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chestnuts-msg – 12/17/10

 

Medieval harvesting and use of chestnuts. Roasting. Recipes.

 

NOTE: See also the files: nuts-msg, soup-msg, flour-msg, almond-milk-msg, hais-msg, comfits-msg, almond-cream-msg, Pynade-art.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

   Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                         Stefan at florilegium.org

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Date: Tue, 07 Oct 1997 22:44:52 -0500

From: Maddie Teller-Kook <meadhbh at io.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Chestnuts Roasting on an...

 

Bronwynmgn at aol.com wrote:

> My lord and I were given a large bag of chestnuts straight from the tree this

> evening.  We have no idea what to do with them.  Any suggestions?  Are there

> any period recipes in which chestnuts are appropriate, and does anyone know

> how to roast them?

> Brangwayna Morgan

I just got Terence Scully's "Early French Cooking". There is a recipe

for a stuffed pork roast. The stuffing consists of pears, chestnuts,

buttery cheese and seasonings. Looks delicious. I plan to make it for a

dinner in a few weeks. Let ya know how it goes.

 

meadhbh

 

 

Date: Wed, 8 Oct 97 05:05:29 UT

From: "Paul Louis" <pocopup at classic.msn.com>

Subject: RE: SC - Chestnuts Roasting on an...

 

        To roast chestnuts in any kind of quantity, 1st , slice an *x* in the tops

where they are lighter brown. You are cutting through the shell layer in order

to keep the chestnut from exploding when they are roasted. place them on a

sheet tray, and roast in a 375 oven till they open . approx. 10 min. I like

mine with a pinch of salt , other of my friends like them with butter......

Recipies I have played around with include, chestnut ice-cream, using the

roasted chestnuts ground up  when baking rye bread, and tossed in a bitter

greens salad with a cranberry vinigrette.

 

Olga

 

 

Date: Wed, 08 Oct 1997 12:23:41 -0400

From: marilyn traber <margali at 99main.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Chestnuts Roasting on an...

 

> My lord and I were given a large bag of chestnuts straight from the tree this

> evening.  We have no idea what to do with them.  Any suggestions?  Are there

> any period recipes in which chestnuts are appropriate, and does anyone

> know how to roast them?

> Brangwayna Morgan

 

Take them, cut a small x over the odd patch where they were attatched to

the stem, pop them into boiling water for about 5 minutes or put them

into a mesh fireplace popcorn popper over good hot coals for about 5

minutes, shaking frequently or spread them on a cookie sheet and bake at

450 for about 5 mintues. These will loosen the husk and when cooled

allow you to peel them.

 

Take the chestnut meats, place into honey and water, poach until soft,

then remove and puree, add spices and a dab of honey and fill small

pastrys or creme puffs with the goo.

 

If you take the meats, dunk in honey and do the honey roast/fry thing,

they are good rolled in coarsely chopped raw almonds as a taste and

texture contrast.

 

take the softened chestnuts and coat liberally with buttercream candy

mix[1bag 10x sugar, a flavor extract, enough melted butter to make a

stiff paste] and let the shell harden, they are called nipples of venus

 

margali

 

 

Date: Fri, 25 Aug 2000 23:35:54 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - interesting URL - food shopping!

 

> I've found a lovely site that has chestnut flour.

> Any ideas what to do with it?

> www.ethnicgrocer.com

>

> Diana d'Avignon

 

There's a northern Italian um, I don't know what to call it... a gateau,

perhaps. A big flat cake, or maybe an enormous cookie, made with

chestnut flour and pignoles. Castignacci? I'll have to take a bit to

look up details.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Sat, 26 Aug 2000 12:35:29 EDT

From: DeSevyngy at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - interesting URL - food shopping!

 

<< > Diana wrote:

> I've found a lovely site that has chestnut flour.

> Any ideas what to do with it?

 

Adamantius responded:

<< There's a northern Italian um, I don't know what to call it... a gateau,

perhaps. A big flat cake, or maybe an enormous cookie, made with

chestnut flour and pignoles. Castignacci? I'll have to take a bit to

look up details.

>>

 

It is, in fact, called Castagnaccio, and resembles the funny cakelike bar

cookies that my mom was so fond of making when I was a kid.  I found out

later, she didn't have the patience to spoon out individual cookies and keep

an eye out the window while I was out inventing tackle-asphault-baseball and

games of the kind, so all the dough went in a big pan!  

 

This recipe that I share below is from one of Lorenza de'Medici cookbooks.  

While the printing of this recipe is decidedly OOP, the root recipe is a

period one.  I do recall several years ago (maybe a decade), seeing this

recipe in a period source book and recalling that is was pretty much

identical to the one I had in Lorenza's book.  Unfortunately, this was at a

time when my only interest in the SCA was fighting, hence, I neglected to

even write down the name of the source.  Bad Isabeau, no biscuit.  

 

At any rate, the full recipe and authors comments are below.  I have made

this recipe several times (every time I have chestnut flour) and it is

fabulous. If you plan on serving it at a feast, I strongly suggest that you

serve it at lunch, freshly out of the oven.  It definately get heavy and a

bit greasy when let to sit too long.  Also, this recipe for 6 calls for an

11-in non-springform tart pan, although I now have one especially for this

cake, I used a glass 9x13in casserole pan for years with no ill effect to the

texture or baking time of the cake.

