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organ-meats-msg – 9/22/11

 

Medieval cooking of organ meats. Livers, kidneys, hearts, testicles, brains, penises, lungs. Recipes.

 

NOTE: See also these files: liver-msg, exotic-meats-msg, food-sources-msg, haggis-msg, sauces-msg, sausages-msg, blood-dishes-msg, Blood-Soup-art.

 

KEYWORDS: organ meats kidney liver pate heart brain testicles penis udder medieval SCA recipe

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

   Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                         Stefan at florilegium.org

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Date: Sat, 9 May 1998 18:16:18 EDT

From: LrdRas <LrdRas at aol.com>

Subject: SC - Bourneys- A Redaction

 

This the period-like recipe I used for the Bear Heart at EK Crown which I know

you've all been waiting for. ;-)

 

Original:

Bourneys

Take pipes, hertes, neres, myltes, and of the rybbes of the Swynw, or elles

take (if thou wilt) Mallard or Goos, and choppe hem small, and then parboile

it in faire water, and take it vp, and pike it clene, and putte into a potta,

and cast thereto ale ynough. Sauge, Salt, and lete boile right ynowe, and then

serue it forth.

 

Translation:

Take lungs, hearts, ears, spleens, and of the ribs of swine, or else take  (if

you will) mallard or goose, and chop them small, and then parboile it in clean

water, and then take it up, and pick it clean, and put into a pot, and cast

thereto ale enough, sage, salt, and let it boil right enough, and then serve

it forth.

 

Redaction (Period-like adaptation):

Bourneys

(copyright 1998, L.J. Spencer, Jr.)

 

1 bear heart

12 sage leaves

1 tsp salt

Ale to cover

 

Cover heart with water. Boil for 15 minutes, removing scum as it forms. Remove

heart from water. Cut into bite-size pieces. Put heart pieces into a small

pot. Add sage. Add ale to cover and salt. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to

simmer. simmer until heart is tender. Serve.

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Mon, 27 Jul 1998 23:47:57 -0700

From: "Anne-Marie Rousseau" <acrouss at gte.net>

Subject: Re: SC - testicle recipes and sauces

 

Hi all from Anne-Marie

We are asked:

> There are recipes for Testicles!!!???? and sauces too!?!!?!?

> (And I always thought you had to eat them raw... the things people don't

> tell you...)

> Genevia

 

I enjoy the "Red Deer Testicles in Hunting Season" from Taillevent. We do

it with the "oysters" from chicken backs, and I've been meaning to try it

with real testicles, just to be able to compare texture, etc.

 

Its a spicy and piquant broth that offsets the meat bits rather nicely. Try

it!

- --AM

 

 

Date: Mon, 17 Aug 1998 19:59:49 EDT

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - offal?

 

Seton1355 at aol.com writes:

<< Excuse me, but what is offal? >>

 

'Offal' includes the liver, brains, spleen, thyroid, intestines, brains,

lungs, stomach, testicles, penis, heart, womb and kidneys of an animal.

 

Sometimes it also is used to refer to parts of the animal such as the tongue,

eyes, ears, noses, cheeks, etc. although this usage is rare. Another term used

which may or may not include offal is 'specialty meats'.

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Thu, 4 Dec 1997 17:56:41 EST

From: LrdRas <LrdRas at aol.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Re: SC Oysters getting way OT

 

<< On the other hand there are 'farm oysters'. This little

delicacy, described by Roald Dahl in _My Uncle Oswald_ comes in pairs,

two to each male lamb.  >>

 

They have a flavor slightly reminiscent of liver and a texture not unlike

sweet breads. I will eat them if served but did not find them particularly

memorable enough to seek them out.

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Thu, 04 Dec 1997 09:33:37 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: SC - Re: Testicles

 

Par Leijonhufvud wrote:

> Anyone know of a period recipie? I've had these fried, more or less

> straight of the lamb, but with the recent years things have changed

> (i.e. immigration form other parts of the world) such that it might be

> possible to obtain enough of these to serve at a feast...

 

I don't recall having seen medieval recipes that refer specifically to

testicles. There are a few Roman recipes for various elaborate mixed

stews and patinae that call for capon testicles, IIRC. Somewhere along

the line I have seen recipes for pig's or lamb's fry, but as I recall,

it wasn't immediately clear whether the main ingredient was testicles or

unborn, fetal animals.

 

There are some late-and/or-post-period recipes (the ones I have seen are

English, but I suspect similar ones can be found in sources from other

countries, particularly France and Spain), again calling for various

assortments of "dainties", such as cock's combs, capon brains, capon

testicles, sweetbreads, etc., to be used in quelcechoses (a.k.a.

kickshaws) and oleos.

 

FWIW, you may well be able to find testicles in meat packing plants for

those animals corresponding to the type of animal whose

testicles...well, you get the idea, I'm sure. This can only get more

confusing. In other words, I know you can get capon and/or turkey

testicles, usually frozen in bulk, from commercial poultry packing

plants. I have an Asian market in my neighborhood that sells them in

little plastic trays, like ground beef. For all I know, a similar

situation may exist in the case of lamb. For larger animals like steer,

you won't find testicles because they have been removed in a different

way, before slaughter, and are effectively destroyed. But then I doubt

there's much of a culinary market for testicles you have to carve to

serve, anyway.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Sun, 7 Dec 1997 10:23:42 -0600 (CST)

From: alysk at ix.netcom.com (Elise Fleming )

Subject: SC - Finishing the "Bull"

 

Greetings! Well, we have certainly made more-than-enough use of one

part of the bull.  Petits Propos Culinaires printed an article in 1987

entitled "Udder and Other Extremeties: Recipes from the Jews of Yemen"

by Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett.  She included a recipe for udder and

one called "Geed" which I give you here.

 

Geed (penis of ox or bull)

 

500 grams penis               black pepper

1 tomato, chopped             cumin

1 onion chopped               saffron

cloves of garlic              salt

coriander

 

Scald the penis and clean it.  Boil 10 minutes, remove and slice.

Brown the onion, garlic, coriander in oil.  Add penis and fry.  Mix

(and add) chopped tomato, pepper, cumin, saffron and salt.  cover the

pot. Cook over low flame 2 hours, adding a little water from time to

time to prevent burning.  Serve hot.  Season with hilbeh.

 

Hilbeh is a mixture of ground fenugreek seeds that have been soaked in

water for two hours, drained, mixed with tomato puree and a little zhuq

(a spicy mixture of ground black pepper,caraway seed, cardamom, dried

red peppers, garlic, and fresh coriander)."

 

 

Date: Tue, 17 Mar 1998 00:32:10 GMT

From: korny at zikzak.net (Kornelis Sietsma)

Subject: SC - Serving brains...

 

I was browsing for recipes the other day, and found an interesting looking

recipe for a dish that included brains as a primary ingredient.  (The

recipe is from "Daz Buoch von Guoter Spise", and looks very cute - brains,

apples, flour and eggs, mixed together and roasted on a spit).

 

Now I was fed brains (fried in butter - yuum) as a child, and consider them

fairly weird, but very tasty.  However, everyone I've described this recipe

to has said "Yuck! no-one will eat *that*"...

 

What are others' experiences in serving unpopular food such as this at

feasts? I am still very tempted to serve it as a side dish - there must be

*some* people brave enough to try it.

 

- -Korny (who likes snails and chicken feet as well :)

- --

William Bekwith MKA Kornelis Sietsma | http://zikzak.net/~korny

 

 

Date: Tue, 17 Mar 1998 17:31:51 EST

From: aldyth at juno.com (Deborah J Hammons)

Subject: Re: SC - Serving brains...

 

One of the first Hunters Feasts I ever cooked, a large quantity of

rainbow trout was donated.  I cooked it whole, (cleaned) with the head

on. Many of the guests expressed dismay that they could not eat anything

that was still looking at them.  For that feast, if someone objected to

the heads, the servers brought them back to the kitchen and we took care

of it.  A few feasts with fish have come and gone.  The most memorable

was when we appointed one of the servers as the "executioner" so to

speak. The trout were offered to each guest, with the disclaimer, "Head

on or head off?"  If the head off was preferred, the executioner was

called, and with a spiffy little guilottine (sp) offed the head right

there at the table.  Entertaining as well as filling.

 

Aldyth

aldyth at juno.com

 

 

Date: Tue, 28 Jul 1998 23:49:04 EDT

From: korrin.daardain at juno.com (Korrin S DaArdain)

Subject: Re: SC - Garbage

 

There is a recipe in Cariadocís Miscellany on Garbage.

 

       Garbage

       From Cariadocís Miscellany, Copyright © by David Friedman, 1988,

1990, 1992.

_     Two Fifteenth Century

       Take faire Garbage, chikenes hedes, ffete, lyvers, And gysers,

and wassh hem clene; caste hem into a faire potte, And caste fressh broth

of Beef, powder of Peper, Canell, Clowes, Maces, Parcely and Sauge myced

small; then take brede, stepe hit in + e same brothe, Drawe hit thorgh a

streynour, cast thereto, And lete boyle ynowe; caste there-to pouder

ginger, vergeous, salt, And a litull Safferon, And serve hit forthe.

       1 lb chicken livers 1/2 c fresh parsley, packed down

       1 lb chicken gizzards

       1 t fresh sage = 6 medium

       10.5 oz can conc. beef broth leaves

       1 can water

       3 1/2 oz bread = 2 slices homemade

       1/8 t pepper

       1/4 t ginger

       1/2 t cinnamon

       3 T verjuice

       1/8 t cloves

       1/2 t salt

       1/4 t mace

       10 threads saffron

       Cut up gizzards to remove the thin bits of gristle connecting the

lumps of meat. Wash and chop parsley and sage. Put broth, meat, herbs,

pepper, cinnamon, mace and cloves into a pot and bring to a boil. Simmer

uncovered 1 hour 10 minutes. About 15 minutes before it is done

simmering, remove about 3/4 cup of the broth and tear up the bread into

it; let soak briefly and mash thoroughly with a mortar and pestle. Put

back into pot, bring back to a boil and cook, stirring, about 5 minutes,

add remaining ingredients and cook a couple of minutes, stirring, and

serve.

 

Korrin S. DaArdain

Kingdom of An Tir.

Korrin.DaArdain at Juno.com

 

 

Date: Mon, 14 Sep 1998 14:31:03 -0700

From: "needlwitch at msn.com" <needlewitch at email.msn.com>

Subject: Re: SC - The thingy recipe (a bit OT)

 

>Alys' recipe for bull penis:  Is it period and is the recipe

>available. I'd love to serve this at a feast (if I could get my hands

>on half a dozen thingys).

>Drake.

 

Here is the recipie I have. Remember, you asked for it. :-)

 

Petits Propos Culinaires printed an article in 1987 entitled "Udder and

Other Extremeties: Recipes from the Jews of Yemen" by Barbara

Kirshenblatt-Gimblett.

 

Geed (penis of ox or bull)

500 grams penis               black pepper

1 tomato, chopped             cumin

1 onion chopped               saffron

cloves of garlic              salt

coriander

Scald the penis and clean it. Boil 10 minutes, remove and slice. Brown the

onion, garlic, coriander in oil. Add penis and fry. Mix (and add) chopped

tomato, pepper, cumin, saffron and salt. cover the pot. Cook over low flame

2 hours, adding a little water from time to time to prevent burning. Serve

hot.

 

Enjoy. Thorbjorn the Cook

 

 

Date: Fri, 18 Dec 1998 13:46:07 -0800

From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Deer Heart - NOT oop

 

pndarvis at execpc.com writes:

> Also, does anyone have a good recipe for deer heart?

 

Here is a period recipe for heart. It's not originally for deer heart, but

I expect it would work, although you might want to increase the boiling

time.

 

Corat

Curye on Inglysch p. 100 (Forme of Cury no. 14)

 

Take the noumbles of calf, swyne, or of shepe; perboile hem and kerue hem

to dyce. Cast hem in gode broth and do therto erbes, grene chybolles smale

yhewe; seeth it tendre, and lye with yolkes of eyren. Do therto verious,

safroun, powdour douce and salt, and serue it forth.

 

1 lb calf heart

1 10 oz can conc. beef broth + 1 can water

"herbs":        4 oz spinach

       4 oz turnip greens

6 oz scallions

8 egg yolks

1/4 c verjuice

12 threads saffron

"powder douce": 2 t sugar, 2 t cinnamon, 1/2 t ginger

1 t salt

 

Parboil heart in 4 c water: bring water to boil, add heart, bring back to

boil, total time about 4 minutes. Drain. Cut heart in 1/2"-1" cubes. Put

with broth and chopped washed greens, simmer about 20 minutes. Stir in

beaten egg yolks, turn off heat. Add verjuice, saffron (crushed into

water), spices, salt, and serve it forth.

 

Numbles means innards. We suspect the title of the recipe is derived from

the French word for "heart" and therefore use heart, but it is also good

made with kidney.

 

Elizabeth/Betty Cook

 

 

Date: Sun, 03 Jan 1999 20:56:47 -0500

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: Organ meats (was SC - Hedgehogs)

 

snowfire at mail.snet.net wrote, in response to A'aql Ras:

> >You are very close on this one. The organs in the pluck are all closely

> >connected with a network of short large arteries and veins so when you

> >gut the animal you litarally 'pluck' these three out of the cavity in one

> >mass. :-)

> What are giblets then? All of the above?

 

As far as I know, giblets are the heart, stomach, and liver of poultry,

i.e. domestic or game birds _and_ domestic rabbits, in which latter case

the giblets also normally include kidneys. The usual heart, liver, and

gizzard combo in the little bag inside the chicken is what machinery is

capable of removing intact, hence the determination.

Hand-slaughtered-and-butchered poultry would probably also include other

internal organs, for example possibly lungs (except in America where we

are terrified of such things), kidneys, and the more unusual but

eminently edible tongues, brains, and combs, not to mention necks,

wingtips (pinions, silly, not shoes!) and feet.

 

There are those who maintain rabbit uteri (or was it ovaries?) are

yummy, but the results of that polling aren't yet in from all the

outlying districts.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Thu, 04 Feb 1999 08:48:52 -0500

From: "D. Clay-Disparti" <Clay at talstar.com>

Subject: Re: SC - And Speaking of Kidney

 

Tina Carney wrote:

> Does anyone want to explain the correct way to prepare Beef Kidney?  I

> blanched the kidney three times and it still had a "strong" taste.

> Brighid the Ageless

> living the canton of Rimsholt

> in the Glorious Middle Kingdom

 

You need to be sure to snip out the core of the kidneys after you have skinned

them and cut them in half  lengthwise.  Then I believe soaking them overnight

would help rather than blanching them.  It is my guess that blanching them would

cause the tissue to "Sieze Up" some and, of course, the result would be a

flavour much stronger than anticipated.  If you still have a problem, you may

want to change the soaking liquid several times like you do with salted cod.

 

If you like the pie, you may also want to try steak and kidney pudding.  Let

me know if you want the recipe.

