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tongue-msg – 5/15/11

 

Medieval cooking of tongue. Recipes.

 

NOTE: See also these files: organ-meats-msg, liver-msg, exotic-meats-msg, food-sources-msg, haggis-msg, sauces-msg, sausages-msg, blood-dishes-msg, Blood-Soup-art.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

   Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                         Stefan at florilegium.org

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Date: Mon, 18 Oct 1999 10:05:20 -0500

From: "Decker, Terry D." <TerryD at Health.State.OK.US>

Subject: RE: SC - Period Beet Recipes (was: summer feast)

 

> hey all from Anne-Marie

> isnt there a German medieval recipe for beets ("ein condimente" comes to

> mind)?

 

George Fugger's recipe for smoked tongue found in Sabina Welserin uses red

beet root as part of the pickling process, before smoking the tongue.  So it

wouldn't surprise me to find it used in other late German recipes.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2000 15:54:42 -0700 (MST)

From: grasse at mscd.edu (Martina Grasse)

Subject: SC - RE: digest 1935 - tongue

 

Sieggy,

Since someone asked for recipes for the tongue dish (and to get on a more

cooking related thread)

This is probably not the dish you judged because 2 of my 3 judges were

willing to taste it, and many of the populace were willing to sample.  I

received a wonderful comment from a fairly newcomer... she thanked me for

providing her with an opportunity to taste a meat (tongue) she would

otherwise not have had the chance to try, and she liked it.  Another member

of the populace came back for seconds, thirds, and got his lady to taste it

as well - yes, they did take the recipe away with them ;-)

 

This dish was entered at the past Outlands Kingdom A&S, it placed second to

my entry of 3 Hedgehogs from Maister Hansen.

 

I chose to prepare the tongue partly to show that it can be made edible, Ein

New Kochbuch has many recipes for meats that a modern mind might shy away

from, but that are really very good.  

 

(My translation and interpretation from the original German)

 

Beef tongue with apples and onions

19. Setz die Zungen zu in einem Wasser/ vnnd la? sie wol an die statt

sieden/ seuber sie au?/ vnd zeuch die Haut ab/ schel Epffel vnd Zwibel darein/

vnd hack sie klein. Nimm lauter Butter in einen Kessel/ mach sie warm/ vnd

thu die Epffel vnnd Zwibel darein/ schwei? es zimlich/ vnnd nimm ein wenig

Mehl/ gestossen Pfeffer/ geriebnen Saffran/ klein vnd grosse Rosein darein.

Nimm Rindtfleischbru:eh vnd Essig/ so wirdt es fein sa:euwerlich/ Schneidt die

Zungen voneinander/ leg sie auff ein Ro?t/ vnd breun sie auff beyden seiten

ab/ thu es in das gescharb/ vnd la? darmit sieden/ so wirdt es gut vnnd wol

geschmack.

 

19. Put the tongue into a water/ and let it simmer

till done/ clean it out/ and pull the skin off/ peel apple and onion thereto/

and chop them small.  Take clear (lauter = clear) butter in a kettle/ and

make it warm/ and

put the apple and onion therein/ sweat them rather/ and take a little

flour/ crushed pepper/ rubbed saffron/ small and large raisins thereto.

Take beef broth and vinegar/ so it becomes nice and tart/ Cut the

Tongue apart/ lay it on a rack/ and brown it on both sides/

Put that into the mixture/ and let it simmer therewith/ so it becomes good and

Well tasting.

 

1 whole beef tongue (2 1/2 - 3 lb)

1 large onion

2 bay leaves

1 t peppercorns

1 t salt

water to cover

 

Rinse the tongue, and cut off any obvious bits of fat and gristle.  Place in

a pot along with the aromatics and simmer for 3-4 hours, until a sharp knife

can be inserted easily.  Pull off the tough skin while the tongue is still

very hot (it will peel off easily now, not at all if you let it cool) then

let the tongue cool.

 

1 large onion

2 medium apples

2 T butter

1 T flour

1 t freshly ground pepper

pinch of saffron

1/4 cup raisins

3/4 cup vinegar

3/4 cup beef broth

 

Peel the apple and the onion and dice them.  In a Dutch oven or large pan

melt the butter, add the apples and onion, and let them sweat till the onion

is translucent but do not let it brown.  Sprinkle in the flour, pepper and

saffron, stirring to prevent any lumps, and let the flour cook for a few

moments to remove any raw taste. Add the raisins, broth and vinegar. Adjust

your seasonings.