 

Hmm, a dear friend of mine is going to be the chef at our Baronies annual

winter formal feast next year.  I wonder if I can bribe her into putting this

cake on the menu?!? <veg>

 

Isabeau

_________________________________

Castagnaccio

chestnut cake

 

This is an ancient and very popular cake recipe. Castagnaccio is

often sold in the streets of Florence during autumn and early

winter. It is best when freshly made, and should be served warm.

_________________________________

 

1/4 cup (1oz/30g) raisins

3 cups (12oz/375g) chestnut flour

2 1/2 cups (20 fl oz/600ml) water

6 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

pinch of salt

1/4 cup (1 1/2oz/45g) pine nuts

2 fresh rosemary sprigs, finely chopped

 

+ Soak the raisins in water to cover for 1 hour.

+ In a bowl, mix the flour, water, 2 tablespoons olive oil

and the salt to form a creamy dough.

+ Add 3 tablespoons pine nuts and the rosemary.

+ Preheat oven to 450*F (230*C). Pour the remaining oil

into an 11-in (27-cm) tart pan (do not use a pan with

removable bottom) and add the dough. Do not pour off

excess oil.

+ Drain the raisins. Sprinkle the dough with the raisins

and the remaining pine nuts. Bake for about 20 minutes or

until the surface of the castagnaccio begins to crack.

+ Pour off the excess oil. Remove castagnaccio from

the pan and serve warm.

__________________________________

serves 6

__________________________________

 

HL Isabeau de Sevyngy

Squired to Sir Sakura kita no Maikeru

Shire of Gryphon's Lair

Artemisia

 

 

Date: Mon, 11 Sep 2000 23:32:12 -0700

From: "David Dendy" <ddendy at silk.net>

Subject: Re: SC - Help!!!!

 

>I am in serious need of some information.  I am cooking that Oriental

>feast weekend after next (9/23) and am in need of several ingredients

>which I cannot seem to locate.  I hope some one of you will know where I

>can find them:

>[snip]

 

>    Chestnuts

 

Chestnuts can usually be had, in dried form, in Italian groceries.

 

Francesco

 

 

Date: Mon, 18 Jun 2001 10:08:27 -0400

From: margali <margali at 99main.com>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Southern California Chestnut resource?

 

They do make a commercial chestnut paste -

http://causses-cevennes.com/produits/Verfeuille2-UK.htm

my favorite brand. I like the glass jars.

 

margali

[and the ones soaked in brandy are a great secret ingredient for

stuffing ;-)]

 

 

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

Date: Tue, 19 Jun 2001 17:47:49 -0700

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Southern California Chestnut resource?

 

>Where in southern California would you find chestnuts this time of year?

>Magnus Grehatta is doing a recipe for the Talanque Tourney this weekend

>that requires a chestnut paste, and we can't seem to find chestnuts.

>Surely there is an ethnic grocery or some little place that caters to

>little old ladies that would have such a thing!  So far the local British

>food shops have been scoured, the natural food shops, the weird food shops,

>and nobody has chestnuts. Water chesnuts they have aplenty, but not just

>plain old regular chestnuts!!

>Maggie MacD.

 

French. French. French.

 

Chestnut paste is used in the making of a dessert called a Mont

Blanc. There's a brand in a can - white with brown chestnuts and

green leaves on it - i think it's Clement Faugier. Look in the

gourmet aisle of a good supermarket or in a gourmet shop. Shouldn't

be that hard to find...

 

Anahita

 

 

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

Date: Tue, 19 Jun 2001 19:03:28 -0700

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Southern California Chestnut resource?

 

>The chestnut stuff that the cook needs has to be sugar free, so the

>packaged pastes won't work in this particular case.

 

Probably won't be useful to you, but for anyone else...

 

Clement Faugier make several types of packaged chestnut thingies.

 

There are "marrons glaces", which are whole chestnuts cooked in and

packaged in sugar syrup. They're often in a glass jar so you can

appreciate how much like miniature pickled brains they look.

 

Then there are cans of chestnut puree and chestnut paste. One has

sugar. The other is unsweetened. But i forget which.

 

I think they also make chocolate-covered marrons glacees.

 

So if anyone else needs unsweetened chestnut paste, you might be able

to use this. All the Japanese chestnut pastes i've seen are

pre-sweetened.

 

Anahita

 

 

Date: Mon, 18 Jun 2001 09:54:39 -0500 (CDT)

From: "Pixel, Queen of Cats" <pixel at hundred-acre-wood.com>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Southern California Chestnut resource?

 

On Mon, 18 Jun 2001, margali wrote:

> They do make a commercial chestnut paste -

> http://causses-cevennes.com/produits/Verfeuille2-UK.htm

> my favorite brand. I like the glass jars.

> margali

 

http://coenzymedesign.com/portfolio/chestnut/catalog.htm

 

They have chestnut paste, and they're in CA. ;-)

 

Margaret FitzWilliam

 

 

Date: Wed, 20 Jun 2001 10:52:50 -0700 (PDT)

From: Huette von Ahrens <ahrenshav at yahoo.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Southern California Chestnut resource?

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

Also, the French word for Chestnut is Marron.

Sometimes it is called Pate de Marron, or something

similar.

