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leeks-msg – 12/10/09

 

Period usage of leeks. Recipes.

 

NOTE: See also the files: root-veg-msg, mushrooms-msg, vegetables-msg,  vegetarian-msg, salads-msg, turnips-msg, onions-msg, veg-stuffed-msg.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

    Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                          Stefan at florilegium.org

************************************************************************

 

From: ddfr at best.com (David Friedman)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Leeks-- anyone got any recipies?

Date: 8 May 1996 04:54:19 GMT

 

v081lu33 at ubvms.cc.buffalo.edu wrote:

>         My housemate Angus recently came into possession of a large bag full

> of fresh wild leeks, as a result to a little jaunt into the hinterland of

> Buffalo to visit his kin (and ride their horsies!) Anyone have any good

> recipies? (Vegetarian ones?)

>

>                         --Tristan

---

Here is an old favorite of ours; you could presumably use a vegetable broth.

 

Funges

Forme of Cury p. 14/A15

 

Take Funges and pare hem clene and dyce hem. take leke and shred hym small

and do hym to see›  in gode broth. color it with safron and do ›'inne

powdo fort.  

 

1/2 lb mushrooms  1 c beef or chicken broth  1/4 t powder fort (see

introduction p.5)

1 leek   6 threads saffron 1/4 t salt

  

Wash the vegetables; slice the leek finely and dice the mushrooms. Add

saffron to the broth and bring it to a boil. Add the leek, mushrooms, and

powder fort to the broth, simmer 3-4 minutes, remove from the heat, and

serve.

 

We prefer to use beef broth, but it is also good with chicken. If you use

a canned broth, remember that some are concentrated and must be diluted

before using. Campbell's beef bouillon or chicken bouillon, for instance,

should be combined with an equal quantity of water.

 

--

And another that we have only done once:

 

Buch von Gute Speise

 

A puree with leeks.  Take white leek and cut small and mix well with good

almond milk and with rice meal and boil that well and do not oversalt.

 

As we did it, with reasonable success:

 

leeks 3 medium, 10 oz went in

almond milk: 1 c from

   almonds 1/4 c

   water 1 1/8 c

rice flour 1 T

salt 1/4 t

 

White and pale green parts of the leeks were chopped up, mixed with almond

milk and rice flour, stirred and heated 18-20 minute over medium heat,

salt added after ten minutes. Came out fine.

---

David/Cariadoc

--

ddfr at best.com

 

 

From: rfeld at ids2.idsonline.com (Becky Feld)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Leeks-- anyone got any recipies?

Date: Wed, 08 May 1996 09:33:49 -0400

Organization: Capital Area Internet Service, Inc.

 

ddfr at best.com (David Friedman) wrote:

 

> Funges

> Forme of Cury p. 14/A15

>

> Take Funges and pare hem clene and dyce hem. take leke and shred hym small

> and do hym to see›  in gode broth. color it with safron and do ›'inne

> powdo fort.  

>

> 1/2 lb mushrooms  1 c beef or chicken broth  1/4 t powder fort (see

> introduction p.5)

> 1 leek   6 threads saffron 1/4 t salt

>    

> Wash the vegetables; slice the leek finely and dice the mushrooms. Add

> saffron to the broth and bring it to a boil. Add the leek, mushrooms, and

> powder fort to the broth, simmer 3-4 minutes, remove from the heat, and

> serve.

>

> We prefer to use beef broth, but it is also good with chicken. If you use

> a canned broth, remember that some are concentrated and must be diluted

> before using. Campbell's beef bouillon or chicken bouillon, for instance,

> should be combined with an equal quantity of water.

 

Cariadoc seems to have forgotten to include the "recipe" for powder fort.

It is a spice mixture used in a number of period recipies. Different

people use different spice mixtures.  Cariadoc's recipe (from his

excellent _Miscelleny_) is: "by weight: 1 part cloves, 1 part mace, 1 part

cubebs, 7 parts cinnamon, 7 parts ginger, and 7 parts pepper, all ground."

 

I actually prefer a mixture Catarina (Angharad) uses, which is: 1/2 tsp

black pepper, 1/4 tsp white pepper, 1/4 tsp ground cinnamon, 1/4 tsp

ground cardamom, 1/4 tsp ground ginger, 1/8 tsp mace, 1/8 tsp ground

cloves.  I usually quadruple the recipe and store it in a small spice jar.