 

Dee/Isabella

 

 

Date: Tue, 2 Mar 1999 11:59:25 -0500

From: renfrow at skylands.net (Cindy Renfrow)

Subject: Re: SC - Pig Maws

 

>I was at the spermarket yesterday afternoon and I found a small portable

>freezer filled with pig maws. Of course, I couldn't resist the temptation and

>now have several of them in the freezer. :-) Mordanna was kind enough to share

>a recipe for this treat but that leaves one left.

>Does anyone have any period recipes for this food item? An original or

>translated period recipe is OK since the redaction part will be relatively

>easy.I would prefer a recipe source from pre-1450 C.E. but early modern

>would be acceptable.

>Ras

 

Harleian MS. 279 - Leche Vyaundez

 

xx. Yrchouns--Take Piggis mawys, & skalde hem wel; take groundyn Porke, &

knede it with Spicerye, with pouder Gyngere, & Salt & Sugre; do it on [th]e

mawe, but fille it nowt to fulle; [th]en sewe hem with a fayre [th]rede, &

putte hem in a Spete as men don piggys; take blaunchid Almaundys, & kerf

hem long, smal, & scharpe, & frye hem in grece & sugre; take a litel

prycke, & prykke [th]e yrchons, An putte in [th]e holes [th]e Almaundys,

every hole half, & eche fro o[th]er; ley hem [th]en to [th]e fyre; when

[th]ey ben rostid, dore hem sum wyth Whete Flowre, & mylke of Almaundys,

sum grene, sum blake with Blode, & lat hem nowt browne to moche, & serue

forth.

 

I'd be interested to hear how this works out for you.  I've tried it

without success many times (much to my husband's annoyance). It always came

out the consistency of a softball.

 

Cindy

 

 

Date: Tue, 02 Mar 1999 14:09:55 -0500

From: Wade Hutchison <whutchis at bucknell.edu>

Subject: Re: SC - Pig Maws

 

>Harleian MS. 279 - Leche Vyaundez

>xx. Yrchouns--Take Piggis mawys,& skalde hem wel;

<snip>

>I'd be interested to hear how this works out for you.  I've tried it

>without success many times (much to my husband's annoyance). It always came

>out the consistency of a softball.

>Cindy

 

Hi, Cindy -

I did Yrchouns for a feast several years ago, and it turned out fine.

Two things I did - I found it worked much better if you did _not_

scald the pigs stomachs before you filled them.  I just cleaned

them well in hot water.  If you scald (or parboil) the empty stomach,

then it thickens and curls up to the point where you can only

put about a tablespoon of filling in it.  It may be that the ones

you get from the butcher have already been scalded and cleaned -

I've never tried it with a "fresh" stomach.  The second point, which

I didn't even have to tell the feasters, was that you don't eat the

stomach - only the filling.  It made a very tasty and compact sausage,

with one stomach full feeding about 8 (at a feast).  I have some

pictures - I'll have to scan them in.

       -----Gille MacDhnouill

 

 

Date: Wed, 03 Mar 1999 09:41:17 -0500

From: Wade Hutchison <whutchis at bucknell.edu>

Subject: Re: SC - Pig Maws

 

>whutchis at bucknell.edu writes:

>> The second point, which

>> I didn't even have to tell the feasters, was that you don't eat the

>> stomach - only the filling.

>WHAT!!!!!

>Sacrilege!

>That would be like having a cheese ball coated with caviar and throwing

>away the caviar!

>Mordonna

 

Well - I tried it, and although it was kinda tough, it was tasty.

No matter how long I cooked the thing, I couldn't get a crispy

texture on the outside without some part of the thing scorching

black. We settled for a nice brown (hedgehog) color - but the

stomach was still too tough for most of the crowd.

I was a bit hesitant to serve these things, since I didn't quite

know how the local group would react. (this was about 4 or 5 years

ago when we were just getting into the swing of serving feasts

with all period recipes)  I was pleasantly surprised in that not

a single yrouchon came back to the kitchen with any filling left -

but there were only one or two with pieces cut off the stomach.

       -----wade/Gille

 

 

Date: Fri, 14 May 1999 18:52:45 -0000

From: "=?iso-8859-1?Q?Nanna_R=F6gnvaldard=F3ttir?=" <nannar at isholf.is>

Subject: SC - Re: Bull-Fries

 

>-Poster: Elysant <Snowfire at mail.snet.net>

>Nanna - I believe you mentioned there was a traditional Icelandic recipe for

>Bull's Testicles?  Am I correct?

 

Well, lamb's testicles were - and still are - very popular, usually boiled,

then preserved in fermented whey (sára), as I've told you about. There are

references to bull's testicles being treated in the same manner but no

recipe as such - not that I can recall. When I was a child several lamb's

testicles were usually stuffed inside a pouch sewn from a portion of the

stomach before being boiled and if calves were being slaughtered at the same

time, I'm sure their testicles were included also.

 

Nanna

 

P.S. The testicles are rather good, if you have a taste for whey-preserved

Icelandic food. I have no idea what others would think of the stuff.

 

 

Date: Fri, 6 Aug 1999 19:31:16 -0400

From: renfrow at skylands.net (Cindy Renfrow)

Subject: Re: SC - re: want recipe

 

>Margarite asked:

>>>     Does anyone out there have a period recipe for baked heart? Thanks

>in advance. <<

>I also have been hunting for heart recipes... in Rumpolt and a number of

>other places,... and have found NONE.  Was there some stigma or taboo about

>heart? (they seemed to cook any and every other bit of innards they had

>(liver, stomach, kidneys, lungs, brains, intestines,...) as well as ears,

>snouts, tails... so why no heart?

>Gwen Cat

 

Perhaps it was just lumped together under the name 'numbles' or 'chaudwyne'?

 

Here is a recipe from Harl. 279, Potage Dyvers:

xv. Bowres. Take Pypis, Hertys, Nerys, Myltys, an Rybbys of the Swyne; or

ellys take Mawlard, or Gees, an chop hem smal, and thanne parboyle hem in

fayre water; an [th]an take it vp, and pyke it clene in-to a fayre potte,

an caste [th]er-to ale y-now, & sawge an salt, and [th]an boyle it ry[3]th

wel; and [th]anne serue it forthe for a goode potage.

 

pypis = lungs

hertys = hearts

nerys = ears

myltys - spleens

 

Cindy Renfrow/Sincgiefu

renfrow at skylands.net

 

 

Date: Fri, 06 Aug 1999 23:56:20 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - re: want recipe

 

Cindy Renfrow wrote:

> myltys - spleens

 

Yes, some still use that term today... my butcher calls them "melts".

However, the same term is applied to the soft roe, i.e. the testes, of

male fish (the hard roe being the ripe ovaries of female fish).

 

Whaddaya say to the prospect of the term referring (only as a

possibility, mind you) to, um, _forest_ oysters (in the case of pigs)?

 

Spleens, BTW, are a fairly good substitute for lungs in those benighted

locales where lungs are considered unfit for sale for human consumption,

for those trying to make semi-decent haggis, sans a proper paunch and pluck.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Wed, 11 Aug 1999 19:18:27 -0000

From: "=?iso-8859-1?Q?Nanna_R=F6gnvaldard=F3ttir?=" <nannar at isholf.is>

Subject: Re: SC - Romantic Foods

 

Adamantius wrote:

>What, no sweetbreads? I'd send that back if I were you!

 

You want sweetbreads? then use Pellegrino Artusi¥s recipe from Science in

the Kitchen and the Art of Eating Well:

 

"350 grams of macaroni, 170 grams of Parmesan cheese, 150 grams of

sweetbreads, 60 grams of butter, 70 grams of truffles, 30 grams of fat and

lean ham. A handful of dried mushrooms. The giblets of 3 or 4 chickens and

their gizzards, which you can also use if you cut away the gristle. If you

can add cockscombs, cock's testicles and unborn eggs, so much the better.

Nutmeg for flavouring. Don¥t be put off by all this rich condiment, as it

will all disappear under the layer of pastry."

 

There is two-part article about the history of

timballo/timpano/pasticcio/parmesan pie in PPC #59 and 61, tracing the

origins back to Babylon.

 

Nanna

 

 

Date: Mon, 23 Aug 1999 00:11:45 +0200

From: Thomas Gloning <Thomas.Gloning at germanistik.uni-giessen.de>

Subject: SC - Rumpolt 1581 on rabbit

 

Rumpolt on rabbit #7; roughly:

'Roasted kidneys from rabbits. You must catch a lot of rabbits before

you get a good dish. You can prepare them black, yellow, brown or with

onions that are strained through a _Haartuch_, like one usually prepares

a pike in a Polish manner.'

 

The original transcriptions of some 30 recipes in German:

http://www.uni-giessen.de/~g909/rumphase.htm

http://www.uni-giessen.de/~g909/rumpkuen.htm

Thanks to Gwen Cat !

 

Note, that recipe #7 is rather an enumeration of possible preparations,

that are described elsewhere. At present, I am preparing a talk on the

language and the textual structure of recipes 1350-1800; if there is

anything I should not forget, please let me know (off list).

 

Thomas

 

 

Date: Fri, 3 Sep 1999 15:01:36 -0500

From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

Subject: Re: SC - re: want recipe

 

>From the Miscellany:

 

Corat

Curye on Inglysch p. 100 (Forme of Cury no. 14)

 

Take the noumbles of calf, swyne, or of shepe; perboile hem and kerue hem

to dyce. Cast hem in gode broth and do therto erbes, grene chybolles smale

yhewe; seeth it tendre, and lye with yolkes of eyren. Do therto verious,

safroun, powdour douce and salt, and serue it forth.

 

1 lb calf heart

6 oz scallions  

"powder douce"

2 t sugar

1 10 oz can conc. beef broth + 1 can water      

8 egg yolks

2 t cinnamon

"herbs":        4 oz spinach    1/4 c verjuice          1/2 t ginger

       4 oz turnip greens      12 threads saffron      1 t salt

 

Parboil heart in 4 c water: bring water to boil, add heart, bring back to

boil, total time about 4 minutes. Drain. Cut heart in 1/2"-1" cubes. Put

with broth and chopped washed greens, simmer about 20 minutes. Stir in

beaten egg yolks, turn off heat. Add verjuice, saffron (crushed into

water), spices, salt, and serve it forth.

 

Numbles means innards. We suspect the title of the recipe is derived from

the French word for "heart" and therefore use heart, but it is also good

made with kidney.

 

David/Cariadoc

http://www.best.com/~ddfr/

 

 

Date: Sun, 19 Sep 1999 00:20:04 -0500

From: Stefan li Rous <stefan at texas.net>

Subject: SC - hearts

 

An interesting comment from "Food and Drink in Medieval Poland" since we

were recently discussing the eating of hearts. Sorry Ras, there are no

recipes.

 

P92:

"It is worth mentioning that in the charter of 1140 for the Cistercian

monastery at Jedrzejow (later known in Poland for its fine gardens), the

townspeople were required to give the local prince and his posterity all

the hearts of cattle slaughtered in that place. (31) It is not clear

whether these beef hearts were considered a special delicacy or whether

they were simply food intended for servents connected to the princely

household. The context would suggest that the hearts were set aside for

the monks, who were of low social standing. Mikolj Rej referred to beef

hearts in his writings as something only fit for  monks, servants, and

the poor."

 

(31) This is mentioned by Dlugosz in his "Opera Omnia" III (under the

year 1141),3; and further discussed by Dembinska (1963), 105.

- --

Lord Stefan li Rous    Barony of Bryn Gwlad    Kingdom of Ansteorra

Mark S. Harris             Austin, Texas           stefan at texas.net

 

 

Date: Thu, 4 Nov 1999 21:40:20 -0500

From: "Richard Kappler II" <rkappler at home.com>

Subject: SC - garbage

 

Ye olde, and yes I mean OLDE, Master Chief decided last week that it would

be a good thing for office harmony to start doing potlucks every week or

two. Tomorrow is the first.  With all the hell I catch in the office about

researching period recipes, trying to translate Latin, medieval German and

early English etc, I figured I just had to cook something period, thinking

along the lines of 'pick the nastiest sounding stuff, don't tell 'em what it

is, then when they love it, clue 'em in.'  In the spirit of this endeavor, I

chose 'Garbage' out of His Grace's Miscellany.  Its been up on the sign up

board for a week now and speculation has been rampant, but none of them

realize there really is a dish called garbage.

 

So anyway....I prepared the dish tonight and was even surprised myself!  I

followed the recipe in the Miscellany exactly, with two exceptions:  while

the recipe in the Miscellany disregards the chicken heads and feet due to

difficulty in obtaining such, I threw in a coupla chicken necks I had in the

freezer waiting for the next batch of stock.  THIS STUFF IS GREAT!  The

sweet spices both contrast and meld so well with the rich flavor of the

chicken parts, and the broth the whole recipe produces is some of the best

I've ever had.

 

The other exception: in the original recipe it calls for drawing the bread

and broth mixture through a sieve, whereas the redaction calls for mashing

up broth soaked bread in a mortar and pestle.  I tried it as written in the

redaction at first, but didn't like the consistency.  I'm presuming that the

purpose of this is to thicken the broth, yes?  So I followed the original,

taking the bread soaked broth and pushing it through a fine wire strainer

and thought the consistency much better.

 

I highly recommend this recipe to all, whether you like the ingredients or

not, the end result is delightful and not at all what I thought I would end

up with.  The complexity of flavor in this dish is simply amazing!

 

regards, Puck

 

 

Date: Thu, 4 Nov 1999 23:38:43 -0500

From: "Richard Kappler II" <rkappler at home.com>

Subject: SC - garbage

 

From His Grace Cariadoc and Elizabeth's Miscellany, 8th edition:

 

>Take faire Garbage, chikenes hedes, ffete, lyvers, And gysers, and wassh hem

>clene; caste hem into a faire potte, And caste fressh broth of Beef, powder

>of Peper, Canell, Clowes, Maces, Parcely and Sauge myced small; then take

>brede, stepe hit in pe same brothe, Drawe hit thorgh a streynour, cast

>thereto, And lete boyle ynowe; caste there-to pouder ginger, vergeous, salt,

>And a litull Safferon, And serve hit forthe.

 

regards, Puck

 

 

Date: Wed, 29 Dec 1999 13:00:37 -0500

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Christmas Dinner and Gifts

 

Lurking Girl wrote:

> What bit is the gizzard, exactly?  I had a vague notion it was another

> term for the giblets.

 

Giblets are what medieval people would call garbage: assorted feet, wing

tips, heads, necks, and innards. Gizzards refer specifically to the

stomach of da boid, that sort of butterflied, muscular spheroid you find

in the little bag  that is clearly neither heart, liver, nor neck.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Wed, 29 Dec 1999 22:29:20 EST

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: SC - Gizzards

 

troy at asan.com writes:

<< Gizzards refer specifically to the stomach of da boid, >>

 

A minor correction, master. The stomach is specifically referred to as a

stomach. :-) Gizzard refers specifically to the muscular enlargement  of the

alimentary canal just before the stomach. Birds store grit (tiny stones)

there and use it to grind their food into a paste before it is sent to the

actual stomach for digestion. Dinosaurs also possessed a gizzard as do

earthworms and a few insects.