 

Huette

 

 

Date: Fri, 18 Apr 2003 18:03:27 -0400

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] chestnuts

From: David Tallan <DTALLAN8500 at rogers.com>

To: SCA-Cooks <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

One possibility is the Viandier's "Soutil brouet d'Angleterre" (Subtle

English Browet):

 

Grind together chestnuts that have been cooked and peeled, egg yolks cooked

in wine, and a little pork liver, moisten this with a little warm water, and

strain it; grind ginger, [cinnamon,] cloves, [long pepper, grains of

paradise, galingale, spikenard,] and saffron for colour, and boil everything

together.

(Scully translation no. 24, [] indicates material not in Vatican manuscript,

but in one or more of the others).

 

There are a number of other version of this recipe,

 

The Menagier de Paris has it (p. M-20 in the Hinson translation).

The Vivendier has it (recipe 23, p. 50 in the Scully translation).

Trait de Cuisine has it (p. T-2 in the Hinson translation)

 

I'm not sure who all has redacted it. I know that Anne Willan has in:

Willan, Anne. Great Cooks And Their Recipes From Taillevent to Escoffier.

(Little Brown and Company) 1992.

 

I hope that this helps,

David Tallan (Thomas)

 

On 4/17/03 2:29 PM, "Pixel, Goddess and Queen" <pixel at hundred-acre-wood.com>

wrote:

>>> 

I was in Cost Plus the other day, and they had pound jars of peeled

chestnuts so I bought a couple. Now what do I do with them? What did they

do with them in period?

 

Margaret

<<< 

 

 

Date: Mon, 20 Sep 2004 13:55:53 -0400

From: Jadwiga Zajaczkowa / Jenne Heise <jenne at fiedlerfamily.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Chestnuts Chestnuts Everywhere

To: Barbara Benson <voxeight at gmail.com>,  Cooks within the SCA

        <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> Being that chestnuts when purchased are very expensive I thought I

> would at least try to do something with this literal windfall. I know

> that they are a period nut and I have found some interesting info in

> the Florithingie - albeit some of it quite dated.

 

Pleyn Delight, I believe, has a recipe for turnips with chestnuts. It

didn't turn out the way we wanted it when we tried it, but I think we

probably could have gotten something we liked better had we had a lot of

chestnuts to experiment with.

 

-- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika jenne at fiedlerfamily.net

 

 

Date: Mon, 20 Sep 2004 14:14:44 -0400

From: Daniel Myers <edouard at medievalcookery.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Chestnuts Chestnuts Everywhere

To: Barbara Benson <voxeight at gmail.com>,  Cooks within the SCA

        <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

On Sep 20, 2004, at 1:49 PM, Barbara Benson wrote:

> So, if anyone has any interesting, period references to chestnuts to

> share I would love to accumulate some recipes (read: as many as

> possible). From all different time periods and cultures.

 

Here are a few from a quick search ...

 

From: Le Menagier de Paris (Janet Hinson, trans.)

Venison of Deer or Other Beast, If you wish to salt it in summer, it is

appropriate to salt it in a wash-tub or bath, ground coarse salt, and

after dry it in the sun. Haunch, that is the rump, which is salted,

should be cooked first in water and wine for the first boiling to draw

out the salt: and then throw out the water and wine, and after put to

partly cook in a bouillon of meat and turnips, and serve in slices with

some of the liquid in a dish and venison.

 

Item, if you have small young turnips, you should cook it in water and

without wine for the first boiling, then throw out the water, and then

partly cook in water and wine and with sweet chestnuts, or if you have

no chestnuts, some sage: then serve as above.

 

From: Le Menagier de Paris (Janet Hinson, trans.)

Subtle Broth from England. Take cooked peeled sweet chestnuts, and as

many or more hard-boiled egg yolks and pork liver: grind all together,

mix with warm water, then put through a sieve; then grind ginger,

cinnamon, clove, grain, long pepper, galingale and saffron to give it

color and set to boil together.

 

From: Le Menagier de Paris (Janet Hinson, trans.)

Stuffed Piglet. Have the piglet killed and its throat cut and let it be

scalded in boiling water, then skinned: then take some lean pork, and

remove the fat and innards of the piglet and put it on to cook in

water, and take twenty eggs and cook them hard, and some sweet

chestnuts cooked in water and peeled: then take the egg yolks, sweet

chestnuts, fine old cheese, and the cooked meat of a leg of pork, and

chop it up, then grind with saffron and a large amount of powdered

ginger mixed in with the meat; and if your meat is too hard, mix in egg

yolks. And do not split open your piglet's stomach but cut the smallest

hole possible: then put it on the spit, and then push your stuffing

inside, and sew it up with a large needle; and it should be eaten

either with yellow pepper if it is winter, or with a cameline sauce if

it is summer.

 

From: Le Menagier de Paris (Janet Hinson, trans.)

RISSOLES ON A FISH DAY. Cook chestnuts on a low fire and peel them, and

have hard-cooked eggs and peeled cheese and chop it all up small; then

pour on egg yolks, and mix in powdered herbs and a very little

free-running salt, and make your rissoles, then fry in lots of oil and

add sugar. And note, in Lent, instead of eggs and cheese, put in cooked

whiting and sciaena, chopped very small, or the flesh of pike or eels,

and chopped figs and dates.

 

From: Le Menagier de Paris (Janet Hinson, trans.)