 

-Rivka

--

Becky Feld  at ->---

rfeld at ids2.idsonline.com

http://www.geopages.com/SiliconValley/2851

 

 

From: mittle at panix.com (Arval d'Espas Nord)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Leeks-- anyone got any recipies?

Date: 8 May 1996 11:43:43 -0400

Organization: PANIX Public Access Internet and Unix, NYC

 

> My housemate Angus recently came into possession of a large bag full

> of fresh wild leeks, as a result to a little jaunt into the hinterland of

> Buffalo to visit his kin (and ride their horsies!) Anyone have any good

> recipies? (Vegetarian ones?)

 

Are they true leeks or ramps (Italian wild leeks, which look like really

anemic leeks)?  

 

Ramps are a spring delicacy in NYC.  They can be steamed or sauteed with a

little butter.  If you sautee them, cut off the white bulbs and sautee them

first.  When they are nearly done (starting to turn transparent), add the

leaves, cut up into 1 inch sections.  Sauteed ramps are amazingly sweet.

 

The best non-soup recipes I've found for true leeks were published in

Cook's Illustrated magazine about eight months ago.  They suggest that

leeks be thoroughly cleaned (immersing them in water for ten minutes helps

a lot), and steamed for 7-10 minutes, until they are nearly soft.  Then

they can be grilled, roasted, or braised.  When grilled, they tasted sort

of like oniony asparagus.

===========================================================================

Arval d'Espas Nord                                         mittle at panix.com

 

 

From: jkrissw at aol.com (JkrissW)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Leeks-- anyone got any recipies?

Date: 9 May 1996 05:25:56 -0400

 

lfmdlrt at aol.com (Lfmdlrt) writes:

>You can try a recipe for Potato-Leek soup or Vichy-Soise (sp?), but this

>does call for chicken stock.  I'm sure vegetarian cookbooks have an

>alternative.

 

I have made various soups calling for chicken stock vegetarian by

substituting a vegetable stock.  One makes vegetable stock by...

surprise... boiling assorted veggies down to a spongy mass, throwing out

the sodden vegetable "carcasses", and keeping the broth.  It can be quite

tasty when using mushrooms, leeks, onions, carrots, etc. (I even used a

couple of beets once and made a borscht.)  The trick is to not be stingy

on the vegetables you put in to make the stock, and not be reluctant to

throw them out when done cooking them down.

 

Daveed of Granada, AoA, CHA

From the Barony of Lyondemere in fair Caid

mka J. Kriss White in smoggy L.A.

jkrissw at aol.com

 

 

From: v081lu33 at ubvms.cc.buffalo.edu (TRISTAN CLAIR DE LUNE/KEN MONDSCHEIN)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Leeks

Date: 8 May 1996 17:16:04 GMT

Organization: University at Buffalo

 

        As a vegetarian substitute for the beef or chicken broth that many

recipes call for, or just as a general seasoning, I use the parve stock

mix. Makes great egg drop soup, etc. Also, no one can actually tell that it's

not chicken stock. Of course, it *does* have sodium and MSG, but no fat...

        While not terribly authentic in the most rigorous sense, it, much like

a metal stake anchoring a pavillion, is something you won't notice unless

you check for it...

 

                       --Tristan

 

 

Date: Wed, 24 Sep 1997 21:48:21 +1000

From: KandL Johnston <woodrose at malvern.starway.net.au>

Subject: Re: SC - Ein Guter Spise

 

Cathy Harding wrote:

> I am going to be doing a lunch for about 14 people in a couple of weeks and

> thought I would use my latest aquisition ( a copy of ein guter spise).

> This weekend I showed the recipes to one of the persons in charge to see if

> any of the recipes appealed to her.  Her observation was that there were few

> or no recipes with vegetables (There are some no meat eaters in the group).

> My question is does anyone know of german vegetable recipes from this time

> period?

 

<snip>

 

Another is Leek Greens

 

600 g Leek whites

30 g rice flour

salt, pepper, nutmeg, basil to taste

 

Clean leeks and cut into fine rings. Mix in rice flour. Make almond milk by

mixing 75 g Almond powder, 250 ml wine, 1 tsp Almond essence, 1 tsp sugar

together very well. Pour over the leeks with the spices and stew on very low

heat until leeks are done.