 

Trim gristle and fat from the tongue, and slice it into 1/4" slices.  Arrange

the slices on a rack and roast for a few minutes to let them brown.  (Because

I do not have an open hearth with cooking grates I did this in a skillet and

it worked well.)  Add your slices into the sauce mixture and let it simmer

together till the sauce has reduced by half.

 

NOTES I realize the original says nothing about adding aromatics to the

water to help flavor the tongue. I feel this is because the author assumes

the reader to know enough about basic cooking, so he does not spell this

out. He also does not list salt in the ingredients, but in some recipes he

cautions the reader not to oversalt - even though salt was not included in

his instructions.

 

 

Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2000 09:33:40 -0500

From: collette at kricket.net (colette waters)

Subject: Re: SC - Wanted:  Period recipes for Organ Meats - particularly Heart

 

Oh I forgot the "period part" from Le Menagier de Paris

"Item, when gutting it, you first remove the dainties, which are the

c...ns{letters missing [JH], which include the flesh of the nape between

neck and shoulders, vein from the heart, liver, ect. And these dainties

are parboiled, then cooked and eaten with hot sauce."

Also

"Fresh beef tongue should be parboiled, skinned, larded and roasted, and

eaten with a cameline sauce"

Also good recipe for smoked tongue in Sabina Welserin and wonderful

headcheese in EIN NEW KOCHBUCH Rumpolt

 

Begga Elisabeth

 

 

Date: Mon, 20 Aug 2001 08:02:34 +0200

From: UlfR <parlei-sc at algonet.se>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] period beef tongue recipes

 

>That reminds me, does anyone know of period recipes for a beef tongue?

>I'm thinking about serving it at feast.

 

There is also one in forme of cury

(http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/foc/FoC147small.html). It turns out fairly

nice, but be forewarned that those who feel that "Tongue? Ick!" will not

be pleased, which might or might not be a good thing depending on how

you see it.

--

UlfR

 

 

From: "Olwen the Odd" <olwentheodd at hotmail.com>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Tongue

Date: Wed, 05 Sep 2001 20:41:22 +0000

 

While I am not at a place I could help you with recipes (I'm at work), I can

give you my opinion on how far one tongue would stretch.  IMO one large size

tongue should definately go two tables.  It is a very rich meat and one that

many diners have not tried so the chance that will happen is probably high.

Typically tongue is sliced very thin. Were I serving a sauce with it I

would probably go for a mustard type sauce.

 

Olwen

 

>Anyone know of any other "period" recipes for tongue? I'm mostly

>looking for cow's tongue, but I do have a connection to an SCA

>butcher, so i might be able to get lamb tongues or something like

>that - i want something larger than bird tongues and not pork, as it

>will be an alternative for those at the feast who don't eat pig meat.

>Also, would one cow's tongue be enough for two tables of 8 each, when

>served in the Second Course, after a Course of  Entremets, with

>another meat dish, a couple sauces, two vegetable dishes, a grain

>dish, and a few other things? Or would I need a whole tongue for each

>table? My budget for 90 people is $300 - the boned pork legs in the

>Second Course will cost around $50, chicken in the First Course will

>be between $35 & $40, and i will have one more meat dish in the First

>Course...

>Thanks,

>Anahita / Subaytila

 

 

From: "Robin Carroll-Mann" <rcmann4 at earthlink.net>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Date: Wed, 5 Sep 2001 22:34:12 -0400

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Tongue

 

On 5 Sep 2001, at 13:42, lilinah at earthlink.net wrote:

> Anyone know of any other "period" recipes for tongue? I'm mostly

> looking for cow's tongue, but I do have a connection to an SCA

> butcher, so i might be able to get lamb tongues or something like that

> - i want something larger than bird tongues and not pork, as it will

> be an alternative for those at the feast who don't eat pig meat.

 

Granado has some recipes for cow's tongue pastries -- an

empanada and another in puff pastry. They're boiled, then baked in

the pie with bacon and spices.  He also has some recipes for calf's

tongue -- stuffed with meat, cheese, bacons, eggs, and garlic, and

then roasted; and a couple of stews. I don't have time to translate

them right now, but could do so when I get back from my vacation,

if you're interested and can wait until then.

 

Brighid ni Chiarain *** mka Robin Carroll-Mann

Barony of Settmour Swamp, East Kingdom

 

 

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

Date: Fri, 7 Sep 2001 12:44:02 -0700

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Tongue in Disguise

 

I found this recipe on the Turten page in Max Rumpolt, Ein New

Kochbuch, 1581 on-line

 

20. Take a roast Ox-tongue, chop it with small black raisins,

cinnamon, sugar and egg yolks, so it is a good filling.