A MUST SAUCE (for Starlings? don't think so: JH). Take new black

grapes, and squish them in the mortar, and boil up a bouillon, then

strain through a sieve: and then throw on powdered spices, a little

ginger and more cinnamon, or cinnamon alone for it is better, and stir

a little with a silver spoon, and throw in crusts or toasted bread or

eggs or chestnuts to thicken it: some red sugar, and serve.

 

From: Le Menagier de Paris (Janet Hinson, trans.)

TO MAKE A BOAR INTO A GOOD PIG. Take a boar of two years old or

thereabouts, and in May or June castrate him, and in boar-hunting

season hunt it down, singe it and butcher it like a boar. Or else thus:

take some tame pig which may be scalded, and cook it in half water half

wine, and serve in a dish of this stew, turnips and chestnuts and the

meat.

 

From: Le Viandier de Taillevent (James Prescott, trans.)

Subtle English soup. Take cooked peeled chestnuts, egg yolks cooked in

wine, and a bit of pork liver. Crush everything together, soak with a

bit of lukewarm water, and sieve. Grind ginger, cloves and saffron (to

give colour), and boil together.

 

From: Le Viandier de Taillevent (James Prescott, trans.)

Stuffed piglet or pig. Scald it, wash it well, and put it on the spit.

The stuffing is made of pork pluck, cooked pork meat, some egg yolks,

harvest cheese, cooked peeled chestnuts and good Spice Powder. Put

everything in the piglet's belly, stitch up the slit, and put it to

roast. Baste it with a spoon, while turning the roast, with vinegar and

good boiling drippings. Eat it hot with Yellow Pepper [Sauce]. Some

lazy persons eat it with Cameline [Sauce].

 

- Doc

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

   Edouard Halidai  (Daniel Myers)

 

 

Date: Mon, 20 Sep 2004 19:36:06 -0700 (PDT)

From: R J <chaingangorg at yahoo.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Chestnuts Chestnuts Everywhere

To: Barbara Benson <voxeight at gmail.com>,  Cooks within the SCA

        <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Congrats on the new home!

 

  I would like to request that you contact your local

agricultural co-op extension, there is one in every

county.

The reason I mention this is that there are edible

chestnuts, and some that aren't meant to be food. The

ag-extension people ought to be able to help you

verify whether yours are "food" or not.

 

If they are food, I rather like to use a fake

fingernail from a halloween store to help me pick the

annoying fuzz off.

They can be canned or frozen, whole, in chunks, or

even in a meal.

 

Of course, they are also reputed to be pretty dang

good pig food, so you can always look for pork recipes

instead!

 

All the best,

AEsa

 

 

Date: Fri, 2 Dec 2005 05:07:13 -0500

From: "Terri Morgan" <nothingbutadame at inthe.sca.org>

Subject: RE: [Sca-cooks] Chestnuts - Revisited

To: "'Cooks within the SCA'" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

    We roasted some (quite by accident, at first) at a demo that we attend

every year. Our firepit was close enough to a massive tree that a few

chestnuts made their way into the coals. They were quite tasty - but before

we learned that, we were dodging chestnut-missiles as they exploded from the

firebed. As far as I can tell, so long as they are relatively fresh, the

moisture inside of them is going to be enough to pop the shell open for you

(this might be why some recipes call for soaking them) and propel them with

some force.

 

    Make sure you have a covered pan that can release steam (we used a

popcorn-popping cast iron pan) and I hope your family enjoys the experience.

The taste is wonderful and for all that few of us had ever eaten "chestnuts

roasted on an open fire", we all agreed that somehow it touched a mutual

memory-chord.

 

Hrothny

 

 

Date: Fri, 02 Dec 2005 06:35:56 -0800

From: elisabetta at klotz.org

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re: Chestnuts - Revisited

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

> Please, share your experiences and insights in roasting chestnuts.  

> I would so appreciate it. Thank you.

> Molli Rose

 

We "x" them and soak them. The "x" is not just so they won't explode due to

steam, but also because it is much easier to peel them. Most of the chestnuts

get boiled for the turkey stuffing, but a few get taken out of the water and

thrown into a pan and baked in the oven with the turkey until they smell done,

about 10 minutes.

 

I highly recommend "x"ing them instead of just pricking, but since most of ours

are boiled, I'm not sure if the "x" will affect the roasting process.

 

Elisabetta

 

 

Date: Fri, 02 Dec 2005 09:44:35 -0500

From: "Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius"

        <adamantius.magister at verizon.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Chestnuts - Revisited

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Okay, so what do people do with chestnuts? Apart from the usual

roasted, or in stuffing?

 

I believe there's a brewet in either Taillevent or le Menagier (but

called "English") that calls for them, as well as some 14th-century

English recipes. I STR there's a recipe in Apicius that uses them in

a lentil dish that I liked.

 

More recently there's a modern Italian cake that involves baking

sweetened puree with pine nuts (I wanna say it's called castignacci,

but I'm not sure this is an accurate memory, and my books are all

over the place -- I mean big-time -- at the moment while we rearrange

furniture yet again). This might easily be period, although I have no

direct evidence, and it's been alleged that the modern French Mont

Blanc aux marrons has period Italian forebears. This last is

basically a mound of milled or "riced" chestnut puree, sweetened and

flavored with vanilla, then coated with whipped cream. Oddly enough

it also sometimes turns up on the menus of the finer Chinese

restaurants (usually without the whipped cream), and chestnuts also

appear in the fillings of various steamed rice dumplings roughly

corresponding to tamales.