 

Note: we mixed it all up, and set it aside until 20 minutes before serving so

that it went out immediately after cooking.

 

<snip>

 

I have more but out of time right now. Hope this helps.

 

Nicolette

- ---------------------------------------

Rudolf von der Drau and Nicolette Dufay

Baron and Baroness, Stormhold

 

 

Date: Fri, 7 Nov 1997 10:35:54 -0500 (EST)

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: SC - Leek dish-problem

 

<< he recipe used 2

ozs. oatmeal, 1 pint of milk, and 1 lb. leeks. It stood like cold gelled

oatmeal and was very bitter.  >>

 

IIRC, someone mentioned that you used the green portions of the leek also.

When using leeks you should ONLY use the white portion because use of the

green portion imparts a decidedly bitter taste. :-)

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Fri, 07 Nov 1997 11:01:34 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Leek dish-problem

 

LrdRas at aol.com wrote:

> IIRC, someone mentioned that you used the green portions of the leek also.

> When using leeks you should ONLY use the white portion because use of the

> green portion imparts a decidedly bitter taste. :-)

 

The pale green portions shouldn't pose too much of a problem. Basically

the tenderer and less fibrous parts of the leek, which include _some_ of

the green, are fine, as long as you don't get too close to the tip,

which is usually dry and tough, as well as bitter. I usually go about an

inch or two beyond the strictly white portion, and have no difficulites

with bitterness. In fact, I usually have people coming into the kitchen

looking for leftovers, generally without success...

 

You're right, though, since if you don't know how much of the green you

can include, it's safer to use only the white. I've always been

extremely reckless and extremely lucky with things like that. Mostly I

include it to make the color more interesting.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Fri, 7 Nov 1997 21:36:40 -0500 (EST)

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - Leek dish-problem

 

<<  I usually go about an

inch or two beyond the strictly white portion, and have no difficulites

with bitterness. In fact, I usually have people coming into the kitchen

looking for leftovers, generally without success...

  >>

 

You are indeed correct. I also leave an inch or two of the green attached. My

advise was meant to assure a more inexperienced cook would not use the leaves

which were not buried with earth during the leeching process as the leek was

growing . Oftentimes you can tell by carefully inspecting the leek where the

soil line ends and the part exposed to light begins.

 

Because of shading and other factors such as less light exposure and cooler

temperatures at the base of the plant the first couple of inches can and

should be used. But as with many other skills in the culinary arts such as

pinching, sqeezing or sniffing to determine ripeness of fruits and

vegetables, only experience and time can guarantee correct judgement.

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Mon, 5 Oct 1998 09:09:23 EDT

From: Balano1 at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - leeks recipe

 

The following from To The Kings Taste was a hit with all! No wine and we

couldn't bear to discard all the greens but it was awesome!

 

Mushrooms and Leeks - To The Kings Taste

Serves 4-6

 

8 small leeks                   1/8 tsp. saffron

3 Tbsp. butter                  1/2 tsp. minced fresh ginger

1 1/2 lbs. mushrooms, quartered Buerre Manie: 3 tsp. butter combined with 3

Tbsp. white flour

1 cup vegetable or chicken stock        Salt & Pepper

1/2 tsp. brown sugar

 

1) Wash leeks carefully and slice them into rings, discarding roots and greens

2) Sauté leeks in butter in a large heavy skillet until they begin to wilt.

Then add mushrooms and toss to coat.

3) Combine stock, sugar, saffron, ginger and pour this liquid over vegetables.

4) Simmer covered in the pot for about 2 minutes.

5) Add Buerre manie, stirring rapidly over a low flame until the liquid

thickens and vegetables are evenly glazed.

6) Add salt and pepper to taste.

 

- Sister Mary

 

 

Date: Tue, 25 May 1999 17:54:48 -0500

From: Rayne or Richard <PRIDEelectric at centuryinter.net>

Subject: Re: SC - Quick source check...

 

Ben Engelsberg wrote:

> Anyone have a reference handy documenting leeks?