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Sun, 05 Mar 2000 13:19:09 -0600

From: Magdalena <magdlena at earthlink.net>

Subject: SC - A Recipe for Ras

 

Platina 4.38

 

38. On Chicken Roll

 

Divide crests of chickens in three pieces, livers in four,

and leave testicles whole.  Cut lard into bits, but do not

pound. Cut up finely two or three ounces of veal fat, or,

instead of fat, add beef or calves marrow.  Use as much as

will be enough of ginger, cinnamon, and sugar.  Mix all

these with about forty dried sour cherries; then put in a

roll made suitable for it from finely ground meal.  It can

be cooked in an oven or under cover on the hearth.  When it

is half-cooked, put over it two beaten egg yolks and a bit

of saffron and verjuice.

 

I wonder where one gets rooster testicles?

- -Magdalena

 

 

Date: Mon, 6 Mar 2000 10:00:29 EST

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: SC - Testicle sites-revisited-OOP

 

McKeown at micronet.net writes:

<< Where is that please?!? >>

 

A web search reveals many sites dealing with the culinary aspect of preparing

and serving testicles. Since web search engines are notorious for not being

specific it is suggested that you study the URL closely before going to a

site to avoid sites that may contain sexually related content if that is a

particular bugaboo for you.

 

To start the ball rolling, try the following sites:

 

>From this site can be purchased bison testicles (turkey testicles are not

available there):

 

http://www.pahasapa.com/wp/diamondm/

 

A large collection of testicle recipes and as well as testicle facts are

found at this site which also includes FAQ's and information on where to

begin searching for turkey and other testicles, as well as festivals (one of

which prepares and serves 2 1/2 tons of testicles during the festival), etc.,:

 

http://funlinked.com/testicle/

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 18:46:28 EDT

From: Mordonna22 at aol.com

Subject: SC - Organ Meats

 

Organ meats are not "traditionally considered to be offal."

This is a relatively modern assessment.  Rather, as with most things, it

varied from cuisine to cuisine, and from animal to animal.  For several

reasons, organ meats were often considered luxuries, chiefly because they do

not lend themselves to prolonged storage as readily as muscle meat, and

because the organs make up less of the animal in volume  (i.e. a 1000 lb.

steer will produce about 450-500 lbs of dressed muscle, and only about 10-15

lbs of organ meat, including heart, liver, tongue, lungs, spleen, kidneys,

tripe etc....)   In most agrarian societies organ meat is a luxury indulged

in only around butchering time.   The advent of canning, and more recently

freezing has made organ meats available year round now days, but its scarcity

in relation to the muscle means it is still a rare treat.  It seems to be

only in urbanized societies that organ meat is considered yucky stuff. I

would attribute that to the difficulty in preserving it, thus making it

unfamiliar to most urban dwellers.

 

Mordonna the Cook,

SunDragon's Western Reaches

Atenveldt

(m.k.a. Buckeye, AZ)

 

 

Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2000 09:33:40 -0500

From: collette at kricket.net (colette waters)

Subject: Re: SC - Wanted:  Period recipes for Organ Meats - particularly Heart

 

Oh I forgot the "period part" from Le Menagier de Paris

"Item, when gutting it, you first remove the dainties, which are the

c...ns{letters missing [JH], which include the flesh of the nape between

neck and shoulders, vein from the heart, liver, ect. And these dainties

are parboiled, then cooked and eaten with hot sauce."

Also

"Fresh beef tongue should be parboiled, skinned, larded and roasted, and

eaten with a cameline sauce"

Also good recipe for smoked tongue in Sabina Welserin and wonderful

headcheese in EIN NEW KOCHBUCH Rumpolt

 

Begga Elisabeth

 

 

Date: Wed, 24 May 2000 17:31:45 -0500

From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

Subject: SC - Tripe

 

At 5:10 PM -0400 4/22/00, Siegfried Heydrich rather rashly wrote:

>...The aristocracy ate the more succulent muscles, and sometimes (rarely) the

organs, but something like tripe would have been beneath them.

 

The following is from a cookbook which also has things like peacock

roasted and served in its plumage, so would have been for the cooks

of a noble household.

 

Tripe de Mutton (Two Fifteenth Century Cookery Books p. 82)

 

Take a panche of a shepe, and make it clene, and caste hit in a potte

of boyling water, and skyme hit clene, and gader al awey the grece,

and lete hem boyle til thei be al tendur; then take hem vppe on a

faire borde, and kutte hem in smale peces of ij peny brede, and caste

hem yn an erthen potte with stronge broth of bef or Mutton; take

ffoyles of parcelly, and hewe hem small, and cast hem to, And lete

hem boyle togidre til they ben tendur, and then take pouder of

ginger, and a quantite of vergeous, and take saffron and salt and

caste there-to, and lete hem boile togidre til they be ynogh. [thorns

replaced by th]

 

Elizabeth of Dendermonde/Betty Cook

 

 

Date: Sun, 28 May 2000 15:40:28 -0500

From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Wanted:  Period recipes for Organ Meats - particularly Heart

 

About a month ago, Gwynydd wrote:

>Having had such success with the Noumbles, I have been emboldened and would

>like to try out other dishes of organ meats on my Lady.  She tells me that

>she has never had heart and would like to try it.  No recipes for tripe or

>brains please!  As well, I don't have an oven so please bear this in mind.

>I am looking for period recipes.

 

From the Miscellany:

 

Corat

Curye on Inglysch p. 100 (Forme of Cury no. 14)

 

Take the noumbles of calf, swyne, or of shepe; perboile hem and kerue

hem to dyce. Cast hem in gode broth and do therto erbes, grene

chybolles smale yhewe; seeth it tendre, and lye with yolkes of eyren.

Do therto verious, safroun, powdour douce and salt, and serue it

forth. [end of original; thorns replaced by th]

 

1 lb calf heart

1 10 oz can conc. beef broth + 1 can water

"herbs":      4 oz spinach

        4 oz turnip greens

6 oz scallions

8 egg yolks

1/4 c verjuice

12 threads saffron

"powder douce":     2 t sugar, 2 t cinnamon, 1/2 t ginger

1 t salt

 

Parboil heart in 4 c water: bring water to boil, add heart, bring

back to boil, total time about 4 minutes. Drain. Cut heart in 1/2"-1"

cubes. Put with broth and chopped washed greens, simmer about 20

minutes. Stir in beaten egg yolks, turn off heat. Add verjuice,

saffron (crushed into water), spices, salt, and serve it forth.

 

Numbles means innards. We suspect the title of the recipe is derived

from the French word for "heart" and therefore use heart, but it is

also good made with kidney.

 

Elizabeth/Betty Cook

 

 

Date: Mon, 12 Jun 2000 11:08:40 EDT

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - testicle festival

 

Seton1355 at aol.com writes:

<< Yes, this is food content although, I suspect  OOP.  but thought I;d share

anyway..... >>

 

Yes, this Festival has been occurring for years. Recently someone here asked

for chicken testicle recipes. I don't have access to the book at the moment

but Platina has a recipe that includes chicken testicles as an ingredient.

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Thu, 07 Sep 2000 20:08:38 -0500

From: Diana L Skaggs <upsxdls_osu at ionet.net>

Subject: SC - Calf Fries

 

>What's a "calf fry," or do I really want to know? <g>

>--Maire

 

Calf fries are male animal testicles.  A delicacy in these here parts.  My

ex-husband really liked them, so I would cook them once in awhile. My

favorite recipe:

 

Clean, wash and cut into bite sized pieces.  Soak in salt water several

hours or overnight. Dip in drench of 2 beaten eggs and 1/2 cup buttermilk.

Roll in mixture of 2/3 cup all-purpose flour, 1/3 cup cornmeal, 1 tsp. salt

and 1/2 tsp. ground black pepper.  Deep fry in hot vegetable oil until

golden brown. (Use fresh oil, fries tend to pick up the flavor of

previously fried foods). Serve them forth!

 

Leanna

 

 

Date: Thu, 9 Nov 2000 11:55:25 -0600

From: "Michael Newton" <melcnewt at netins.net>

Subject: SC - Bourreys

 

While I was perusing recipes on the net in A Boke of Kokery, I came across

the following recipe:

Bourreys.

Take pipes, hertes, meres, myltes, and of the rybbes of the Swyne, or elles

take (if thou wilt) Mallard or Goos, and choppe hem small, And then parboile

it in faire water, And take it vp, and pike it clene, And putte into a

potte, and cast thereto Ale ynogth, Suage, Salt, And lete boile right ynowe,

&then serue it forth

 

Here's my translation/redaction so far:

 

Bourreys.

 

Take the lungs, heart, ?,?, and of the ribs of the Swine, or else take (if

you will) Mallard or Goose, and chop it small, and then parboil it in fair

water, and take it up, and pike it clean, And put into a pot and cast

thereto Ale enough, Sage, Salt, And let boil right enough, and then serve it

forth.

 

Dice pork lungs, heart, two unknown parts, and rib meat or duck and/or goose

meat. Parboil it, and in the case of the pork take the scum off as it

boils.(I can't see much need to do this for the poultry-but I could be

wrong) Drain and add ale, sage and salt, cook until done.

 

 

okay, what the heck is meres and mytles?

 

Any other comments?

 

Beatrix of Tanet

 

 

Date: Thu, 16 Nov 2000 22:02:55 +0100

From: "Cindy M. Renfrow" <cindy at thousandeggs.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Bourreys

 

>okay, what the heck is meres and mytles?

>Beatrix of Tanet

 

This recipe is from Harleian MS 4016; there is another in Harl. 279 that

gives the option of using Mallard or Geese.

 

That should be 'neres', not 'meres' = ears. Myltes = spleens.

 

"Take lungs, hearts, ears, spleens and of the ribs of the Swine..."

 

Cindy Renfrow/Sincgiefu

cindy at thousandeggs.com

Author & Publisher of "Take a Thousand Eggs or More, A Collection of 15th

Century Recipes" and "A Sip Through Time, A Collection of Old Brewing

Recipes"

http://www.thousandeggs.com

 

 

Date: Sat, 18 Nov 2000 01:03:05 +0100

From: TG <gloning at Mailer.Uni-Marburg.DE>

Subject: Re: SC - Bourreys

 

<< a fellow from the Calontir Cooks list (...) suggested meres being the

word for boundaries, which put me in the idea that it calls for the

diaphragm muscle. Given the choice in a meat recipe I'd lean toward the

diaphragm more that ears, ... >>

 

1. The word form of the manuscript is "neres" (see Austin p. 70). No

"meres" around.

 

2. "nere, variant of neer, kidney." (OED2)

 

Best, Thomas

 

 

Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2000 20:44:56 +0100

From: TG <gloning at Mailer.Uni-Marburg.DE>

Subject: Re: SC - headcheese

 

<< I assume the term goes back to period. >>

 

The earliest attestations for the term "headcheese" I found so far are

from the 19th century.

 

<< Do we have any period recipes for this? >>

 

In case headcheese is roughly the same as German "Presskopf" (pressed

meat of the head together with other ingredients), there are some German

(predecessors of) recipes for Presskopf. A very detailed description how

to make "Pre?kopf" is found in the "Frauenzimmerlexikon" (1715, Lexicon

for women). Prior to 1600, there are recipes in Rumpolt, one is online

in the ox-section of Rumpolt (# 2 "Ein gepre?ten Ochsenkopff"). Rumpolt

has also a recipe for a "Gepresten Schweinskopff" (from the pig; the

more ears, the better) and "Ein gepresten Hirschkopff" (from a stag), of

which he says:

 

"... Also richt mans zu f?r Kànig vnd Keyser/ f?r F?rsten vnd Herrn/ vnd

darff sich einer nicht schemen/ ein solche Spei? zu zurichten/ denn es

ist seltzam von einem Wiltpret/ wenn viel Ohren darvnter geschnitten

seyn".

(Roughly: '... This way it is prepared for Kings and the Emperor, for

princes and noblemen/ and one must not be ashamed/ to prepare such a

dish (for them)/ because it is something special made from deer/ if many

ears are cut into it'.)

 

The "Rheinfrânkisches Kochbuch" (1445) has a recipe for a liver sauce

which is said to fit for a "geprasten kop" (pressed head).

 

<< Any idea why it is called "cheese" although I seem to remember it

doesn't have any cheese in it? >>

 

I guess the common aspect is the element of pressing that is the same

with cheesemaking.

 

Best, Thomas

 

 

Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2000 17:16:28 EST

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - headcheese

 

stefan at texas.net writes:

> I'm not exactly sure what "headcheese" is, although I've heard the term

 

It is more or less a gelatinous mass with chunks of meat throughout that is

sliced and served much as luncheon meat is.  It is basically made by boiling

a pig's head with brains and tongue and all until it falls apart. You remove

the tasty bits, discard the bones and let the whole mass cool to a gelatin

under a weight. Depending on which PA Dutch group your background includes it

may or may not also contain vinegar. Our branch calls the vinegar abomination

'souse'. :-).

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Thu, 03 May 2001 20:27:29 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Re: SC - Re: sca-cooks V1 #3141 - lungs

 

"Craig Jones." wrote:

> >But I agree, most of these are less traditional in the area than the old

> >standbys, potato, kasha, and liver. I've never seen lung knishes. Must

> >be my outer borough upbringing. You'd think it would be difficult to get

> >out all the blood, considering what French chefs go through to achieve

> >this, but then it is much the same with liver, I suppose.

> >

> >Adamantius

> Umm, if I'm going to play with these lamb lungs next weekend is there anything

> (ie. prep work) I need to do with them before I cook with them.

> Drakeyboy.

 

I seem to recall there being instructions for prepping lights in Jane

Grigson's book on charcuterie.. Hang on a sec...

 

OK, the short version is that there are two basic methods, at least in

the European culinary regimen, of rendering lungs cookable:

 

One involves parboiling them for 15 minutes or so, during which time you

have to hold them under the surface of your bubbling liquid -- they are

balloons and/or sponges, after all, so their natural tendency is to

float. After they're parboiled, they can be cooled, trimmed (of

membranes and tubes), and cut up as desired for further cooking.

 

The other common method involves beating them with a wooden mallet or

rolling pin to expel all the air; they can then be cut up and trimmed,

raw, before cooking.

 

That's what Grigson says, essentially.

 

Now that I think of it, I remember old Scots haggis recipes recommending

that the pluck be boiled with the trachea hanging over the side of the

pot, with the opening in another container, the better to expel various

proteinous nasties while cooking.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Wed, 26 Sep 2001 10:05:28 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Nasty Foods...

 

Craig Jones. wrote:

> ""(So, what was the worst SCA dish y'all have ever come across at a

> feast?)