 

Then there are candied chestnuts (not my fave), and chestnut flour

sometimes turns up around Passover one of the primary baking starches

for flourless cakes.

 

Chestnut ice cream is good, too, and I assume one could make a sort

of sweet-potato pie thingy with them, too. Polenta.

 

What have I left out?

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Fri, 2 Dec 2005 12:58:42 -0500

From: ranvaig at columbus.rr.com

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Chestnuts - Revisited

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> Please, share your experiences and insights in roasting chestnuts.  

> I would so appreciate it.

 

I've roasted them in the oven with an X cut into them.. but never

knew it was supposed to be a the pointed end.  I'd recommend that you

NOT roast all three pounds at once, they are much easier to shell

when they are hot.  Start with a small batch and figure out the best

method and how fast you can shell them.

 

To my mind the best thing would be to just eat them out of the shell

while still hot.

 

Ranvaig

 

 

Date: Fri, 2 Dec 2005 15:14:51 -0800 (PST)

From: Honour Horne-Jaruk <jarukcomp at sbcglobal.net>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re: Sca-cooks Digest, Vol 31, Issue 3

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

> Please, share your experiences and insights in

> roasting chestnuts.

> Molli Rose

Respected friend:

 

Chestnuts roasting in the microwave...

Only way to go. Score, time one minute for four

chestnuts and adjust as your power of microwave

requires. I've never found any other method even half

so easy or tasty.

 

-They're also fun to watch; they spin around as the

steam escapes.

 

Yours in service to both the Societies of which I am a member-

(Friend) Honour Horne-Jaruk, R.S.F.

Alisond de Brebeuf, C.O.L. S.C.A.- AKA Una the wisewoman, or That Pict

 

 

Date: Mon, 12 Dec 2005 12:02:18 -0500

From: "marilyn traber 011221" <phlip at 99main.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Roasting chestnuts

To: Robin Carroll-Mann <rcmann4 at earthlink.net>,  Cooks within the SCA

        <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> If I can find some at a decent price, I want to serve some roasted

> chestnuts for an upcoming dayboard.  I've never roasted them before,

> but the instructions for oven-roasting seem fairly straightforward --

> slash shells, 400 oven, remove when done.  I will probably buy them

> in advance and freeze them.  I have two main questions:

> 1. can I do the slashing the day before, in order to save

> preparation time on the morning of the event?

 

Yep. Shouldn't be a problem.

 

> 2. how long after roasting do the chestnuts remain edible?  Will

> they hold well (perhaps in insulated bags, or do they really need to

> be made just before eating?

> Thanks in advance.

> Brighid ni Chiarain

> Barony of Settmour Swamp, East Kingdom

 

They tend to hold pretty well- if you roasted them the day before, and served

them for the day board, they'd be fine. Trouble is, they TASTE better hot, on

the order of, bread is good, but freshly baked bread is better. They're also

easier to peel if they're hot, or at least warm.

 

Phlip

 

 

Date: Mon, 12 Dec 2005 12:42:21 -0500

From: "Sharon Gordon" <gordonse at one.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Roasting chestnuts

To: "Robin Carroll-Mann" <rcmann4 at earthlink.net>,       "Cooks within the

        SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

In addition to other posted info, Williams-Sonoma has a chestnut cutter that

makes the slashing much faster and safer to your fingers.  If the link

breaks, search on Chestnutter

 

http://ww1.williams-sonoma.com//cat/pip.cfm?

skus=7314909&cat=46&pgid=sku7081235&cmsrc=rel&src=pipgsku7081235|k|

pxsrd0m1\p15\p0\p\p\p\p\p\pchestnut|s7081235&lid=1&src=pipgsku7081235%

7Ck%7Cpxsrd0m1%5Cp15%5Cp0%5Cp%5Cp%5Cp%5Cp%5Cp%5Cpchestnut%7Cs7081235

 

Sharon

gordonse at one.net

 

 

Date: Mon, 12 Dec 2005 10:49:52 -0800

From: elisabetta at klotz.org

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re: Roasting chestnuts

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

> If I can find some at a decent price, I want to serve some roasted

> chestnuts for an upcoming dayboard.  I've never roasted them before,

> but the instructions for oven-roasting seem fairly straightforward --

> slash shells, 400 oven, remove when done.  I will probably buy them

> in advance and freeze them.  I have two main questions:

> 1. can I do the slashing the day before, in order to save preparation

> time on the morning of the event?

> 2. how long after roasting do the chestnuts remain edible?  Will they

> hold well (perhaps in insulated bags, or do they really need to be

> made just before eating?

> Brighid ni Chiarain

> Barony of Settmour Swamp, East Kingdom

 

You can also slash the shells and soak them in water overnight before

roasting.

 

I have a large (4 qt) and small (1 qt) slow cooker, as well as a chafing dish (2

qt?)and sterno, if you would like to borrow them to keep the chestnuts warm for

dayboard.