 

It's a filling for a pie.

 

Anahita / Subaytila

 

 

From: "Robin Carroll-Mann" <rcmann4 at earthlink.net>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Date: Sat, 6 Oct 2001 17:34:12 -0400

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Recipes: beef tongue pastries

 

Long ago, in what feels like another universe, I promised to translate

some recipes for beef tongue.  Here they are.

 

Source: Diego Granado, _Libro del Arte de Cozina_ (1599)

Translation: Lady Brighid ni Chiarain (Robin Carroll-Mann)

 

Para hazer pasteles de lengua de vaca en oxaldre

 

Tomese la lengua de la vaca fresca y hagase heruir en agua y sal, hasta

que este bien cozida, saquese de alli despues de cozida, y quitesele aquel

pellejo que tiene encima, dexese resfriar, y poluorizese con pimienta,

clauos, canela, gengibre, nuez moscada, y sal, y especias la cantidad que

quisieres.  Y tomese harina de candeal, cernida con vn cedazo claro, de

manera que no quede en el cedazo fino el saluado, y amassese con agua

fria sin sal, porque si se amassasse con agua caliente y con sal se haze

leuadura, y facilmente se quebraja, y no es tan buena, principalmente en

el verano, aunque en el inuierno quando haze grandes frios basta que el

agua aya perdido el frio, porque tan dan~oso le es el mucho frio, como el

demasiado calor.  Estando hecha la masa vayase sobando, y meneando

sobre vna mesa por espacio de media hora, hasta que tenga correa,

juntamente con estar solida.  Hagase de la dicha pasta vn suelo redondo,

alto de medio dedo, y ponganse en el tajadillas de tocino gordo, largas

de vn palmo, poluorizese el tocino y la pasta con las especias

sobredichas, y pongase encima de las tajadas la lengua con ontro tanto

de tocino por encima poluorizado con las especias, y con agua, o

verdaderamente claras de huevos batidas, se mojara la masa, harase el

ojaldre y se atapara, haziendole de forma ouada, pongase el pastel en el

horno que este caliente.  Si quisieres antes de meterle en el horno le

puedes dar el color con agua ten~ida con azafran, y porque si se da con

los hueuos toma el pan antes de tiempo color.  En estando cozido sacase

del horno, y no auiendole dado primero el color con azafran, on con los

hueuos, vntese el pastel en el punto que saliere del horno con vna

corteza de tocino que le dara el color, y esta manera de pastel hecho de

harina gruessa resiste mas al ayre que si fuesse ojaldrado con la flor de la

harina, porque el que se haze de la flor de la harina, agua tibia, sal y

gordura, estando al ayre quebraja la corteza, y no es tan vistoso, aunque

es mejor de comer el pan.  El dicho pastel se conserua frio tres dias en el

verano, y en el inuierno ocho dias.

 

Si quisieres poner la carne cruda en el pastel, quitesele el pellejo de

encima con agua caliente, y hagase estar ocho horas en vn adobo, hecho

de vinagre, sal, vino blanco, oregano, y mosto cozido, y dientes de ajos,

y pimienta molida, saquese de alli, y dexase escurrir, y atrauiessese con

tocino gordo a la larga, el qual tocino aya estado poluorizado con las

mesmas especias que diximos arriba, y pongase de la manera sobredicha

en el suelo del pastel con el tocino, y especias, aduiertiendo que a la

lengua cruda se le ha de dar mas anchura en el pastel que a la cozida,

porque la lengua sintiendo el calor hincha y leuanta la massa, y no

hallando harta massa, facilmente rompe la corteza, y assi como el pastel

comienza a leuantarse se le haga vn agujero en medio con el punzon y se

haga acabar de cozer.

 

 

To Make Pies of Cow's Tongue in Leaf-pastry

 

