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almond-milk-msg – 4/13/10

 

Making almond milk. Almond milk in period. Deskinning almonds.

 

NOTE: See also the files: almond-cream-msg, alnd-mlk-chs-msg, nuts-msg, dairy-prod-msg, butter-msg, fasts-msg.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I  have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done  a limited amount  of  editing. Messages having to do  with separate topics  were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the  message IDs  were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make  no claims  as  to the accuracy  of  the information  given  by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time  and  efforts of  those who have written  these messages. The copyright status  of these messages  is  unclear  at this time. If information  is  published  from  these  messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

   Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                         Stefan at florilegium.org

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Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 21:43:17 EST

From: LrdRas <LrdRas at aol.com>

Subject: SC - Deskinning blanched almonds

 

Patricia.R.DUNHAM at ci.eugene.or.us writes:

<< Of course, I didn't have much in the way of

fingertips left, after having blanched and slipped the skins off x-many

pounds of bulk almonds, before we blenderized 'em. >>

 

A little tip> To remove most of the skin blanch the almonds, drain and place

on a towel, Wrap them up in the towel and sort of roll, rub and squeeze them

around. Rinse.  Repeat process.  This removes almost all of the brown skin

relatively easily.

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 23:40:23 -0800

From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Deskinning blanched almonds

 

Ras answered Patricia Dunham:

><< Of course, I didn't have much in the way of

> fingertips left, after having blanched and slipped the skins off x-many

> pounds of bulk almonds, before we blenderized 'em. >>

>A little tip> To remove most of the skin blanch the almonds, drain and place

>on a towel, Wrap them up in the towel and sort of roll, rub and squeeze them

>around Rinse.  Repeat process.  This removes almost all of the brown skin

>relatively easily.

 

Alternatively, set some number of 5- to 8-year-olds to squirting the

almonds out of their coverings into a bowl. Then rinse them again before

grinding.

 

Elizabeth/Betty Cook

 

 

Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 08:27:31 -0500

From: Christi Redeker <Christi.Redeker at digital.com>

Subject: RE: SC - onion soup - IP

 

Mordanna wrote:

>> hmmmm

   do I perhaps see a cause?  What had been ground in the grinder before the

   almonds?  I am not defaming your cleanliness, milady, so much as attesting to

   the staying power of coffee stains.

 

Actually, I think the issue is the wine in it.  Now that I go back and

read the originals, and then the redaction that I copied instead of

creating my own (bad apprentice, bad) I see the difference.  And

besides, my boyfriend bought me the coffee grinder so I could grind

almonds, not coffee, it was brand new.

 

The originals are as follows:

 

Harleian MS 279 - Potage Dyvers (Taken from "Take a Thousand Eggs or

More")

 

xj. Froyde almoundys.  Take blake sugre, an cold water, an do hem to in

a fayre potte, an let then boyle to-gedere, an salt it and skeme it

clene, an let it kele; than take almaundys, an blawnche hem clene, an

stampe hem, an draw hew, with the sugre water thikke y-now, in-to a

fayre vessel:  an [yf] the mylke be nogt swete y-now, take whyte sugre

an caste ther-to.

 

Harlien MS 4016 (Taken from "Take a Thousand Eggs or More")

 

109 Froyte de almondes.  Take blak sugur and colde water, and caste the

sugur and the water in a potte; and lete hem boile togidre, and salt,

and skemme hem clene, and let hit kele; And then take Almondes, and

blanche hem clene, and stamp hem in a morter al smal, and drawe hem thik

ynowe thorgh a streynour with sugar water, into a faire vessell. And if

hit so be that the mylke be not swete, take white sugur and cast

thereto; And serue hit forth in the maner of potage, A namly in lenton

tyme.

 

Now the redaction I followed (evidentially without checking back against

the originals, me bad) reads:

 

ALMOND MILK

 

1 cup blanched almonds

2 cups water, wine, or broth

1 Tablespoon dark brown sugar

dash salt

white sugar to taste

 

Grind the almonds coarsely with 1 or 2 teaspoons cold water and place

them in a large bowl.  Put the water, sugar, and salt in an iron pot and

bring to a boil.  Pour the boiling water over the ground almonds and let

sit for 10 to 15 minutes.  Cool completely and serve as a pottage or

soupy dish.  If it is not sweet enough, add white sugar, a teaspoon at a

time, until the mixture is satisfactory.

 

Now, please remember this is not my redaction, and I do not want to get

into an argument about it comparing to the original.  When I made the

almond milk it was late at night and I just took it at face value.  I

guess I know why there is the discrepancy now between what Cariadoc,

Mordanna, and Ras all mentioned as the consistency of their almond milk

compared to mine.

 

Murkial

(the sheepish)

 

 

Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 10:05:56 -0800

From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

Subject: RE: SC - onion soup - IP

 

At 8:27 AM -0500 1/15/98, Christi Redeker wrote:

 

>Now the redaction I followed (evidentially without checking back against

>the originals, me bad) reads:

>ALMOND MILK

>1 cup blanched almonds

>2 cups water, wine, or broth

>1 Tablespoon dark brown sugar

>dash salt

>white sugar to taste

>Grind the almonds coarsely with 1 or 2 teaspoons cold water and place

>them in a large bowl.

 

One point that may not have occured to you is the "grind coarsely." Since

the objective is to get stuff out of the almonds and then throw away the

solid part, I think you want to grind them quite fine--at least, we do.

 

My favorite "redaction vs original" story involves a stew someone did with

lemons and oranges in it. I asked about the source, which turned out to be

14th or 15th c. English. I expressed skepticism, and was told that it was

in the source. It turned out that the lemons and oranges were in the

(published--possibly _To the King's Taste_) redaction--the original said

"garnish with fruit."

 

David/Cariadoc

http://www.best.com/~ddfr/

 

 

Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 21:16:27 -0400

From: renfrow at skylands.net (Cindy Renfrow)

Subject: RE: SC - onion soup - IP

 

<snip>

>Now the redaction I followed (evidentially without checking back against

>the originals, me bad) reads:

>ALMOND MILK

>1 cup blanched almonds

>2 cups water, wine, or broth

>1 Tablespoon dark brown sugar

>dash salt

>white sugar to taste

>Grind the almonds coarsely with 1 or 2 teaspoons cold water and place

>them in a large bowl.  Put the water, sugar, and salt in an iron pot and

>bring to a boil.  Pour the boiling water over the ground almonds and let

>sit for 10 to 15 minutes.  Cool completely and serve as a pottage or

>soupy dish.  If it is not sweet enough, add white sugar, a teaspoon at a

>time, until the mixture is satisfactory.

>Now, please remember this is not my redaction, and I do not want to get

>into an argument about it comparing to the original.  When I made the

>almond milk it was late at night and I just took it at face value.  I

>guess I know why there is the discrepancy now between what Cariadoc,

>Mordanna, and Ras all mentioned as the consistency of their almond milk

>compared to mine.

>Murkial

>(the sheepish)

 

Hello! Thank you, milady, for pointing out a typo and a source of

confusion in my redaction of this recipe.  Your timing is quite good, since

I am currently putting the finishing touches on the *second edition* of

Take 1000 Eggs. Another few weeks & it'd be at the print shop!

 

The ingredients list above should read:

2 cups water (or wine, or broth, as noted in the specific recipe**)

 

**This recipe for almond milk was intended to be used throughout the book,

in many different recipes.  Some of these called for a "thrifty" or thin

milk, while others called for a thick milk.  Some for wine, and some for

broth or water.

 

The recipe needs to be amended to give the option of grinding the almonds

to powder in order to yield a smooth pottage. "Grind the almonds coarsely"

is instructed in order to achieve a *clear* milk, which I find difficult to

do when the almonds are ground to flour - the almonds soak up the liquid,

and there are too many particulates (for my tastes) in what little does

trickle out.

 

BTW, if anyone has noticed anything else that needs fixing, please email

me. Thanks!

 

Cindy/Sincgiefu

renfrow at skylands.net

 

 

Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 22:07:54 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: RE: SC - Almond milk - IP

 

> Our almond milk (made with finely ground almonds and water) comes out as

> white as milk, usually a slightly thinner consistancy.

> Elizabeth/Betty Cook

 

That would make sense from a chemistry standpoint. Some recipes call for

grinding the almonds with a  few drops of water so that "no Oil may come

to the top" or some such. Since it's pretty clear that the authors of

the recipes don't want the oil floating on top, I think it's a fairly

safe bet to say that almond milk is an emulsion of sorts.

 

Looking at other emulsions, like, say, cream or mayonnaise, you'd expect

it to be pale and nearly opaque. What I've made in the past has been

along the lines of skimmed milk. White but slightly translucent. I

expect grinding the almonds finer would help.

 

Adamantius

troy at asan.com

 

 

Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 10:58:30 -0800

From: "Crystal A. Isaac" <crystal at pdr-is.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Almond milk

 

Michael Macchione (kael) wrote:

> Just had a thought.  I've been listening to the discussion on almond milk

> avidly, as I will be making a large batch of in the near future.    But I

> only just thought to ask, how long will almond milk last in a refrigerator

> (does it even need to be refrigerated??)

 

Yup, it needs to be refrigerated. It's made from nuts. Nuts go stale.

Nut oil gets rancid. I've never keep Almond milk for more than a couple

of days, but a cook I respect tells me it will last a week in the

'fridge. Anybody have real experince?

 

Crystal

 

 

Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 07:49:39 -0800

From: "Micheal J. Hobbs" <llewmike at iwaynet.net>

Subject: Re: SC - Almond milk

 

Having made it in the past, I would not recommend keeping it for more

than a week.  After that, it starts to discolor and taste funny.

 

LLEW

 

 

Date: Sat, 24 Jan 1998 12:13:17 EST

From: Bronwynmgn <Bronwynmgn at aol.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Almond milk

 

<< Just had a thought.  I've been listening to the discussion on almond milk

avidly, as I will be making a large batch of in the near future.    But I

only just thought to ask, how long will almond milk last in a refrigerator

(does it even need to be refrigerated??) >>

 

We made a good bit for our fall event.  We started making it a week ahead of

time and kept it refrigerated.  What didn't get used (about a gallon and a

half) stayed in the fridge after the event for about another week, at which

point we noticed that it was starting to grow things and dumped it.  So I

would say two weeks max.  I have no idea if you can freeze it and if that

would extend the life a bit.

 

Brangwayna Morgan

 

 

Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 14:54:30 -0800

From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Almond milk

 

Brangwayna Morgan wrote, concerning almond milk:

 

>I have no idea if you can freeze it and if that would extend the life a bit.

 

We froze some once and it was all right when we unfroze it, as I remember.

I would experiment with it more before trying this for a feast, though.

 

Elizabeth/Betty Cook

 

 

Date: 30 Jan 1998 10:21:15 -0800

From: "Marisa Herzog" <marisa_herzog at macmail.ucsc.edu>

Subject: Re: SC - almond milk

 

<snip>Take whole almonds drop them in a pan of boiling water for about 2

minutes,take them out, do the towel rubbing,  then follow Cariadoc's recipe

for almond milk.

<snip>

 

yup! that's it, but you shouldn't need to leave them in for 2 mins.  just

keep an eye on them, the skins will start to balloon a bit when they are

loose, then scoop em out and fold them up in a towel and kinda massage/knead

them and they will pop right out of their skins!

- -brid

 

 

Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 15:22:25 -0600 (CST)

From: alysk at ix.netcom.com (Elise Fleming)

Subject: SC - Re: almond milk

 

Greetings! I haven't tried Cariadoc's towel method for getting the

skins off almonds but sqooshing them between your fingers works fine,

or taking them between your hands and rubbing them together.  It's a

good project for when you are watching tv!  I usually let the almonds

sit in the boiling water (which is now cooling off) for 5 minutes,

sometimes longer.  If a particular almond doesn't want to "strip" for

you, plop it back in boiling water for a few more minutes.  Whole,

unblanched almonds seem to retain their flavor and "essence" longer

than those that have been slivered and blanched.

 

Alys Katharine

 

 

Date: Thu, 04 Jun 1998 19:20:09 -0500

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: SC - almond milk

 

>     What is a good proportion of almonds to liquid to make almond milk?

>     Must one grind the almonds with the liquid or is the almond meal

> from the grinding added to the liquid and stirred/soaked?

> Ceridwen

 

I've had good results by grinding the almonds, pouring 3 or 4 cups

boiling water over each cup of ground almonds, letting them steep for 5

or 10 minutes, blending everything as smooth as possible in a blender,

then straining through a fine strainer or cheesecloth. The blender helps

minimize almond waste, and also helps keep the almond oil from floating

on top.

 

BTW, you can usually get a second-rate almond milk (as with small beer)

from the strained, used almonds.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Fri, 05 Jun 1998 09:26:46 +1000

From: Robyn Probert <robyn.probert at lawpoint.com.au>

Subject: Re: SC - almond milk

 

At 03:49 PM 04/06/98 -0400, Ceredwin wrote:

>    What is a good proportion of almonds to liquid to make almond milk?