> The worst dish I ever redacted (at a cooks guild night) was Tangut

> Lungs (ASFTQ).  Cubes of Boiled sheeps lung smothered in a very bitter

> green sauce composed of Leek juice, Ginger Juice, Pepper, Butter,

> Flour.

> I boiled the lung too long and use too much leek juice.  It reminded

> of chunks of liver flavoured marshmallow in a diesel-based sauce as

> bright as green M&M's.

 

Hmmm, liver-flavored sponges in anti-freeze. Yummers. But you seem to be

on the right track insofar as preventative and curative measures are

concerned. Yes, lungs are spongy, and there are some basic preparation

methods that other cuisines use to minimize the livery flavor and firm

them up. Whether or not the Mongols or Chinese of the period would have

used anything like these methods, I don't know (Lookit me, Ma, I'm

Vehling-ing!)

 

But, the theory of a biter sauce on a livery-tasting dish isn't really

unsound: for example, at one place I worked we used to sell grilled

calves' liver with a sweet-and-bitter sauce of cream, brunoise-cut

carrots, and angostura bitters. It really wasn't bad. The liver was

sweet with a touch of bitterness anyway, balanced by a bit more

bitterness from the grill-marks. Then the sauce had more or less the

same characteristics, but instead of these being viewed as deficiencies

to be corrected, you realized that the dish was _supposed_ to be sweet

and bitter, and it all became somehow pleasing to the palate. Especially

when the liver was not cremated.

 

> A poor redaction that was so bad that the nicest comment on the Guild

> Comment Sheet was simple - "Vile.".  I've been threatened with

> physical harm if I ever try the recipe again...

 

Harumph. Buell and/or Anderson mention that this dish is a

characteristic Uighur dish and still popular today. How bad could it be

if properly prepared? I'm not saying it's necessarily something I'd want

for every meal, but if it has survived this long and, as is implied, is

more or less unchanged, it must hold some redeeming value.

 

"[55] 'Tangut' Lungs

 

"Sheep's lung (one), leeks (six chin; take the juice), flour (two chin;

make into paste), butter (half a chin), black pepper (two liang), juice

of sprouting ginger (two ho).

 

"[For] ingredients use salt and adjust flavors evenly. Submerge the

lungs in water and cook. When done baste with the juice and eat."

 

Do you want to give us your redaction? A couple of points occur to me

right off the bat.

 

European cooks usually beat the air out of lungs before cooking; they

hit them with a rolling pin or a mallet until most of the air is out and

the lungs are flat. They can then be parboiled, cooled (and sometimes

pressed to firm them up and expel the last of the air and any cooking

water), then trimmed, cut up, etc. Now the recipe doesn't specify how

these are to be cut up, but it seems evident that they eventually are.

Note that you start out with one lung and then they are referred to in

the plural. Besides, it makes them easier to eat. I mention this only as

a possibility, though. Could there be some preparation Yuan cooks might

be familiar with, that the recipe doesn't mention? It might be worth

finding a modern version of this recipe.

 

For a powerful liver-type flavor, or rather, to limit or eliminate it,

it looks as if the cooking water might be salted as much as necessary

(hint, hint) to draw out various bitter fluids from the lungs, after

which that water is thrown away, and the cooked lungs sauced with the

ginger/leek sauce. I've had, for example, chicken or duck livers in

ginger and scallion oil sauce in modern Chinese restaurants; that has

always been pretty good. This doesn't sound too far off.

 

Did you use sprouting ginger or regular ginger root? That would make a

big difference. You might also have gotten some bitterness if you used

too much of the green leaves of the leeks. Is there any reason to assume

the leeks referred to are the (usually) big ones called for in European

(or even other Australian) recipes?

 

> Luckily it never made it to a feast.....

> Drakey,

> ps.  Those in Lochac..... I still have another 2 sheep lungs in the

> freezer..... run, run for your lives.....

 

I still say it doesn't sound any worse than most of the other lung

recipes I've seen. No worse than, say, a spleen recipe... and I'm not

really helping matters, am I? ;  )

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Thu, 08 Nov 2001 07:38:36 -0800

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

From: Anne-Marie Rousseau <acrouss at gte.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] sheep testicle recipes

 

we did a reconstruction of Taillevents "red deer testicles in hunting

season" which involved meat in a wonderful broth. We didn't have access to

the real deal, and so used the "oysters" from the back of chickens instead,

but it was dang tasty! :)

 

--AM

 

 

Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2003 10:11:59 -0400

From: Daniel Myers <doc at medievalcookery.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Getting the most use out of a particular food

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

On Tuesday, July 22, 2003, at 09:40 AM, Bronwynmgn at aol.com wrote:

Then of course there is Garbage, which if I remember correctly is a dish of cold chicken livers which specifically says that it is suitable for

supper in the summer...

<<< 

 

Here's the source recipe I have for "Garbage" - note that it also

contains the heads and feet.

 

Source [Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books, T. Austin (ed.)]: .xvij.

Garbage. Take fayre garbagys of chykonys, as the hed, the fete, the

lyuerys, an the gysowrys; washe hem clene, an caste hem in a fayre

potte, an caste ther-to freysshe brothe of Beef or ellys of moton, an

let it boyle; an a-lye it wyth brede, an ley on Pepir an Safroun,

Maces, Clowys, an a lytil verious an salt, an serue forth in the maner

as a Sewe.

 

- Doc

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

  Edouard Halidai  (Daniel Myers)

  http://www.medievalcookery.com/

 

 

Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2003 18:41:20 -0500

From: "Terry Decker" <t.d.decker at worldnet.att.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Getting the most use out of a particular food

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

"Garbage" is Middle English for "chicken offal," so the dish is one made

from the waste parts of butchered chickens.

 

Bear

 

>>> 

Then of course there is Garbage, which if I remember correctly is a dish of

cold chicken livers which specifically says that it is suitable for supper in

the summer...

 

Brangwayna

<<< 

 

 

Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2003 11:57:03 -0400

From: "Phil Troy/ G. Tacitus Adamantius" <adamantius at verizon.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] professional cooks-- reality check wanted

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Also sprach Olwen the Odd:

>>> 

Anybody got a period recipe for pate?  I don't recall seeing one but

I am fuzzy this day. (ok, it's true, I'm fuzzy most days..)

<<< 

 

Pate as in mousse (which is what most people nowadays seem to be

thinking of when they say pate; something spreadable), pate en croute

(like a meatloaf in pastry), or pate en terrine (like a meatloaf in a

clay pot)? Originally, only pate en croute need apply for the term,

"pate". I mean, since only that one actually had any pate (dough)

involved.

 

I assume, if we're still talking about a sculpture in chicken liver

pate, that it's the mousse-ey item. One might rationalize it by

taking one of the period liver dishes like vinaigrette or fegatelli,

or some such, and chopping it finely for sculpting purposes.

 

I do think either Le Menagier or Taillevent has a recipe for what

amounts to a terrine, essentially a meat pie made in a pot instead of

a crust. I don't think it's done with liver, though. You might also

investigate the [I think] 15th-century English sources for meat

stuffings cooked in flowerpots, sacks, etc., then removed and glazed

to look like their original containers.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2003 13:00:44 -0400

From: Daniel Myers <edouard at medievalcookery.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Pate history - OOP(?)

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

On Monday, September 22, 2003, at 12:19 PM, Phil Troy/ G. Tacitus

Adamantius wrote:

> Also sprach Daniel Myers:

>> From: Forme of Cury

>> "Gees In Hoggepot. XXXI. Take Gees and smyte hem on pecys. cast hem

>> in a Pot do [th]erto half wyne and half water. and do [th]erto a gode

>> quantite of Oynouns and erbest. Set it ouere the fyre and couere it

>> fast. make a layour of brede and blode an lay it [th]erwith. do

>> [th]erto powdour fort and serue it fort. "

> This is a general hint, and not a liver recipe, I gather, huh?

 

Um... yeah!  (bear with me, I was shooting from the hip on this thing)

With the above recipe a lot would of course depend on how small the

pieces were, but the combination of goose, onions, herbs, blood and

bread make me think of a thick, strongly flavored soup or paste or

whatnot with a high fat content.

 

>> There were also a good number of recipes for blood pudding that

>> included goose livers.

> Hmmm. Now those I haven't seen. Would you care to post one, or refer

> us to a source?

 

Oh bother ... I thought I had a couple, but I may need to retract

and/or amend that statement.

 

It looks like I mentally combined the following (and probably other)

references.  My brain saw the word "blood" and packed the recipes all

into the same category.

 

From: Le Menagier de Paris (Janet Hinson, trans.)

"Note that you can make nice black puddings from a goose, but it will

be thin, and because of the thinness the guts are bigger than the suet.

"

 

From: "Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books":

"Chawdwyn. Take Gysers, lyuers, and hertes of Swannes, or of wilde

gese; And if the guttes be fatte, slytte hem, and cast hem there-to,

And boile hem in faire water; And then take hem vppe, And hew hem

smale, and caste into the same brot ayene, but streyne hit thorg a

streynour firste; And caste thereto pouder of peper and of canell, and

salt, and vinegre, And lete boile; And then take the blode of the swan,

and fress brot, and brede, and drawe hem thorg a streynour and cast

thereto, And lete al boyle togidre; And then take pouder of Gynger,

whan hit is al-moost ynoug, And caste there-to, And serue it forthe."

 

... and ...

 

"Kutte a Swan in the rove of the mouthe toward the brayne enlonge, and

lete him blede, and kepe the blode for chawdewyn; or elles knytte a

knot on his nek, And so late his nekke breke; then skald him. Drawe him

and rost him even as thou doest goce in all poyntes, and serue him fort

wit chawd-wyne"

 

- Doc

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

   Edouard Halidai  (Daniel Myers)

   http://www.medievalcookery.com/

 

 

Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2004 06:42:27 +0100

From: UlfR <ulfr at hunter-gatherer.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] OOP Bugs was:International recipe site

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Phil Troy/ G. Tacitus Adamantius <adamantius at verizon.net> [2004.01.15]  

wrote:

>> We were fifty people eating and we ate the brass

>> of the animals,

> I wonder if that's the right word. What is the

> brass of the animals? I ask only because it

> sounds good, but brass is kind of hard on the

> teeth.

 

Swedish "bräss": English "thymus"?

 

UlfR

--

UlfR Ketilson                               ulfr at hunter-gatherer.org

 

 

Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2004 01:00:28 -0500

From: "Phlip" <phlip at 99main.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] OOP Bugs was:International recipe site

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

>> I wonder if that's the right word. What is the

>> brass of the animals? I ask only because it

>> sounds good, but brass is kind of hard on the

>> teeth.

> Swedish "bräss": English "thymus"?

> UlfR

 

OK- that would work- it would translate into "sweetbreads" in English.

Occasionally eaten, but generally unknown in the US- part of the "icky"

bits....

 

Saint Phlip,

CoDoLDS

 

 

Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2004 06:05:44 -0500

From: "Phil Troy/ G. Tacitus Adamantius" <adamantius at verizon.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] OOP Bugs was:International recipe site

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Also sprach Ana Valdés:

> Hehe, yes, you are right, it was my "Swenglish"

> tricking me...It was the "thymus" of the animals

> we ate...(Bräss in Swedish).

 

Ah. "Sweetbreads". Mollejas. One of my favorites,

at least cooked the way you probably had them. In

fact, most ways ;-). Many cultures use the same

name when speaking of the pancreas as a food,

also. English-speaking butchers and cooks (those

few, it seems, who discuss sweetbreads at all

these days) distinguish between "throat

sweetbreads" (thymus) and "heart sweetbreads"

(pancreas).

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Fri, 13 Feb 2004 12:40:21 -0500 (EST)

From: <jenne at fiedlerfamily.net>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] P: brains, a clever food

To: <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

If you are looking for brain recipes, there are a number of them in

Welserin, referred to as "A clever food".

 

-- Pani Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika jenne at fiedlerfamily.net

 

 

Date: Fri, 13 Feb 2004 10:39:18 -0800 (PST)

From: Christiane <christianetrue at earthlink.net>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re: Cruel food

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

====================

Please, do anyone have recipes or stories about that kind of food? I am

now completing my long term project about the cookbook I am writing,

about "cruel food". And I need recipes and tales about lamb testicles and

brains and all people in different cultural times has eaten.

My idea with the book is punctualize its not any "forbidden or

disgusting food", everything is eadible if you need or fancy doing that.

Have now  an enormous bibliography about these kind of alimentary

taboos.

Ana

======================

 

Initially upon joining the SCA, I did some research into Florentine

cibreo, a dish that features chicken livers, chicken hearts, chicken

kidneys, chicken wattles and combs, and the kicker, an ingredient I

turned to the cook's list to answer just to make sure my understanding

of Italian held up ... "beans of chicken" is what the phrase literally

translates to, but they don't mean legumes. Yes, the magic ingredient

is rooster testicles.

 

Have managed to locate places to get most of the ingredients (except

the wattles and combs), but haven't dared to make it yet. Who besides

me would actually eat it?

 

Gianotta

 

 

Date: Mon, 10 May 2004 17:25:21 +0200 (CEST)

From: Finne Boonen <fboonen at vub.ac.be>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Food and squeamishness

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

On Mon, 10 May 2004, Susan Fox-Davis wrote:

>>>  I was wondering, has anyone ever served food at a feast such as a  whole

>>> pig's or ox's head, or a whole piglet, or, basically, anything that can

>>> stare right back at you while you munch on it?

>> 

> I'm going to ask the white-girl-city-kid question:  how exactly do you

> eat a pig's or ox's head, when it is presented whole like that?  Which

> parts are edible, or at least tastier than others?  Which are nasty or

> too cartiliginous to bother with?  I take it that the eyes are no good,

 

if your going old icelandic (possibly scandinavian in general) you'd be

trying very hard to get a sheep's ear, the testicles are ussually served

pickled. (I don't like them particularly much tho)

 

Finne

 

 

Date: Tue, 24 Aug 2004 13:07:24 -0700 (PDT)

From: Christiane <christianetrue at earthlink.net>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Cibreo (was Re: black broth)

To: Mairi Ceilidh <jjterlouw at earthlink.net>,     Cooks within the SCA

        <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Ooooo, recipe please?  And, where the heck did you find the cocks combs?  I

live in a culinary desert, and have trouble finding all but the most common

things.

 

Mairi Ceilidh

==================================================

 

OK, you asked for it <g>. I have not actually tried to cook this yet;  

I've instead taken the time to track down the ingredients.

 

First of all, I am fortunate enough to live very near Philly and it has  

a Chinatown and an Italian Market with some poulterers. Beans of  

chicken (fagioli di pollo) have been translated for me as rooster  

testicles or unlaid eggs. The rooster testicles (sometimes referred to  

as "rooster fries") are available in Chinatown; I have been told there  

are coxcombs, too, in dried form, but I think I would wind up going to  

the Market as I could probably get them fresh there, as opposed to  

dried.

 

Chicken livers, of course, are easily gotten.

 

The unlaid eggs the second recipe calls for, a friendly chicken farmer  

is the only way I can think to get them.