 

Not sure if this is an "acceptable source" to the group (haven't been on long

enough to figure this part out), but my "History of Food" by Toussaint-Samat

says on page 69, para 4:

 

"The Allium genus includes onions and leeks (very popular in the Middle Ages) as

well as shallots, once thought to be a distinct species, Allium ascalonicum,

which was brought to Western Europe during the Crusades. In fact shallots were

known before that period, but they do not exist in the wild state; perhaps they

are a mutation of the onion."

 

Hope this helps until someone with "real knowledge" jumps in.

 

THLady Rayne

 

 

Date: Tue, 25 May 1999 20:45:55 -0400

From: snowfire at mail.snet.net

Subject: Re: SC - About Leeks

 

Ben Engelsberg wrote:

> Anyone have a reference handy documenting leeks?

 

In 640AD leeks were declared our national emblem in Wales after the Welsh victory over the Saxons.  Welsh warriors wore leeks to identify each other during the battle.  Welsh Leek (and Lamb) Stew harkens back to this time (at least).

 

To verify refer to books on Welsh history.

 

Elysant

 

 

Date: Tue, 25 May 1999 19:39:23 -0700 (MST)

From: Ben Engelsberg <bengels at chronic.lpl.arizona.edu>

Subject: SC - Leek Terrine

 

Thanks for all of the replies to my misposted leek question.

 

Since you all were nice enough to answer that misaddressed question

(Before the friends it was supposed to did, even), I'm going to share

another interesting recipe...

 

This recipe is from a nonperiod source, but I suspect that it is perfectly

period, as it uses no non-period ingredients, tools, or methods, with the

exception of some plastic wrap, for which a number of period replacements

can no doubt be found.

 

The recipe is from _Cooking at Home With a Four-Star Chef_, by

Jean-Georges Vongerichten, and Mark Bittman.  Copyright is certainly

theirs.

 

You will need:  A narrow rectangular mold, approximately the same length

as your leeks, though you can trim th eleeks down to fit. 14" long by 3"

high should work fine.

 

LEEK TERRINE

5 to 6 pounds leeks (preferably the more delicate leeks of spring)

salt and freshly ground pepper.

Any vinaigrette, or extra-virgin olive oil and lemon juice.

(Substitute Verjuice, or other sour citrus, perhaps)

 

Prep steps:

1) Set a large pot of salted water to boil.  Leaving the root ends of the

leeks intact, split the leeks almost to the root.  Trim off any hard green

part, and wash well.  Use string to tie the leeks into 4 bundles; this

will help prevent them from falling apart.  Plunge leeks into boiling

water and cook until very tender, about 20 minutes.  When done, a

thin-bladed knife will pierce them easily.

 

2) Drain the leeks and let them cool for about 5 minutes. Line your mold

(14"x3"x3") with enough plastic wrap to fold over the top.

 

3) Trim the root ends from the leeks.  If the leeks are an inch thick or

more in diameter, split them in half; if not, leave them whole.  Make one

layer of leeks with the white ends facing towards you; then one with the

white ends away from you.  Repeat, alternating directions, until all leeks

are used.  You can go about an inch over the top of the mold, but no more.

 

4) Bring the plastic wrap up over the top of the leeks, but leave an

opening for liquid to run out.  Place a flat piece of wood (or heavy

cardboard) which will fit snugly inside the mold on top of the leeks.

Place two or three custard cups or ramekins on a baking sheet with a lip,

and invert the mold so that the wood or cardboard rests directly on the

cups; you want to elevate the mold a bit over the baking sheet so the

liquid drains away from the terrine.

 

5) Chill for 24 hours.  Invert the terrine so that it is right side up.

You will note that the leeks are packed almost as solid as a brick.

 

6) Invert the mold again, this time on a cutting board; then unmold, but

leave wrapped.  Trim ragged edges, and slice.  remove plastic bits from

each portion, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and dress with

oil/vinaigrette.

 

This will keep several days, wrapped and refrigerated.

 

- ----

My comments:

 

This recipe works, apparently, because of the amazing amount of natural

gelatin (pectin?) present in leeks.  It might be interesting to

intersperce some sort of flavoring, such as dried fruit, spices, or

garlic, in with the leeks.

 

I've prepared this mundanely with excellent results.

 

Any comments on using it in period?

