Home Page

Stefan's Florilegium

sauerkraut-msg



This document is also available in: text or RTF formats.

sauerkraut-msg – 6/27/13

 

Period sauerkraut and pickled cabbage.

 

NOTE: See also these files: cabbages-msg, fd-Germany-msg, pickled-foods-msg, salads-msg, fd-Russia-msg, fd-East-Eur-msg, vinegar-msg, compost-msg.      

 

************************************************************************

NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

   Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                         Stefan at florilegium.org

************************************************************************

 

Date: Wed, 23 Sep 1998 07:15:54 -0500

From: vjarmstrong at aristotle.net (Valoise Armstrong)

Subject: SC - Sauerkraut

 

Yesterday I was reading Bernd Roeck's _Baecker, Brot und Getreide in

Augsburg_ and I ran across a list of markets in the city in the mid-16th

century. There was one market area specifically for sauerkraut. Still

haven't found any recipes for it, but since there was a designated area for

sauerkraut merchants I wonder if, in urban areas, it wasn't a guild

acrivity.

 

Valoise

 

 

Date: Wed, 23 Sep 1998 20:42:37 -0500

From: vjarmstrong at aristotle.net (Valoise Armstrong)

Subject: Re: SC - Sauerkraut

 

Ras wrote:

>Cool! Could you write down and send the SPECIFIC reference (pub., pg. etc.).

>I've just added sauerkraut to the Oct. menu. :-) Period-like, of course, but

>it WILL be there.

 

Roeck, Bernd.  Baecker, Brot und Getreide in Augsburg. Sigmaringen: Jan

Thorbecke Verlag, 1987.

 

It's probably out of print, but I got it fairly easily through interlibrary

loan. I didn't save the ISBN, just photocopied what I needed. It's not as

interesting as it sounds at first - the subtitle translates to something

like - The history of the baking trade and the politics of supply in the

Imperial city at the time of the Thirty Year's War_. But mixed in with the

out of period and political stuff are some nice tidbits, like the food

budget for an orphange in 1572 and speculation from period sources on what

the working class ate and spent on food. There's also an appendix that

giving the Augsburg municipal baking laws from 1606.

 

It's cultural history, academic and in German, but there are some SCA

applicable parts.

 

Valoise

 

 

Date: Tue, 6 Oct 1998 18:13:07 -0500

From: allilyn at juno.com (LYN M PARKINSON)

Subject: Re: SC - Sauerkraut

 

>>I've just added sauerkraut to the Oct. menu. :-) Period-like, of

course, but  it WILL be there.

   Ras (Still hoping for a recipe but will fudge it if I have to. ;-))<<

 

If this was a guild activity, you probably aren't going to get a recipe.

It would be a 'mystery' and carefully hidden secret.  The farm wives

would have known how to make it, but they didn't write cookbooks in

period. Present day German sauerkraut is much sweeter than the

traditional USA stuff we've grown up with.  I didn't like it, being used

to the sharper, saltier taste, with lots of dill in it.  Now, some of the

Northern Germans may make it that way--I've lived in Frankfurt A/M, the

areas northeast of Nuremberg, and in Bavaria and Swabia.  

 

Basically, it's shredded cabbage pickled in salt.  It's quite acidic, try

not to use an aluminum pan, but I'm sure you know that.  The differences

in 'sauerkraut' come with the way you prepare it--adding bacon pits,

wursts, onion, wine or champagne, dill seed, caraway seed, apples, etc.

These are either/or, not all together.

 

Allison

allilyn at juno.com, Barony Marche of the Debatable Lands, Pittsburgh, PA

Kingdom of Aethelmearc

 

 

Date: Fri, 09 Oct 1998 15:28:13 EDT

From: kathleen.hogan at juno.com (Kathleen M Hogan)

Subject: Re: SC - Sauerkraut

 

On Tue, 6 Oct 1998 18:13:07 -0500 allilyn at juno.com (LYN M PARKINSON)

writes:

>>>I've just added sauerkraut to the Oct. menu. :-) Period-like, of

>course, but  it WILL be there.                  Ras (Still hoping for

>a recipe but will fudge it if I have to. ;-))<<

 

>Basically, it's shredded cabbage pickled in salt.  It's quite acidic,

>try not to use an aluminum pan, but I'm sure you know that.

 

The way my Mother learned to make  it (we lived in the Ramstein area) was

fairly simple, but takes a loooong time.  She used to layer shredded

cabbage and kosher salt in a stoneware crock (a regular dinner plate fit

inside it just to fit)...about 2" cabbage and a tb or so of salt, then

mashed it with a wooden masher until the juice came over the cabbage.

Then another layer of cabbage and salt and more mashing...continuing this

until it came to the top of the crock. She then put the plate on it with

a weight (she used a quart jar of water).  We then put it in the back of

the garage (a cool dark place) for a couple of months.  I remember one of

our neighbors complaining that it smelled like something died in the

garage (we have a paper mill here in Augusta, and when the wind blows

from the mill, it smells like Mom's sourkraut...I think I'm one of the

few people around here that actually likes the smell).  But the sourkraut

was WONDERFUL.  I can't document it as a period method, but it is

certainly simple enough to be.

 

Caitlin NicFhionghuin

House Oak & Thistle

Shire of Bordervale Keep, Atlantia

Augusta, GA

 

 

Date: Sat, 10 Oct 1998 21:49:21 -0500

From: vjarmstrong at aristotle.net (Valoise Armstrong)

Subject: SC - Two recipes with Sauerkraut

 

Who was looking for sauerkraut recipes - was that Ras? Well I just got my

hands on a copy of Marx Rumpolts' Ein New Kochbook (1581), used up a ream

of paper to photocopy the thing. I haven't had a chance to really look at

it, but I flipped through the chapter on miscellaneous prepared dishes and

found two that call for sauerkraut. There may be others, but this is a huge

book and I don't really have time to read it right now. I've substituted

modern 's' forms for the old ones and German ones. Here they are.