>    Must one grind the almonds with the liquid or is the almond meal

>from the grinding added to the liquid and stirred/soaked?

 

It depends on how rich you want your almond milk to be. Almond milk was also

made with wine and/or with stock.

 

I use a food processor. First process the almonds until fine (fresh ground

yields much more than buying pre-ground). For a rich almond milk I use

1 cup white wine, 2 cups water, 1.5 cups ground almonds. Put these in the

food processor and whiz for 1 minute, then leave for 5 minutes and process

again. The liquid should be cream coloured (you could wait and process again

if you were not in a hurry). Strain through a fine strainer, stirring to get

the liquid through. Save the meal and clean the strainer. Wring out a cloth

with water and line the strainer, then pour the milk through into a clean

bowl. Gather up the cloth and twist until the meal is dry. Dump out the meal

and replace with the meal from the first straining, then repeat to squeeze

out the last of the milk. This is some trouble, but makes a very smooth

almond milk.

 

BTW if you make soap, the almond meal is a great additive.

 

Rowan

 

 

Date: Thu, 4 Jun 1998 22:26:49 -0400

From: mermayde at juno.com (Christine A Seelye-King)

Subject: SC - Almond Milk

 

>Has anyone tried subbing almond milk in for cow milk?  Results?

>Bogdan

 

I bought some at the health food store I work at in a Parmalat-type

container. (About 2.99 a qt.)  I also buy Parmalat milk in those boxes

for days when we are out of milk.  One morning my lord opened the almond

milk up instead of the regular milk (it was there, he just didn't look!)

. So, we had almond milk in our protein drinks, and in our coffee, and I

even drank some just because the container was open and I didn't have

time to cook anything special with it.  It was very tasty in all of the

above, even though I wouldn't have chosen to use it that way.

It is a little thinner than anything other than skim milk, and it would

not have the thickening qualities of cow's milk, I wouldn't think.

The taste and texture of the commercial stuff is very nice, it comes in

regular and vanilla, and the ingredients list reads like a medieval

recipie.

Mistress Christianna MacGrain

(But I'm not buying anymore until I have a specific use for it!)

 

 

Date: Wed, 10 Jun 1998 00:29:05 -0600From: Tim Allison <tallison at mcs.com>Subject: SC - almond milk in storesWhile shopping at an upscale supermarket in Chicago, I found in an asepticpackage a beverage labelled almond beverage. It said to use in any recipewhere dairy milk might be used. The ingredients are almonds, water, andbrown rice for sweetener. The product is packaged in Oregon, which meansit's probably available in a large part of the country. It's not cheap, butneither are almonds, and the amount of time and trouble it will save areprobably worth quite a bit.Caroline Richenda Carol Mitchell

 

Date: Wed, 24 Jun 1998 19:23:04 EDT

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - almond milk

 

lynnx at mc.net writes:

 

<< I just bought some almond milk at the supermarket. It's called Naturally

Almond, and the ingredients are almonds, water, and brown rice

sweetener(plus a few stabilizers). I haven't tasted it yet, but I'm not

an expert on how almond milk is supposed to taste. >>

 

Both I and my co-feastocrat used this product this weekend. We did not find it

objectionable. It is slightly different from regular almond milk in several

ways, but the flavor was good, IMO. It does not seem to have the thickeneing

ability of hand-made almond milk but that was easily over come with a little

rice flour.

 

Would I use it again? Well, for certain dishes without hesitation but for

others I would use hand-made.

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Wed, 24 Jun 1998 21:35:25 EDT

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - almond milk

 

TerryD at Health.State.OK.US writes:

<< What would your criteria be for choosing between your almond milk or the

commercial product, in general?

 

Bear >>

 

If you think the redaction is supposed to be thickened by the almond milk the

hand-made product is superior. If your redaction is dependent on rice flour,

egg yolks, or bread crumbs for thickening or if thickening is contra-

indicated then the commercial product seems to work just fine.

 

Ras

 

 

From: Librarian <betpulib at ptd.net>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: almond milk

Date: Wed, 24 Jun 1998 17:33:38 GMT

 

Heather Law wrote:

> I just bought some almond milk at the supermarket. It's called Naturally Almond, and the ingredients are almonds, water, and brown rice

sweetener(plus a few stabilizers).

<<snip>>

 

Just a note: The inclusion of sweeteners (esp. brown rice sweeteners)

will make this product incorrect for most period recipes except perhaps

balncmanger (a bland dish made with chicken , almond milk, and rice,

sometimes vaguely sweet, designed to be completely white)

 

Almond milk is sometimes used as a beveage in modern arabic cultures (and

perhaps period ones as well, though I am not sure), but is usually simply

used as a substitute for dairy products in recipes in Europe, during our

period of study, and in an extremely broad generality. By and large, it

was used for various fast/lenten/meatless days, and altered the

taste/texture of the finished dish as compared to those made with dairy

products. It is however, an acceptable substitute for those purposes, as

it behaves well under the right conditions.

 

Almond milk is NOT a hassle to make unless you are making it in a period

manner (ie: grinding by hand in a martar and pestle, which is not too

terribly onerous once you have the knack). Modern coffee grinders or

blenders or food processors make short work of grinding almonds very fine

while adding a quantity of cool water. You then strain out any lumps.

Voila! Almond milk. Heat it slowly, and you get almond butter, once it's

drained of it's liquid "whey".

 

As a purist, I wouldn't use the store-bought variety when cooking for the

public because it contains things not found in medieval almond milk

(non-period sweetner and stabilizers). In a pinch, tho, it might do. I'd

have to see if it tasted and behaved like REAL almond milk. I suspect the

rice is there for thickening and viscosity(mouth-feel) as well as

sweetening, making the product a starch-based rather than a

protein-and-fat-`based liquid.

 

I think what you have found is the health-food version of an almond

milk(less)shake, meant to be a beverage and not a milk substitute, as

almond milk was in period. But now I'm curious and have to hunt some down

to see. Preparing 2 dishes side-by side, using store-bought versus

home-made almond milk should settle the question nicely.

 

Lady Aoife Finn of Ynos Mon

 

 

From: Kevin of Thornbury <kevin at maxson.com>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: almond milk

Date: Wed, 24 Jun 1998 16:21:36 -0400

Organization: Kingdom of Atlantia

 

cellio at usa.net wrote:

>

> Simple almond milk for the modern kitchen: take almonds, dump into a food

> processor, add water (or wine, depending on what your recipe calls for),

> turn on for a few seconds, drain off the liquid, and iterate.  When the

> liquid stops being cloudy-white in appearance, it's time to add more

> almonds.

>

> Ellisif

 

I use a Braun coffee bean grinder; the almonds come out as flour.  By

the time I add water, broth, wine or whatever, the mixture is smooth and

doesn't require straining.  Stir it up with a fork and you're done.

 

I've done the food processor method, and it's a pain for me.

_____                                           

|+^+| Lord Kevin of Thornbury

|/+\| (mka Kevin Maxson)

\_/   kevin at maxson.com   http://www.atlantia.sca.org

 

 

From: jtn at cottagesoft.com (Terry Nutter)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: almond milk

Date: Tue, 07 Jul 1998 12:54:01 -0700

 

Hello, Katerine Rountre stopping by for a moment.  Lad Aoife Finn wrote of

almond milk:

 

>Just a note: The inclusion of sweeteners (esp. brown rice sweeteners)

>will make this product incorrect for most period recipes except perhaps

>balncmanger (a bland dish made with chicken , almond milk, and rice,

>sometimes vaguely sweet, designed to be completely white)

 

Well, sort of.  Some recipes that call for almond milk also call for sugar

(not just blancmanger); but I use primarily English sources, and medieval

English cuisine is distinguised from other regional cuisines, among other

things, by its much greater use of sweeteners.

>Almond milk is sometimes used as a beveage in modern arabic cultures (and

>perhaps period ones as well, though I am not sure), but is usually simply

>used as a substitute for dairy products in recipes in Europe, during our

>period of study, and in an extremely broad generality.

 

Well, hmmmm..... Many "almond milks" are drawn with broth or with wine; I

have not directly counted, but I suspect, more than are drawn with water.

Water-based almond milk is an alternative to cow's milk (I hesitate to

call it a substitute; English cuisine calls for milk and cream at times,

and also for almond milk, but almond milk is by far the more common).  But

almond milks based on broth or wine do not much resemble milk, nor could

milk be used to replace them.  So I am not at all convinced that almond

milk should be viewed as "non-dairy milk".

 

There are a couple of English recipes titled simply Almond Milk and Almond

Butter. These are invariably sweetened.  But they are in other ways

different from almond milks that are described as part of other recipes;

one possibility is that they were intended as "stand-alone" dishes.  (The

Almond Butter seems clearly to have been so intended.)

 

>By and large, it

>was used for various fast/lenten/meatless days, and altered the

>taste/texture of the finished dish as compared to those made with dairy

>products.

 

This may be true elsewhere, but as a description of English cuisine, it is

at best misleading.  Almond milk is perhaps the most common base for

browets containing meat, for instance.  In general, there are not

milk-based equivalent recipes for those.  In fact, almond milk is far more

common in combination with meat than cow's milk, which shows up rather

more frequently in custard-like things.

 

BTW, in most times and places in the middle ages, eggs, milk, and cheese

were permitted for most "meatless" days outside of Lent.

 

>It is however, an acceptable substitute for those purposes, as

>it behaves well under the right conditions.

>Almond milk is NOT a hassle to make unless you are making it in a period

>manner (ie: grinding by hand in a martar and pestle, which is not too

>terribly onerous once you have the knack). Modern coffee grinders or

>blenders or food processors make short work of grinding almonds very fine

>while adding a quantity of cool water. You then strain out any lumps.

>Voila! Almond milk. Heat it slowly, and you get almond butter, once it's

>drained of it's liquid "whey".

 

Many medieval recipes specify that the liquid with which almond milk is

drawn should be hot.  I have found, as a rule, that if I grind almonds

fine, steep them for about 15 minutes in *hot* water or broth (i.e. liquid

that was boiling when I first poured it over), then strain the result, I

get a much more satisfactory almond milk.

 

-- Katerine Rountre/Terry Nutter

 

 

Date: Mon, 28 Sep 1998 14:39:38 -0400

From: "Groulx, Michelle" <MGroulx at NRCan.gc.ca>

Subject: SC - Almond Milk

 

Kinuko said...

>I also found powdered almond milk at the supermarket,

>and was wondering if this has been used/tried by anybody.

>Please let me know how it compares to the stuff one makes

>at home.  Blending and straining one's own almond milk is

>a most exasperating procedure depending on time constraints.

 

I too use, given time restraints and budget, powdered Almond Milk. I

purchase it from Chinatown where I can get a jar for about $1.79. It makes

more Almond Milk than I will use in a year. I am absolutely sure that

quality and authenticity suffer. But since almonds are within the

"ridiculous" price range in Cda, I feel pretty good that I have found a

suitable substitution rather than omitting it altogether. Seriously folks,

Almond Milk can break your budget up here if required in larger quantities.

Same with Pine Nuts.

 

Micaylah

 

 

Date: Mon, 28 Sep 1998 18:19:25 -0400

From: dy018 at freenet.carleton.ca (Micaylah)

Subject: Re: SC - Almond Milk really

 

Adamantius says...

>If I remember correctly, a can that makes 8 quarts costs between 3 & 4 dollars

>US. The problem is that, as with the other commercial almond milk products, it

>contains other stuff and only bears  a passing resemblance to the real article.

>Which is not to say I wouldn't use it, but since the stuff I have seen and

>bought has been sweetened a bit more than I like things to be, I'd be inclined

>to use it only for sweet dishes like daryols, etc.

 

I tend to agree that it is sweeter than normal home made Almond Milk.

However, I have tried it in savory dishes and have found it is acceptable.

(If just accetptable is acceptable) As I posted earlier, at the cost of

almonds in this country, it makes a pretty good substitution given the

alternative. Adamantius, it seems to be pretty highly priced compared to

here. This is confusing. Could it be because of you purchasing it in a

health food store and not in your local Asian community stores?

 

Micaylah

 

 

Date: Thu, 01 Oct 1998 18:54:06 EDT

From: kathleen.hogan at juno.com (Kathleen M Hogan)

Subject: SC - Greetings and Salivations <grin>

 

Almond Milk

Yield: 1 servings

 

          Ground almonds

          Water, stock, or wine

          Rice flour/cornflour

          Salt

 

Vurst nim of alemauns, & hwyte of heom one pertie, ah hwyte summe  hole

& the other do to grinden.  Sothen nim the hole alemauns & corf  heom to

quartes; sothen nim fat broth & swete of porc other of vthur  vlehs;

tempre thin alemauns & sothen drauh out thi milke & sothe do  hit in an

veyre crouhe...