Take the fresh cow's tongue and boil it in water and salt, until it is well

cooked, take it out of there after it is cooked, and remove the skin which

it has on top, let it cool, and sprinkle it with pepper, cloves, cinnamon,

ginger, nutmeg, and salt, and spices in the quantity that you wish.  And

take flour from summer wheat, sifted with a light sieve, in such a manner

that nothing remains in the sieve but the bran, and mix it with cold water

without salt, because if it is mixed with hot water and salt it will become

leavened, and will easily break, and is not as good, especially in the

summer, but in the winter when the weather is very cold, it suffices that

the water should lose its chill, because too much cold is as dangerous to

it as too much heat.  When the dough is made, keep kneading it and

turning it upon a table for half an hour, until it has strands, and at the

same time has become solid.  Make from this paste a round bottom-crust,

half a finger high, and put on it little slices of fatty bacon, as long as a

palm, sprinkling the bacon and the paste with the aforementioned spices,

and put on top of the slices of tongue and equal amount of bacon,

sprinkled on top with the spices, and with water, or truly with beaten egg

whites, moisten the dough, make the leaf-pastry and seal it, making it in

an oval shape, put the pie in the hot oven.  If you wish, before putting it

in the oven you can color it with water tinted with saffron, because if it is

made with the eggs, the bread will take on color ahead of time.  It being

cooked, take it out of the oven, and if you haven't first colored it with

saffron, or with the eggs, grease the pie with a bacon rind at the moment

that it comes out of the oven, which will give it color, and this kind of pie

made with coarse flour will better resist the air than if it were made with

leaf-pastry from fine flour, because that which is made from fine flour,

tepid water, salt, and fat, will break its crust when it is in the air, and it is not as handsome, although the bread is better to eat.  This pie can be

stored cold three days in summer, and eight days in winter.

 

If you wish to put the raw meat in the pie, remove the skin on top with

hot water, and keep it for eight hours in a marinade made of vinegar, salt,

white wine, oregano, and boiled must, and cloves of garlic, and ground

pepper; take it out of there, and let it dry, cross it  lengthwise with fatty

bacon, the said bacon having been sprinkled with the same spices as we

said above, and put it in the abovementioned way on the bottom of the

pie with the bacon, and spices, taking care that the raw tongue must be

given more room in the pie than the cooked, because the tongue, when it

feels the heat, will swell and raise the dough, and if does not encounter

enough dough it will break the crust, and so as the pie begins to rise,

make a vent-hole in the middle with a pick, and let it finish cooking.

 

 

Para hazer lengua de vaca en empanada

 

Tomese la lengua fresca y medio cuezase con agua y sal, y quitesele el

pellejo y cortese a tajadas redondas, las quales se vayan atrauesando

con tocino gordo, poluorizense con pimienta, canela, clauos, gengibre, y

con sal juntamente, tengase aparejada la caxa, o suelo de la empanada

hecha de harina passada por cedazo, y amassada con agua fria, y

hueuos, y sal, y vna poca de manteca de puerco, y no ha de ser muy sutil

y delgado, y sea mas ancha de abaxo que encima, poganse en lo hondo

algunas tajadas de tocino gordo con las de la lengua encima, y agraz con

vn poco de azucar, y de las mesmas especias del capitulo passado, y

cubrase con vna tapa de la grandeza del suelo, porque si fuesse de la

grandeza de la boca no saldria sequido, y podria facilmente abrir.

Estando cubierto se le de el color con hueuos batidos, o con agua

ten~ida con azafran, y pongase a cozer en el horno, y estando cozido

siruase caliente.

 

Mas quieriendo poner la lengua cruda en el pastel, hagase la tapa del

pastel de harina bien passasa por cedazo, como de dize en el capitulo

passado, y se dexe reposar por medio quarto de hora.  Tengase la lengua

cortada a tajadas redondas limpia de su pellejo, y que aya estado en

adobo como en el capitulo passado se dixo, o salpresado con sal, y

especias, y ponganse las dichas tajadas en el pastel con otras tajadillas

de ventresca de puerco salada debaxo, y poluorizense con las mesmas

especias, y cubrase el pastel con vn pezoncillo enmedio, y cuezase en el

horno, haziendole vn agujero, y en estando casi cozido an~adasele por el

agujero vna cucharada del dicho adobo, y hagase acabar de cozer: pero a

la que se aura salpresado, en lugar de adobo se le ponga azucar, vinagre,

y zumo de naranja.

 

 

To Make Cow's Tongue in Empanada

 

Take the fresh tongue and half-cook it with water and salt, and remove

the skin and cut it in round slices, which are then crossed with fatty

bacon, sprinkle them with pepper, cinnamon, cloves, ginger and salt

together, have ready the box or bottom of the empanada, made of flour

strained through a sieve, and mixed with cold water, and eggs, and salt,

and a little pig's lard, and it does not have to very delicate and thin, and it

should be wider below than on top; put some slices of fatty bacon on the

bottom with the [slices of] tongue on top, and verjuice with a little sugar,

and the same spices from the previous chapter, and cover it with a lid the

size of the bottom (because if it were the same size as the opening it

would not come straight off), and you will be able to easily open it.