 

111. Saur Kraut mit einer gesottenen hennen/unnd gerauchteren Speck/ist

auch nicht boss zu essen.

 

       Sauerkraut with a boiled hen and smoked bacon is also not bad to eat.

 

117. Gehackt saures Kraut ist auch nicht boss/wenns gesotten ist/ so macht

mans ab mit saurem Raum und Butter.

 

       Chopped sauerkraut is also not bad when it is boiled, so one

prepares it with sour cream and butter.

 

I know those are pretty short on detailed instructions, but they're the

first sauerkraut recipes that I've noticed.

 

Valoise

 

 

Date: Sun, 11 Oct 1998 00:19:34 EDT

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: SC - Sauerkraut redaction-recipe

 

vjarmstrong at aristotle.net writes:

<< Chopped sauerkraut is also not bad when it is boiled, so one

prepares it with sour cream and butter.

 

I know those are pretty short on detailed instructions, but they're the

first sauerkraut recipes that I've noticed.

 

Valoise

>> 

 

Seems like some detail. Thanks Let's see what I can do with the above recipe:

 

saures Kraut mit saurem Raum und Butter (Sauerkraut with Sour Cream and

Butter)

 

1 lb sauerkraut, rinsed well and drained

1/2 stick butter

1 cup sour cream

 

Put sauerkraut in a medium pan. Add water to cover. Bring to a boil. Cover pan

with a tight fitting lid. Reduce heat to simmer and continue cooking for 20

mins. Reserving liquid, drain kraut.

 

Return kraut to pan. Add 1/2 the reserved liquid. On low heat, add butter in

small chunks stirring after each addition until melted. Repeat until all the

butter has been incorporated into the kraut. Mix sour cream into buttered

kraut. Immediately remove from heat and serve.

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Mon, 12 Oct 1998 19:07:32 EDT

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - Sauerkraut redaction-recipe

 

allilyn at juno.com writes:

<< Haven't you just washed out all the flavor?  Wish I had some sauerkraut to

try.  I'll have to get some fresh cabbage and some coarse salt and try

making my own for the period redaction attempts.>>

 

Yes, and no.  I felt that this dish was meant to be more subtle.  Period salt

had all kinds of nastiness in it and a preliminary rinsing would have been

done, IMO.  The cabbage itself without the preserving liquid has a much milder

and subtler flavor.

 

BTW, I know that a lot of people currently eat their sauerkraut cooked in it's

own juices.  This is not bad but it is another change in very recent history.

Unfortunately this practice has all but dulled the modern taste buds to the

nuances of flavor in rinsed kraut while accounting for the large number of

people who don't like this wonderful food product.

 

I think that modern manufacture's also put a recommendation to rinse their

kraut on their labels.  Almost all the early recipes that I have for using

kraut call for an initial rinsing.  Many also include apples and/or other

sweeteners to cover the sour taste.  The sour cream in the recipe adds back a

smooth tang that is superb.  Also a rinsing of the kraut falls within the

range of advice given medieval recipes regarding preliminary preparation of

other period foods which have been preserved in a salt solution.

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Tue, 13 Oct 1998 09:02:35 EDT

From: Mordonna22 at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - Sauerkraut redaction-recipe

 

allilyn at juno.com writes:

> Haven't you just washed out all the flavor?  Wish I had some saurkraut to

> try.  I'll have to get some fresh cabbage and some coarse salt and try

> making my own for the period redaction attempts.

 

As with salt cured hams, washing out the salt is necessary if homemade kraut

is to be edible to most palates.

 

Mordonna DuBois

 

 

Date: Wed, 14 Oct 1998 08:47:48 -0700 (PDT)

From: Karen <tyrca at yahoo.com>

Subject: SC - Sauerkraut OOP

 

>allilyn at juno.com writes:

>> Haven't you just washed out all the flavor?  Wish I had some saurkraut to

>> try.  I'll have to get some fresh cabbage and some coarse salt and try

>> making my own for the period redaction attempts.

 

>As with salt cured hams, washing out the salt is necessary if homemade

>kraut is to be edible to most palates.

 

>Mordonna DuBois

 

When we lived in Germany, about 8 years ago, the German Grandmother

that adopted us told me how to make saurkraut, and she was not talking

about the fresh cabbage.  She always started by rinsing to get out

some of the salt, (and if you are using canned, the taste of the can

as well).  This does not negate any of the flavor as the juice is not

the flavor agent, the kraut itself is sour.  She would then add a

tablespoon of flour, and a teaspoon of sugar, 8 juniper berries, and a

handful of caraway seeds.  The kraut would slightly thicken and

bubble, and the sugar would set off the sharp taste of the sour and

juniper without really being noticed.  I know this is [not] documentablly

period, that is just the way she showed me to make it, and that is the

way I always do.

 

Many Germans today also add white wine to it after it has been rinsed,

as it is inexpensive (there) and they all have it.  This adds a

different dimension to the flavor that I really liked.

 

Tyrca

==

Lady Tyrca Ivarsdottir

 

 

Date: Mon, 23 Oct 2000 15:24:47 -0600 (MDT)

From: grasse at mscd.edu (Martina Grasse)

Subject: SC - RE sour kraut (cooks 2716)

 

Bear wrote:

>If you are adhering to strict historical accuracy, I don't think you can

>truly document sauerkraut or pirogi, although both are probably "period."

>I've used similar undocumentable dishes for feasts where I wasn't trying for

>historical accuracy.