 

You can make thin or thick almond milk, as suits your dish, by adapting

the quantity of almonds to the amount of liquid in your  recipe. In

either case your object is to produce a liquid or puree as  smooth as

possible. The method is the same.

 

First pulverise the almonds in a blender (not a food processor) or in

a coffee or nut mill.  Put them in a bowl and pour on enough boiling

liquid to make a smooth cream.  Leave to stand for 10-15 minutes, then

rub the mixture through a metal sieve. This mixture may be

smooth enough.  If not, cream a little rice flour  or cornflour with it

and heat until it thickens slightly.  Then add any extra liquid the

recipe calls for, and a scrap of salt.

 

  I find that 125 g/4 oz almonds and 1 tablespoon rice flour  moistened

with 275 ml/10 fl oz/ 1 1/4 cups liquid produces a 'milk' suitable for

most purposes. Almond milk might be used whenever a flavoured liquid base

without meat products, cow's milk, cream or eggs was needed.  It could

also be used as a  thickener--or just for its aroma and flavour.

 

from The Medieval Cookbook by Maggie Black Chapter 3, "Life in the

Cloister"

 

Title: Almond Milk                        England, 14th Century

Yield: 1 pint

 

     2     c     Milk or cream

   1/2    c     Coarsely ground almonds

   1/4    ts    Bitter almond essence

     2     tb    Orgeat syrup     *

 

  * made by Combier of Saumur in France

 

   Simmer all the ingredients together for 10 minutes and allow to

cool, covered. It can be strained or not, as desired.

 

Almond Milk and VERJUICE are the two most important sauces needed  to

recreate English medieval cookery.

 

From _Seven Centuries of English Cookery_ by Maxime de la Falaise 1973

Grove Press, 1992   ISBN 0-8021-3296-0

 

Caitlin NicFhionghuin

Shire of BorderVale Keep

Atlantia

Augusta, GA

 

 

Date: Thu, 1 Oct 1998 21:55:54 EDT

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: SC - Wedding feast-longish

 

<< This is my first time to do this (for my spring wedding) ...<snip>.....So

many, (almost all) of the recipes call for almond milk.  I read that they used

that because fresh milk was hard to get and keep.  My Groom does not like nuts

at all, so I need to limit the use of

almonds.>>

 

The aversion your fiance has to nuts of all kinds is unfortunate when you are

dealing with the preparation of medieval-style food.  Since a large number of

people with specific food aversions point to flavor as the primary factor

generating their aversion, the inclusion of one or two dishes with almond milk

should not be a problem.

 

Almonds (when compared with other stronger flavored nuts like walnuts or

hazelnuts) are very bland when raw.  The milk produced from them shares this

characteristic. As an added advantage, almond milk takes on the flavors of

the surrounding ingredients rather well.  This combination makes it a

wonderful liquid alternative in not a few modern recipes as well.

 

I am not aware if your fiancee's aversion to nuts includes coconuts but If

authenticity is not a major issue, you might try experimenting with replacing

the almond milk with coconut milk.  My own experiments using this substitution

have been successful when I have based a modern creation on period sources of

inspiration. You might want to try an experiment or two of your own in that

area.

 

 

Date: Mon, 15 Mar 1999 10:33:01 -0800 (PST)

From: Laura C Minnick <lainie at gladstone.uoregon.edu>

Subject: Re: SC - Needing help with almond milk

 

On Mon, 15 Mar 1999, Jennifer Carlson wrote:

> Could someone tell me what is the most efficient device for straining

> almond milk?  The only sieve I own that is fine enough to trap the almond

> grounds is a small one and plugs up with the grounds too quickly to be of

> much use.  Do coffee filters work?  Or should I strain it through a muslin

> bag?  I always wind up using my hands to press the milk out of the grounds,

> and this is neither effiecient, tidy, nor thorough enough for me.

 

I put a layer of cheesecloth inside my standard seive, and use a spatula

or back of a big spoon to press it out. of course, I can't keep from

snitching bits of the almond paste stuff that's left, so staying clean

isn't really what I'm after. But the spat gives more leverage more evenly

than my fingers do.

 

'Lainie

- -

Laura C. Minnick

University of Oregon

Department of English

 

 

Date: Mon, 15 Mar 1999 13:53:45 -0500

From: Christine A Seelye-King <mermayde at juno.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Needing help with almond milk

 

On Mon, 15 Mar 1999 11:58:40 -0600 Jennifer Carlson

<JCarlson at firstchurchtulsa.org> writes:

>Do coffee filters work?  Or should I strain it through a muslin

>bag? I always wind up using my hands to press the milk out of the grounds,

>and this is neither effiecient, tidy, nor thorough enough for me.

>Talana

>Northkeep, Ansteorra

 

A clean, cotton, white kitchen cloth (not terry cloth like most dish

cloths, more  like a clean large hankerchief) works quite well.  I made

Almond Milk and Cheese just recently, and that method worked quite well.

 

       Mistress Christianna MacGrain

 

 

Date: Mon, 15 Mar 1999 14:35:58 EST

From: Jgoldsp at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - Needing help with almond milk

 

JCarlson at firstchurchtulsa.org writes:

<< Could someone tell me what is the most efficient device for straining  >>

 

I use a jelly bag place it in and go about my other business come back later

and squeeze the bag to get the last bits works for me. Good luck

 

TTFN Joram

East Kingdom, Barony of the Bridge

 

 

Date: Mon, 15 Mar 1999 21:42:10 EST

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - Needing help with almond milk

 

JCarlson at firstchurchtulsa.org writes:

<< Could someone tell me what is the most efficient device for straining

almond milk?  >>

 

A double layer of cheese cloth works well. Simply line your strainer, our in

the almond/liquid combo  Pull up the ends. If you have the time you can

suspend it over a bowl over night in a cool place. If not simply twisting the

bag from the top will squeeze out the liquid. The resulting mass can be used

again to make a slightly less rich batch and then the 2 batches can be mixed

together.

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Tue, 16 Mar 1999 00:05:23 -0500

From: Christine A Seelye-King <mermayde at juno.com>

Subject: Re: SC - more almond milk questions

 

On Mon, 15 Mar 1999 21:32:05 -0600 Helen <him at gte.net> writes:

>How much milk yield do you get out of a pound of almonds?

 

You can get about 1 gallon of almond milk for every pound of almonds.

 

The method Ras describes works well, but you can re-grind your almonds

3,4,or 5 times with new water, as you will get more almond solids and oil

out of every grind.  When we did it last month, what was left tasted like

sawdust. We drained it well, and a friend took it home to incorporate

into soaps as almond fibre.  Mix all of the batches together.

 

To make almond cheese, take the milk (say 2 cups worth) and put it in a

pot with about 2 tsp. sugar and a splash of rose water.  Let it boil for

some time (a large enamel pot works well, as the small volume of liquid

when boiling will climb the sides of the pot just like milk). When it has

boiled for a while, you will see that it has separated into curds and

whey. Using your trusty cloth and collander again, pour your mixture

into it and let it strain.  The foam on top of the liquid is your curds,

and the whey that drains out is very pale, moreso than skim milk.  (We

fed the whey to the dogs).  Take the cloth with the drained curds, and

squeeze it to remove leftover moisture.  I put a plate on mine and

pressed it for a while, and then squeezed again.  When it is drained, it

will form a ball.  Refrigerate this and let it rest for a while.  It sets

up to the consistancy of firm sour cream, or whipped cream cheese.  It is

delightful as a spread.   I would do it without the rosewater for a more

savory spread.  There are several recipies for this in Digby, Plat, and

Guter Spice.  They are called Almond Cheese and Almond Butter, both names

pretty much describe the same product.  It makes a nice alternative to

dairy for Lent (or for those of us doing with less dairy).

 

Mistress Christianna MacGrain

 

 

Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 11:21:15 -0800

From: kat <kat at kagan.com>

Subject: SC - Packaged Almond Milk

 

Made a recipe last night--Blaunche Porrey, from Pleyn Delit--with

store-bought almond milk (the brand name of the one I bought was Blue

Diamond's "Breeze") and it *really* was a very good experience.  In

texture, color and smell, the almond milk was extremely similar to my

homemade.

 

Since part of the purpose of the almonds in the recipe seems to be a

thickener, I took a few ounces of slivered almonds, ground them to powder

in my Braun coffee grinder (love those things!) and threw them in for

texture. Tasting the soup later, it was for all intents and purposes

identical to a batch I'd made a few weeks before; the only difference being

that I didn't spend an hour blanching and skinning almonds...  ;-)

 

Any other folks used this product, with or without success?  I know a while

back Ras had tried a commercial almond milk that he wasn't pleased with the

results of (can't remember if he gave a brand name or not) but this one

seemed to work pretty good...

 

       - kat

 

 

Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 21:07:02 EST

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - Packaged Almond Milk

 

kat at kagan.com writes:

<< Any other folks used this product, with or without success?  I know a while

back Ras had tried a commercial almond milk that he wasn't pleased with the

results of (can't remember if he gave a brand name or not) but this one

seemed to work pretty good...

 

       - kat >>

 

I have since found out why I was displeased with the product and have changed

my viewpoint to one in favor of the product. :-)

 

Why did I initially have a negative experience? Welllllll......I can only say

....don't forget to SHAKE the container before pouring. :-) <blushing in

embassassment>

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Sat, 20 Mar 1999 10:29:59 -0500

From: "Robin Carroll-Mann" <harper at idt.net>

Subject: Re: SC - more almond milk questions

 

And it came to pass on 18 Mar 99,, that david friedman wrote:

> At 9:32 PM -0600 3/15/99, Helen wrote:

> >For all those on the other list I am on, I am sorry but I need all the

> >input I can get..... How much milk yield do you get out of a pound of

> >almonds?

> By the recipe we use (in the Miscellany), 1 cup = 7 ounces of almonds

> yields 4 c almond milk.

> Elizabeth/Betty Cook

 

I have not tested these directions, but the "Libro Del Arte de

Cozina" (1599) has some recipes with specific quantities.  The

directions for almond milk differ according to the thickness desired

for each dish, but the yield in the recipes I looked at is 3-4 pounds

of milk from 1 pound of peeled almonds.

 

Lady Brighid ni Chiarain

Settmour Swamp, East (NJ)

 

 

Date: Mon, 09 Aug 1999 21:16:34 -0500

From: Helen <helen at directlink.net>

Subject: Re: SC - grinding almonds oop

 

> helen at directlink.net writes:

> <<

>      Just saw someone (will not say her name) grinding almonds in her food

> processor, and she said adding a tablespoon of sugar will keep them from

> getting oily as you pulse them.

>   >>

> A tablespoon full of sugar to how many almonds?

> Mordonna

 

6 1/2 oz by weight.  Looked like a cup and a half.

 

 

Date: Mon, 09 Aug 1999 22:59:26 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - grinding almonds oop

 

>     Just saw someone (will not say her name) grinding almonds in her food

> processor, and she said adding a tablespoon of sugar will keep them from

> getting oily as you pulse them.

> Helen

 

The standard medieval/Renaissance European wisdom about this seems to be

to add a small amount (a few drops) of water or rosewater every so

often. Of course if you need really dry almond "flour", and are not

making marzipan or almond milk, it could cause problems.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Sun, 29 Aug 1999 01:28:25 -0400 (EDT)

From: cclark at vicon.net

Subject: Re: SC - uses for leftover almond crumbs?

 

Lord Stefan li Rous wrote:

>You mentioned leftover walnuts and it made me think of the leftover almond

>crumbs left from making almond milk. I'm thinking of the stuff that is

>strained out of the almond milk solution after your mix the ground almonds

>in the water or broth. The liquid becomes the almond milk, but what do most

>folks do with the almond crumbs or mash? I think there are some period recipes

>that use this mash. Can this be used for marchepane? ...

 

I would guess that they might have been considered waste products unsuitable

for further use in feast cookery. Or they might have been used in marchpane.

They might have been used for cheap filler in some less glamorous food. But

this is just speculation.

 

What I do with them is cookies. A bunch of leftover ground almonds, some

butter, some sugar, optional eggs, a little spice and salt, perhaps a few

drops of almond extract and/or vanilla, and flour. They can have some

chopped nuts added, or pecan halves on top.

 

Thanks for reminding me; I've still got some sitting in the freezer.

 

Alex Clark/Henry of Maldon

 

 

Date: Sun, 29 Aug 1999 14:42:50 -0500

From: LYN M PARKINSON <allilyn at juno.com>

Subject: Re: SC - uses for leftover almond crumbs?

 

Stir it into a stew, or a soup, let dry and sprinkle over a salad, put

through a blender with enough water to make a second running and use it

to cook rice or barley, or even veggies.  Some  of our recipes call for

things to be cooked in a second running, the first saved for mixing into

the finished dish.

 

When mine goes through the blender, I get a thick, only slightly coarse

milk. Unless it specifically says to strain because it wants clarity, I

often use the whole thing.  They were perfectly capable of producing a

paste consistency even finer than my blender can do.