 

 

Date: Wed, 26 May 1999 11:42:50 CEST

From: "Christina van Tets" <cjvt at hotmail.com>

Subject: SC - leeks, tavern food and galingale

 

For non-culinary documentation of leeks, you could try the CA on gardening

(sorry, it's still in a box somewhere):  I think it gives details on early

etymology of gardens, and indicates the importance that leeks held at that,

even among the non-Welsh.  Also you could try a Germanic etymological

dictionary (that the words for garlic and chives are variants on the basic

word for leek in German and Dutch I find interesting in itself - it would

imply that the leek was in use prior to the sound shift which split Dutch

from German in about 500 AD - did the Goths use leeks??).

 

<snip of tavern food info>

 

Cairistiona

 

 

Date: Tue, 26 Oct 1999 18:55:00 EDT

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: SC - Recipe 4-Weekend of Wisdom

 

WHITE LEEK BRUET

Copyright 1999 L. J. Spencer, Jr.

>From Du Fait de Cuisine. Translated by Elizabeth Cook

(This bruet was vary well received. It is subtle yet delicious. Recommended).

Makes 8 servings.

 

TRANSLATION: To make white leeks, he who is in charge of them should arrange

that he has his leeks and slice them small and wash them very well and put to

boil. And take a good piece of salt chine of pork, and clean it very well and

put it to boil therewith; and when they are well boiled take them out onto

fair and clean tables, and let them save the broth in which they were boiled,

and let there be a good mortar full of blanched almonds, and then take the

broth in which the said leeks have boiled and draw up the almonds with it,

and if there is not enough of the said broth take beef or mutton broth -- and

take care that it is not too salty; and then afterward put your bruet to boil

in a fair and clean pot. And then take two fair and clean knives and chop

your leeks, and then take them and bray them in a mortar; and, being brayed,

put them into your broth, of almonds as much as water, to boil. And the leeks

being boiled, when it comes to the side board put your meat on fair serving

dishes and then the said broth of the said leeks put on top.

 

2 Leeks, white part only

1/4 lb. Salt pork, sliced thinly

1 cp. blanched Almonds, ground finely

Good broth (See Note)

Salt, to taste

1 cp. Almonds

1 cp. Water

 

Slice leeks into rounds. Rinse well to remove silt and sand. Put leeks into a

pot. Cover with water.

 

Rinse salt pork well. Add to leeks. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium

and continue cooking until leeks are tender and pork is cooked through.

 

Reserving stock, drain leeks. Measure reserved stock and add good broth to

make 1 qt. stock. Bring stock to a boil. Turn off heat. Mix almonds with

stock. Salt to taste.

Separate pork from leeks then using 2 knives finely chop leeks. Mash leeks in

a mortar. Stir leeks into broth.  (You can eliminate chopping if a food

processor is used for this step.)  Add leeks to stock and pour over meat. Add

almonds and water.  Simmer 20 minutes. Pour leek mixture over salt pork.

Serve.

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Thu, 28 Oct 1999 16:00:27 GMT

From: "Liam Fisher" <macdairi at hotmail.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Recipe 4-Weekend of Wisdom

 

>Ras wrote (edited):

>  WHITE LEEK BRUET

>Copyright 1999 L. J. Spencer, Jr.

>From Du Fait de Cuisine. Translated by Elizabeth Cook

>Makes 8 servings

>2 Leeks, white part only

>1/4 lb. Salt pork, sliced thinly

>1 cp. blanched Almonds, ground finely

>Good broth (See Note)

>Salt, to taste

>1 cp. Almonds

>1 cp. Water

>------------

>      I wondered what the note was for the 'good broth' and approx. how

>much did you use?

 

Good beef broth, and used enough to make the desired amount, I can't

remember exactly...enough to add flavor and still be able to taste

the leeks, really.

 

>      How are the '1 cp. Almonds' prepared? Toasted? Skinned? Slivered?

>Sliced?

>Coarsely chopped? Whole?

 

I had intended to sprinkle skinned and slivered almonds over the

bowls as they went out to the table, but at the moment of serving

I forgot about it as my mind was on the Rissoles and the torment

of the Filo dough. (I never spell that one right...) The almonds

that went into the bruet itself were ground to the best of my ability at the

time.