 

Sorry Bear, I disagree

 

Rumpolt - 1581 German (are you sick of us yet ;-) does list recipes using

'Saures Kraut'  (would quote, but he is home and I'm at work), but not being a

cookbook he gives no directions for making the kraut (one is served with

cream (or sour cream.. dont recall). (and no, it is not just cabbage because

he has several just Kraut recipes.

 

Gwen Cat

 

 

Date: Mon, 23 Oct 2000 21:35:50 EDT

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: SC - Sauer Kraut mit saurem Raum und Butter-recipe

 

jenne at mail.browser.net writes:

> Ooh ooh ooh can you quote with translations? This would be a great

> resource for E. Europe... (no, I'm not sick of Rumpolt yet!)

> --

> Jadwiga Zajaczkowa,

 

This was served at the Silver Rhyll Harvest Feast that I cooked a couple of

years ago. Good stuff. :-)

 

Sauer Kraut mit saurem Raum und Butter

Sauerkraut with Sour Cream and Butter

(from ein New Kochbock. Max Rumpolt. 1581 CE)

(Translation by Veloise Armstrong)

Redaction copyright c 2000 L. J. Spencer, Jr.

 

117. Gehackt saures Kraut ist auch nicht boss/ wenns gesotten/ ist/ so nacht

mans ab mit saurem Raum und Butter.

 

117. Chopped sauerkraut is not bad when it is boiled, so one prepares it with

sour cream and butter.

 

1 LB Saurkraut

1/2 stick Butter

1/2 cp. Sour Cream

 

Put sauerkraut into a medium pan. Barely cover with water. Boil until tender.

Drain. Stir in butter and sour cream. Serve.

 

Ras

 

 

From: "Robin Carroll-Mann" <rcmann4 at earthlink.net>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Date: Wed, 14 May 2003 18:58:58 -0400

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] 16th c German Recipes Help

 

On 14 May 2003, at 10:54, lilinah at earthlink.net wrote:

> Also, i have recipes on-line i made for the German feast i cooked for

> the Province of the Mists Boar Hunt in 2001:

> http://witch.drak.net/lilinah/2001Menu.html

[snip]

> RELISHES

> - Red Cabbage marinated in red wine vinegar, honey, caraway, anise,

> pepper - Ein Buch von Guter Speise

[snip]

 

I made the red cabbage for Mudthaw dayboard, using your redaction.  It  

Was very tasty.

 

Brighid ni Chiarain *** mka Robin Carroll-Mann

Barony of Settmour Swamp, East Kingdom

 

 

Date: Tue, 13 Sep 2005 11:32:44 -0700 (PDT)

From: Sandra J. <kieralady2 at yahoo.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] sour cabbage - german recipe

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

I am looking for a period German recipe for sourcraut.

I've found a couple of recipes that reference

saurkraut (saures Kraut) in Ein New Kochbuch and the

Preserved Cabbage (Eynngemacht Crautt), from Ein

Kochbuch aus dem Archiv des Deutschen Ordens, but not

actually anything that describes the appropriate

method to make specifically "sour cabbage".

 

Any help would be appreciated. I feel like I'm

overlooking it or something silly like that. *sigh*

 

Kind Regards,

Clara von Ulm

 

 

Date: Tue, 13 Sep 2005 17:44:42 -0700 (PDT)

From: Huette von Ahrens <ahrenshav at yahoo.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] sour cabbage - german recipe

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

The earliest mention of Sauerkraut is from 1607 in the book "Le  

Tresor di Santi" written in

1607, which describes it as being German.  There are pickled cabbage  

recipes that go back to Roman times, but they aren't quite sauerkraut.

 

So I would say that Sauerkraut is probably late period, but we just  

haven't found the recipes yet.

 

Huette

 

 

Date: Wed, 14 Sep 2005 03:10:25 -0500

From: "otsisto" <otsisto at socket.net>

Subject: RE: [Sca-cooks] sour cabbage - German recipe

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

I was told once and never got docs on it. That an English captain in the

late 1500s, mentions an observation that the Germanic nations' sailors did

not seem to suffer like English sailors of scurvy. This was attributed to

the consumption of pickled cabbage.

 

In order to get his crew to eat the pickled cabbage, he had a barrel brought

on board and had it labeled for officers only.

 

 

Date: Wed, 14 Sep 2005 09:23:08 +1200

From: Adele de Maisieres <ladyadele at paradise.net.nz>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] sour cabbage - german recipe

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Sandra J. wrote:

> I am looking for a period German recipe for sourcraut.

> I've found a couple of recipes that reference

> saurkraut (saures Kraut) in Ein New Kochbuch and the

> Preserved Cabbage (Eynngemacht Crautt), from Ein

> Kochbuch aus dem Archiv des Deutschen Ordens, but not

> actually anything that describes the appropriate

> method to make specifically "sour cabbage".

> Any help would be appreciated. I feel like I'm

> overlooking it or something silly like that. *sigh*

 

OK, there's absolutely nothing mystical about making salted, preserved

vegetables like sauerkraut.  It's just shredded vegetables and salt.

 

You will need to use only non-reactive containers and utensils for this.

 

Shred 5lbs of cabbage finely. (this is about one medium-sized white

cabbage)  Make the slices about 2mm thick.

Layer it in a large crock or stone jar with 1/4c salt.  (preferably

something tallish and narrowish-- a large preserving jar, tupperware

container, ceramic cookie jar, whatever).

 

IMPORTANT:  If you do not have exactly the right amount of cabbage, you

must increase or decrease the salt so that the proportions are the same.

Cover it lightly and leave it for a few hours-- the cabbage will produce

quite a bit of liquid.