When it is covered, color it with beaten eggs, or with water tinted with

saffron, and set it to cook in the oven, and when it is cooked serve it hot.

 

But if you wish to put the raw tongue in the pie, make the lid of the pie

from flour well-sifted though a sieve, as was said in the previous chapter,

and let it rest for an eighth of an hour.  Have the tongue cut into round

slices cleaned of its skin, and it having been in marinade as was said in

the previous chapter, or salted with salt and spices, and put the said

slices in the pie with other little slices of salted pork belly underneath,

and sprinkled with the same spices, and cover the pie with a little stem in

the middle, and cook it in the oven, making a vent-hole, and when it is

almost cooked, add a spoonful of the said marinade through the vent-

hole, and let it finish cooking: but in the one that had been salted, put

sugar, vinegar, and orange juice instead of the marinade.

 

 

Translation notes:

I preserved the original spelling, except that I replaced cedillas with the

letter 'Z'.

 

"Leaf-pastry" (hojaldre) is an early form of puff pastry.

 

"Dedo" (finger) and "palmo" (palm) are archaic Spanish measurements.

A palm is roughly the width of a man's outstretched hand, or about 8.23

inches (21centimetres).  A finger is 1/12 of a palm, or .69 inch (1.75 cm.)

 

Brighid ni Chiarain *** mka Robin Carroll-Mann

Barony of Settmour Swamp, East Kingdom

rcmann4 at earthlink.net

 

 

Date: Wed, 08 Oct 2008 22:31:10 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae at mac.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Lamb's Tongue

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

<<< I picked up a couple of lamb's tongues at the butcher this morning (very

much an 'oh cool, I've never seen them before' purchase). Way back in

the dark ages I've cooked beef tongue, but never lamb's tongue (which is

about a fifth the size!). So does anyone have a Lamb's Tongue recipe

they recommend? Period recipe would be nice, but am quite happy to give

modern a whirl too.

 

Lucrezia >>>

 

Beef tongue recipes prior to 1500 appear in English under the

title longe de buf or lange beof.  One appears in the Liber Cure Cocorum.

Cindy Renfrow transcribed it into modern English as:

64. Tongues of beef.

 

Take the ox tongue and skin it well,

Seethe it, pierce it with lard each part,

You shall stud it With cloves,

Then put it to [the] fire and roast it all; [ Page 27

<http://www.pbm.com/%7Elindahl/lcc/LCC29small.html>; ]

 

With yolks of eggs baste it aye

While that it roasts, as I say [to] you.

Then take blood, that is so dear,

Boil it in fresh broth of the beef,

Pound it quite well in a mortar,

Put in fair grease, that is so clear;

Season it with very good spices withal,

And then, serve it into the hall;

To the aforesaid tongue this sauce is prepared,

Here ends our pottage [by] very good right. [End of Pottages, beginning

of Sauces]

 

http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/lcc/parallel.html#q57

 

I've not found one for lamb's tongue, but I will keep looking.

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2008 17:02:24 -0400

From: "Sharon R. Saroff" <sindara at pobox.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Lamb's Tongue

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

I have never done lamb's tongue.  However, I have an old family

recipe that I have found in an historical Jewish cookbook of

mine. It is for sweet and sour tongue.  It is traditional for the

new year, Sukkot and Purim.  I am trying to look into documentation now.

 

Sweet & Sour Tongue.

 

Boil the tongue in a pot of water to cover with some peppercorns,

whole cloves, bay leaves and juniper berries.  Cook the tongue until

it is easy to peel off the outer skin.  After the skin is peeled off,

cut into slices about 1/4" thick.

 

In another pot, place 1 cup of tomato sauce and 1/2 cup water.  Add

the juice of 1 lemon and about 2 tbs of brown sugar.  Then add 1 tsp

of ground cinnamon, 1 tbs crushed garlic and 13  crushed ginger

snaps. Cook the tongue in the sauce for about 30-45min or until the

tongue is tender.

 

I like to serve this over medium to broad egg noodles.

 

HL Sindara

 

 

Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2008 13:31:19 -0700

From: Lilinah <lilinah at earthlink.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Lamb's Tongue

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

I made the following recipe for my third feast, which was primarily German.

 

You'll need to adjust the quantities for a lamb's tongue which is

smaller than the tongue i used.