 

The really cool thing about cibreo is that they are still cooking it in  

Florence, and there are lots of variations on the Web, if you can read  

Italian. I also looked for it under English, and found the second one.

 

Fegatini, creste, rognoncini e fagioli di pollo gr. 400 (about 400  

grams of livers, crests, kidneys -- veal kidneys have been suggested  

--, and rooster testicles -- keep in mind that "fagioli di pollo can  

also mean unlaid eggs!)

Burro gr. 50  (50 grams of butter)

tuorli d'uovo 2 (two beaten eggs or egg yolks)

porri 1 (1 leek)

Farina bianca (white flour, couple of tablespoons or however much you  

need to thicken the sauce to your satisfaction)

Brodo di carne q.b. (chicken broth, I'd use a small can)

limone 1?2 (half a lemon)

Zenzero q.b.

Sale e pepe (salt and pepper to taste)

 

Boil the wattles and crests in slightly salted water until tender,  

drain and set aside. Saute the livers, chopped-up leek, and kidneys  in  

the butter, add the rooster testicles, saute until tender. If using the  

unlaid eggs, just saute the livers and kidneys until tender. I'd add in  

some white wine into the saute, if you can get your hands on Vin Santo,  

that's very traditionally used. Heat the broth in a second saucepan,  

when just barely warm, add the beaten egg, then the lemon juice.  If  

you're using the unlaid eggs at this point, simmer them in the broth  

and egg and lemon for a few minutes, add this to the livers, crests,  

and kidneys, simmer for a few more minutes, add salt, pepper, and more  

lemon juice to taste. Serve it over pasta or rice.

 

Here's another I found with some quaint history attached:

 

Cibreo, the sauce of chicken livers, crests, wattles, and the little  

yellow unborn eggs, was so beloved of that legendary buona forchetta  

("a good fork," as the Italians call a good eater) Caterina de' Medici,  

that she literally almost ate herself to death on it. She ate so much  

cibreo one evening that she took violently ill and barely survived. If  

eaten in moderation, however, those results do not follow, and  

especially if you can find the crests and eggs (get to know a chicken  

farmer), you may understand why Caterina went to such extremes.

 

Ingredients

Coarse-grained salt

1/12 pound chicken breasts

1/12 pound wattles

1/12 pound unlaid eggs

1/2 small red onion, cleaned

5 or 6 sprigs Italian parsley, leaves only

3 tablespoons (1-1/2 ounces) sweet butter

1 tablespoon unbleached all-purpose flour

3/4 pound chicken livers (including some cut up veal kidneys, optional)

1 cup dry white wine

1/2 cup meat or chicken broth, preferably homemade

1 extra-large egg yolk

  Salt

  Freshly ground black pepper to taste

 

Preparation

 

Heat 2 cups of salted water in a saucepan. When the water reaches the  

boiling point, put in the crests and wattles (setting aside the unlaid  

eggs) and cook them for about 5 minutes. Drain the crests and wattles  

and cool them under running water.

 

Chop the onion and parsley finely.

 

Heat the butter in a saucepan over medium heat, and when it is hot, mix  

in the flour with wooden spoon and sauté for 1 minute. Then add chopped  

onion and parsley and sauté, stirring constantly for 3 or 4 minutes  

more. Add the whole chicken livers and the boiled crests and wattles,  

and then, after 3 or 4 minutes, the wine. Lower the heat and allow the  

wine to evaporate very slowly (about 5 or 6 minutes).

 

While the wine is evaporating, heat the broth in a second saucepan.  

When lukewarm (and no warmer), remove the broth from the flame and mix  

in the egg yolk.

 

When the wine has evaporated, taste for salt and pepper. Add the broth  

with the egg yolk and the unlaid eggs and stir very well. Let simmer  

for 2 to 3 minutes more, until the chicken livers, crests, and wattles  

are soft.

 

Remove the saucepan from the flame and serve very hot.

 

Note: The sauce is used both for fresh pasta (tagliatelle con cibreo, )  

or for a main dish (ciambella con cibreo, ).

 

Now, cibreo has been traditionally considered a peasant dish; but I  

think the addition of unlaid eggs really elevates it a bit, because  

think about it: why slay a nice fat laying hen in her prime for one  

meal? Using the unlaid eggs is also thrifty, though, so even if the hen  

is being killed, it's not going entirely to waste.

 

Gianotta

 

 

Date: Fri, 10 Sep 2004 13:28:33 -0700

From: Susan Fox-Davis <selene at earthlink.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Menagier and stuff was Charcuterie

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Working from my own memory:  cracklings show up early in Platina, within

the first dozen or so recipes.  The same recipe, which says you can do

the same with chicken skin, is my period documentation for grebenes.

 

 

Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 09:45:35 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Rilles, rillons, rillettes was Charcuterie

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Went looking and came across this title.

Don't know if this will help but there is a book on the topic--

(no I don't own this one)

Breton, Olivier is he author. The title is

Rilles, rillons, rillettes. Paris 1994.

2841020126

It was reviewed by Alan  Davidson in PPC 49.

It's the only book catalogued under "rillettes--history" according to  

OCLC.

Amazon France has copies.

This might provide more informaion.

 

Johnnae llyn Lewis

 

Continuing the thread From last week when Master A wrote:

and I would not be at all surprised if Powers has translated as

cracklings something very much like rillons, which are rillettes' big

brother.

 

 

Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 14:10:21 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Re: Rilles, Rillons, Rillettes

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.or>

 

nickiandme at att.net wrote:

> Rilles, Rillons, Rillettes (L'Aventure de la Véritable Rillette du  

> Mans), Oliver Breton

> was reviewed in PETITS PROPOS CULINAIRES ssues 49 and 55.

> Kateryn

 

I think the 49, 55 means it's on page of 55 of issue 49 of PPC.

It is NOT in PPC 55 as far as I can find.

I just checked both issues which at hand as I have a complete run

from 1979 on the shelf.

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Thu, 21 Oct 2004 11:14:50 -0700 (PDT)

From: Christiane <christianetrue at earthlink.net>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re: Bless the Amish/Cibreo

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

In a message dated 10/21/2004 2:40:06 AM Eastern Daylight Time, Stefan

li Rous <StefanliRous at austin.rr.com> writes:

> Okay, what is "cibreo"? And what "parts" are in it?

 

An Tuscan Chicken giblet stew topped with a sauce made of egg yolks

and lemon.

 

Andrea

------------------------------

Besides livers and kidneys, it traditionally also includes coxcombs,

rooster "parts," and embryonic chicken eggs. Caterina de' Medici,

legend says, loved it and once ate so much of it at a banquet that she

nearly died.

 

Gianotta

 

 

Date: Thu, 21 Oct 2004 19:57:32 -0400

From: Bill Fisher <liamfisher at gmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Bless the Amish!

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

On Thu, 21 Oct 2004 01:40:06 -0500, Stefan li Rous

<stefanlirous at austin.rr.com> wrote:

> Gianotta mentioned:

>> I finally got a chance to go to the Amish market that opened up in my

>> town last year. Their butcher shop is amazing; and I found out that I

>> can special order all of the parts I need to make cibreo! I may even

>> be

>> able to get the eggs! Woohoo!

> Okay, what is "cibreo"? And what "parts" are in it?

 

Cibreo

chee-BREH-oh

 

A Tuscan stew of chicken giblets, very popular in nineteenth century

cooking. According to Pellegrino Artusi's 1891 recipe, the giblets are

stewed in broth with butter, salt and pepper, then topped with a sauce

of egg yolk cooked with lemon juice, flour and broth. The origin of

the name cibreo is unclear, but over the years it has come to mean

mixture or combination

 

> And "the" eggs? I assume by this you are talking about something other

> than chicken eggs?

 

Having grown up on them, jumbo brown eggs :-)  probably anyway.

 

And fresh too.

 

Cadoc

 

 

Date: Fri, 22 Oct 2004 10:03:57 -0500 (GMT-05:00)

From: Christiane <christianetrue at earthlink.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Re: Bless the Amish/Cibreo

To: Bill Fisher <liamfisher at gmail.com>,    Cooks within the SCA

        <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Cadoc says:

You mean the non-laid eggs from slaughtered chickens?

 

---Yes, those are it. It took me forever to figure out what the Italian  

recipes said, too, because they all called for "beans of chicken" (ceci  

di pollo). I am pretty sure these are rooster testes (Italians love  

their food puns on private parts).

 

Gianotta

 

 

Date: Fri, 22 Oct 2004 14:21:26 -0700 (PDT)

From: Christiane <christianetrue at earthlink.net>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re: Coxcombs

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

Stefan responded to another post:

> I think I remember us discussing coxcombs here before. Somehow though,

> I don't think this dish would go over well at an SCA feast unless maybe

> the Royalty ate it. Do we have any adventuresome Royalty? :-)

 

Were they actually _eaten_?  I've seen them used as decorations on 17th

century plates but didn't get the impression that they were actually

ingested.

 

Alys Katharine

---------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Here's a modern recipe from D'Agostino's in NYC, which calls for

livers, crests, wattles, and unlaid eggs, as well as some chicken

breast:

 

http://www.dagnyc.com/RecipeShow.cfm?recipe_id=19382

 

It also cites the Caterina legend.

 

Every other recipe I have found online has been in Italian, and almost

all refer to the Caterina legend. Makes me want to confirm if that is

the case, that she loved cibreo and nearly ate herself to death on it,

and what was in the Renaissance version.

 

Gianotta

 

 

Date: Wed, 07 Sep 2005 21:26:53 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] A Challenge to Find a Dish

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>,

        lilinah at earthlink.net

 

U is for Urchonys in Servise from the Arundel 334

number 86  line number 343

The Arundel 334 is that misidentified manuscript that Warner published in the

1790's. It's also part of the Household Ordinances collection from 1790.

They numbered it 344. I have both versions, including the one on microfilm.

 

Urchonys in Servise

Take the mawe of a grette fwyne, and v. or vi. of pygges mawes, and fylle hom

fulle of the fame farfe, and fowe hom fafte, and fethe hom a lytel while, and make prikkes of pafte, and fry hom, and fet hom in the mawse made aftur, and yrchon, and do hom on a fpete, and rofte hom, and endore hom as to fore, and ferve hit forth.

 

Substitute the "s" for the long '"f".

 

Nice dish for a Muslim girl, eh?

 

Johnnae

 

lilinah at earthlink.net wrote:

> Well, SCA-period Muslims don't really have "last names", just father's

> names, tribal names, location names, job names, personal

> characteristic names, devotional names, etc.

> So going with my personal name, "Urtatim"...

> Can anyone think of recipes that start with "U"? I'm stumped...

 

 

Date: Wed, 22 Feb 2006 10:12:15 -0500

From: "Barbara Benson" <voxeight at gmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] medieval recipes using tripe

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

In my current project I just happened to just copy a tripe recipe from

Martino. I have never, and most likely will never, prepared or served

it. Just not my thing. Were I to, it looks like a tasty way to cook

something that has relatively little taste of it's own. Switch out

"tripe" for "Black Eyed Peas" and it would be a tasty dish I would

think. C

 

Considering how new the publication of this translation of Martino is,

I doubt you have it in your file yet:

 

Tripe pottage: First of all, tripe should be well cleaned and well

washed; make sure that it is white. To make it tastier, cook well with

a bone taken from salt-cured meat, but to preserve its whiteness do

not add salt; and when done cooking, cut into small pieces and add

some mint, sage, and salt, and bring to a boil. Then serve in bowls,

topped with spices, and with cheese, if desired.

 

Glad Tidings,

Serena da Riva

 

> Stefan> I think I may have one or two recipes using tripe in my  

> organ-meats- msg file. I've forgotten, but what is tripe?

> Does anyone have any period recipes using tripe? Have you cooked the

> recipe? Did you like it?

 

 

Date: Thu, 23 Feb 2006 06:52:20 EST

From: Bronwynmgn at aol.com

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] TI Article

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

Stefan writes about Daniel's idea of serving cold organ meats:

<<Do you really intend to serve them cold? Some of those are  disliked

because of their texture. It seems to me that serving them cold  would

intensify that problem.>>

 

At least one that I know of, A Dish Meete for Sumer (can't remember the

source and the spelling is probably wrong, too) is a dish of chicken bits and is

intended to be served as a cold supper dish.  One of our household members

also brings a chicken liver pie to Pennsic that we eat cold for lunch (well, she

eats it for breakfast, too, but that's a bit much for me).

 

Brangwayna

 

 

Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2006 06:27:25 -0500

From: Daniel Myers <eduard at medievalcookery.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Sows Utter stuffed with Fried Baby Mice.

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

On Mar 28, 2006, at 12:32 AM, Stefan li Rous wrote:

 

> Radei mentioned:

>>>> 

> Sows Utter stuffed with Fried Baby Mice.

>> Recipes for mice, Anyone?  (couldn't resist....) Berti

> <<<

> Oh? Period recipe, please?

 

The cow's udder part is pretty easy, but I think the stuffing would

be more difficult.

 

Cow's udder.

For cow's udder which has been well washed and cooked, & put on a

towel so it can rest well, & put it on a spit.  For the udder's

sauce , take two or three pieces of toasted white bread, which are

not burned at all, & take some broth with verjuice to temper the

bread, & mix with four or five egg yolks, & put therein nutmeg,

cinnamon, ginger, saffron, & sugar, & let it boil well together, &

put it on the roasted udder.

[Ouverture de Cuisine]

http://www.medievalcookery.com/notes/ouverture.shtm

 

I suppose the mice could be skinned, soaked in vinegar to dissolve

the bones (as was done with small birds) and then fried, but I can't

find any recipes to verify.

 

- Doc

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

   Edouard Halidai  (Daniel Myers)

 

 

Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2006 15:23:00 -0500

From: "Radei Drchevich" <radei at moscowmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Sows Utter stuffed with Fried Baby Mice.

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Appears in an 1st century Roman text.  I will have to Find the  

reference again.

 

basics the baby mice <pre-hairing out> are fryed in olive oil, stuffed  

in the sows utter and baked.  Is mentioned in "those about to dei  

Salute you" as well as "Now I lay me down to Eat", original source I  

believe is Pliny.

 

Those records are still paper, so may take a while to find the  

reference.

 

> Radei mentioned:

>>>> 

> Sows Utter stuffed with Fried Baby Mice.

>> Recipes for mice, Anyone?  (couldn't resist....) Berti

> <<<

> Oh? Period recipe, please?

> Stefan

> --------

> THLord Stefan li Rous    Barony of Bryn Gwlad    Kingdom of Ansteorra

 

Radei

Vasil House of the Red Shark

Guild of St. Camillus de Lellis

 

 

Date: Wed, 29 Mar 2006 08:07:56 -0700

From: "Sue Clemenger" <mooncat at in-tch.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Sows Utter stuffed with Fried Baby Mice.

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

I think it's a typo/misspelling of "udder," is all...

There are a number of recipes in my copy of Apecius that deal with  

the, uh, less commonly used parts of an animal, including this one.