 

Cover and weight the cabbage in such a way that it's all immersed in the

brine and protected from the outside air.  I've done this by putting a

plastic bag of cold water on top of the cabbage, but also by the simpler

method of putting a well-fitted weight on top of the cabbage and

covering the crock not-too-tightly.  Now, leave the whole thing to

ferment at room temperature for 2-6 weeks, depending on how sour you

like it.  Then keep refrigerated until it's all eaten.

 

I served this at a feast a while ago, with roast beef and freshly-baked

rye bread. It was very well received and nearly all of it got eaten.

--  

Adele de Maisieres

 

 

Date: Wed, 14 Sep 2005 09:34:44 +1200

From: Adele de Maisieres <ladyadele at paradise.net.nz>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] sour cabbage - german recipe

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Sandra J. wrote:

> I am looking for a period German recipe for sourcraut.

> I've found a couple of recipes that reference

> saurkraut (saures Kraut) in Ein New Kochbuch and the

> Preserved Cabbage (Eynngemacht Crautt), from Ein

> Kochbuch aus dem Archiv des Deutschen Ordens, but not

> actually anything that describes the appropriate

> method to make specifically "sour cabbage".

 

And the remark I meant to make earlier--  I haven't found a strictly

period recipe, either, and I don't expect that I will.  There are lots

of period references to sauerkraut, and some to the general method of

production (which is roughly: cabbage is shredded and put in barrels

with salt), but as far as I can tell, this is something made on farms,

not in professional kitchens. A period professional cook would have

bought it by the barrel, rather than made it himself.

--  

Adele de Maisieres

 

 

Date: Wed, 14 Sep 2005 05:39:00 -0700 (PDT)

From: Louise Smithson <helewyse at yahoo.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] An Italian recipe for sauerkraut? was sour

        cabbage -     german recipe

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

>>> 

So I would say that Sauerkraut is probably late period, but we just  

haven't found the recipes

yet.  Huette

<<< 

 

I figure that this will make the whole discussion more complicated. I  

came across this recipe in Scappi some time ago.  It refers to  

cabbage in salt, packed in wooden barrels or ceramic vases. It could  

easily be another salted cabbage or it could indeed be sauerkraut.  

Although one could argue that just about any cabbage stored in a  

salty liquid will become sauerkraut anyway.

 

Helewyse

 

Per far minestra di cauli cappucci stati in sale. Cap CXCVII

 

Son portati in Trevisi & in Venetia di terra Todesca cauli cappucci  

salati con salimora in vasi di terra o di legno, li quali cavati che  

son dalla salimora si lavano in più acque, & si fanno stare in molle,  

& si fanno perlessare con acqua semplice; & cavinosi dessa acqua, &  

rinfreschinosi con altre acque, & faccianosi cuocere in brodo di  

carne di vaccina grassa, spigoli daglia ammaccati, & cotti che sono  

si cavano ascuitti, & si copreno di agliata. Si possono ancho  

soffrigere con lo strutto liquefatto, & aglio, & cipollette battute  

dapoi che saranno cotti nel brodo, & si serveno con pepe, & fior di  

finocchio sopra.

 

To make a dish of headed cabbage kept in salt. Chapter 197

 

Into Trevisi and Venice is carried from Germany salted headed cabbage  

with salted liquid in vessels of ceramic or of wood. The which is  

taken from the salted liquid and washed in water and then soaked in  

water and parboiled in simple water. One takes it from this water and  

refreshes it with more water, and put it to cook in fatty beef broth  

with chopped garlic cloves, and when it is cooked one takes it out  

dry (strains it) and covers it with garlic sauce. One can also fry it  

in melted lard with garlic and chopped onions after it has been  

cooked in the broth and one serves it with pepper and ground fennel  

above.

 

 

Date: Wed, 14 Sep 2005 10:33:51 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Sour Cabbage -- notes

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Sour Cabbage Notes

 

Went looking for references to sauerkraut last night. This was before

reading this am's posts, so forgive me for being behind in those.

In Regional Cuisines of Medieval Europe: A Book of Essays.

In this collection edited by Melitta Weiss Adamson with the section on

Germany written by Adamson, I found these mentions

 

<>In talking about 16th century food in Germany, she writes Lower class

foods according to Ryff are oats, cabbage, chestnuts, beans, millet, and turnips

  Cabbage, Ryff informs the reader, is eaten daily all over

Germany, and in Bavaria sauerkraut is eaten three to four times a day as

a meal. Page 163

 

Ryffs book is Guualterus H. Rivius [Walter Ryff]. Kurtze aber vast

eigentliche nutzliche vnd in pflegung

  it dates from 1549

 

<>Adamson later on in her discussion of Daz Buch von Gutter Spise

mentions that Two recipes each contain cabbage/sauerkraut (recipes 48,

84). Page 169

 

If one checks the edition of Daz Buch von Gutter Spise that Adamson

edited, one will find that recipe 48 is a sauce recipe that ends and

some sauerkraut or turnips, anything you want.

 

<>Apparently in the 1460 cookbook written by von Maister Hans or Meister

Hans (facsimile is titled Maister Hannsen des von Wirtenburg koch) there

is a mention made to cabbage seeds being saved from cabbage worms.

Meister Hans noted I secretly noticed that you like to eat sauerkraut,

while by nature I prefer gruel

Page 176 <>

 

Lastly Adamson mentions that the 1485 Kuchenmeysterey contains some

material in the sauces section. The focus in chapter 4 is on sauces,

especially garlic sauces, mustard, electuaries, cabbage, and

sauerkraut. Page 183

 

Perhaps someone could check a copy of the Kuchenmeysterey and see what

is in this chapter. I dont have a copy at hand of this.