 

Henry of Maldon gives us his cookie usage.  If you had a huge amount at a

feast, making up this cookie dough and handing it to the Children's

Activities co-ordinator could give our little darlings a great time

making cookie shapes--hey, metalworkers! how about some medieval themed

cookie cutters?--provided that you had the oven space to let the cookies

bake. A plate of the best for High Table, presented by the children, and

the not-so-perfect ones a good snack for the kiddies in mid-afternoon.

 

Failing that, go ahead and strain, throw the 'refuse' into a ziplock bag,

take home and make a delicous soothing baked custard.  Put up feet, and

relax.

 

Allison

allilyn at juno.com, Barony Marche of the Debatable Lands, Pittsburgh, PA

Kingdom of Aethelmearc

 

 

Date: Sun, 29 Aug 1999 15:07:27 -0500

From: "Sharon R. Saroff" <sindara at pobox.com>

Subject: Re: SC - uses for leftover almond crumbs?

 

I have a recipe for Murachinos, Turkish almond macaroons that uses 3 cups

ground almonds, 3 egg whites, 1 1/2 cups sugar (I use 1 cup) and a pinch of

salt. The recipe is out of Sephardic Holiday Cooking by Gilda Angel.  I

recently won a dessert competition with these cookies.  They seem to be a hit.

 

Sindara

 

 

Date: Sun, 29 Aug 1999 23:45:00 -0400

From: Christine A Seelye-King <mermayde at juno.com>

Subject: Re: SC - uses for leftover almond crumbs?

 

> You mentioned leftover walnuts and it made me think of the leftover

almond crumbs left from making almond milk. I'm thinking of the stuff

that is strained out of the almond milk solution after your mix the

ground almonds in the water or broth. The liquid becomes the almond

milk, but what  do most folks do with the almond crumbs or mash? I think

there are some  period recipes that use this mash. Can this be used for

marchepane? Seems a waste  to throw this out, especially for a large

feast.

Lord Stefan li Rous

 

Having just recently made almond milk from scratch, I am here to tell you

that the only thing I left in that batch of ground almonds was the

dietary fiber.  I milked them 'til they screamed.  There was absolutely

no flavor left in it when we were done, after about 5 runs.  One of the

ladies in the household took it home and was going to use it as

scrubby/pumice in homemade soap.

It was great almond milk, though, as well as almond cheese (the oils and

the solids from the almonds help it congeal.)

Christianna

 

 

Date: Tue, 16 Nov 1999 23:08:19 -0500 (EST)

From: cclark at vicon.net

Subject: Re: SC - Almond Cream (Was Blown Eggs& Chocolate)

 

Cadoc MacDairi wrote:

>Doesn't seem curdled to me, the starches are boiled from the almonds in the

>same way as almond milk and allowed to settle and then drained with a peice

>of linen.  Then they use the resulting paste in the rest of the recipe.  Or

>at least that's how it reads to me.

 

The most detailed recipe I know for "Fried creme de almondes" (in Harl.

4016), instead of "draw it up," says "drawe hem [th]orgh a streynour." It

then continues to refer to the strained almonds in water as "hem" (them). I

would assume that this means that the other recipes may be interpreted as

calling likewise for strained almond milk, although the straining process is

sometimes referred to only by such phrases as "draw it up."

 

I am not aware that almonds contain any significant amount of starch (though

I haven't got exact nutritional info handy), but they (and their milk)

contain a good deal of protein. Boiling causes some thickening of the

proteins by coagulation. In some recipes, a little vinegar is added to

promote further coagulation. When the uncoagulated proteins with the excess

liquid (whey) are drained out, what remains is a kind of curd. Even though

the almond milk is not cooked to the point of lumping and separating in the

pot, it may still be reasonably described as having been curdled.

 

So the way I interpret it, froid creme de almandes is a drained curd of

almond milk, usually salted and sugared, sometimes mixed with other

ingredients such as wine and currants. The times that I've made it, it's

come out to a texture vaguely similar to whipped cream.

 

Alex Clark/Henry of Maldon

 

 

Date: Sat, 4 Mar 2000 10:20:20 -0600

From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Almond Milk - a silly question

 

Anahita the ever curious asks:

> So, trying to find something else to drink at feasts, besides water

> and sekanjaben, i ask:

> Was almond milk drunk as a beverage in period?

 

From Le Menagier:

 

ALMOND MILK. Parboil and peel your almonds, then put in cold water,

then grind and soak in water in which onions have been cooked and

strain through a sieve: then fry the onions, and add a little salt,

and boil on the fire, then add the sops.  And if you make almond milk

for sick people, do not add onions, and in place of the onion water

to soak the almonds as spoken of above, add and soak them in clean

warm water and boil it, and do not add salt, but lots of sugar. And

if you want to make it as a drink, strain through a sieve or through

two pieces of cloth, and lots of sugar to drink it.

 

Which makes it clear that it could be used as a drink, but not clear

whether that was only for sick people or not.

 

David/Cariadoc

http://www.best.com/~ddfr/

 

 

Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2000 22:04:53 -0500

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Rabbit tips?

 

Sue Clemenger wrote:

> Has anyone out there ever gotten almond milk to actually

> _thicken_ anything? I can't seem to get it to work.  Any hints would be

> appreciated!

 

Almond milk, per se, doesn't really thicken other liquids. It will,

however, get pretty thick if you reduce it by simmering. You'd need a

fair amount of good almond milk, say, maybe a quart or so, and reduce it

in cooking to perhaps 1-2 cups. Rather like those Thai or Singapore

curries made with coconut milk. In the case of an almond milk sauce, you

probably want to stop reducing it just before it starts to break and

produce surface oil.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Sat, 1 Apr 2000 15:52:30 +0200

From: "Cindy M. Renfrow" <cindy at thousandeggs.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Rabbit tips?

 

> Has anyone out there ever gotten almond milk to actually

> _thicken_ anything? I can't seem to get it to work.  Any hints would be

> appreciated!

 

Make the almond milk with powdered almonds & use the almond milk unstrained.

 

> And while I'm asking questions, can anyone tell me how easy it is to make

> almond milk without use of electric appliances?.

 

It's a bear if your almonds are hard.  You might soak them in a cold place

overnight to soften them, or grind them before you leave for pennsic.

 

Cindy

 

 

Date: Sun, 9 Apr 2000 11:19:34 -0400

From: "Robin Carroll-Mann" <harper at idt.net>

Subject: SC - Almond meal

 

Yesterday, while picking up some rosewater at the Indian grocery, I

discovered that in their nut section they carry almond meal -- blanched

almond, ground more finely than I've ever been able to manage in my

food processor.  I think this might be a good solution for almond-milk at

Pennsic. Also I plan to try turning some of it into almond paste.  At

$3.99 a pound, it's rather more expensive than unblanched almonds for

$1.50 a pound, but it's still cheaper than commercial almond paste.  

And then there's the convenience factor...

 

Brighid

 

 

Date: Mon, 22 May 2000 23:52:32 EDT

From: allilyn at juno.com

Subject: Re: SC - Substitutions-hazelnut milk

 

I hadn't thought of the reduced volume of water in milk or cream.  It's

not for OOP rice pudding, although I like that.  Several recipes in the

period corpus call for rice to be cooked in milk or cream, and if I can

get it just right, I think it makes a nicer feast dish.

 

Just spotted this reference:

Hazelnut Frumenty          Diversa Servicia 89.         Curye on

Inglysch Book II p. 79.

For to make formenty on a fichssday, tak the mylk of the hasel notis.

Boyl the wite wyth the aftermelk til it be dryyd, & tak & coloure yt with

safroun; & the ferst mylk cast therto & boyle wel, & serue yt forth.

 

For to make frumenty on a fish day, take the milk of the hazelnut.  Boil

the wheat with the second running of the hazelnut milk until all liquid

is absorbed., color it with saffron, add the first running of the

hazelnut milk, boil well, and serve.

APdeT

 

My apologies--Chiquart's #78 was for barley with almond milk.

 

Allison,     allilyn at juno.com

 

 

Date: Fri, 26 May 2000 11:39:37 EDT

From: DianaFiona at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - Almond Milk, Again

 

lilinah at earthlink.net writes:

<<

1) How necessary is it really to remove the skins from the raw

almonds before grinding? Do the skins impart an unpleasant flavor? Or

is the objection just that the milk is less white? Or is there some

other reason? I am using the almond milk for Andalusian and Near

Eastern recipes which call for water as the diluant. Some European

recipes call for wine or verjus as the liquid or in addition to

water. Will either of these liquids interact differently with the

almond skins than water?

>>

   I'm lazy, and hate the tedium of skinning almonds, so I often leave the

skins on if the dish will be dark when I'm through. I haven't noticed a major

flavor/texture difference, even when the pulp is left in the dish. It does

help to grind the nuts in a coffee/spice grinder, rather than a blender or

food processor, though--you get a much finer grind, which reduces the

detectability of the skins.........

   Also, I store my bags of nuts in the freezer routinely, and the only ill

effects I've noticed are the occasional off odors from the chopped leeks

stored next to them, and such........... (G) I would certainly plan to freeze

any pre-ground almonds, rather than even refrigerating them. I don't imagine

that they'd keep well at all!

 

               Ldy Diana

 

 

Date: Mon, 29 May 2000 16:05:43 EDT

From: Seton1355 at aol.com

Subject: SC - Almond Milk flan from Scully

 

Today I was moved to make Almond Milk Flan from my new cookbook.  It came out

tasting wonderful but there were some problems:

 

It thickened but it didn't set up.  

I used a litre of boxed almond milk instead of making my own.

When I used a *pinch* of saffron, the custard did not change color.  I added

more (too much probably) and it came out a nice yellow-y color.  So how much

saffron is too much?

I didn't have rice flour so I ground up 3/4 C of abrorio rice.  I chose the

type of rice for it's sticky quality and the amount beacuse I used a litre of

almond milk not  1 C gr almonds to 1 1/4 C water.....

Well , as I said it tastes good and I shall serve it over berries tonight.

Phillipa

 

 

EARLY FRENCH COOKERY

D. Eleanor Scullu & Terence Scully

 

*Almond Milk Flan*   (P282)

 

The use of almond milk in these flans makes them a lean-day counterpart for

standard medieval milk or cream flans which would incorportate animal milk,

eggs and butter, as well as spices and saffron on non-fasting days. The

Menagier lists * Flaons de creme* / Creme Flans as part of the issue or

dessert of the meal, although neither he nor various copiers of the Viandier

have thought it worthwhile to provide a recipe for this preparation.

 

The variety of flan that Chiquart has left us is a delectable use of almonds.

Despite the absence of ingredients that we might nowadays think necessary

for a custard, baking a combination of almond milk and rice flour produces

highly palatable results that are not greatly different in texture from

modern flan, but perhaps more interesting in flavor.

 

Prepare sufficient pÇte bris»e or other pie dough for a single crust, 9" pie

or 10-12 tartlet shells.  Pre-bake blind or prick with a fork and bake for 10

min at  375F / 190 C.

 

1 C ground almonds

1 1/4 C water

 

1 1/2 C sugar

pinch salt

pinch saffron

1/4 C rice flour

Garnish: 2 T blanched, sliced almonds or some fresh berries

 

Combine almonds and water well. (Blender may be used).  Strain thjrough

several layers of damp muslin or cheese cloth to obtain almond milk.  

 

In a pot, bring almond milk just to the boiling point.

Add sugar and dissolve.

Add salt and saffron.

Add half of this hot mixture to the rice flourwhile stirring.

Combine with remaining hot almond milk.

Pour prepared custard mixture into prepared pastry.

Bake 20 - 25 minutes  at  375F / 190 C until light crust appears on surface.

Sprinkle with almonds or berries.

 

To serve: Serve warm garnished with fruit

 

 

Date: Tue, 30 May 2000 00:26:48 -0400

From: "Bethany Public Library" <betpulib at ptdprolog.net>

Subject: Re: SC - Almond Milk, Again

 

To make almond butter you run the "milk" through the almonds several times

as they are grinding, getting as much of the good stuff out of the nuts as

possible. Then the mess is strained, and you gently heat the condensed

almond milk in a sauce pan or double boiler (agitating continually) until it

gets incredibly thick. Almonds thicken like starch does, when grounds finely

in liquid and with applied heat. Let it cool and it gets even thicker.

Refrigerate, and it gets hard, like butter---but it does tend to weep a bit,

so be sure to drain it before serving.

 

I love it sweetened with some honey and a bit of orange or lemon peel in the

manufacture (not medieval), served with a dollop of seville marmalade on

some extremely crisp pastry or a croissant.

 

See Dawson's Huswife's Jewel for a recipe for "Almond Butter in the Newest

and Best fashion" or some similar title.

 

Aoife

 

 

Date: Tue, 30 May 2000 17:01:37 -0400

From: Christine A Seelye-King <mermayde at juno.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Almond Milk, Again

 

The below process is how we made almond cheese, with one more step.