 

>      Overall this recipe sounds a lot like a leek and pork soup garnished

>with almonds.  Is this what you achieved?  If this was >cooked down a lot

>it would be more like leeks, pork and almonds as a >thicker 'pottage'. I

>can't tell from reading the recipe alone. Could >you please share a little

>more insight?  I'm

>really quite intrigued by this dish and would like to try making it some

>time soon.

 

well, in serving it is meant that you extract the meat from the leeks and

prepare the almonds and leek mixture separately and pour it over the cooked

salt pork.  In reading the original (which I need ANOTHER copy of as my

hotmail dumped it...can someone re-send it to me?) I had some ideas in my

head but lost them becasuse I can't review the original. I'll post more

ideas once I get a new copy.  I think Bruet were meant to be a "meat with

sauce" kind of situation.

 

I also inadvertently went a little lighter on the leeks than Ras' redaction

intended, but it still came out ok.  If you cooked it down

for a while, it would be a heavier pottage, but I don't think it was

intended as such.  I would also use more pork and leeks than this one did

and add the almonds towards the end if making a pottage from it, as I think

the almond flavor is a vital component and shouldn't be cooked away too

much.

 

Cadoc

- -*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-

Cadoc MacDairi, Mountain Confederation, ACG

 

 

Date: Tue, 29 Aug 2000 14:33:35 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - oop  -  Brewer's Casserole

 

LrdRas at aol.com wrote:

> How does one shred a leek? Lengthwise? Crosswise? IMNTK.

 

IMNTK? There's an acronym I've never seen before. I managed not to know?

 

Leeks are often split lengthwise or quartered to make it easier to

remove sand and such from between the leaves. Standard wisdom, such as

it is, involves trimming off some of the tough green leaves, rinsing and

then soaking the leek, either split or whole, depending on how you

intend to cook it, in a tall container like a coffeepot, upside-down so

gravity does the work, then rinsing again. If you've split or quartered

your leek, you can then cut your leek into one-or-two-inch lengths, then

shred those pieces lengthwise.

Adamantius

 

 

Date: 10 Mar 00 15:25:45 EST

From: Nora Siri Bock <heathentart at usa.net>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: [Re: cookbooks and leeks]

 

"Melanie Wilson" <MelanieWilson at bigfoot.com> wrote:

> >BTW, slice your leeks straight down the middle the long way, seperate the

leaves.

 

> Interesting why do you slice that way ? I slice the outer layer & remove

> only that way, chop leaves off then slice crossways.

 

> Mel

 

Leeks <at least, as they're cultivated in the U.S.> are grown in a sandy soil,

and this gets between the the layers of leaves.  Americans love tender leeks

with white bottoms <no facetious remarks, please> and we plant them much

deeper for that purpose.

 

This method also ensures that we have to wash them well, to remove all the

soil.  So we split them lengthwise, separating each leaf, wash it clean, then

chop to size.

 

The European leeks I've seen when traveling are much bigger, and more green

with less white stalk to them.

 

Nora

 

 

Date: Fri, 10 Mar 2000 15:47:13 EST

From: <LrdRas at aol.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: cookbooks and leeks

 

MelanieWilson at bigfoot.com writes:

<< Interesting why do you slice that way ? >>

 

Probably for the same reason you slice your way. To make sure that all the

sand is removed. When the root end is cut off, then the coarse green part

then sliced length wise all the pieces can be easily separated in the rinse

water and cleaned easier. After a few finishing swishes the lengths can be

picked up by the bundle and then easily sliced. cross ways. I have (and do)

slice then cross ways occasionally but find it much easier to clean and slice

the other way when dealing with large numbers of leeks.

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Fri, 10 Mar 2000 16:09:55 EST

From: <LrdRas at aol.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: [Re: cookbooks and leeks]

 

MelanieWilson at bigfoot.com writes:

<< OK so this is modern rather than historical?

Mel >>

 

Who knows? I have seen no references that I can recall that gives specific

details as to how to chop your leeks. Even if a single recipe did mention

either way it would only be documentable for that particular recipe and might

have been mentioned because it was 'unique' and needed clarifying. All in all

I really don't think we 'know' which way it was done more often. A good rule

of thumb would be to use whatever method you feel comfortable with unless the

recipe clearly indicates a specific method.