 

-----

 

Marx Rumpolt, Ein New Kochbuch

 

19. Put the tongue into a water/ and let it simmer till done/ clean

it out/ and pull the skin off/ peel apple and onion thereto/ and chop

them small. Take clear [clarified?] butter in a kettle/ and make it

warm/ and put the apple and onion therein/ sweat them rather/ and

take a little flour/ crushed pepper/ rubbed saffron/ small and large

raisins thereto. Take beef broth and vinegar/ so it becomes nice and

tart/ Cut the Tongue apart/ lay it on a rack/ and brown it on both

sides/ Put that into the mixture/ and let it simmer therewith/ so it

becomes good and Well tasting.

 

Anahita's version (i was still Anahita then - it was my second &

1/2th year in the SCA)

 

-- First Part - Preparing Tongues

 

1 eight lb cow tongue

water to cover

1 large onion

1 tsp peppercorns

1 tsp salt

2 bay leaves

 

1. Rinse tongue and cut off any obvious bits of fat and gristle.

2. Place in pot with water to cover, add aromatics. Simmer 3-4 hours,

until a sharp knife can be inserted easily.

3. Pull off the tough skin while tongue is still very hot. It peels

off easily while hot, but not at all when it's cool. If tongue should

get too cool, put it back into simmering broth for a few minutes.

This took a long time, because i'd get some peeled, then it would be

too cool, so i'd have to warm it up again, then i'd get some peeled

and it would get too cool, so i'd have to warm it up again... over

and over...

I did this the night before the feast.

4. Let peeled tongue cool.

 

-- Second Part - Making the Dish

 

20 apples, peeled and diced

10 onions, peeled and diced

2 sticks butter

white wheat flour as needed - begin with 1/2 cup.

1 TB. pepper

1/2 tsp. saffron, crumbled

2 cups white raisins

2 cups currants

beef broth, from concentrate - also use water left from boiling

tongues, with stuff skimmed off

2-1/2 cups vinegar

 

1. In deep heavy pan melt the butter, add the apples and onion, and

cook until onion is translucent but not brown.

2. Mix flour, pepper, and saffron.

3. Add flour to apples and onions, stirring to prevent lumps.

4. Let cook for a few moments to remove raw taste from flour.

5. Add raisins, currants, broth and vinegar: should be tart and a little sweet.

6. Simmer briefly to blend.

7. Cut tongue into 1/4" slices, trimming gristle and fat as necessary.

8. Brown tongue slices on grill.

9. Return tongue to sauce and let simmer until sauce reduced by half.

 

This was very tasty.

 

Note that sauce quantities are for the 8 lb tongue. It has been so

long i don't quite recall - we might have had more sauce than we

needed.

 

How much does the lamb's tongue weigh?

--

Urtatim (that's err-tah-TEEM)

the persona formerly known as Anahita

 

 

Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2008 21:15:33 -0400

From: ranvaig at columbus.rr.com

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Lamb's Tongue

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Rumpolt has three recipes for Mutton tongue. Nr 4 is very similar to the one Urtatim posted.

There are 28 Lamb recipes not yet transcribed, but I didn't see one for tongue.

 

Ranvaig

 

Hammel 3. Zungen in Zwibeln eingemacht. Nimm Zwibeln / setz sie zu in einem Wasser / und wenn sie geschelt sein / so la? sie sieden / bi? sie weich werden / und wenn sie weich sein / so streich sie durch ein H?rin Tuch / thu darnach die Zungen in dieselbige Br?he / machs an mit Pfeffer und Safran / und la? es damit sieden / so ist es auch ein gute Speise / auf Polisch gemacht / denn die Polacken essen alles gern mit Zwibeln / ist auch gut und wohl geschmack.

 

3. Tongue prepared in Onions. Take Onions/ set it to (the fire) in a water/ and when it has been peeled/ then let it simmer/ until it becomes soft/ and when it is soft/ then strain it through a hair cloth/ then do the tongue in the same stock/ mix with pepper and saffron/ and let simmer together/ like this it is also a good dish/ made in the Polish (way)/ because the Polish like to eat everything with onions/ it is also good and well tasting.

 

Hammel 4. Widerumb ein Zung auf ein ander manier zu kochen. Nimm Apfel und Zwibeln durcheinander / und hacks / und wenn sie klein gehackt sein / so schwei? die Apfel und Zwibeln in Butter / und wenns geschwei?tist / so r?r darein ein wenig wei? Mehl / so wirdt es fein dick / gie? darnach darein ein gute Rindtfleischbr?he / und ein wening Essig / da? es seurlich wirt / dz es auch nicht garzu saur ist / mach es mit Safran und Pfeffer ab / thu darein ein wenig kleine Rosein / und la? darmit auf sieden / so wirst du es erfahren / wie es so gut ist / Darnach thu die Zungen darein / wenn sie erstlich gesotten und au?geseubert ist / so ists ein gute Speise zu essen . Du kanst ein sollche Zungen auf vielerlei manier kochen / es sei wei? oder Schwarz / gelb gebraten / oder in Pasteten eingemacht.