After the gentle boiling process, the almond milk was put into a cloth

over a colander to strain out the 'whey', or very thin liquid.  After it

has had a chance to hang or drip for a while, the thick 'curds' that are

left are gently squeezed in the cloth to make them clump together, and

then let rest in a cool place (like the refridgerator) and it makes a

very nice almond cheese, about the texture of thick sour cream or whipped

cream cheese.  With the addition of a little rosewater, it is a very nice

spread on lots of foods (or just good on your finger, when you snitch a

taste ;)

Christianna

I have a class handout around here somewhere with several references to

this technique from period sources, but I don't know where that is just

now :(

 

<betpulib at ptdprolog.net> writes:

> To make almond butter you run the "milk" through the almonds several times

> as they are grinding, getting as much of the good stuff out of the nuts as

> possible. Then the mess is strained, and you gently heat the condensed

> almond milk in a sauce pan or double boiler (agitating continually) until it

> gets uncredibly thick. Almonds thicken like starch does, when grounds finely

> in liquid and with applied heat. Let it cool and it gets even thicker.

> Refrigerate, and it gets hard, like butter---but it does tend to

> weep a bit, so be sure to drain it before serving.

 

 

Date: Tue, 11 Jul 2000 09:23:38 -0700

From: "E. Rain" <raghead at liripipe.com>

Subject: SC - nut milks

 

Hi all,

in doing some translating this week I came across a reference to an

alternative to almond milk.  In the anonymous 14th c. Tuscan cookbook two

different recipes so far call for "nut milk" as an alternative to almond

milk. You could argue that this is specifically walnut milk, but the word

noci is generally used to mean nuts generically .

 

Personally I like almonds, but if you were allergic it's good to know that

at least in 14th c. Tuscany you've got an alternative.  I also think it

might be interesting to try & see how differently flavored other nut milks

would be - hazelnuts yumm!

 

Please note I am not advocating that you run out & make pistachio milk for a

Viking dish or even walnut milk for a 14th c. French dish.  I don't recall

coming across this option in another recipe corpus, and would use it

sparingly even with 14th c. Italian foods, but it is a very cool piece of

info :->

 

Eden

 

 

From an anonymous Tuscan manuscript of the 14th c.   translation c. Eden

Rain 2000:

 

Another way to make gourd/squash    (p. 48 in the paperback)

take dry squash, and put it to soak with hot water at vespers, and when it

is softened cut it small, and cut it over the [vessel] with onions, and with

oil, pepper and saffron: saute and put into sausage, make with vinegar and

breadcrumbs, to cook.  And in such mode you can make it with almond milk,

pepper, saffron, salt and oil and with milk of nuts.

 

De le zucche - Altremente.

Togli zuccche secche, et polle a mollo con acqua calda, al vespero; e quando

sono mollificate, tagliale minute, e taglia sora la taola, con cipolle, e

con oglio, pepe e zaffarano; soffrigi e poni in civero, fatto di aceto e

mollena di pane, a cocere.  E a tala modo si puo fare con latte d'amandole,

pepe, cruoco, sale e oglio e con latte di noci.

 

 

For those of you who are data junkies this recipe can be found (in Italian

of course) in L'arte Della Cucina in Italia (p. 48 in the

paperback)published by Einaudi Tascabili c. 1987 & 1992 Edited by Emilio

Faccioli.

 

Eden Rain

raghead at liripipe.com

 

 

Date: Wed, 23 Aug 2000 23:51:55 -0400

From: "Robin Carroll-Mann" <harper at idt.net>

Subject: SC - Toasted almond milk

 

Two of the Spanish recipes I've been playing with call for almond milk

made from blanched *toasted* almonds.  It's yummy stuff, and definitely

has that hearty nut taste, unlike the usual blandness of almond milk.  

Are there recipes from other countries that do the same?

 

Lady Brighid ni Chiarain

Settmour Swamp, East (NJ)

 

 

Date: Tue, 16 Jan 2001 10:07:32 -0800 (PST)

From: Ginny Claphan <mizginny at yahoo.com>

Subject: SC - almond milk source - Almond Breeze

 

Blue Diamond Growers has released an Almond Milk product called Almond Breeze.

The target market seems to be those who are lactose and/or soy intolerant.

 

It is available in some health food stores in the United States, but also can

be ordered by the case (27 8 oz. containers $US 16.00) from their web site at

http://www.bluediamond.com/store/natural_foods/almond_breeze.cfm

 

Ingredients from their nutrition label include water, evaporated cane juice,

almonds, tricalcium phosphate, vanilla extract, sea salt, potassium citrate,

carrageenan, lecithin, vitamin E acetate, vitamin A palmitate, vitamin D2.

 

Has anyone tried this yet?

 

Gwyneth Banfhidhleir

 

 

Date: Tue, 16 Jan 2001 10:34:04 -0800

From: "Laura C. Minnick" <lcm at efn.org>

Subject: Re: SC - almond milk source - Almond Breeze

 

Ginny Claphan wrote:

> Blue Diamond Growers has released an Almond Milk product called Almond Breeze.

> The target market seems to be those who are lactose and/or soy intolerant.

 

> Ingredients from their nutrition label include water, evaporated cane juice,

> almonds, tricalcium phosphate, vanilla extract, sea salt, potassium citrate,

> carrageenan, lecithin, vitamin E acetate, vitamin A palmitate, vitamin D2.

> Has anyone tried this yet?

> Gwyneth Banfhidhleir

 

Tried it- ok to drink, but I don't think you can use it as almond milk

in a medieval recipe- too much stuff added.

 

'Lainie

 

 

Date: Tue, 16 Jan 2001 14:25:56 -0500

From: margali <margali at 99main.com>

Subject: Re: SC - almond milk source - Almond Breeze

 

I have tried it, but as it has added sugars it is not on my uselist!

 

It has a fairly bland sweet mildly almond taste, very wishy washy. All

of the solids have been filtered out and the carageenan is to texturize

it in place of all of the almond oil they seem to have filtered out.

Other than the fact it seems to be a product to replace regular milk on

cereal or to drink, it isn't too horrid. I personally wouldn't cook with

it, unless I was making a fairly sweet rice or bread pudding or a

dessert.

margali

[and the chocolate is horrid]

 

 

Date: Tue, 16 Jan 2001 13:59:20 -0800

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

Subject: Re: SC - almond milk source - Almond Breeze

 

margali wrote:

>It has a fairly bland sweet mildly almond taste, very wishy washy. All

>of the solids have been filtered out and the carageenan is to texturize

>it in place of all of the almond oil they seem to have filtered out.

>Other than the fact it seems to be a product to replace regular milk on

>cereal or to drink, it isn't too horrid. I personally wouldn't cook with

>it, unless I was making a fairly sweet rice or bread pudding or a

>dessert.

 

There is another brand - Pacific Foods Naturally Almond - which i

think has a better flavor than the Blue Diamond brand, and which can

be found in health food stores. I only buy the "original" flavor - NO

vanilla for me.

 

Original Naturally Almond contains:

almond base (filtered water, almonds)

brown rice sweetener (filtered water, brown rice)

natural flavor

malt (barley)

sea salt

guar gum

xanthan gum

carrageenan

locust bean gum

 

That's a lot of vegetable gums, but this "healthy non-dairy beverage"

(to quote the box) doesn't feel "gummy".

 

I've used commercial almond milks to cook with at camping events. As

i have no medical issues, the sugars aren't a problem for me

physically, but i don't like sweet things, and i found that Naturally

Almond doesn't taste particularly sweet. Since many Medieval recipes

utilizing almond milk also have some added sugar, i just don't add

the sugar or only add it to taste.

 

Commercial almond milks are useful for camping and on-the-fly

cooking. But for feasts and home cooking, they can't compare with

"home made".

 

However now that i've been to Morocco, i have to say that giant

American almonds don't have half the flavor of the tiny Moroccan

almonds - and i am very careful to buy the freshest almonds i can,

and never the sad stale almonds one finds in little sacks at the

supermarket.

 

Mmmmm, Moroccan almond milk...

 

Anahita al-shazhiyya al-Andalusiyya

 

 

Date: Tue, 16 Jan 2001 20:03:31 EST

From: Bronwynmgn at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - almond milk source - Almond Breeze

 

mizginny at yahoo.com writes:

<< Has anyone tried this yet? >>

 

I've used it several times for initial experimentation and for Pennsic use

and haven't found it much different from the hommade stuff when all is said

and done.  I don't think I'd use it for a feast, though, just because it does

have the extra ingredients.  But if I see a recipe I want to try, and don't

feel like milking nuts, I'll use it for the first trial or for home cooking.

 

Brangwayna Morgan

 

 

Date: Fri, 19 Jan 2001 12:03:34 -0500

From: Christine A Seelye-King <mermayde at juno.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Almond butter?

 

On Fri, 19 Jan 2001 12:03:49 +0000 kirsty <kirsty at dcs.st-and.ac.uk>

writes:

> Talking about almond milk I am cureouse to know how to make almond

> Butter/ cream/ cheese etc. dose anyone know?

 

As Bear has said, for a product called almond butter, you would grind the

almonds into a paste.  If you roast the almonds first, you will get a

richer flavor.  

 

However, if you are talking about a creamy cheese/spread made from almond

milk, that is also a period use of the almond.  After making almond milk

(grinding blanched, peeled almonds with water until all of the milky

solids have drained out - this process requires several re-grindings,

usually about 4, so that one pound of almonds will yield approx. 1 gallon

of milk), the liquid is placed in a deep pot and brought to a boil, a

small amount of sugar and some rosewater is called for in some recipes.

After the liquid has foamed up (the reason for the deep pot, as it will

try to boil over just like boiling cow's milk),  it is removed from the

heat and poured into a strainer lined with a clean kitchen cloth.  The

'whey' is drained out of the milk, and after about an hour or more of

this, the solids left behind will bind together in a form resembling

softly whipped cream cheese or stiff sour cream.  If I recall correctly,

the cloth is squeezed at the end to finish the draining and to help the

mass bind together.   It is delightful on wafers or other mildly flavored

foods. We have eaten it for breakfast, lunch and dinner on various

things, and it is delicious.  I have not tried it without the sugar and

rosewater to see if the sugar makes a difference in it's texture, but I

think it would be very good as a non-sweet as well.  I can easily see

using this product as a dairy substitute during a Lenten fast, for

example.

 

The store-bought almond milks will not work for this sort of recipe,

because they lack the almond oils and solids necessary.  

 

Christianna

 

 

Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2001 10:56:38 -0500

From: "Bethany Public Library" <betpulib at ptdprolog.net>

Subject: Re: non-member submission - Re: SC - Almond butter?

 

Huswife's jewel has a recipoe for almond butter that is 'in the newest and

best fashion" or some such similar title. It isn't curdled at all. The

almond milk is simply strained from the almonds after prodigous grinding,

and the resulting milk is then boiled to take advantage of the natural

thickening properties of the almonds. This almond butter (cheese, some call

it) will weep quite a bit. But the recipe is worth taking advantage of if

you're interested. It helped me win a category at Ice Dragon (huge mucking

A&S competition).

 

Aoife.

 

 

Date: Mon, 9 Apr 2001 03:28:26 EDT

From: LadyPDC at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - Almond milk left overs

 

prescotj at telusplanet.net writes:

> Can one make good marzipan with almond [milk] leftovers?

 

made some, tasted pretty good to me,  worked pretty good too.

 

Constance

 

 

Date: Fri, 02 Nov 2001 05:50:57 -0700

From: Sue Clemenger <mooncat at in-tch.com>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Marzipan Request

 

Cool recipe <g>. It sounds more like an almond cheese than marzipan,

though (I've seen several similar recipes in english-language texts).

They're basically made by making almond milk, and coagulating that.

It's unclear from your recipe if you're supposed to be heaping the

remaining crushed almonds onto the cloth (which would make it more like

a marzipan), or if you're supposed to be heaping the almond cheese,

which would give you a sweetened cheese.  Hmmm.....and I have several

pounds of almonds here at the house....hmmmmm (weekend project, anyone?

<g>)

Never seen one, before, though, that's done up as a hedgehog--how

adorable <gg>

--Maire

 

Martina Sch=E4fer wrote:

> ,,Kochbuch aus dem Inntal" (cookbook from the Inn valley), late 1500/begin.1600, Bavaria. The german version is made by Danner, Ostbair. Grenzmarken 12/1970. That's all bibliographical information about the book I could find. I don't know if there is a version translated into english.

> As well as possible translated the recipe for hedgehock from almonds says:

> Put fine crunched Almonds into a clean pot and mix the stuff with a small stick (maybe cinnamon?). Put it on a cloth so it makes a heap and let it drip until it gets dry (That makes only sense if you made almond milk before. Otherwise there is no liquid to "drip"). Than put sugar over it. Now take almonds, cut in 4th, colored with safran and stick with it the hedgehock. Put thick almondmilk to it and put it in a bowl.