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Wed, 14 Sep 2005 11:32:27 -0400

From: "Jeff Gedney" <gedney1 at iconn.net>

Subject: RE: [Sca-cooks] sour cabbage - German recipe

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> I was told once and never got docs on it. That an

> English captain in the late 1500s, mentions an

> observation that the Germanic nations' sailors did

> not seem to suffer like English sailors of scurvy.

> This was attributed to the consumption of pickled

> cabbage. In order to get his crew to eat the pickled

> cabbage, he had a barrel brought on board and had it

> labeled for officers only.

 

Sounds up my alley...

I'll see what I can find...

 

But it _sounds_ apochryphal. Ship's stores were generally

closely watched and apportioned out by stewards.

Stuff listed for the captain's table would not go into

the general "messe" in the way described.

The English would eat almost anything to relieve their

boredom of the beer biscuit and salt cod/salt beef diet.

... including eskimo dog, penguin, manatee, dolphin, corn,

grass, whatever the can catch or gather that might be

concievably or even remotely edible.

 

I think if they were put ashore in Germany, after months

of eating weevily bisuit, maggoty salt beef and cod,

drinking scummy water, and smelling the gasses that

issued from the festering bilges every night as they try

to sleep, that a fresh crock of sauerkraut in a dry

German inn would seem like cheese and wine on a bed

of rose petals.

 

I seriously doubt that they would have to be coaxed into

eating any any sort of fresh food.

 

 

On scurvy:

I know that in the Elizabethan period the cause and

cure of scurvy was still widely unknown.

 

A major complication being that the modern concept of

Scurvy as a vitamin C deficiency rarely was experienced.

The period Scurvy diagnosis usually included descriptions

of symptoms associated with other vitamin deficinecies,

such as "wet" beriberi (A vitamin B1 deficiency usually

associated with the high alcohol content of the sailor's

diet), and pellagra.

There were lots of theories as to causation, yes, but the

notion of a purely dietary deficiency causing the

condition was not among them.

The most usual period theory being that the very atmosphere

of the ocean was bad for you, the very ocean was inimical

to non ocean based life. This was commonly called "malaria"

(bad air "mal+aria").

 

Once you got back on the wholesome land, the very vapors

of the good earth cured you. It was pretty well established

that some foods and medicines would help to deter the

condition at sea, but why they worked was anyone's guess,

and the exact foods and medicines recommended varied from

place to place and era to era.

 

For example, it was known that some fruits deterred scurvy,

but it was thought that the acidic nature of the foods was

the curative agency, so in his 1565 voyage, Sir John Hawkins

shipped, and distributed, his favorite remedy for scurvy,

which was a mixture of sulfuric acid, sugar and water. (and

you thought Coke was bad for the teeth!)

 

Source:

Keevil, J. J., "Medicine and the Navy: 1200-1900: Vol 1

1200-1649", E. & S. Livingstone, Edinburgh,  1957

 

Capt Elias

Dragonship Haven, East

(Stratford, CT, USA)

Apprentice in the House of Silverwing

 

 

Date: Wed, 14 Sep 2005 14:17:13 -0700 (PDT)

From: Huette von Ahrens <ahrenshav at yahoo.com>

Subject: RE: [Sca-cooks] sour cabbage - German recipe

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

And Krautsalat (coleslaw) has been mentioned in period.  In his German travel diaries from 1580, Michel de Montaigne kept a list of "dishes unfamiliar to me," in which he included, without further comment, the "cabbage salads" that were set before him in the Swabian town of Lindau on Lake Constance.  No recipes alas, but if you make your coleslaw without mayo, then you will be at least serving something potentially pre-1600.

 

Huette

 

 

Date: Thu, 15 Sep 2005 23:48:34 -0500

From: Stefan li Rous <StefanliRous at austin.rr.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] sauerkraut

To: SCA-Cooks maillist SCA-Cooks <SCA-Cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Adele de Maisieres commented:

> Louise Smithson wrote:

>> I figure that this will make the whole discussion more complicated.

>> I came across this recipe in Scappi some time ago.  It refers to

>> cabbage in salt, packed in wooden barrels or ceramic vases. It

>> could easily be another salted cabbage or it could indeed be

>> sauerkraut. Although one could argue that just about any cabbage

>> stored in a salty liquid will become sauerkraut anyway.

> I believe you have hit the nail on the head, here.  If you mix salt

> and cabbage in the right ratio, it _will_ turn into sauerkraut.

 

But I thought that sauerkraut was more than simply salted cabbage.

Isn't there some kind of fermentation going on? Isn't that where the

sour taste comes from? In which case, unless the yeasts/bacteria/

whatever are already there in/on the cabbage, there is no guarantee

that it will turn into sauerkraut, unless the needed beasties are

there in the air, the temperature is right etc.

 

If you salt the cabbage and then stick it in the refrigerator, you

get salted cabbage, right? Not sauerkraut.

 

Stefan

--------

THLord Stefan li Rous    Barony of Bryn Gwlad    Kingdom of Ansteorra

     Mark S. Harris          Austin, Texas

 

 

Date: Thu, 15 Sep 2005 22:14:30 -0700 (PDT)

From: Pat <mordonna22 at yahoo.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] sauerkraut

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Yes, if you salt the cabbage and then stick it in the fridge, it  

won't turn into sauerkraut.

However, do you remember me talking all those years ago about Auntie  

Ruth?  My ex's foster mother who taught me so much about German cooking?

Well, Auntie Ruth made several batches of Sauerkraut every year for  

more than seventy years, and never added yeast.  She'd just shred the  

cabbage, layer it with salt in a stoneware churn, stick it in the  

meathouse outside and wait a week or so.  Nothing to it.  'Course  

that meathouse had been standing for nearly a century and a half (it  

was the "new" one, built after the first one burned,) and been used  

to store ham and 'kraut for all that time, so there were probably  

plenty of yeasty beasies in residence.