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2000 15:36:20 -0700

From: Mary Hysong <ladymari at cybertrails.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: LEEKS

 

Seton1355 at aol.com wrote:

> Why would leeks be grown differently here than in the UK?  Doesn't the plant

> have the same growing requirements no mater where it is grown?

> P

 

Sometimes plants are grown in different ways for differing end results.

They still get the same climate and soil they need, but some culteral

practices are different.  Leeks  are basically like big green onions.

But some people like a long white part on their onions and leeks and

throw away the green part. So, if thats the market demand, ones with

long white parts sell and ones with too much green don't. The white part

is because it's been shaded and doesn't contain any chlorophyll like the

parts that get sun. So if you want a long white part you plant in the

bottom of a deep trench and gradually fill the trench in as the plants

grow, thus leeks in some places have a lot of dirt in them.

 

Mairi, ATenveldt.

 

 

Date: Sun, 01 Oct 2000 11:11:12 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Easy period soups?

 

Stefan li Rous wrote:

> Okay, leeks I've seen and used a few, but which is the "tender part"?

 

The white and the pale green parts are generally more tender and less

fibrous than the dark green portions.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Mon, 29 Oct 2007 22:29:20 -0400

From: Daniel Myers <edoard at medievalcookery.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Searching for Period Italian Leek Soup recipe

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

I'm a little slow in replying, but how about this?

 

105. LEEK POTTAGE. You must take leeks, well-peeled, and washed and

cleaned the night before, set them to soak in an earthen bowl filled

with water, in the night air; and let them be this way all night

until the morning; and then give them a boil, moderately, because

they are very difficult to cook; and when they are well-boiled, press

them a great deal between two chopping blocks, and gently fry them

with the fat of good bacon; and do not cast salt upon them; and when

they are well gently fried, set them to cook in a little good broth

which is fatty; and then take almond milk and cast it in the pot and

cook it until it is quite thick; and when it is thick, taste it for

salt, and if it lacks salt cast it in; and then prepare dishes, and

[cast] upon them sugar and cinnamon.  [Libre del Coch, R. Carroll-

Mann (trans.)]

 

The others I've found all seem to call for adding fish:

 

xlv - For to make Blawnche Perrye. Take the Whyte of the lekys, an

sethe hem in a potte, an presse hem vp, and hacke hem smal on a bord.

An nym gode Almaunde Mylke, an a lytil of Rys, an do alle thes to-

gederys, an sethe an stere it wyl, an do ther-to Sugre or hony, an

dresse it yn; thanne take powderd Elys, an sethe hem in fayre Water,

and broyle hem, an kytte hem in long pecys. And ley .ij. or .iij. in

a dysshe, and putte thin (Note: Thine.) perrey in a-nother dysshe, an

serue the to dysshys to-gederys as Venysoun with Furmenty. [Two

Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books]

 

Blanche porrey. Take blanche almondes, And grinde hem, and drawe hem

with sugur water thorgh a streynour into a good stuff mylke into a

potte; and then take the white of lekes, and hew hem small, and

grynde hem in a morter with brede; and then cast al to the mylke into

the potte, and caste therto sugur and salt, and lete boyle; And seth

feyre poudrid eles in faire water ynowe, and broile hem on a gredren;

and kut hem in faire longe peces, and ley two or thre in a dissh

togidre as ye do veneson with ffurmenty, And serue it forthe. [Two

Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books]

 

Whisked (?) greens. Bring the white of leeks, chopped finely, boiled

and drained, again to the boil with wine and some water. Cook salmon

in it, and onion, well fried, and dried herring. Add saffron, pepper

and salt and let cool. [Wel ende edelike spijse, C. Muusers (trans.)]

 

Viandier is oh so helpful here as he says everyone knows how to make

leek soup, so he doesn't give a real recipe:

 

Of other small pottages. Small pottages such as greens of chard;

cabbages; turnips; leeks; veal with Yellow [Sauce]; pottages of

scallions without anything else; peas; milled, pounded or sieved

beans with or without the pod; pork intestine; soup with pork pluck

(women are mistresses of it, and each knows how to make it); and

tripes ? these I have not put in my viandier, for one knows well how

they should be eaten. [Le Viandier de Taillevent, J. Prescott (trans.)]

 

- Doc

 

<the end>



Formatting copyright © Mark S. Harris (THLord Stefan li Rous).
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