 

4. Then again to cook a tongue in another manner.  Take apples and onions together/ and chop/ and when it is chopped small/ then sweat the apples and onions in butter/ and when it is sweated/ then stir into it a little white flour/ so it becomes nicely thick/ pour into it a good beef broth/ and a little vinegar/ that it becomes sour/ that is also not too sour/ mix it with saffron and pepper/ do into it a little small raisins/ and let it simmer together/ like this you will learn/ how it is so good/ then do the tongue in it/ when it first is cooked and cleaned/ like this it is a good dish to eat.  You can cook such a tongue in all sorts of manners/ be it white or black/ gold roasted/ or prepared in a pie.

 

Hammel 5. Geselcht oder ger?uchert Zungen die kanstu kalt geben / wenn sie gekocht sein / oder warm / kanst sie auch kochen in Pfeffer / wenn sie d?rr sein / kanst sie auch geben unter ein K?lkraut/ wenn das Kraut gr?n ist.

 

5. Cured or smoked tongue that you can give cold/ when it is cooked/ or warm/ you can also cook it in a pepper (sauce)/ if it is dry/ you can also give it under a cabbage herb/ if the herb is fresh.

 

 

Date: Thu, 2 Sep 2010 02:03:02 -0400

From: Sharon Palmer <ranvaig at columbus.rr.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Smoked and Pickled: Sources and Recipes?

 

<<< A third approach is smoking. One can get hard

sausages that keep without refrigeration,

although most of them have pork, making them

unsuited to my (muslim) persona. Does anyone

have sources for smoked meat or fish that will

keep? Most modern smoked food seems to be smoked

only for flavor, and not enough for preservation. >>>

 

This recipe from Rumpolt that describe smoking

meat to be kept.  (Several others describe

smoking meat that is then cooked/served

immediately).

 

Ochsen 11. Smoked stuffed tongue. Take a raw

Tongue and cut the meat out from the Skin/ slice

meat of the ox/ that is not fat/ also Pig meat

that is well softened (cooked to jelly?)/ one so

much as the other nicely small/ and that no water

comes in/ grind salt in a mortar/ and beat a

little pepper/ and take twice so much salt as

pepper/ and rub it with the hands/ before you it

stuff/ put it then into the tongues/ and tie it

tightly/ dont hang it in the chimney/ but in

smoke where no heat comes/ let it hang in there a

week or four/ like this the inside is nicely red/

and keep it for a year or two/ put not make in

summer but instead in the winter when it is cold.

And when you wish to eat it/ then let boil an

hour or two/ pull out/ and let become cold/ and

when you it wish to slice it/ then pull the skin

off/ as then you will see if you filled it firmly

or not. If you it filled that it so that it is

firm so let it be sliced/ if it is not hard/ then

give it whole on a table/ like this it is a good

meal.

 

Rumpolt also mentions these smoked foods, but doesn't give directions:

bacon (Speck), meat (Fleisch), goose (Gaen?),

sturgeon (Stoer) , capon, pork (Sp?nsaw), venison

tongue (Hirsch Zungen.), pork sausage (Schweinen

W?rst.), salmon (Salm), pheasant (Fasan), tongue

(Zung, beef (Rindtfleisch), veal (Kalbfleisch),

calves feet (K?lbernfue?), mutton feet (Fue? von

dem Hammel), rabbit (K?niglein), trout (Foren).

pike liver (Hechten Leber), pike (Hecht), carp

(Karpffen), lamprey eel (Neunaugen), mutton

(Hammelfleisch), chicken (Hennen), turnips

(Stickelruben), whitefish (Renken)

 

Ranvaig

 

 

Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2011 16:11:26 -0800

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Tongue, was Organ meats

 

Ana wrote:

<<< I ate tongue in Montevideo as well, Fabulous, cooked, cold and

soaked in milk, oil, vinegar and garlic. >>>

 

Angharad replied:

<<< Tongue was very common in the UK when I was a child. We used to eat it cold

and sliced like ham. In fact you bought it from the deli counter the same

way. I have the impression it was supposed to be ox tongue, but it occurs to

me that oxen were probably not so common in the 70's so it was probably

beef. >>>

 

And Randell added:

> We had tongue when I was a child as well.