 

Elisabetta

 

 

Date: Mon, 12 Dec 2005 10:54:28 -0800 (PST)

From: Carole Smith <renaissancespirit2 at yahoo.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Roasting chestnuts

To: Robin Carroll-Mann <rcmann4 at earthlink.net>,  Cooks within the SCA

        <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

One concern with chestnuts is that they burn easily, so it's good to  

keep them moving by shaking the pan frequently when you are roasting  

them.  I believe that's why many suggest you soak them in water first.

 

   Cordelia

 

 

Date: Mon, 12 Dec 2005 22:13:18 -0500

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Roasting chestnuts

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

What an odd little device!

An enclosed Chestnutter that makes a perfect "X" through the outer shell

and inner skin, which then loosen during roasting.

 

Here are some reasons to use one--

http://www.chestnutter.com/

 

Better yet are the reasons given here. It reads:

" I can agree completely with this guy from Gizmodo. Chestnut scoring,

preparation, whatever you call it is indeed DANGEROUS. Watch your

fingers, your arteries, you name it - you will be hurt one time or

another. Luckily this little contraption can help you in the kitchen

over the next 2 holidays

<http://www.321gold.com/editorials/benson/benson120903.html>; AT LEAST! "

http://www.kitchencontraptions.com/archives/000713.php

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Tue, 13 Dec 2005 06:35:45 -0800

From: elisabetta at klotz.org

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re: chestnutter [was Roasting chestnuts]

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

> Am Montag, 12. Dezember 2005 18:36 schrieb Susan Fox:

>> Boo hisssssss!  Unitasker!

>> 

>> Ok then, what other use would this utensil have, in or out of the  

>> kitchen?

 

Wow, I'm guessing that you never spent hours "x"ing chestnuts as a  

child and teenager.

 

It takes a lot of time to "x" chestnuts. You have to be careful, and work

slowly.

 

They're yummy, but very, very time consuming in the preparation.

 

I have e-mailed this link to my family, and suspect we will be using  

it next year....

 

Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!

 

 

Date: Tue, 13 Dec 2005 15:25:37 -0500

From: Lee Sebastiani <valeriavictrix at mac.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re: Chestnutter

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

Bought one--it fell apart the first time I used it. (Of course, a

more expensive quality cutter may work well.) Now I use a small,

stubby paring knife and wear a thick oven mitt on my left hand (in

case of knife slippage).

 

--Adela de Shea

 

 

Date: Fri, 15 Dec 2006 10:49:21 -0500

From: "Daniel  Phelps" <phelpsd at gate.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] chestnut cream

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Aislinn/AEscwynn wrote:

<<< I found a can of chestnut cream imported from France in my local discount

store for fifty cents, so I couldn't pass it up. From the description of

the can, it appears to be almost a syrup. Is there anything medieval I can

use this with/on/in? Are chestnuts new world? >>>

 

Latin    Castanea dentata (Marsh.) Borkh.

Spanish    Castana

French    Chataigne

German    Kastanie

Swedish    Kastanje

Arabic    Kastana

Dutch    Kastanje

Italian    Castagna

Portuguese    Castanha

Russian    Kashtan

Japanese    Kuri

Chinese    Pan Li

 

The American chestnut is native to the United States east of the Mississippi

River. The Chinese chestnut is C. mollissima, the Japanese C. crenata.  The

European C. sativa. is also known as the sweet English chestnut, the Spanish

chestnut and the French chestnut.  The ancient Latin name of the genus,

Castanea is said to have come from Kastanea, a city in Pontus, Asia Minor or

from a town of the same name in Thessaly, Greece, where chestnuts were first

introduced into Europe.  Xenophon, a Greek historian of the fourth century

B.C. state that the children of Persian nobility were fattened on chestnuts.

Dioscorides in the first century A.D. called the chestnut the Sardis nut,

since the best came to Greece from Sardis in Asia Minor.  The Romans took

the chestnut to France and Britain as a flour made from ground chestnuts

provided a staple for the Roman legions.  Tis mentioned in Shakespeare's the

Taming of the Shrew.

 

All of this from "The Book of Edible Nuts".

 

Daniel

 

 

Date: Fri, 15 Dec 2006 10:52:18 -0500

From: "Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius" <adamantius1 at verizon.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] chestnut cream

To: hlaislinn at earthlink.net, Cooks within the SCA

        <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

On Dec 15, 2006, at 9:39 AM, Stephanie Ross wrote:

> I found a can of chestnut cream imported from France in my local discount

> store for fifty cents, so I couldn't pass it up. From the description of

> the can, it appears to be almost a syrup.

 

Many French products are subject to strict "standards of identity":

chestnuts have to be chestnuts, chestnut paste must be a certain

percentage of chestnuts, and chestnut cream (if anything like the

same deal as for, say, truffles or anchovies) must be a certain,

presumably lower, percentage of chestnuts, if it is to be labeled

that way. Is the stuff actually a liquid? I'm assuming it's more of a

puree sweetened with sugar or a syrup, in which case it sounds pretty

much like Mont Blanc in a can. The standard presentation would be to

pile it attractively high on a platter and cover it with whipped

cream. You could probably also use it to fill little tartlets or

something like that.

 

> Is there anything medieval I can

> use this with/on/in? Are chestnuts new world?