 

Mordonna

 

Stefan li Rous <StefanliRous at austin.rr.com> wrote:

>>> 

  In which case, unless the yeasts/bacteria/

whatever are already there in/on the cabbage, there is no guarantee

that it will turn into sauerkraut, unless the needed beasties are

there in the air, the temperature is right etc.

 

If you salt the cabbage and then stick it in the refrigerator, you

get salted cabbage, right? Not sauerkraut.

 

Stefan

<<< 

 

Lady Anne du Bosc

known as Mordonna the Cook

Shire of Thorngill, Meridies

Mundanely, Pat Griffin of Millbrook, AL

 

 

Date: Fri, 16 Sep 2005 19:13:11 +1200

From: Adele de Maisieres <ladyadele at paradise.net.nz>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] sauerkraut

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Stefan li Rous wrote:

> But I thought that sauerkraut was more than simply salted cabbage.

> Isn't there some kind of fermentation going on? Isn't that where the

> sour taste comes from? In which case, unless the yeasts/bacteria/

> whatever are already there in/on the cabbage, there is no guarantee

> that it will turn into sauerkraut, unless the needed beasties are  

> there in the air, the temperature is right etc.

 

Yes, there's a fermentation process, but it's incredibly reliable. You

don't need to add any sort of starter culture, and it works at a wide

range of temperatures (albeit at varying speeds).

 

> If you salt the cabbage and then stick it in the refrigerator, you  

> get salted cabbage, right? Not sauerkraut.

 

I haven't tried this-- but I suspect it turns into sauerkraut

_eventually_.  If you want it _not_ to become sauerkraut, you need to up

the ratio of salt to cabbage.

--

Adele de Maisieres

 

 

Date: Fri, 16 Sep 2005 21:00:39 -0700 (PDT)

From: Holli Sicard <sicardrenfairefam at yahoo.com>

Subject: RE: [Sca-cooks] sauerkraut

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

otsisto <otsisto at socket.net> wrote:

> Where do you get kraut muckers?

> Lyse

 

I got mine from a friend of mine.  I'll ask her where she acquired  

it.  It says it was made in Germany by a company named Gartopf.  I  

did find this link:

http://www.aviva.ca/shop/products.asp?itemid=656&;catid=90

An Original HARSCH Fermentation Pot (7.5L), exactly what mine says on  

the front.

It says there is a picture coming soon, but the description is  

exactly what I have.

"Sudkeramik Fermentation Crock - Original System Harsch Natural  

Fermentation is one of the oldest known preservation methods.  Lactic  

acid bacteria ferment the vegetables and they preserve longer, have a  

pleasant acidic taste and rich contents of vitamins and minerals."

If you would like me to stake a few pics, let me know.

 

Holli

 

 

Date: Fri, 16 Sep 2005 17:18:29 -0500

From: "otsisto" <otsisto at socket.net>

Subject: RE: [Sca-cooks] sauerkraut

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

I found this

http://www.canningpantry.com/sauerkraut-crocks.html

 

Lyse

 

 

Date: Fri, 16 Sep 2005 22:10:30 -0700

From: Susan Fox <selene at earthlink.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] sauerkraut

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> otsisto <otsisto at socket.net> wrote:

> I found this

> http://www.canningpantry.com/sauerkraut-crocks.html

> Lyse

 

*sheesh*  The smallest on that page was $99 for a 5 liter crock.  The Korean

market near my old house has comparable crocks for kim chee for under $20.

 

The lesson:  shop the ethnic markets with the people who really make this

stuff at home, rather than the upscale catalogs with upscale prices for

yuppie dilettantes. I don't want to get fooled again!

 

Bluntly but honestly, as ever,

Selene Colfox

 

 

Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2005 09:19:02 +0200

From: Volker Bach <carlton_bach at yahoo.de>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] sauerkraut

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Am Samstag, 17. September 2005 07:10 schrieb Susan Fox:

> *sheesh*  The smallest on that page was $99 for a 5 liter crock.  The

> Korean market near my old house has comparable crocks for kim chee for

> under $20.

> The lesson: shop the ethnic markets with the people who really make this

> stuff at home, rather than the upscale catalogs with upscale prices for

> yuppie dilettantes.  I don't want to get fooled again!

 

True. What is even better is that you can make sauerkraut in almost any

container that is waterproof. I haven't done it yet (I live in a small

apartment and my neighbours already complain enough about the egg tempera

paints and resin varnishes), but friends and relatives of mine have done it

in crockpots, enameled cookpots, buckets, glass jars, and in one documented

case in a disused garbage bin (which I would not recommend, notwithstanding

the kraut being the best of the lot). I think wooden casks are traditionally

recommended.

 

I've got to make some this autumn

 

Giano

 

 

Date: Fri, 16 Sep 2005 19:15:33 +1200

From: Adele de Maisieres <ladyadele at paradise.net.nz>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] sauerkraut

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Pat wrote:

> Yes, if you salt the cabbage and then stick it in the fridge, it  

> won't turn into sauerkraut.

> However, do you remember me talking all those years ago about  

> Auntie Ruth? My ex's foster mother who taught me so much about  

> German cooking?

> Well, Auntie Ruth made several batches of Sauerkraut every year for  

> more than seventy years, and never added yeast.  She'd just shred  

> the cabbage, layer it with salt in a stoneware churn, stick it in  

> the meathouse outside and wait a week or so.  Nothing to it.  

> 'Course that meathouse had been standing for nearly a century and a  

> half (it was the "new" one, built after the first one burned,) and  

> been used to store ham and 'kraut for all that time, so there were  

> probably plenty of yeasty beasies in residence.

 

I do the same thing in my kitchen at home-- no century-and-a-half's

worth of anything 'round here.  At any rate, the cabbage doesn't get

left exposed to the air-- mine gets covered with clingfilm.