--Maire, who got really confused on what the heck a "sow's matrix" was

supposed to be...if it was a uterus, why didn't they just *say* so???

 

 

Date: Mon, 3 Apr 2006 08:02:48 -0500

From: "Terry Decker" <t.d.decker at worldnet.att.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Sows Utter stuffed with Fried Baby Mice.

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Not stuffed with mice, but...

 

Sumen Plenum:  teritur piper, careum, echinus salsus, consuitur et sic

coquitur. manducatur cum allece sinapi.

 

--Apicius 262

 

Stuffed udder.  Pound pepper, caraway and salted sea urchine.  Sew up and

thus cook.  You eat it with allec mustard.

 

Presumably you stuff the sea urchin mix in the udder before sewing it up.

There is probably a dropped "and" between allec and mustard.  Allec is a

sauce for boiled meats.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Mon, 03 Apr 2006 09:17:11 -0400

From: "Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius"

        <adamantius.magister at verizon.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Sows Utter stuffed with Fried Baby Mice.

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

On Apr 3, 2006, at 9:02 AM, Terry Decker wrote:

> Presumably you stuff the sea urchine mix in the udder before sewing

> it up. There is probably a dropped "and" between allec and

> mustard.  Allec is a sauce for boiled meats.

 

My recollection is that allec is halec, the solid-phase dregs that

are a by-product of liquamen or garum production. It does

occasionally turn up in sauces, though.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Mon, 3 Apr 2006 18:11:21 -0500

From: "Terry Decker" <t.d.decker at worldnet.att.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Sows Utter stuffed with Fried Baby Mice.

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> My recollection is that allec is halec, the solid-phase dregs that are a

> by-product of liquamen or garum production. It does  occasionally turn up

> in sauces, though.

> Adamantius

 

Right you are.  I was thinking of allecatum, which is a sauce made from

allec.

 

"The so-called liquamen is made as follows:  the entrails of fish are thrown

into a vessel and salted.  Take small fish, either atherinae, or small red

mullet, or sprats, or anchovy, or  any other small fish, and salt all this

together and leave to dry in the sun, shaking it frequently.  When it has

become dry from the heat extract the garum from oit as follows; take a long

fine meshed basket and place it in the middle of the vessel with the

above-mentioned fish, and in this way the so-called liquamen, put through

the basket, can be taken up.    The residue is allec."

 

--Geoponica, Book XX, Chapter 46

 

The word appears as both allec and hallec.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Sun, 30 Apr 2006 20:29:51 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] What NOT to serve at feast...

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Actually that date is more likely in error-- That's a Gervase Markham

recipe according to another source.

It's given as 1683 which would make it a late edition. Here it's given as--

If you are curious, your friendly neighbourhood purveyor of beeves might

source you an udder, and you can try Gervase Markham’s recipe (1683),

which sounds good enough for guests.

To roast a Cows Udder

http://theoldfoodie.blogspot.com/2006/03/archive-february.html

 

It's on page 89 of the Michael Best edited Markham.

 

Johnnae

 

marilyn traber 011221 wrote:

> Not necessarily. I find the article to be more of an expression of the

> ignorance of the author, than a collection of repulsive recipes.

> Recipe the first:

> Cinnamon Sugar Dusted Cow's Udder:

> Take a Cows Udder, and first boyl it well snipped ~The English  

> Housewife, 1863

> First off, this recipe is post period by quite a bit- 1863. And, if one

> wishes to eat a cow's udder, this seems a reasonable way to do it,

> considering mammaries of any species are very fatty. It looks to me  

> that this dish would be akin to a pudding.

> Phlip

 

 

Date: Thu, 8 Jun 2006 10:33:09 EDT

From: Bronwynmgn at aol.com

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Jumbo Shrimp in Caramel Pepper-Garlic Sauce

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

 

In a message dated 6/8/2006 10:18:23 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,

tom.vincent at yahoo.com writes:

 

<<What *really* didn't go over well were the chicken hearts marinated in

cider vinegar, parsley and cinnamon.  Fourteen pounds of  chicken  

hearts.>>

 

They went over well at my table.  We only had 6 people at it and we  ate most

of the bowl we were given.  Even one of the people who can be picky about

food textures ate a few.

 

Well, OK, two of us ate most of them.  The two who are adventurous eaters.

14 lbs was really a bit much; I don't think I'd have made that much if I was

feeding 300, and there weren't nearly that many people  eating...

David's a good cook and getting really into period foods; now we need to

work on portion sizes....

 

Brangwayna

 

 

Date: Mon, 21 Aug 2006 08:47:51 -0400

From: "Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius"

        <adamantius.magister at verizon.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Tripe dressing

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Cc: Foxton Bill <bill_foxtonobe at yahoo.co.uk>

 

On Aug 21, 2006, at 2:15 AM, Stefan li Rous wrote:

> I just got back from Pennsic Saturday night and this message was

> waiting in my mailbox with a question about tripe. Here is Bill's

> original question, my reply and his reply to this.

> As I mentioned to him, I thought some of you might be able to answer

> his questions about tripe and I thought some of you might be

> interested in this subject as well. Raw tripe eaten with salt, pepper

> and a sprinkling of vinegar? Certainly sounds plausibly medieval, but

> not my idea of breakfast.

> Please remember to copy him on any replies since he isn't on this

> list.

> Thanks,

>     Stefan

 

Hello, Stefan and Bill...

 

I'll reply to various points more or less in order, but I think

there's some confusion at work here.

 

> Begin forwarded message:

>> From: Foxton Bill <bill_foxtonobe at yahoo.co.uk>

>> Date: August 21, 2006 12:54:21 AM CDT

>> To: Stefan li Rous <StefanliRous at austin.rr.com>

>> Subject: Re: Tripe dressing

>> 

>> Dear Stefan, In the north of England they sell what they  call

>> dressed tripe. Tripe dressing is or was a trade centered around the

>> town of Darwin in Lancashire. I believe there is only one shop

>> still operating there now. The tripe in the shop window is very

>> white and is obviously uncooked. It has a slightly slimy and

>> gelatinous texture. Here in Kosovo it has a slightly off white

>> appearance and is as it comes out of the cow. I would be happy to

>> try and wash it and cook it as it comes after a thorough washing

>> but I have a feeling that there may be a process which I am not

>> aware of which could be soaking it in a liquid with something added

>> to get the very white appearance. I am happy to give you permission

>> to post my message to the list. Thanks for answereing. Incidentally

>> in the north of england people actually eat tripe raw with salt and

>> pepper with a sprinkling of vinegar. Yuk! Best regards Bill

 

I think there are different ways of treating tripe before sale not

only in different countries, but also at different times. The short

answer is that as far as I know, I don't think it's possible for most

tripe to be eaten raw. There may be exceptions, such as if you're

taking tripe from an unweaned calf or something like that, but in

general, tripe is much too tough to consider eating raw without some

kind of treatment. It would be like eating raw animal hide.

 

I have cookbooks with text and recipes that suggest that in the USA,

where both Stefan and I live, tripe was sold by many butchers in a

pre-cooked form -- parboiled -- until approximately the 1950's or

60's. Now, however, it seems to be sold raw or simply blanched or

scalded before cutting, chilling and packing, and definitely requires

further cooking. Most recently, the tripe I've seen in the ordinary

supermarkets is frozen, cut into blocks, packed and thawed, so this

may or may not eliminate the blanching step.

 

My suspicion is that in the north of England, and in France, tripe

can still be purchased in some places in pre-cooked form, after which

you can eat it without further cooking, with vinegar and oil (this is

also common with pig's and calves heads, similarly cooked), braised

in cider, rolled in breadcrumbs and fried, or whatever. In Poland and

places like the Ukraine, and in markets elsewhere that cater to

immigrants from these places, you can buy tripe cooked and packed in

jelly (which is not as bad as it sounds ;-)  ). There are also a

number of Chinese tripe dishes that call for uncooked tripe to be

marinated in baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) solution to tenderize

it before stir-frying or steaming, but I'm not aware of this being

done anywhere else.

 

I think that what you're seeing in Kosovo is probably whole stomachs,

washed but not blanched. What you would do is wash the tripe, place

it into a large pot of salted, boiling water, boil for a few minutes,

skim off any foam that rises, and drain. Discard the water, rinse the

tripe in cold water, scrape/cut off any large pieces of fat or areas

with dark spots, and cut it into more manageable pieces (which may or

may not be the pieces you're going to serve it in). You can then

simmer it in fresh water, stock, wine, ale, or any combination

thereof (milk in parts of England and Ireland, with plenty of onions

and black pepper), like a stew, which you can serve as is, or cooked

down until the liquid will jelly when cold (tripe has a lot of

collagen). Or, take it out of the liquid when it's almost done, drain

until dry, and fry or saute it.

 

I hope this helps; I haven't given recipes, exactly...

 

Phil Troy / Adamantius

 

 

Date: Mon, 21 Aug 2006 10:15:57 -0500

From: "Pat Griffin" <mordonna22 at yahoo.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Tripe dressing

To: "'Cooks within the SCA'" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>,

        <bill_foxtonobe at yahoo.co.uk>

 

This is from my article in the Florilegium on butchering a pig.  It would

apply as well to "tripe" (which is a cow's stomach) as to "maw" which is a

pig's stomach.

 

Carefully drain the contents into an offal pit.  (A hog was generally

starved for a day or two before butchering to help with this process.)  The

stomach (known as the "Maw") should be split open and rinsed thoroughly

three or four times, then the inner lining should be scraped repeatedly

until all the green and brown slime is removed, then rinsed several more

times. Carefully rinse the intestines several times.  Turn them  

inside out and treat the same.

 

Lady Anne du Bosc

Known as Mordonna The Cook

 

 

Date: Sat, 07 Oct 2006 14:26:37 -0400

From: "Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius"

        <adamantius.magister at verizon.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Chicken feet...

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

On Oct 7, 2006, at 1:35 PM, Tara Sersen Boroson wrote:

 

> ... in stock.  Scald and peel or throw in as they are?

> I've always thrown them in as they are.  But there was a discussion on a

> traditional foods forum on the subject, and people seemed to be split on

> the issue, with perhaps a slight majority leaning toward scalding and

> peeling.  What do you wise people say?

 

Do wise guys count?

 

> Some of the folks in the peel camp were proclaiming, "The chickens walk

> around in shit."  I argued that the feet are already scalded with the

> rest of the bird before plucking, then agitated greatly in the

> electric plucker, so they're as clean as they're gonna get.

 

I agree, more or less. Sometimes I see chicken feet with little

scraps of papery snake-skin-looking stuff, which I just pinch off

with my fingers. Many people like to trim off any claws that may be

there, but that's probably if you're eating the chicken feet, say in

"garbage", or steamed with black bean sauce for dim sum.

 

For the stock pot, hey, protein is protein, and if you're going all

classical, yes, all the meats and bones sometimes get a blanching,

and it wouldn't hurt here, either, but it's brought to a boil and

simmered for hours anyway, so for most purposes it's probably not

really necessary. No chicken-toe cooties are going to survive.

 

>   People argued that

> they were gross, with their callouses and stuff.  Well, are callouses

> going to affect the final product?  I doubt it.  Just strikes me as a

> huge expense of time when I don't see much benefit.

 

For the most part, I'd agree.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Sat, 7 Oct 2006 14:47:16 -0400

From: "grizly" <grizly at mindspring.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Chicken feet...

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

-----Original Message-----

>>>>> For the stock pot, hey, protein is protein, and if you're going

all classical, yes, all the meats and bones sometimes get a blanching,

and it wouldn't hurt here, either, but it's brought to a boil and

simmered for hours anyway, so for most purposes it's probably not

really necessary. No chicken-toe cooties are going to survive.  < < < < <

 

Should I want to use the feet of chicken, I'd think that a quick cleanse to

remove any stray intoxication lingering about (toxins aren't killed by the

heat) and into the pot.  The bugs are wiped out inside of a couple of

minutes at boil, and anything else is in the realm of food discrimination

ideology.

 

Just like eating a 3" African Hissing Cockroach for a discount into Six

Flags on Halloween Fright Night . . . . it's all up to your personal

sensibilities.

 

niccolo difrancesco

(won't likely eat the feet, but would used them for stock)

 

 

Date: Fri, 05 Jan 2007 13:29:01 -0500

From: "Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius" <adamantius1 at verizon.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] haggis question

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

On Jan 5, 2007, at 1:12 PM, Stanza693 at wmconnect.com wrote:

> I guess what I was really asking was since the Irish seem to have been known

> to eat tripe, does anyone think they might have thought to stuff it with

> something to make it more tasty?  I know, the argument that "if they had the

> technology, they would have done it" doesn't fly.  However, I'm still learning

> what leaps can be made logically and what are crazy figments of my

> imagination.

 

In part, the problem is that it depends on what you mean by tripe;

not all ruminant stomachs are equally good for stuffing, since as

they cook they can become very tender and sort of gelatinous, again,

depending n which stomach it turns out to be. The standard honeycomb

beef tripe (which is what most people are thinking of when they hear

"tripe", isn't the best for stuffing, but there are various other gut

sections that are more appropriate, ranging from things like hog

maws, which are somewhat meaty, like a giant chicken gizzard, to

various beef middles and caps, generally actually part of the large

intestine of the animal.

 

Similarly, I expect there's some difference between the various

stomachs of a sheep which make some better for use as a large sausage

casing than others.

 

> I didn't copy out the rest of the author's discussion, but she does make

> mention of the fact that traditionally, sheep/pig/cow stomach was eaten but

> that it is almost exclusively beef now  and that the best tripe actually

> comes from the second stomach of the cow.  She says, however, that tripe is

> very bland and relies on accompanying sauces for flavour.

 

That's true. Tripe is very rich, but doesn't have much of a

distinctive flavor, and what it does have that is distinct is

generally not desirable, so it's washed until it has very little

flavor of its own.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Wed, 24 Dec 2008 21:56:16 -0600

From: "Daniel & Elizabeth Phelps" <dephelps at embarqmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] *cough* Need recipe ideas

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

<<< You see, we have a new "International" store in our area. And they have an, um, unusual selection of meats available so I was, um, wondering - anyone

got a good idea of how to cook "Beef Pizzel"? 'Cause I think the "serving

High Table" possibilities* are quite amusing. >>>

 

Well I don't have a period recipe at hand but perhaps this from "Two Fat

Ladies Full Throttle" will enlighten.

 

Penis Stew

 

340g/1 lb of penis, ram's or bull's

3 tbsp oil

1 onion chopped

2 cloves of garlic, peeled and chopped

1 tsp coriander seeds, crushed

1 large tomato, chopped

freshly ground black pepper

1 tsp cumin seeds, crushed

1 tsp salt

 

Scald the penis, drain and clean it.  Place in a sauce pan, cover with cold

water, bring to a boil, remove scum and simmer for 10 minutes.  Drain and

slice. Heat the oil in a large frying pan, add the onion,, garlic and

coriander and fry until the onion is golden.  Add the penis slices and fry

on both sides for a few minutes.  Stir in the remaining ingredients with a

good grinding of pepper, and add a little water to cover and bring to a

boil. Lower the heat, cover and simmer for about 2 hours or until tender.