> The question still is, did the put milk/water/wine to the crunched almonds and thisaway made almond milk or not. I tend to say, they did not. Because if you'd do that you would'nt get it dry enough anymore to take it away from where you worked and "put it in a bowl" without destroing your work.

> Whats your opinion?

> Marcellina

 

 

From: Bronwynmgn at aol.com

Date: Sun, 20 Jan 2002 08:50:28 EST

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Almond milk

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

afmmurphy at earthlink.net writes:

> I've seen that almond milk is used in any number of recipes. I've a

> question. Does this at all resemble commercial almond milk? Can that be

> substituted, if time is a factor? Is it different?  Or does it just make

> more sense to make your own, because you don't want a full quart, or

> it's expensive, or...

 

Homemade vaguely resembles commercial almond milk.  The commercial ones tend

to have a couple of natural additives like carragenan (which I belive is

something from seaweed which helps keep it from separating?), and sometimes

flavoring added.

I have used commercial almond milk for quick tests of dishes, or at camping

events if I didn't want to deal with making my own (and didn't think to grind

the almonds ahead of time to take with me :-))- the commercial stuff is good

for that because it doesn't have to be refrigerated until you open it.

 

For anything where I'd be serving it to someone other than myself or my

household as a period dish, like at a feast, I make my own.  It really isn't

that difficult.  I believe I've used roasted almonds before; I currently have

a bunch of raw slivered unblanched almonds I'm working with, because for some

reason Forme of Cury specifically requests unblanched almonds drawn up with

whatever.

I grind them up in the food processor with whatever the specified liquid is

and then strain through cheesecloth.  You can reuse the same amount of ground

almonds a number of times; I easily got 8 cups of milk from 1 cup of almonds

over about 4 strainings, and could have kept going with the same batch.  Just

stick them back in the food processor with more liquid and whirl them a

little more, then strain again.

 

Brangwayna Morgan

 

 

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

Date: Sun, 20 Jan 2002 10:33:19 -0800

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: R: [Sca-cooks] Almond milk

 

A F Murphy <afmmurphy at earthlink.net>

>I've seen that almond milk is used in any number of recipes. I've a

>question. Does this at all resemble commercial almond milk? Can that be

>substituted, if time is a factor? Is it different?  Or does it just make

>more sense to make your own, because you don't want a full quart, or

>it's expensive, or...

 

Actually there are several brands of commercial almond milk available

and they don't taste the same nor have the same mouth-feel. And

naturally they don't behave the same.

 

I use it at camping events, but for feasts i have my minions, errr,

my kitchen staff make it to order.

 

I buy the brand with the fewest additives. I don't like the

mouth-feel of the gums in my almond milk and i don't want vanilla or

sweetener in mine either.

 

>I've never made it, (and I guess I have to find directions - grind 'em

>up with water and strain? Raw or roasted?

 

It depends on the recipe. Some are made with water, some with broth,

some with wine, some with verjus.

 

>I've also only tried the commercial kind once,

>and learned that it doesn't set up as tapioca pudding - pity, sounded

>like a good idea- so I don't know what its properties are, either.

 

Do you mean you used it to make tapioca pudding? If so, i'm surprised

it wouldn't set. I thought it was the mixture of the starches in the

tapioca, plus the egg and milk that made it set. And i don't quite

see why almond milk wouldn't work - unless it had to do with some

additive in the specific brand you used.

 

Do you recall which brand it was? Each brand is different in terms of

additives besides water and almonds.

 

Anahita

 

 

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

Date: Sun, 20 Jan 2002 22:27:18 -0800

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Almond milk

 

>So, either raw or roasted almonds work? The second are usually easier to

>get, of course, though I have to avoid the salted ones, of course! And

>if I can get 4-8 cups of milk from 1 cup of almonds, that's not bad at

>all. I gather it depends on the recipe?

 

Generally almond milk is made from raw almonds. There are a few

recipes i've seen that use toasted almonds, but they are by far in

the extreme minority. I think, if the old brain is running on all

cylinders - that most of the ones that use toasted almonds are

Spanish.

 

So raw almonds most of the time, and the liquid called for will vary

with the recipe. Most of the recipes i've seen have specified the

liquid.

 

Anahita

 

 

From: Bronwynmgn at aol.com

Date: Mon, 21 Jan 2002 09:28:25 EST

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Almond milk

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

afmmurphy at earthlink.net writes:

> And

> if I can get 4-8 cups of milk from 1 cup of almonds, that's not bad at

> all. I gather it depends on the recipe?

 

Well, how much you make depends on the recipe.  How much you can get from a

certain amount of almonds seems to depend on how much of the almond oil you

need in it to call it almond milk...You see, the first few strainings are

creamy looking and a bit thickened.  It starts to get thinner after that.  I

got 8 cups of milk from one cup of almonds without a significant change in

creaminess.  Eventually, the liquid would have become less creamy and more

watery - well, more like whatever liquid you started with.  Then it's up to

you to decide how far you want to push it.

 

Brangwayna Morgan

 

 

From: Bronwynmgn at aol.com

Date: Tue, 5 Feb 2002 11:45:00 EST

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Almond Milk...place to find it

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

jjdeclet at yahoo.com writes:

> Is this almond milk in cans sweetened?  Could almond milk be replaced with

> almond flavored cow's milk?  I know this is not period but it might help

> in a bind.

 

The commercial almond milk I've seen has been boxed (and not refrigerated)

rather than canned.  Many of them do seem to be sweetened somewhat.  I'm not

sure almond-flavored cow's milk would substitute appropriately - almond milk

looks like cow's milk to a certain extent, but doesn't necessarily behave

the same way - and is not strongly almond-flavored, at least to my taste.

 

Brangwayna Morgan

 

 

Date: Tue, 05 Feb 2002 15:37:20 -0800

From: "Laura C. Minnick" <lcm at efn.org>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Almond Milk...place to find it

 

Jaime Declet wrote:

> That is the reason why I am asking because I a few weeks ago I tasted what I was told was almond milk and to me it tasted like flavored milk with a heavy almond taste and somewhat sweet.   I have never made almond milk but by reading the recipes I always thought it was more along the lines of milky water.  Is it like coconut milk?

> Jaime

>   Bronwynmgn at aol.com wrote:

> The commercial almond milk I've seen has been boxed (and not refrigerated)

> rather than canned. Many of them do seem to be sweetened somewhat. I'm not

> sure almond-flavored cow's milk would substitute appropriately - almond milk

> looks like cow's milk to a certain extent, but doesn't necessarily behave the

> same way - and is not strongly almond-flavored, at least to my taste.

 

Nope.

 

Almond milk and cow's milk are not comparable, and I am not sure why one

would want to substitute a flavored cow's milk. Also, the commercial

almond milk is not, in my estimation- and we have discussed this before

on the list but I don't remember when- suitable for cooking. But we are

mixing two issues here.

 

First- almond milk vs cow milk. Almond 'milk' is of course not really

milk. True milk is made by a kind of subaceous gland that is hormonally

stimulated to produce the fluid we call milk. It is a blend of fats,

proteins, vitamins and minerals, and carbs, depending or course on the

animal. Cows produce milk with a lot of protein and a LOT of calcium.

Humans produce milk that is lower in calcium and somewhat of protein but

higher in teh fats needed to develop braincells. Etc. etc.

 

Almond milk is made by grinding your almonds, adding water, smooshing,

then squeezing teh moisture out. What goes out with the moisture is what

makes it look like milk. You have some almond flour, which will impart

some protein- BUT- it is not animal protein, and specifically not milk

protein which contains casein. This is the main reason why it doesn't

behave like a milk product in a pudding or thick sauce. The almond will

also impart some small amount of fat to the liquid, but again, it is not

the same sort of fat and doesn't compare to moo juice.

 

If you try to substitute one for the other in a medieval recipe it

*might* work. After all, they did it. But in a modern recipe? Wouldn't

do it. Wouldn't be prudent.

 

Now- the commercial almond milk- I wouldn't touch 'em. They aren't real

almond milk. I think the basic problem is that the makers don't

understand almond milk either. If they think it is a milk substitute

made of almonds, or worse, almond flavored milk? Oh joy. Ever read the

label? There's so much stuff added it's frightening. Real almond milk

should be: Almonds, water. That's it. For shipping, I can concede a

small amount of preservative. But the stuff they've added to it is not

preserveatives. Reading it I am guessing that: They believe that almond

milk is just as unstable as a dairy product on the shelf, so you have to

do things to it lest it rot. They believe that people won't like it

unless it is either 'just like real milk' or tastes like a milkshake.

All those stableizers and thickeners and carrageenan and all that stuff-

that isn't because they need to be there, it's because that's what

people expect when they open the box. They aren't marketing to people

who really want almont milk- they are marketing to people who want fake

cows milk.

 

Bleah. Gimme the real stuff. I do it in the blender or food processor.

It's cheaper than the boughten stuff and it's better. I can cook with

it. If I want to take some with me and not make it in camp, I make it

ahead, put it in a canning jar, and put it in the 'cool' but not 'cold'

section of the cooler, near the cheese. It keeps fine.

 

'Lainie

 

 

From: Bronwynmgn at aol.com

Date: Wed, 6 Feb 2002 18:41:30 EST

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Almond Milk...place to find it

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

goldberg at nymc.edu writes:

> Hmmmm.... I need to make "rice in almond milk" for 75 for a feast on

> Saturday. I'm estimating a need for about 12 quarts of almond milk on the

> basis of the recipe I have... looks like you're getting almost a gallon (16

> cups) from half a pound of almonds? How do you make your almond milk? If

> you can get that quantity, then it's certainly a LOT cheaper to make it

> myself... I just hope the store will let me return what I bought....

 

You should be able to get the gallon easily, maybe even a gallon and a half.

Just keep squeezing out the almonds until the "milk" starts to get a little

thin and watery, then get rid of some of the ground-up ones and add fresh.

I use an 11 cup food processor, put in about a cup of almonds to start and

grind them up a little, then add about 2 cups of liquid at a time.  I really

can't do more than that at once or it gets messy :-)  Whirl them around for a

few 10 or 15 second bursts, maybe let them sit a minute or two, and dump the

mess into cheesecloth; let the liquid drain through into whatever you want it

in, then squeeze the rest of the liquid out and dump the almonds back into

the food processor for another go.  It's a bit messy, but not difficult.  You

can keep it under refrigeration for a couple of days, although you'll have to

shake it to mix it back together - it tends to separate.

 

Of course, if they won't let you return what you bought, use it - you can

cook with it, it's just not quite the real thing.  I've used it for quick

trials and stuff before.

 

Brangwayna Morgan

 

 

Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2003 15:18:18 +0000

From: "Olwen the Odd" <olwentheodd at hotmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] olwyn the odd... help?

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

> we are going to make a bunch of almond milk for the feast and can the

> almond refuse be turned into marzipan?

> -- Pani Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika jenne at fiedlerfamily.net

 

As for your second question, the answer is no.  All the oils are leached

right out of the nuts.  You could perhaps use the remains for a garnish

sprinkled over a dish, just make sure you let folks know about the nuts.

You can take them home and use them for mincemeat pie, you can crush them

completely and incorporate them into a piecrust, you can put them in banana

nut bread, you can feed them to your chickens, you can add them to stuffing,

you can do lots of things with them but you can't make marzipan from

them.

 

Olwen

 

 

Date: Tue, 16 Mar 2004 18:09:53 -0500

From: "PhilTroy / G. Tacitus Adamantius" <adamantius.magister at verizon.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Almond milk question

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Also sprach AEllin Olafs dotter:

> So I'm finally trying this. Working with a recipe that blithely

> tells me to take my good almond milk...

> Do I strain it first? I'm then going to be thickening it, and

> draining it, and using eveything left in the cloth... but I'm not

> sure if "everything" includes the suspended solids or not. I do know

> I should blanch the almonds first, so I don't have any peel, which

> suggests I don't strain? I was originally assuming that to get milk,

> I would - but now I'm not sure.

> AEllin

 

Period people used a fairly large amount of almonds to get a smallish

amount of milk. They were known to re-use almond draff to get more

than one batch of milk, just as brewers did to make different grades

of ale. n general, though, almond milk was strained. The reason some

modern recipes don't always recommend this is that they assume you're

using a blenderrather than a mortar, and that any solids in your milk

will be so finely ground as to be indistinguishable frm the little

curds you get when you cook the milk.

 

_Could_ be true! ;-) (Dat's da ticket!)

 

In any case, the theory behind almond milk is that some of the

thickness comes from emulsified almond oil. some, perhaps, from

gelatinized starches, but (again, i theory), almost none of it comes

from almond solids. In practice this may not be completely true.