--

Adele de Maisieres

 

 

Date: Tue, 20 Sep 2005 08:21:12 -0700

From: "Bj Jane Tremaine" <vikinglord at cox.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] sauerkraut

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

My Grandmother keep her in a oak barrel in the root caller with a plate on

top to keep the cabbage in the brine.  I remember scraping off the mold on

top to remove the plate to get to the kraut.   Lots of penicillin in her

basement.

 

Jana

 

 

Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2009 04:07:41 -0500

From: ranvaig at columbus.rr.com

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] ginormous amounts of cabbage

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

< Apart from the remains of pots of pickled cabbage being found in the base of the Great Wall of China and elsewhere, I believe sauerkraut is mentioned in Marx Rumpolt. >

 

<< Certainly is-- I think it says something like "pig's foot with sauerkraut isn't bad". >>

 

Some sauerkraut recipes and menu items from Rumpolt.

 

Swchweine Wildpret gekocht im Pfeffer auff Vngerisch/ Ein saur kraut gekocht mit einem ger?ucherten Speck/ vnd d?rren W?rsten/ vnd auch mit ger?ucherten Capaunen vnd H?ner.

Wild boar cooked in a Pepper sauce in the Hungarian manner/ a sauerkraut cooked with smoked baon and dried sausage/ and also with smoked capons and hens.

 

Ein saur Kraut gekocht/ vnd mit ge?uchtem Speck vnnd Bratw?rsten vmblegt.

A sauerkraut cooked/ and with smoked bacon and bratwurst laid around.

 

Ein saur Kraut mit d?rren Lachs gesotten/ vnnd Backfisch/ vnd Bratfisch auff das Kraut/ alles in ein Sch?ssel angericht.

A sauerkraut cooked with dried salmon/ and backfish/ and fried fish on the kraut/ all arranged in a dish.

 

Warme Erbe? mit saurem Kraut.

Warm peas with sauerkraut.

 

Hammel 22. Karwenada von dem Hammel zu kochen. Nimm au? der Seiten die Rib von dem Hammel / und haw die Brust davon hinweg / und brauchs worzu du es haben wilt / es sei zu gr?nem oder saurem Kraut / Nimm die Riben / schneidt eine nach der andern herau? / sampt dem Fleisch / zerklopf ein segliche Rib besonder mit einer Weidorarenruck / und wenn du es wilt braten / so besprengs auf beiden seiten mit Salz / legs auf ein R??t / und brats geschwindt hinweg / begeu? mit heissen Speck / oder nimm lautere Butter. Und wenn du es wilt anrichten / so nimm ein braune saure Br?he / die wohl gepfeffert ist / gie? oben dar?ber / da? es warm auf ein Tisch kompt / Denn wenn es kalt ist / so wolt ich nicht ein Pfennig drumb geben / Und ein sollche Speise mu? man machen / wenn ein Herr be idem Tisch ist. Und wenns einer gern mit Knoblaunch ist gut und lieblich. Solche Speise kanstu braten oder sieden / oder auch wohl eind?mpfen / denn man hat nicht allzeit drei oder viererlei Fleisch.

 

22. To cook carbonados of the mutton.  Take from the side of the ribs of a mutton/ and cut the breast away from it/ and need what for you will have it/ be it green cabbage or sauerkraut/ Take the ribs/ slice one from the other/ together with the meat/ beat such a rib especially with a Weidorarenruck/ and when you will roast it/

then sprinkle on both sides with salt/ lay on a grill/ and roast swiftly away/ baste with hot bacon/ or take clean butter.  And when you will serve/ then take a brown sour stock/ that is well peppered/ pour over the top/ that it comes to the table warm/ because if it is cold/ then I will not give a penny for it/ And such a dish one has to make/ when a Lord is at the table. And when you would like it with garlic it is good and lovely.  Such dishes you can roast or boil/ or also well steam/ because one has not always three or four meats.

 

Spensaw 23. Ger?uchert oder Geselcht Spensaw ist auch nicht b??/ magst sie kalt oder warm geben/ sie ist auf beide manier gut/ Oder kochs unter gr?nem K?l/ mit saurem Kraut/ oder mit Spenat/ oder Bisenkraut/ welches man sonst R?mischen K?l nennet.

 

23. Smoked or salted pig is not also bad/ serve it cold or warm/ It is good in both manners or cook under green cabbage/ with sauerkraut or with spinach/or Bisenkraut which one otherwise calls Roman cabbage.

 

(And if anyone has a translation for Bisenkraut, I'd be glad to hear it).

 

Fasan 22.  Nim~ ein ger?ucherten Fasan/ vnd guten Speck/ der unterwachsen ist/ auch ein guten Kappaunen/ der nicht ger?uchert ist/ Nim~ den Speck/ vn~ schneidt jn gar klein/ setz jn zu mit saurem Kraut/ vnd la? wol darmit sieden/ r?r es wol mit einem h?ltzern L?ffel/ Wenn das Kraut wol gesotten ist/ so thu den Fasanen darein/ vnd den Kappaun/ la? auch siedenm mit dem Kraut/ r?r es durcheinander mit einem h?ltzern L?ffel/ so ist es ein gutes essen. Vnd ich habe es offte gekocht vor grosse Herrn/ sonderlich vor die Herrn von Osterreich.

 

Take a smoked pheasant/ and good bacon/ that is unterwachsen/ also a good capon that is not smoked/ Take the bacon and cut it very small/ set it to the fire with sauerkraut/ and it let it simmer together well/ stir it well with a wooden spoon/ When the kraut is well cooked/ then put the pheasant in it/ and the capon/ let also cook with the kraut/ stir it together with a wooden spoon/ like this it is a good food.  And I have often cooked for great lords, especially the lords of Austria.