 

If it really is a sweetened puree, that probably limits its medieval

applications; the medieval recipes I'm most familiar with for

chestnuts aren't for sweets. Chestnuts are period for Europe and

Asia, though, as far as I know.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Fri, 21 Sep 2007 16:19:04 -0400

From: silverr0se at aol.com

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] 15th C. Ottoman Bulghur w/Chestnuts

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

 

>> Chestnuts - Again, i know you and i are working blind, pretty much,

but i'm asking for non-Ottoman food experiences... I could just stir

roasted and peeled chestnuts into the cooked bulghur. But i figure

the chestnuts would be more tender if i simmer them in broth after

peeling them, then stir them into the bulghur. (i may be able to get

packs of peeled chestnuts which will save wear and blistering on my

fingers) Any opinions?<<

 

Chesnuts do not stay fresh for very long once they are peeled, so I  

would be careful with pre-peeled ones.

 

When roasting your own, if you throw a kitchen towel soaked in ice-

water over them the minute they come out of the oven then, when they  

have cooled and you go to peel them, the shell and that nasty  

little skin inside come right off. No blisters.

 

Renata

 

 

Date: Fri, 21 Sep 2007 20:30:38 +0000

From: "Olwen the Odd" <olwentheodd at hotmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] 15th C. Ottoman Bulghur w/Chestnuts

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

 

Actually, I buy cooked, peeled chestnuts by the bag at local oriental

markets for .99 cents a bag.

 

Olwen

 

 

Date: Tue, 8 Jul 2008 10:19:24 -0400 (GMT-04:00)

From: Christiane <christianetrue at earthlink.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Chestnuts

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

 

Stefan says:

Gianotta asked about chestnuts:

<<< This past Saturday I dragged my mom to the local H&Y food market.  

My main objective was Pocky, but I also picked up a bag of dried  

chestnuts. The intent is to make a Tuscan chestnut and rice soup  

(chopped, sauteed chestnuts, arborio rice, onions, chicken stock, bay  

leaves, salt, pepper). But what are your favorite period entree  

recipes with chestnuts? What are your favorite non-period chestnut  

dishes?

 

Another question: Can you make chestnut flour from dried chestnuts,  

or are they too hard to run through a food processor?>>>

 

I looked at what was in the Florilegium; but what I would like to find out from folks is what recipes they have had particular success with and they find particularly yummy. The soup recipe I got out of a book on Tuscan cooking and it looked tasty, but I don't know if it was period (it could have been, but it may not have been the food of the upper classes). I did find an OOP chestnut soup recipe from the Piedmont, published in 1766 according to the reference. I have also found a chestnut and pasta recipe (make a very liquid puree of the chestnuts and cook the pasta in it; seasonings are olive oil and freshly ground pepper).

 

Dried chestnuts are like dried beans in that they have to be rehydrated by soaking and then boiled to tenderness, I have found out. Then they can be used like roasted fresh ones. I also found some mention that dried chestnuts can me made into flour using a food processor. That's handy to know, because I've found a couple of Asian markets in my area that sell dried chestnuts but getting chestnut flour would entail mail order.

 

Gianotta

 

 

Date: Fri, 5 Jun 2009 10:44:00 -0400

From: Jenn Strobel <jenn.strobel at gmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] newbee cook attempting feast for the first

        time in

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

A caution about cooking with chestnuts in the form of a short story.

 

Two years ago, I served Chestnuts at a feast.  In order to peel the

chestnuts, you need to cut an "X" on the bottom and then boil them.

You can peel them pretty easily when they're hot but as they cool,

they become harder and harder to peel.  At one point, nine people were

drafted to peel chestnuts and it did get done.  I think that I thanked

people for a solid hour because when I tested things at home, peeling

two cups of chestnuts didn't take the effort of peeling about 10 cups

of chestnuts cooked in two batches took.

 

The chestnuts were delicious and everyone loved them, but I would

never again do chestnuts without shelling them well in advance.

 

Because I have to learn things the hard way so others don't have to :-)

 

Odriana

 

 

Date: Fri, 19 Nov 2010 08:10:19 -0700

From: Susan Lin <susanrlin at gmail.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] glace chestnuts

 

I have not done any research as to whether they are period but I like

to think that this is a preservation method that might be close.

 

I did not use a recipe but this is what I did:  I made a simple syrup

of half sugar and half water. Peeled the chestnuts - I think they were

raw but I could be mistaken and they might have been lightly roasted

or boiled. Regardless, I put them and the simple syrup in my small

crockpot, on low. And left them there for 24 hours. Make sure you have

enough syrup to cover them. Then I let them cool, in the pot. Next I

turned the pot back on low for another 24 hours.

 

My understanding of "glace" is to try to convert the object into a

sweet confection by replacing some of its moisture with the simple

syrup. Think a version of brining.

 

That is what I did and my mother loved them. And since I made them for

her I was pleased. I'm sure people will now try to correct me and tell

me I'm wrong but again, you asked what I did.

 

I hope you try it and it works for you. Let me know if you make any

adjustments and how they work out.

 

Shoshanna

 

On 11/18/10, Stefan li Rous <stefanlirous at austin.rr.com> wrote:

Last Monday, Susan Lin commented:

<<< I've even used mine to make glace (pardon the missing accent) chesnuts (

a favorite of my mother). >>>

 

"glace" is a coating? of candy, sugar? or something else?