 

In theory, if you're using one of the neato fifteenth-century (I

think I remember that was where they come from) English recipes for

almond cheese and/or butter, you strain the milk. You blanch and peel

the almonds first not so much to prevent coloring the stuff, but also

to keep unpleasant tannin flavors from getting into your milk. For

some savory applications (maybe mirrauste or Le Menagier's

tile-coloreddish) this is less of an issue, but I'm thinking you

strain the milk, which will, we hope, still be fairly thick when

you're done, if you did it right and used the right proportion of

almonds to water, said your prayers, etc.

 

You then bring it to a boil nd, depending on your recipe, curdle it

like cheese with an acid, or simply boil it until the emulsion starts

to break, the proteins start to coagulate somewhat, and it all

becomes somewhat reduced, and you end up with what looks like

significantly thickened almond milk. (I think the recipe you're

talking about is the one that calls for boiling with no vinegar or

other coagulant added; the one which, when sweetened, would make a

great filling for cannole?)

 

Anyway, you boil your strained milk until it's thick, being careful

not to let it burn (it thickens a bit faster than you might expect,

and if you stir it frequently, it shouldn't burn). As it cools it'll

thicken further. Pour this creamy stuff onto a suitable cloth, like a

tea towel, which will absorb some excess liquid, without being nappy

enough to get almond crud stuck in its fibers. You should be able to

gather up the corners and let it hang up and drip, but it also

shouldn't really be necessary unless you want it really solid. If you

spread it fairl thinly on a large enough towel (and I suppose only

experience will really settle these questions), it should become the

consistency of a thick custard or ricotta fairly quickly. I believe

the recipe says to sweeten the stuff.

 

As I say, it would be real good in cannole or perhaps in little

tartlets (think in terms of an early frangipane cream).

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Mon, 28 Jun 2004 07:22:23 -0400

From: "Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius"

        <adamantius.magister at verizon.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] coconut milk and rice milk

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Also sprach Sharon R. Saroff:

> I have a cooking competition coming up and I am interested in

> knowing how period coconut and rice milks are.  I have seen coconut

> milk a an ingredient in Indian recipes and occasionally in middle

> eastern recipes.  I need a substitute for yogurt because my personna

> would not use it in the same recipe as meat.  I have come up dry on

> my sources at home so far.

 

I assume (rightly or wrogly) we're delving into period Kashrut? If

so, are we talking about European or Middle Eastern Judaic practices?

 

As Doc suggested, almond milk turns up in an amazing number of

European recipes as a substitute for milk, cream, and even eggs. It

does, howeer, lack the tang of yogurt. Even the couple of European

recipes that curdle the almond milk using vinegar don't give a

sour-tasting final product. But then, almond milk is also used in

some Persian and Mughal Indian recipes even today.

 

I suspect the reason why coconut milk and rice milk never took off in

Europe (until, arguably, today) is because the former doesn't keep as

well as almond milk (coconut can get rancid fairly easily), and that

that niche can easily be filled by a more local product, even

asuming almonds aren't local to, say, Yorkshire, and for the latter,

again, there were more easily available substitutes.

 

To substitute for the tang of yogurt as it is used in places like

India, but without a dairy product, it seems like places like

tropical SE Asia (where you sometimes find obviously Indian-inspired

cookery, but in a non-dairy form, places like Myanmar), citrus juices

like lime play a large role, sometimes even in dishes with similar

names to their Indian counterparts using yogurt.

 

I guess we'd need a little more info about exactly what you're trying

to accomplish.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Fri, 19 May 2006 10:25:50 +1200

From: Adele de Maisieres <ladyadele at paradise.net.nz>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Almond Milk Question

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

tom.vincent at yahoo.com wrote:

> I'll again put out my suggestion to use Blue Diamond's packaged  

> almond milk.

 

I haven't tried the stuff (I don't think anyone sells it here), so I

don't really know what it's like, but I read the ingredients:

Purified water, almonds, tapioca starch, calcium carbonate, sea salt,

potassium citrate, carrageenan, soy lecethin, natural flavour, etc,  

etc...

 

vs

 

Adele's own almond milk ingredients:

Water, almonds.

 

The inclusion of starch, carrageenan, lecethin, salt, and flavour

basically says to me "we didn't use enough almonds to make this tasty

and creamy, so we put some other stuff in instead".

--

Adele de Maisieres

 

 

Date: Fri, 19 May 2006 10:29:28 +1200

From: Adele de Maisieres <ladyadele at paradise.net.nz>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Almond Milk Question

To: dailleurs at liripipe.com, Cooks within the SCA

        <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Anne-Marie Rousseau wrote:

<<< doesnt the packaged stuff have a ton of sugar and other impurities (such as new world vanilla) in it? if you're using it for a dessert which is going to be sweet already, you can get away with it, but as the base for a savory sauce/dish?

 

the only almond milk I've seen on the shelves here has a ton of sugar added :(

>>> 

 

Blue Diamond has a plain, unsweeted version.  It has a number of

ingredients that aren't water or almonds, but not sugar or vanilla.

 

(annoyingly, the sugar in the sweetened version is listed in the

ingredients as "dried cane juice").

--

Adele de Maisieres

 

 

Date: Thu, 18 May 2006 23:48:36 -0600

From: "Caointiarn" <caointiarn1 at bresnan.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Sausageand Almond milk

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>,

        <SilverR0se at aol.com>,  <avrealtor at prodigy.net>

 

First Renata asked:

> I will be celebrating my 25th Anniversary in the SCA this November and, I

> want to prepare a more-or->less authentic feast for my household.  No

> matter what dishes I finally choose, it is obvious that I am going to need

> a great deal of almond milk. My question is, does it freeze well so I can be

> making batches all summer long) or should I just make a huge batch as I

> need  it?

 

YES! Almond Milk freezes well.  It will separate, and look yellow, but once

thawed & shook vigorously it will be fine.  I have even used milk plastic

jugs {washed}to hold the almond milk.  Just remember to not fill it to the

top, leave room for expansion.

 

 

Date: Fri, 19 May 2006 04:56:52 -0700 (PDT)

From: <tom.vincent at yahoo.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Almond Milk Question

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Here's the URL for details on all varieties.  http://

www.bluediamond.com/shop/natural/almondBreeze32.cfm

 

The packages aren't that big (32 oz.), so they really don't have a  

ton of *anything* in them.  With 75% of the calories coming from fat,  

it's abundantly clear that they're coming from the almonds and not  

from any of the other minor ingredients.

 

Recommended.

 

Duriel

 

 

Date: Wed, 31 May 2006 19:57:00 -0400

From: Tom Vincent <Tom.Vincent at yahoo.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Almond Milk revisited

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

I thought I'd mention that at this past weekend's Alles Faire, we used

several quarts of the Blue Diamond unsweetened, unflavored Almond Milk

to prepare various dishes.

 

All of us cooks agreed that the expense of almonds and the time to make

almond milk from scratch just wasn't worth it when you're cooking for  

200.

 

Duriel

 

 

Date: Thu, 01 Jun 2006 12:14:54 +1200

From: Adele de Maisieres <ladyadele at paradise.net.nz>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Almond Milk revisited

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Daniel Myers wrote:

> Did it behave like regular almond milk?

> Anyone using it for a feast might want to take extra care - there

> might be a potential allergen issue.  The ingredients list has (among

> several other things) evaporated cane juice and soy lecithin.

 

Evaporated cane juice = sugar.   And it's not in the unsweetened  

version.

--

Adele de Maisieres

 

 

Date: Wed, 31 May 2006 20:15:29 -0400

From: Tom Vincent <Tom.Vincent at yahoo.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Almond Milk revisited

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

*Unsweetened*. It worked just fine.  Although, I must say that almond

milk is such a subtle flavor easily overwhelmed by others that I think

it simply adds richness and calories without much benefit.  I prefer

using it in dishes that would really benefit from it.

 

Duriel

 

Daniel Myers wrote:

> Did it behave like regular almond milk?

> Anyone using it for a feast might want to take extra care - there

> might be a potential allergen issue.  The ingredients list has (among

> several other things) evaporated cane juice and soy lecithin.

> - Doc

 

 

Date: Thu, 01 Jun 2006 12:27:29 +1200

From: Adele de Maisieres <ladyadele at paradise.net.nz>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Almond Milk revisited

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Daniel Myers wrote:

> D'oh!  Must have got the wrong link on the Blue Diamond web site.

> Huh.  The unsweetened one lists tapioca starch instead of the cane

> juice.

 

Hrm, I know.  It lists a number of things that are neither water nor

almonds.

--

Adele de Maisieres

 

 

Date: Wed, 28 Feb 2007 08:37:27 -0500

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] dessert onions

To: alysk at ix.netcom.com, Cooks within the SCA

        <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

This is the only one that I have found that might come close

and I suspect that it only fits depending upon what one's idea

of a sweet dish should be--

 

<snip>

 

There is also this oddball one for an Almond milk that includes onions

 

/This is an excerpt from *Le Menagier de Paris* (Janet Hinson, trans.)

The original source can be found on David Friedman's website

<http://www.daviddfriedman.com/Medieval/Cookbooks/Menagier/

Menagier.html>./

 

ALMOND MILK. Parboil and peel your almonds, then put in cold water, then

grind and soak in water in which onions have been cooked and strain

through a sieve: then fry the onions, and add a little salt, and boil on

the fire, then add the sops. And if you make almond milk for sick

people, do not add onions, and in place of the onion water to soak the

almonds as spoken of above, add and soak them in clean warm water and

boil it, and do not add salt, but lots of sugar. And if you want to make

it as a drink, strain through a sieve or through two pieces of cloth,

and lots of sugar to drink it.

 

But of course their idea of a dessert varied in a number of ways from  

ours.

 

Johnnae

 

> Stefan wrote:

>> (snip) but does anyone know of any

>> period desserts that contain onions?

 

 

Date: Tue, 22 May 2007 13:22:47 -0400

From: "Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius" <adamantius1 at verizon.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] butter from almond milk?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

On May 22, 2007, at 7:33 AM, Tasha wrote:

 

> I've previously made and used almond milk a few

> times and was intrigued to find a web site that

> said it could be churned into butter but I can't

> find instructions for making it. I've

> successfully made butter before with an electric

> mixer and I tried to do the same with the almond

> milk but all I got was frothy almond milk. How is

> butter made from almond milk?

> Eyd?s

 

Hello, Eyd?s!

 

From what I can see, the process for making "butter" from almond

milk is probably  more like making cheese from milk than it is like

making butter from milk or cream or grinding "butter" from nuts.

 

After a brief search of a couple of sources, I found these in MS S,

ff. 80r-92r (which is essentially Part III, the "Utilis Coquinario"

section, of Curye On Inglysch):

 

5 For to make crem & botere of almoundes. Tak blaunched almaundes &

bray hem wel in a morter, & tempre hem with luk water. & draw (th)

erof melk as thikke as (th)ou my(gh)t, & do it in a newe erthen pot,

& do (th)erto vynegre hett a litel. Whan (th)e melk & (th)e venegre

be put togedere perce je pot beneth (th)at (th)e licoure may renne

out, & whan it is all ronnen tak (th)at (th)at leueth in (th)e pot &

do in a fayre twayle & left it vp & doun; & whan (th)e licoure is out

clene, tak it of (th)e twayle & it is botere & creem.

 

7 Botere of almand melk. Tak (th)ikke almound melk & boyle it, & as

it boyleth cast yn a litel wyn or vynegre, & (th)an do it on a

caneuas & lat (th)e whey renne out. & an gadere it vp with (th)yn

hondes & hang it vp a myle wey, & ley it after in cold water, & serue

it forth.

 

In both cases you're mixing almond milk with acid after contriving to

warm up the aggregate mass, presumably to help the curdling process,

then draining off the clear whey. In the second recipe you're

chilling the end product before serving to firm it up, perhaps to

make the illusion more successful.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Wed, 23 May 2007 10:54:13 -0400

From: Karstyl <karstyl at gmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] butter from almond milk?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius wrote:

> On May 22, 2007, at 7:33 AM, Tasha wrote:

>> I've previously made and used almond milk a few

>> times and was intrigued to find a web site that

>> said it could be churned into butter but I can't

>> find instructions for making it. I've

>> successfully made butter before with an electric

>> mixer and I tried to do the same with the almond

>> milk but all I got was frothy almond milk. How is

>> butter made from almond milk?

>> 

>> Eyd?s

>> (finally making her first post)

> Hello, Eyd?s!

> From what I can see, the process for making "butter" from almond

> milk is probably  more like making cheese from milk than it is like

> making butter from milk or cream or grinding "butter" from nuts.

> *Snip a couple or recipes*

> In both cases you're mixing almond milk with acid after contriving to

> warm up the aggregate mass, presumably to help the curdling process,

> then draining off the clear whey. In the second recipe you're

> chilling the end product before serving to firm it up, perhaps to

> make the illusion more successful.

> Hope this helps!

