggs..

 

Dont forget my personal favorite in La Varenne...

from my Complete Anachronist and Feudal Gourmet cookbooks:

This recipe tastes very similar to the familiar modern deviled egg (sans the New World spice paprika, of course). There is an earlier version in Epulario, but la Varenne updates it by omitting Epulario's very medieval sauce of vinegar and spices and using instead fresh herbs to flavor the filling. These eggs travel well and are an easy and elegant potluck or tourney dish. Prepare the egg yolks and put the goo into a zip lock bag, and put the halved egg whites into another. When you're ready to serve, snip off one corner of the bag with the yolk stuffing in it and fill the egg halves by squeezing the plastic bag like a pastry bag. 1. Eggs farced [V1 p294] Take sorrell, alone if you will, or with other herbs, wash and swing them, then mince them very small, and put between two dishes with fresh butter, or passe them in the panne; after they are passed, soak and season them; after your farce is sod, take some hard eggs, cut them into halfs, a crosse, or in length, and take out the yolks, and mince them with your farce, and after all is well mixed, stew them over the fire, and put to it a little nutmeg, and serve garnished with the whites of your eggs which you may make brown in the pan with brown butter.

 

Our version:

2T butter

1 T dill, minced

6 hard-boiled eggs

2 green onions, minced

1 pinch salt

1 tsp. fresh savory, minced

1 tsp. fresh sorrell, minced

1 T balsamic vinegar

pinch nutmeg

 

Cut eggs in half longwise, and remove yolk. SautŽ savory, sorrel,  green onion and dill in 1 T of the butter. Add the vinegar, salt, nutmeg and rest of the butter. Mix  the egg yolks with the sautŽed herb stuff, and stir over low heat till smooth and thick.  Fill the egg white halves and serve. If you wish, you may fry the egg white halves in brown butter  before filling, but we found that this makes them rubbery. Makes 12 filled egg halves, with some leftover stuffing goop. Oh darn.

 

<the end>



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