 

What is your recipe? I occasionally see chestnuts in the stores here,

usually I think around Yule time. We've talked about roasting them before,

but this might give me something else to try on them.

 

Thanks,

Stefan

--------

THLord Stefan li Rous    Barony of Bryn Gwlad    Kingdom of Ansteorra

Mark S. Harris           Austin, Texas

 

 

Date: Fri, 19 Nov 2010 11:58:42 -0500

From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae at mac.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] glace chestnuts

 

On Nov 19, 2010, at 10:10 AM, Susan Lin wrote:

<<< I have not done any research as to whether they are period but I like

to think that this is a preservation method that might be close. >>>

 

Glace chestnuts are in La Varenne's French Confectioner.

Section X recipe 16 (page 508 in the Scully edition.)

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Sun, 21 Nov 2010 17:23:22 -0800

From: David Walddon <david at vastrepast.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] glace chestnuts

 

I was intrigued so I went to La Varenne (Scully's edition) and found a few other "candied" chestnut recipes.

I also have several pounds of chestnuts and am going to try out some of the recipes. I will post here or to my blog (with pictures) once I start in on the recipes.

 

Does anyone have the French for the below. I would like to have it.

 

Also does anyone have any other candied chestnut recipes from period (or close to - given the 1650 or 1600 date issues).

 

Here are the ones that I have found in La Varenne.

 

The compote sounds interesting - Two issues Apricot syrup (made the way it says to do) is not going to happen at this time of year and what kind of Spanish Wine?

The first recipe for Limousin Chestnuts is very straightforward. The next one, "Another way", is not going to happen for me because I am allergic to raw egg white.

 

Eduardo

----

 

In the confections section of the French Cook (Scully pg 372) recipe number 61 and 62

 

61. Limousin Chestnuts

Cook chestnuts normally. When they are done, peel them as you do flatten them a little between your hands; set them out on a plate. Get some water, some sugar and the juice of a lemon or some orange blossom water and make a syrup of them. When it is made, pour it boiling on your chestnuts. You can serve them hot or cold.

 

62. Another way

If you wish to blanch them, get an egg white and some orange blossom water and beat them together; soak your chestnuts in that. Then put them in a dish with some powdered sugar and roll them in it so they get covered with it; then dry them by the fire.

 

Then in the French Confectioner Bk X Unusual Confections (Scully pg 506) recipe 7

7. Chestnut Compote

Roast some chestnuts on the coals, shell them and flatten them, then put them into a silver dish with some apricot syrup, or some other sort of syrup, and a little Spanish wine; boil them. When you want to serve them, put a plate on top and tip them over on it like a cheese.

 

Apricot syrup recipe included in the French Confectioner: Bk V Refreshing Syrups

4. Apricot Syrup

Get very ripe apricots, peel them and remove their pits. Put ver clean little sticks on the bottom of a basin, arrange a layer of apricots on the sicks, then a layer of powdered sugar, and repeat until you have as much as you want to make of it; cover them over and put them in a cellar for a night. If you want to keep the syrup that has fallen into the basin, draw it off and boil it until it has cooked to the pearl stage. You can use the apricots to make tourtes o marmalades.

 

And finally in The French Confectioner: Bk XI Moist Confections recipe 16

 

16. Glace Chestnuts

Make a glazing of some orange-blossom water and some sugar, as is directed for Glace Marzipan. Cook some chestnuts on the coals, shell them, flatten them, glaze them on one side and cook them with the upper part of the oven, then turn them over on their other side, glaze them and cook them the same way.

Glace Brignol plums, cherries and peaches are done the same way as the chestnuts.

 

The orange blossom water is included in the French Confectioner: Bk XVI Marzipan recipe 4

4. Glace Marzipan

Take some plain marzipan paste and make it up into rings or whatever shape you want. Then make a glazing with some orange-blossom water and some powdered sugar: get some orange-blossom water, put some sugar into it and mix the well together until this glazing is slightly thick, Dip one side of your marzipan into it, put some paper and bake it with a moderate heat applied to the top of the oven. When it has baked, let it cool, then dip the unglazed side (into the glazing) and bake it as before.

________________________________________________________

 

Food is life. May the plenty that graces your table truly be a VAST REPAST.

 

David Walddon

david at vastrepast.com

www.vastrepast.net

 

 

Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2010 05:11:23 -0500

From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae at mac.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] glace chestnuts

 

I have the Bibliotheque Bleue edition from the 1980's.

The French Cook: Le Cuisinier fran?ois (London 1653) Introduction by  

Philip and Mary Hyman, 1983 (Montalba: Biblioth?que Bleue)

It's in it.

 

Le Confiturier francois should be up and able to be viewed at the  

Bibliotheque Nationale.

The search keeps getting bumped out this am.

Maybe we can find it there later.

 

Wikipedia says

Gallica Project French National Library: "Le Cuisinier fran?ois" (e-

book)

Universitat de Barcelona: Le Cuisinier fran?ois (e-book)

 

So it should be part of the Grewe collection also, providing it's a  

full edition and contains the pastry and confectionery recipes as well  

as the cookery.

 

Johnnae

 

On Nov 21, 2010, at 8:23 PM, David Walddon wrote:

<<< Does anyone have the French for the below. I would like to have it. >>>

 

<the end>



Formatting copyright © Mark S. Harris (THLord Stefan li Rous).
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