 

Ranvaig

 

 

Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2009 23:21:18 -0600 (CST)

From: "Pixel, Goddess and Queen" <pixel at hundred-acre-wood.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] ginormous amounts of cabbage

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

< On Jan 9, 2009, at 10:12 PM, Stefan li Rous wrote:

So what are you planning on making with this ginormous amount of

cabbage? Stuffed cabbages? >

 

It's a pickled cabbage recipe from Ein Kochbuch aus dem Archiv des

Deutschen Ordens, found here:

http://www.greneboke.com/recipes/pickledcabbage.shtml. Well, that was some

of the cabbage. The rest got dressed with an olive oil/red wine

vinegar/sugar/salt/caraway seed dressing as a sort of extemporaneous

periodoid blanched cabbage salad.

 

I should remember that when doing cabbagey things for northern plains

people, that one should assume the servings are going to be very small.

Made twice as much as was necessary, as usual.

 

The lunch went swimmingly well--people seemed to be pleased with the

offering (sausage or spinach tart, the cabbage salads, cheese, apples,

shortbread, a cider mustard and a pear mustard, and lemonade), nobody

asked me for ketchup, I got a bunch of compliments which I was not

expecting, and I was able to dispose of leftovers without a problem. I had

as an able assistant a lady who just moved into town from Thescorre in

Aethelmarc, and thus got to introduce her to everyone who went through the

lunch line that I happened to know.

 

Margaret FitzWilliam

 

 

Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2009 09:54:57 +1300

From: Antonia Calvo <ladyadele at paradise.net.nz>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Sauerkraut

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Laureen Hart wrote:

<<< One source said you should keep the kraut at 65-70 degrees for the first 4-5 days so you get the correct leuconostoc started. After that time you can put it in a cooler location. At a secondary phase a second leuconostoc (iirc)

takes over and increases the acidity.

 

Has anyone here dealt with this when making kraut? I started 10 lb of

cabbage and it is on my kitchen counter right now. I would prefer to move it

to a back room that is not heated but don't want to mess it up. Most of the

recipes seemed to go directly to the root cellar or garage. >>>

 

Depends what "unheated" means in your neck of the woods.  If the area

you put it in doesn't get too cold (say, not dropping below 10-12C, it

should be fine, although the fermentation will be slow.  If it's more

like 0-10C, the fermentation will slow to a crawl and possibly even stop.

--

Antonia di Benedetto Calvo

 

 

Date: Wed, 30 Sep 2009 12:32:38 -0700

From: Susan Fox <selene at earthlink.net>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Kraut krauting

 

Oh, you will have something much sooner than that.  The batch I served

with sausages for Crown Prints Prize Tourney in July had been fermenting

no more than three weeks.  The Pear mustard, that should have been

started sooner.  It's nice NOW though.

 

Recommended reading:  WILD FERMENTATION by Sandor Ellix Katz

<www.wildfermentation.com>

 

Selene Colfox, Caid

 

On Sep 30, 2009, at 3:01 PM, Volker Bach wrote:

<<< Well, I started my first batch of sauerkraut - got a big pottery

container, shredded ten kilos of cabbage, salted it down, tamped it

in, put a bowl on top to press it and now i hope to get something

edible in a few  month's time.

 

If it works, I'll try something more ambitious next year.

 

Giano >>>

 

 

Date: Tue, 15 Dec 2009 08:02:24 -0700

From: Susan Lin <susanrlin at gmail.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Accidental sourdough,      krauting failure and

        random        stuff

 

As for the kraut - when I made it last year my instructions said to make

sure there was enough salt water to cover.  It started weeping immediately

but did not give off enough of its own juice to cover so I kept adding a

salted water mixture - something like 1/2 cups salt to 1 quart water until I

had added enough to cover the cabbage - after that it was very happy.

Sometimes "crud" grows on top of the water - just skim that off.  As long as

the kraut stays submerged I think you're okay.

 

Good luck next time.

 

On Tue, Dec 15, 2009 at 3:49 AM, Volker Bach <carlton_bach at yahoo.de> wrote:

<<< The krauting went bad. I got the right fermentation judging by the smell,

but the top grew mould. I suspect the cabbage simply didn't 'sweat' enough

water. Maybe next time I need to add extra water from the start.

 

Giano >>>

 

 

Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2013 13:52:28 -0800 (GMT-08:00)

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Service and Kraut questions from Gwen Cat

 

Gwen Cat wrote:

<<< 1) while I suspect every one knew how to make it, are there actual period (preferably German) recipes for creating sauerkraut? I know Rumpolt has recipes for cooking/serving it, but anyone write down how they made it? >>>

 

Not quite sauerkraut, but related, i suspect:

 

from Ein Buch von Guter Spise, circa 1350

translation by Alia Atlas

 

48. Ein condimentlin.

Mal k?mel und enis mit pfeffer und mit ezzige und mit honige. und mach ez gel mit saffran. und tu dar zu senf. in disem condimente maht du sulze persilien, bern und clein cumpost oder r?eben, waz du wilt.

 

48. A Condiment.

Flavor caraway seeds and anise with pepper and with vinegar and with honey. And make it gold with saffron. And add thereto mustard. In this condiment you may make sulze (pickled or marinated) parsley, and small preserved fruit and vegetables, or beets, which(ever) you want.

 

I have made this with beets, with cucumber, and with cabbage, varying the seasonings. I didn't ferment it, but it was tasty...

 

Urtatim (that's oor-tah-TEEM)

 

<the end>



Formatting copyright © Mark S. Harris (THLord Stefan li Rous).
All other copyrights are property of the original article and message authors.

Comments to the Editor: stefan at florilegium.org