> Adamantius

 

I guess I will de-lurk on this thread, as it was stared by someone doing

the same.  I have made this, and it worked rather well.  I got the

almond milk boiling, added lemon juice (any acid should work, lemon

juice was the one I had on hand,) I think I used about 1Tbs for a quart,

boiled it for a while longer, maybe 10 min. or so.  I then drained it

thru muslin, it took a while to drip, the curds are small and would go

right through a big weave or a strainer, but they did plug up the muslin

some. I had to wring it to get the last of the liquid out (a press

would also work, but I don't have one.)  Fresh and room temp it was soft

and creamy with a light almond taste, after it was chilled the texture

was like a fine-grained ricotta.  It was very yummy on bread.  Some of

the period recipes call for adding rose water, which would go very well.

 

A few points:

I would make sure the almond milk was well-strained before hand or it

could get grainy, I used the same cloth to strain the milk and cheese.

It does not melt like cheese.

It does brown a bit, but not bubbly like cheese, more like it has a

browned crust.

Rennet does not work, and annoys the housemates when left out overnight.

Just boiling the milk thickens it some, but it does not curdle the same,

I am not sure you could get a cheese-like product out of it.  But it is

yummy with chick-peas.

The quart of milk got me about 1.5 cups of cheese, but this is from

memory so the amounts are an estimate.

 

Reyni-Hrefna

 

 

Date: Thu, 13 Sep 2007 22:20:51 -0700

From: Britt <tierna.britt at gmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Almond milk dregs

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

> I'm going to be making 12 lbs of almonds into almond milk.  What  

> can you do with what is left? Does it have enough flavor to make  

> marzipan?  Some kind of cookie?

 

There's enough flavor for baked goods, but not marzipan.  I also like

to dry the remnants and grind them to powder and use them as a

thickening agent.  For modern uses I use the powdered almonds in

batter - my almond chicken is a batter of powdered almonds and enough

flour to make it sticky with an egg and maybe a bit of water as

needed. Dip pieces of chicken into it and fry.

 

The pulverized but not powdered almonds can also be added to batter

for fish or chicken where they'll add texture as well as flavor.

 

A spoonful of pulverized almonds under cupcakes or muffins before

gives a lovely surprise at the bottom, and of course the crushed nuts

can be sprinkled on a ton of things.

 

Add to salads for a little flavor and crunch.

 

And there's a medieval recipe that works well with the almond milk

leftovers. The original is from Hieatt, Constance B. and Jones, Robin

F., 'Two Anglo-Norman Culinary Collections Edited from British Library

Manuscripts Additional 32085 and Royal 12.C.xii' and I found it online

at http://recipes.chef2chef.net/recipe-archive/3/A03132.shtml

 

27. Emeles. E une friture k'ad a noun emeles. Pernez sucre e sel e

alemaundes a payn demeyne, e brauez les ensemble; e pus metez des

oefs; e pus gresse ou oile ou bure, e pernez une quilere e oignez les;

e pus pernez sus e rose les de sucre sec, &cetera. Explicet.

 

27. Emeles (almond cakes). Here is a fritter which is called emeles.

Take sugar, salt, almonds, and white bread, and grind them together;

then add eggs; then grease or oil or butter, and take a spoon and

brush them [i.e. the emeles, while they arefrying]

and then remove them and sprinkle them with dry sugar, etc.

 

 

12 pounds of almonds?  Egad, what're you going to do with (from my

experience and guesstimation) more than 6 gallons of almond milk?

 

- Teceangl

 

 

Date: Fri, 29 May 2009 16:38:34 -0400

From: "Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius" <adamantius1 at verizon.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Almond Milk

To: lilinah at earthlink.net, Cooks within the SCA

        <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

On May 29, 2009, at 3:27 PM, lilinah at earthlink.net wrote:

<<< On our local Kingdom cooking list, we're having a discussion of  

almond milk. This topic was brought up by a new cook.

 

Does one make almond milk of:

-- almonds with skin on;

-- almonds soaked overnight in cold water, skin left on;

-- almonds soaked overnight in cold water & skinned;

-- almonds blanched (dropped in boiling or simmering water & skinned;

-- purchased already blanched;

-- almonds with skin on toasted;

-- almonds with skin off toasted;

or some variation thereof. >>>

 

The short answer (what, me, give short answers???) is that thee recipe  

usually specifies details as per usage, appearance of the overall dish  

in which it is to be used, etc.

 

In general, unless stated otherwise, you want the almonds as moist as  

you can get them, as with soaking them a bit, which prevents the  

resulting milk from breaking its emulsion (to a greater extent,  

anyway). Since this is milk, it should be white, all other things  

being equal. So, in general, the ideal would be blanched almonds,  

peeled either before or after soaking. It probably depends on which  

you can get in bulk, cheaper. Whole, unblanched almonds generally are  

cheaper, and have the longest shelf life, but the bran should usually  

be removed before grinding.

 

Unless the dish is something intended to be in a russet or brown  

sauce, such as a mirrauste, le Menagier's meat tile, etc.

 

<<< How finely does one process the almonds:

-- coarsely chopped;

-- finely chopped;

-- ground into meal;

-- ground into flour;

-- purchased already chopped;

-- purchased already ground into meal;

-- purchased already ground into flour;

or some variation thereof. >>>

 

The finer, the better. Essentially, your milk is thicker and has more  

almond-ey goodness if it has more microscopic particles of almond in  

it. You can still strain out the most obvious hunks of almond dross.

 

For events, I generally a five or ten-pound bag of blanched almond  

meal from someone like Honeyville Grains, and use it for almond milk  

and marzipan. It's cheating, but only slightly, IMO.

 

<<< How do the commercial almonds milks compare to homemade,  

particularly in flavor and in texture?

I only know of two brands:

-- Pacific Naturals Organic Almond Milk

and

-- Blue Diamond Almond Breeze Almond Milk

NOTE: Both now make unsweetened almond milks, but previously only  

had sweetened. >>>

 

I get the impression that most commercial almond milks have Stuff in  

them that almonds do not contain; of course, if they're milk  

substitutes, and get added to coffee, or are used for baking or simple  

drinking, this is not a problem and users of those products may expect  

a more milky, and less nutty, product anyway. But in general, my  

experience is that you get a better almond flavor using almonds and  

water than you do from commercial milks. YMMV.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Sat, 30 May 2009 09:33:42 +1200

From: Antonia Calvo <ladyadele at paradise.net.nz>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Almond Milk

To: lilinah at earthlink.net, Cooks within the SCA

        <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

lilinah at earthlink.net wrote:

<<< Does one make almond milk of:

-- almonds with skin on; >>>

 

Yes, generally, I make almond milk out of whole, blanched, plain almonds

purchased as such

 

<<< -- almonds with skin off toasted; >>>

 

Not generally, but I have a recipe for a Catalan Mirrauste that

specifies almond milk made with toasted almonds, so I make it for that.

 

<<< How finely does one process the almonds: >>>

 

I put them in the food processor, and I run the motor until they're

about as fine as they get.  Then I start adding liquid, so they get

pureed so much as anything else.

 

<<< -- purchased already ground into meal; >>>

 

I've never done this, but I've seen it done, and I wasn;t to impressed.  

My strained almond milk looks very much like a bucket of fresh, rich,

creamy cow's milk (bar the slight colour difference).  The almond milk

I've seen made from pre-ground almonds looks, at best, like skimmed

milk, and sometimes worse-- it's very thin, and not properly white or creamy.

 

<<< How do the commercial almonds milks compare to homemade, particularly in flavor and in texture?

I only know of two brands:

-- Pacific Naturals Organic Almond Milk

and

-- Blue Diamond Almond Breeze Almond Milk >>>

 

Dunno... I'm not sure I've even seen them for sale here.

--

Antonia di Benedetto Calvo

 

 

Date: Wed, 3 Jun 2009 19:27:25 +0200

From: "Susanne Mayer" <susanne.mayer5 at chello.at>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Almond milk

To: <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

We once made Almond milk for Pudding and had whole unshelled almonds, shelled

in hot water, purried still wet in a Blender and added water as necessary,

left to stand a bit (can't remember how long). Then strained through a

cheesecloth and REALLY pressed all the liquid from it. repeat until you cant

get anything more out of the ground almonds (we used those sucked out

almonds as sauce thickener)

 

This was then used to make almond pudding: (Mondseer Kochbuch, transcript

Doris Aicholzer in "wildu machen ayn guet essen" #73 "wie man macht ain mous

von vey?l"

 

In this book  you can find 4 recipes with almond cheese, 5 with mus, 49 with

almond milk and 2 with topfen /ziger a sort of creamcheese from the 3

manuscripts the Mondsseer and dorother cookbook have both a bit more than

20, the Innsbrucker sript has only 9.

 

Just by scimming through I found some with detailed instructions, like the

ones from Cariadoc.

 

As far as I can remember we used Cariadoc recipe:

 

http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/cariadoc/recipes_introduction.html

 

Scroll down to the end of page

 

btw I  put: almond milk recipe Cariadoc in my g.... search engine and got 428

citations ;-)

 

And just for fun:

 

I just found this on the net:

 

Nut and Almondmilk recipes on

 

http://www.paleofood.com/nmilks.htm

 

Regards Katharina

 

Drachenwald

 

 

Date: Mon, 08 Jun 2009 15:35:09 -0400

From: Suey <lordhunt at gmail.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Almond Milk

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

 

I do not remember who gave a recipe for almond milk with skins still

attached. Lladonora directs that the almonds be peeled before crushing

them in a mortar. See Josep Lladonora, La Cocina Medieval, p. 158. It

has never occurred to me to leave the skins on.

 

Suey

 

 

Date: Mon, 08 Jun 2009 16:17:45 -0400

From: "Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius" <adamantius1 at verizon.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Almond Milk

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

On Jun 8, 2009, at 3:35 PM, Suey wrote:

<<< I do not remember who gave a recipe for almond milk with skins still  

attached. Lladonora directs that the almonds be peeled before  

crushing them in a mortar. See Josep Lladonora, La Cocina Medieval,  

p. 158. It has never occurred to me to leave the skins on.

Suey >>>

 

Most recipes seem to call for peeled, blanched almonds, since the  

object will be something that looks like milk.

 

However, some recipes (usually calling for a brownish, russet or  

reddish-colored sauce in the final product) call for unpeeled and/or  

unblanched, and sometimes toasted, almonds for this purpose. Most  

mirrauste recipes and le Menagier's tile of meat and crayfish come to  

mind as examples of the latter.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Sun, 22 Nov 2009 06:27:32 -0800

From: "Laura C. Minnick" <lcm at jeffnet.org>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Best way to make almond milk?

 

<<< I have read so many ways to make almond milk, both modern and medieval.

 

I'm wondering what you all think is the best way to get rich almond milk

for a Lenten recipe. I'm testing the Genestada recipe from Sent Sovi.

 

Madhavi >>>

 

I do it in the blender- the grinding part, that is. Run them until

they're mealy sort of powder, about the texture of of corn meal. The add

some water, blend until it's mixed. Then I put a cheesecloth in a

strainer that is set over a bowl, put the almond slurry in it,  then

pull the cheesecloth into a sort of bag, and twist the top to squeeze

the milk out. Do it until you can get anymore out. Put the almonds back

in the blender, add water, and do it all again, until you stop getting

'milk' out and get something about the consistency of nonfat milk.

Squeeze the almond one last time, as hard as you can. Set the almond

milk aside for an hour or so. It will settle out some, and the richest,

the 'cream' is at the top. If you want really rich almond milk, that's it.

 

My kids used to eat the leftover almond meal. It doesn't taste

particularly almondy, after having all the fat milked out. but it can be

fun to play with- a medieval sort of play dough. :-)

 

'Lainie

 

 

Date: Mon, 23 Nov 2009 08:25:47 +1300

From: Antonia Calvo <ladyadele at paradise.net.nz>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Best way to make almond milk?

 

Judith Epstein wrote:

On 22 Nov 2009, at 8:27 AM, Laura C. Minnick wrote:

<<< I do it in the blender- the grinding part, that is. Run them until they're mealy sort of powder, about the texture of of corn meal. The add some water, blend until it's mixed. >>>

 

You can also buy ground almonds. I believe Bob's Red Mill has it on their product list.

-------

 

Nix. Pre-ground almonds usually make terrible almond milk.

--

Antonia di Benedetto Calvo

 

 

Date: Mon, 23 Nov 2009 08:28:26 +1300

From: Antonia Calvo <ladyadele at paradise.net.nz>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Best way to make almond milk?

 

<<< Do you add hot water or cold? I have always used hot water in the food processor with the almonds, does cold work better?

 

I use sliced almonds because they're cheapest around here, do whole

almonds give richer milk?

 

My almond milk always looks like something between low-fat milk and

skim >>>

 

Sorry, I know this was directed at Lainie, but this is a subject I can't say enough about.

 

Whole almonds give the richest milk-- comes out looking like a pail of

very rich (not-low fat!) milk.

 

I use water that's hot but not boiling.

--

Antonia di Benedetto Calvo

 

<the end>



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