Add a little water from time to time if necessary to prevent burning.

 

Well that should give some ideas anyway.

 

 

Date: Sun, 07 Jun 2009 11:06:43 -0400

From: Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius <adamantius1 at verizon.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Please Define Trotter

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

On Jun 6, 2009, at 3:03 PM, Suey wrote:

<<< Dictionaries define trotter as pig or lamb's feet. In the slaughter  

I refer to the hooves, not feet when the slaughter man is shopping  

up this area. He gives me what I call trotters, the area he chops  

off with a hatchet between the hoof and the lower joint of the leg.  

How would you properly define trotter?

Suey >>>

 

In the case of pigs, the trotter is usually the hind foot (the front  

feet in English are sometimes referred to in 17th, 18th and 19th  

century recipes as petitoes, and are regarded as more delicate and, I  

suspect, cut off shorter).

 

In the US they are generally sold with the horny hoof material removed  

(possibly blanched or scalded), but with the toes otherwise intact. In  

generic "non-ethnic" supermarkets (not that Ward and June Cleaver are  

buying too many pigs' feet in any case), they tend to be cut off  

pretty short, with most or all of the hock or shank sold separately.  

In Chinese or Italian markets (and for all I know, others) it's  

possible to find them with a very long shank section attached, with  

plenty of muscle meat and the option to debone and stuff them.

 

I believe I've heard of the term "petitoes" used in connection with  

lamb and pigs, but not with sheep, so maybe in some cases trotters is  

used as a generic term for all feet, and in other cases, not.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Sun, 7 Jun 2009 02:33:34 -0500

From: Kihe Blackeagle <kihebard at hotmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Please Define Trotter

To: SCA Cooks <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Unfortunately (or not), I was born late enough that my grandfather was no longer slaughtering and smoking on the farm -- BUT I was still raised to think of pig's trotters as including the hooves, ankle ("knuckles"), and some portion of the leg above, but not usually rising to the level of the knee.  

 

Pickled pig's feet as I have seen them sold modernly generally do not include the hoof itself, just the ankle and fleshy parts just above and just below -- but may also be labelled "pickled pig's knuckles" in that case.

 

Adieu, Amra / ttfn - Mike / Pax ... Kihe

 

Mike C. Baker / Kihe Blackeagle

 

 

Date: Fri, 1 Jan 2010 11:35:15 -0600

From: "wyldrose" <wyldrose at tds.net>

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] 'Tis the season.

 

With all. the lamenting of not being able to get a sheep's stomach or lungs

or what not, you could probably get it for nearly free if you go to a meat

locker in a rural area.  This is where a butcher goes out and butchers and

then cuts up a farmer's animal for a price, and then stores it for him till

he has room for the meat at home.  Many times these butchers will let you

know who he/she is butchering for and you can call the farmer and then be

gifted with whatever rare delicacy they have (or pay the farmer a price).

In the area I live, I know if I wanted to get a sheep's stomach there at

least three or four places I could call and probably get one.  Or at least

that is how it works in Minnesota.

 

                      Kay

 

 

Date: Sat, 1 May 2010 21:24:34 -0400

From: Robin Carroll-Mann <rcarrollmann at gmail.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] [oysters

 

On Sat, May 1, 2010 at 9:16 PM, Elaine Koogler <kiridono at gmail.com> wrote:

<<< For Rocky Mountain oysters? I would doubt it. For regular oysters,

yes...but, at least from what I have always known, mountain oysters are a

euphomism for bulls' testicles. >>>

 

Yes, I know.  There are recipes in Scappi/Granado for dishes made with

the testicles of lambs, calves, and kids.  I assume there are some in

other period cookbooks.

 

Brighid ni Chiarain

 

 

Date: Mon, 3 May 2010 02:48:25 -0700 (PDT)

From: Linda Larson <linda_a_larson at yahoo.com>

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Oysters

 

If you butcher a rooster yourself, you will find his testicles inside the cavity near the backbone towards his hind end. They do not descend the way that mammals' do. As for whether they are commercially available, I would doubt it. I wonder if you could get a butcher to save them for you? They are not very big, so you would probably need quite a few if you are experimenting. I've never tried them.

 

Lidia Allen

 

 

Date: Mon, 03 May 2010 12:21:00 -0400

From: "Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius" <adamantius1 at verizon.net>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Oysters

 

On May 3, 2010, at 5:48 AM, Linda Larson wrote:

<<< If you butcher a rooster yourself, you will find his testicles inside the cavity near the backbone towards his hind end. They do not descend the way that mammals' do.  As for whether they are commercially available, I would doubt it. I wonder if you could get a butcher to save them for you?  They are not very big, so you would probably need quite a few if you are experimenting.  I've never tried them.  

 

Lidia Allen >>>

 

Calvin Schwabe reports in "Unmentionable Cuisine" that some chicken (and, I think he says, turkey) packers ship frozen packs of testicles from poultry...

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Mon, 3 May 2010 12:33:56 -0400

From: Robin Carroll-Mann <rcarrollmann at gmail.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Oysters

 

On Mon, May 3, 2010 at 11:14 AM, Susan Fox <selene at earthlink.net> wrote:

<<< I used to see them for sale at the Chinese market, labeled "Rooster Fries." But I tended to call them "Chicken McNuggets." :-) >>>

 

I found a photo of rooster fries compared to a kidney bean.  They're

larger than I expected.

http://www.clovegarden.com/ingred/bd_chknutz.html

 

Brighid ni Chiarain

 

 

Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2011 19:00:14 -0500 (GMT-05:00)

From: Elise Fleming <alysk at ix.netcom.com>

To: "sca-cooks at ansteorra.org" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Calf's Tail in Risotto

 

Greetings! There is a new post on the Tudor Cook web site

(www.tudorcook.co.uk/forums/) with a link to an article about Heston Blumenthal who said he was inspired by them.  One mention is of "an ancient dish of "rice and flesh", a risotto with a calf's tail, dating from about 1390."  You can find the article at http://tinyurl.com/5v9qfpy .

 

I don't know what the recipe is, but thought the mention of the tail might be of interest.

 

Alys K.

 

 

Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2011 06:53:55 -0500 (GMT-05:00)

From: Elise Fleming <alysk at ix.netcom.com>

To: David Walddon <david at vastrepast.com>,         Cooks within the SCA

        <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Calf's Tail in Risotto

 

Eduardo wrote:

> I just got home from the grocery store and I saw calf's tails! Ranch 99 is >FANTASTIC! I didn't buy them because I thought I would not have a use for >them. Now I do! Must return to the store. Eduardo

 

I had put a query about the original recipe on the Forum and the response was that, basically, food history is being played with.  The implication is that there is no "oxtail and risotto" from 1390, that Blumenthal has been "inspired" (reminds me of Cosman and "Fabulous Feasts") and put the two together, claiming a 1390 recipe as the origin, but no proof, no documentation.  His food tastes good, it is said, but historically we need to take him with more than one grain of salt.  Reminds me of SCAdians who say "Well, they had X in the Middle Ages, and they had Y.  I'll put them together and if I don't have Y, I'll substitute C.  So, here's my period dish..."

 

Alys K.

 

On Jan 27, 2011, at 4:00 PM, Elise Fleming wrote:

Greetings! There is a new post on the Tudor Cook web site

(www.tudorcook.co.uk/forums/) with a link to an article about Heston Blumenthal who said he was inspired by them.  One mention is of "an ancient dish of "rice and flesh", a risotto with a calf's tail, dating from about 1390."  You can find the article at http://tinyurl.com/5v9qfpy .

 

I don't know what the recipe is, but thought the mention of the tail might be of interest.

 

Alys K.

 

 

Date: Sun, 30 Jan 2011 23:00:13 -0500

From: "Philip Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius" <adamantius1 at verizon.net>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] some liver and other offal recipes

 

On Sun, 2011-01-30 at 21:53 -0600, Terry Decker wrote:

<<< Try chitterling, Stefan.  It's a Middle English word for the small intestine

of pigs usually fried or steamed.  In recipes, the word has also been used

to refer to beef intestines. >>>

 

You might also check for tharmes, thermys, and look for recipes for

chaudun (usually these involve intestines of various smaller animals,

such as goose or swan, sometimes various fish or porpoise). Somewhere I

recall an English deer haggis recipe that is not encased in the stomach,

but contains chopped gut (plus fat and other stuff) in the filling...

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Sun, 30 Jan 2011 22:55:57 -0500

From: "Philip Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius" <adamantius1 at verizon.net>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] some liver and other offal recipes

 

On Sun, 2011-01-30 at 21:14 -0600, Stefan li Rous wrote:

Ana commented:

<<< I came back from a month in Montevideo, my old hometown. We ate calf

intestine, really stunning good, it's eaten as a part of the "parrillada" or

barbecue. >>>

 

Interesting. I can buy sausage meat here, which is the sausage without the container. This idea of eating the container without the sausage meat is new, though. :-)

 

How were these served? As a pile of rings? Like you sometimes see with calamari? Or was this cut into strips? or what?  By itself, it sounds thin, filmy and insubstantial. Or was this as pieces mixed in with other pieces of meat?

 

This likely goes back to period, but do we have any mention of it or recipes?

==================

 

FWIW, sausage casings are rarely made from the complete intestine;

normally what you see now is one of the layers, more a membrane than the

vascular and muscle tissue comprising most of the intestine (think about

what an intestine does, anatomically, and whether a sausage casing has

anything like the complexity of design needed).

 

When I see Argentine-style grilled pig intestines, they're short

sections, a few inches long, I guess, with that membrane layer, but also

muscle meat and fat. Between the meat, collagen/gelatin, fat and

caramelization from grilling, they are an incredibly rich and unctuous

food, miles away from empty sausage casing. If you've ever had fried

tripe, they're a bit like that.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Wed, 2 Feb 2011 14:21:39 -0500

From: Sharon Palmer <ranvaig at columbus.rr.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] oxtail soup, Vol 57, Issue 36

 

That being said, there is a wide variety of

dishes in many medieval cookbooks, including dishes like "gruel" and

"garbage". I've even seen medieval recipes that call for a cow's udder,

so I think the lack of an oxtail recipe in the medieval corpus is not

insignificant.

 

3. Offal was (to a degree) valued, with contracts stating who in a

manorial setting was to get certain organs (there are also heaps of

recipes for kidney pies).

===========================

 

Well, garbage didn't mean the same thing then.

 

Among Rumpolt's 2000 recipes are 7 for Udder, I think it was a delicacy.

And about 8 for kidneys (none for kidney pie)

Along with spleen, brain, eyes, tongue, stomach,

lungs, throat, tripe, intestines, feet, and

others.

 

And I just noticed an Ox tail recipe.  Not soup though.

 

Ochsen 73. Eyngemachten Ochsenschwantz/ setz jn

zu in einem Wasser/ vnd la? an die statt sieden/

heb die Br?h davon auff/ so wirdt es wohl

geschmack/ Als dann nimm gelbe R?ben/ schab vnd

schneidt sie voneinander/ quells in Wasser/ vnd

k?l es au?/ Nimm darnach ein wenig ungesaltzen

Speck vnd Zwibel/ hacks durcheinander mit gr?nen

Kr?utern/ la? den Schwantz damit sieden/ thu

gestossen Pfeffer darein/ so wirt es gut vnd wohl

geschmack.

 

73. Put up** Oxtail/ set it to (the fire) in a

water/ and let simmer until done/ lift from the

broth/ like this it becomes good and well

tasting/ then take yellow roots (yellow carrots)/

peel and cut them apart/ parboil in water/ and

cool off/ Then take a little unsalted bacon and

onion/ chop together with green herbs/ let the

tail simmer with them/ put in ground pepper/ like

this it is good and well tasting.

 

** Eyngemachten is a difficult word, modernly it

means canned, but in Rumpolt indicates fruit

preserved in sugar or dishes with a sauce or

sometimes in a pie - I suspect they might be

dishes meant to be served cold.  I've settled for

using "put up" to translate it, but am aware that

it isn't entirely correct.

 

Ranvaig

 

 

Date: Wed, 2 Feb 2011 14:08:40 -0700

From: James Prescott <prescotj at telusplanet.net>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Udder was oxtail

 

Ouverture has two recipes involving udder.  The recipes just say 'cooked'.

Larousse Gastronomique suggests blanched then braised, though they could

have simply been boiled.  One of the two recipes then calls for the already-

cooked udder to be wrapped within a caul and roasted on a spit, with a recipe

title of "Roasted cow's udder".

 

Thorvald

 

At 12:51 PM -0800 2/2/11, Donna Green wrote:

<<< Among Rumpolt's 2000 recipes are 7 for

Udder, I think it was a delicacy.

Ranvaig

 

Really, my local carnaceria sells udder. How did Rumpolt cook them?

 

Juana Isabella

West >>>

 

 

Date: Wed, 2 Feb 2011 13:11:46 -0800

From: "Laureen Hart" <lhart at graycomputer.com>

To: "'Cooks within the SCA'" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Organ meats

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------

I ate tongue in Montevideo as well, Fabulous, cooked, cold and sooked in

milk, oil, vinegar and garlic.

Ana

 

*****************************************

Tongue was very common in the UK when I was a child. We used to eat it cold

and sliced like ham. In fact you bought it from the deli counter the same

way. I have the impression it was supposed to be ox tongue, but it occurs to

me that oxen were probably not so common in the 70's so it was probably

beef.

 

Angharad

 

*******

We had tongue when I was a child as well.

Mom did both the cold sliced and the marinated/pickled.

We used to do it for feasts occasionally.

Cooked and sliced most people thought it was great if they didn't know what

it was.

It was totally off putting the time our guild master brought one to a

meeting.

Cooked, but unpeeled, with the little tastebuds staring at you, studded with

cloves.

I never figured out if he was trying to freak people out or what.

It really looked like a big ol' cow tongue...

 

I always thought it was odd that they called the cow tails "ox tails", ours

were never from actual oxen.

Back when they were affordable (70s & 80s) we used to use them for soup,

usually at casual feasts/meals.

One time did a really specialized, expensive feast with a lot of complicated

dishes for a few people.

For the kitchen and serving staff we made a batch of oxtail soup and one

gent was very vocal that we staff were being 'dissed" because Ox tails,

coming from the hind end of the cow, were peasant food, and took it as an

intentional slight. We cooks were more than a little baffled.

I laughed when I saw some in the store last week and they were $4.99 a

pound...

 

We have friends that raised organic cows.

This year we bought a half.

I told them if anyone else didn't want their hearts, livers, tongues, etc

that I would take them.

When they butchered the cows they didn't take the organ meats to the

butcher's to wrap.

They just bagged them up and put them in our friends freezer.

So now I have these giant bags of frozen, unlabeled, cow parts.