SNIP

 

Beef tongue was pretty common in the Jewish delis my family

frequented when i was little (Ruby's in Highland Park; Ruby was no

woman, his family name was Rubenstein). I think only my dad ordered

it, but i ate some, and liked it!

 

I served a very tasty German tongue recipe (1 tongue for about 80

diners) at the third feast i ever cooked, my German based feast.

Cooking and prepping the tongue took hours (i did it at home before

the feast).

 

Tongue

Marx Rumpolt, Ein New Kochbuch

 

19. Put the tongue into a water/ and let it simmer till done/ clean

it out/ and pull the skin off/ peel apple and onion thereto/ and chop

them small. Take clarified butter in a kettle/ and make it warm/ and

put the apple and onion therein/ sweat them rather/ and take a little

flour/ crushed pepper/ rubbed saffron/ small and large raisins

thereto. Take beef broth and vinegar/ so it becomes nice and tart/

Cut the Tongue apart/ lay it on a rack/ and brown it on both sides/

Put that into the mixture/ and let it simmer therewith/ so it becomes

good and Well tasting.

 

Preparing Tongues

(did at home)

 

one 8-lb cow tongue

water to cover

 

1. Rinse tongue and cut off any obvious bits of fat and gristle.

2. Put it in pot with water to cover and simmer 3-4 hours, or until a

sharp knife can be inserted easily.

3. Pull off the tough skin while tongue is still very hot. It will

peel off fairly easily while hot, but not at all once it cools. When

the tongue gets too cool, put it back into simmering broth for a

while to warm it up. This peeling and re-warming step took a long

time and my poor little fingertips were rather sore :)

4. Let peeled tongue cool.

 

Making the Dish

(did on site)

 

20 apples, peeled and diced

10 onions, peeled and diced

2 sticks butter, clarified

white wheat flour as needed - begin with 1/2 cup.

1 TB. pepper

1/2 tsp. saffron, crumbled

2 cups white raisins

2 cups Zante currants

water left from boiling tongue with scum removed, supplement with

beef broth, as needed

2-1/2 cups vinegar

 

1. In deep heavy pan melt butter, add apples and onion, and cook

until onions are translucent but not brown.

2. Mix flour, pepper, and saffron.

3. Add flour to apples and onions, stirring to prevent lumps.

4. Let cook for a few moments to remove raw taste from flour.

5. Add raisins, currants, broth and vinegar: flavor should be tart

and a little sweet.

6. Simmer briefly to blend.

7. We cut tongue into 1/4" slices, trimming gristle and fat as

necessary. I would have liked it better thinner, but this was what

was practicable.

8. Brown tongue slices on grill. (the stove at that site has a flat

grilling surface)

9. Return tongue to sauce and let simmer until sauce reduced by half.

 

Note: i used white raisins for visual interest and to differentiate

them from the dark little raisins of Corinth/currants.

 

The course the tongue was in consisted of:

 

* Pork Loins roasted with garlic, and served with an array of SAUCES:

..... Swallenberg Sauce - white wine, honey, ginger, pepper, garlic -

Ein Buch von Guter Spise, circa 1350 c.

..... Bitter Seville Orange Sauce with cinnamon, sugar, rosewater -

Marx Rumpolt, Ein Neu Kochbuch, German, 1581

..... Horseradish Sauce with ground almonds and white wine - Das

Kochbuch des Meisters Eberhard, 15th C.

..... A Sauce for Venison or Pig - white wine, cherry syrup,

Lebkuchen, apples, almonds, cloves, cinnamon, ginger, pepper,

currants, raisins, vinegar - Ein Kochbuch von Sabina Welserin, c. 1553

 

* Spinach with bacon, sugar, currants, pepper, ginger - Marx Rumpolt,

Ein Neu Kochbuch, German, 1581

* Beef Tongue - sliced and simmered in a sauce of apples, onion,

pepper, saffron, raisins, beef broth, vinegar - Marx Rumpolt, Ein Neu

Kochbuch, German, 1581

* Char de Wardon - Pears (wardons) cooked in white wine, pureed with

sugar, honey, cinnamon, egg yolks, ginger - 15th C. English

* Lentils - cooked with broth, onion, garlic, green herbs, bacon -

Marx Rumpolt, Ein Neu Kochbuch, German, 1581

--

Urtatim [that's err-tah-TEEM]

the persona formerly known as Anahita

 

<the end>



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