The best identification I got was "I think the kinda flat bag is livers".

It is both funny and tragic, I can't possibly eat 10 pounds of liver in one

shot, or 3 beef hearts...

 

Randell

An Tir

 

 

Date: Wed, 2 Feb 2011 17:10:25 -0500

From: Sharon Palmer <ranvaig at columbus.rr.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] oxtail

 

Among Rumpolt's 2000 recipes are 7 for Udder, I think it was a delicacy.

Ranvaig

 

Really, my local carnaceria sells udder. How did Rumpolt cook them?

============

 

Well let me try this again.. my battery ran out in mid email, have a

new battery on order but right now if my plug comes loose, I only

have a few minutes to notice.

 

I only have two recipes completely translated, mostly because I was

interested in the sauce, but here is a summary of the others.

 

Kuh 1.  Eingemacht udder, boiled and sliced, with a sauce of beef

broth, a little vinegar, butter, browned flour, and salted lemon.

 

Kuh 2.   Sliced udder, browned on a griddle or grill, and in a pepper sauce.

 

Kuh 4. Sliced and browned, with salt and pepper or ginger, and butter

poured over it.

 

Kuh 5.  Whole, larded with bacon and roasted on a spit, with chicken

fat, mild spices, cinnamon, grated kuchen, and a little vinegar

simmered together, made sweet or sour.

 

Kuh 7. Pie of udder.  Dough of flour eggs, butter, salt.  Bacon,

herbs, ginger on the bottom, then sliced udder, covered and spread

with a beaten egg, baked, then poke a hole and pour in broth with

vinegar and eggs.

 

---------------------------

 

Kuh 6.  Take apple and onion/ chop them nicely small apart/ and sweat

in clear butter.  Take to it beef broth/ vinegar/ pepper and salt/

stir together with a browned flour/ so it becomes thick/ let simmer

together/ and put in small black raisins/ and when the udder is

cooked/ then cut it to pieces/ and brown on a grill/ put it in the

gescharb (sauce)/ and let it cook further/ and see not to oversalt

it/ like this it is good and well tasting.

 

Kuh 3.  Set almonds to (the fire)/ and peel them/ cut them up/ and

roast them in clear butter/ put them in a kettle/ and take small

black raisins/ that are clean/ pour wine/ beef broth/ and a little

vinegar in it/ and sugar/ make it up with pepper and saffron/ brown a

little meal in the gescharb (sauce)/ and let simmer together/ cut up

the udder and brown it on a grill/ and put it in the gescharb/ like

this it becomes well tasting.

 

Ranvaig

 

 

Date: Wed, 2 Feb 2011 23:27:51 -0800 (PST)

From: wheezul at canby.com

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] udder things to consider

 

Juana Isabella asked:

<<< Really, my local carnaceria sells udder. How did Rumpolt cook them? >>>

 

Anna Wecker had enough recipes for udder to make me feel a little queasy.

 

Katherine

 

 

Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2011 21:26:27 +1030

From: "Claire Clarke" <angharad at adam.com.au>

To: <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: [Sca-cooks]  Udder was oxtail

 

Maestro Martino uses veal 'teats', by which I assume he means udders, quite

often. Mostly they seem to be used for fatty moisture as in a ravioli

filling, as a potential substitute for 'fat pork'. I can't remember if

there's a recipe specifically for cooking udder/teat.

 

Angharad

 

 

Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2011 11:56:58 -0500

From: Sharon Palmer <ranvaig at columbus.rr.com>

To: yaini0625 at yahoo.com, Cooks within the SCA

        <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] udder things to consider

 

<<< Is this one of those historical dishes like horse that was eaten

during harsh times? I can't imagine someone just decided one day, "

I am going to serve cow udder to the King today."

Aelina >>>

 

It's not on any of the Rumpolt menu lists.. 40 some pages worth.

 

I just noticed more Rumpolt udders recipes

 

Calf udder "Euterlein", boiled, grilled, then served with verjuice,

broth, butter, grapes from the verjuice, and ginger.

 

Sheep udder, boiled, grilled, with salt and pepper.. or white

"eingemachen" or yellow with parsley root, sour or not or with

twenty egg yolks and a little vinegar, a little broth, butter, and

green herbs.

 

A pie of cooked cow udder, cut in cubes, fresh butter, chopped bacon,

ginger in a white dough, after baking make a hole and pour in a sour

stock made from egg whites.

 

Ranvaig

 

 

Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2011 16:46:00 -0700

From: James Prescott <prescotj at telusplanet.net>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] udder things to consider

 

<<< Is this one of those historical dishes like horse that was

eaten during harsh times? I can't imagine someone just decided one

day, " I am going to serve cow udder to the King today."

Aelina >>>

 

Ouverture was cuisine intended for the tables of Bishops, one of whom

was also a Prince and Elector of the Holy Roman Empire.  So it is

likely that it would have been acceptable to serve cow's udder at

a feast for a King.

 

Thorvald

 

 

Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2011 17:56:32 -0500

From: Sayyeda al-Kaslaania <samia at idlelion.net>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Veal, was: Mutton (tolerance question - OP)

 

I know there is a humane foie gras:

http://www.ted.com/talks/dan_barber_s_surprising_foie_gras_parable.html

 

Sayyeda al-Kaslaania

 

 

Date: Fri, 6 May 2011 02:43:18 +0200

From: Ana Vald?s <agora158 at gmail.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] recipe for kidneys?

 

On Fri, May 6, 2011 at 2:20 AM, Ian Kusz <sprucebranch at gmail.com> wrote:

<<< Anyone have a period recipe (and/or interpretation of it) for kidneys?

--

Ian of Oertha >>>

 

I have an old Spanish recipe, used in Asturias and in South America.

 

Clean the kidneys well, peel off the membrane covering them. Rub the kidneys

with vinegar, lemon, beer and garlic, let them simmer in this marinade for

one day. Dry them and cover with flour, salt and pepper, fry them and serve

it hot-

 

Ana

 

 

Date: Thu, 05 May 2011 21:20:37 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae at mac.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] recipe for kidneys?

 

<<< Anyone have a period recipe (and/or interpretation of it) for kidneys?

--

Ian of Oertha >>>

 

To make a Tarte of a neare of Veale.

 

TAke two pound of great raisons, and wash them cleane, and picke them,  

and take out the stones of them, and take two kidneys of veale, and a  

p?ece of the legge which is leane, and boile them altogether in a pot  

with the straint of the broth of mut?ton, and boile it, and let it  

boyle the space of one howre, then take it vp and choppe it fine, and  

temper it with cromes of bread finely grated, and take nine yolkes of  

egs & temper them altogether & season them with sinamom, ginger, suger  

and small raisons, great raisons minced, dates and saffron. Then take  

fine flowre and water and thr?e yolkes of egges, butter and saffron,  

and make them like a round tarte close with a couer of the same paste,  

and set him in the Ouen, and let him stand one howre, then take him  

forth, and indore it with butter,  and cast a pouder of sinamom,  

ginger and suger and so serue it.

 

To make a florentine.

 

TAke the kidneies of a loine of veale that is rosted, and when it is  

cold shredde it fine and grate as it were halfe a manch?ete verie  

fine, and take eight yolkes of egges, and a handfull of currants, and  

eight dates finely shred, a litle sinamom, a litle ginger, a litle  

suger & a litle salt, and mingle them with the kidneys, then take a  

handfull of fine flower and two yolkes of egges, and as much butter as  

two egges, and put into your flower, then take a litle s?ething  

licquor, and make your paste and driue it a?broad verie thinne, then  

strake your dish with a litle butter, and lay your paste in the dish &  

fill it with your meat, then draw another sh?et of paste thinne and  

couer it withall, cut it handsomly vpon the top, and by the sides, and  

then put it into the Ouen,  and when it is halfe baked draw it out,  

and take two or thr?e feathers, and a litle rose water, and wet all  

the couer with it, and haue a handfull of suger finely beaten, and  

straw vpon it, and see that the rose water wet in euerie place, and so  

set it in the ouen againe, and that will make a faire ise vpon it, if  

your Ouen be not hote inough to reare vp your ise, then put a litle  

fire in the Ouens mouth.

 

Thomas Dawson. The good husvvifes ievvell. 1587.

 

To make a Pudding.

 

TAke Parseley and Time, and chop it small, then take the kidney of  

Veale, and perboile it, and when it is perboyled, take all the fat of  

it, and lay it that it may coole, and when it is colde shred it like  

as you doo sewet for puddinges, then take marrow and mince it by it  

self, then take grated bread and smal raisons the quantity of your  

stuffe, & dates minced small, then take the egges and roste them hard,  

and take the yolks of them and chop th? small, and then take your  

stuffe afore ye(?) hearsed and mingle altogether, and then take  

pepper, Cloues and Mace, Saffron, and salt, and put it together with  

the said stuffe, as much as you thinke by casting shal suffire, then  

take six Egs and breake them into a vessel whites and all,  and put  

your dry stuffe into the same egges, and temper them all wel together,  

and so fill your haggesse or gut, and s?eth it wel and it will be good.

 

To make Tostes.

 

TAke the Kidney of Ueale and chop it small then set it on a  

chafingdishe of Coales, and take two yolkes of egges, Currans,  

Synamon, Ginger, Cloues and mace, and suger, let them boyle together a  

good while, and a little Butter with the Kidnie.

 

Thomas Dawson. The second part of the good hus-wiues iewell. 1597

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Fri, 06 May 2011 08:16:53 -0700

From: "Daniel Myers" <dmyers at medievalcookery.com>

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] recipe for kidneys?

 

From: Ian Kusz <sprucebranch at gmail.com>

<<< Anyone have a period recipe (and/or interpretation of it) for kidneys? >>>

 

I tried out one for deer kidneys, and it wasn't bad at all.  It's rather

surprising though how small deer kidneys are.

 

http://www.medievalcookery.com/recipes/humbles.html

 

- Doc

 

 

Date: Fri, 06 May 2011 08:59:47 -0700

From: "Daniel Myers" <dmyers at medievalcookery.com>

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] recipe_for_kidneys? (data dump)

 

Here are the recipes I've found that refer to kidneys:

 

To make Florentines. Take Vele and some of the Kidney of the Loyne, or

colde Veale roasted, colde capon or Phesant, which of them you wil, and

mince it very small with sweet suet, put unto it two or three yolks of

Egs, being hard sod, Corance and dates small shred, season it with a

little sinamon and ginger, a very little cloves and mace, with a little

Salte and sugar, a little Time being finely shred. Make your paste fine

with butter & yolkes of Egs and Sugar, role it very thin and so lay it

in a platter with butter underneath: and so cut your cover and lay it

upon it. [A Book of Cookrye (England, 1591)]

 

A Florentine of Flesh. Take the Kidneies of Veale and chop them very

small with Corance, dates, sinamon and Ginger, Sugar, salt, and the

yolks of three Egs, and mingle altogither, and make a fine paste with

yolks of egges, and butter, and let there be Butter in your dishe

bottome, then drive them to small Cakes, and put one in the dish bottom,

and lay your meat in, then lay your other upon your meat, and close them

togither, and cut the cover and it, when it is baked then strew Sugar

and serve it out. [A Book of Cookrye (England, 1591)]

 

To make a Florentine. Take the Kidney of Veale and boyle it a little,

choppe it very fine. Then take Cloves, Mace and Pepper, and season it

withall, then take an ounce of Biskets and as much of Carowayes, and put

into your stuffe, make your paste of fine floure, butter Egges and Sugar

and drive your paste very thin, and lay a sheet of paste in a dish and

under it lay a little butter, and spread it abroad with your thumb, then

lay your meat aloft on it in the dishe, then make the other sheet and

cut it and lay it upon your meat. Then close it and cut it round about

like a Starre, and set it in the Oven and let it abide a quarter of an

houre, then take it out and wet it over with Butter, then cast sugar wet

with rosewater upon it, then set it into the Oven again a little while,

then take it out and serve it in. [A Book of Cookrye (England, 1591)]

 

How to bake Vaunts. Take the kidney of Veale and perboile it till it be

tender, then take & chop it small with the yolkes of three or foure Egs,

then season it with Dates small cut, small raisins, Ginger, Sugar,

Sinamon, Saffron and a little Salte, and for the paste to laye it in,

Take a dozen of Egs both the white and the yolkes, and beate them well

togither, then take Butter and put it into a frying pan, and fry them as

thin as a pancake, then lay your stuffe therin, and so frye them

togither in a pan, then cast sugar and Ginger upon it, and so serve it

forth. [A Book of Cookrye (England, 1591)]

 

How to make Tostes. Take the Kidneye of Vele when it is rosted, and chop

it very fine, then take and put it in a dish, put in the yolks of three

egs, put in Sinamon, Ginger and sugar, take a a little Rosewater and put

to it, take white bread and cut it like diamonds, and toste a little,

set all your stuffe on a Chafingdishe with Coles, and stirre it and

spread it upon the Tostes, take the yolke of an Egge, and with a fether

baste them over, then bake them in a pan and set them in a dishe, and

cast Sugar on them. [A Book of Cookrye (England, 1591)]

 

22. Ein gut geriht (A good dish). Nim dri gesotene smale swines darme.

nim dar zu smaltzes von flemen. daz tu die wile ez ungesoten ist, als

lanc und groz als die darm sint. snit daz zu sammene. slahe zwei eyer

dor zu. und nim ein wenic schoenes brotes und pfeffer und saltz zu

mazze. In dem condimente erwelle die darme. und f?lle sie mit dem

condimente. und stecke sie in einen grozzen darm. swaz des condimentes

?ber blibe. daz giuz in den grozzen darm. und verbint beide die innern

und den grozzen darm an beiden enden besunder. teil daz condiment glich

in die darm. siut sie gar. und giv sie heyz hin. [Ein Buch von guter

spise (Germany, 1345)]

 

Take three boiled small pigs' intestines. Take thereto fat of

domesticated pigs' kidneys. Do that while they are unboiled, (the fat)

as long and wide as the intestines are. Cut that together. Beat two eggs

thereto and take a little good bread and pepper and salt to mass. In the

condiment, boil the intestines and fill them with the condiment and

stick them in a large intestine. Pour the condiment over to stay. Give

that in the large intestine. And bind both the inner and the large

intestine on both ends particularly. Split the condiment the same in the

intestine. Boil it well and give it out hot. [Ein Buch von guter spise

(Germany, 1345)]

 

41. And to know what is and of what things is made and should be made

the cocade pasty and how, take beef and the fair fat from beef kidneys

and let this be chopped very small, and let him take care that when the

beef is dismembered he has all of the marrow, and then put it in his

pasty; and then let him take his spices well and properly, that is

ginger, grains of paradise, saffron, and salt, and all these things in

measure. And the pastry-cook will be well advised to make the crust of

the said pasty so large, well and honestly in several compartments so

large that in each can be put that which one devises for it: in the best

should be lodged the beef pasty, in another compartment should be put a

lamprey, and in another compartment should be put a young well-fattened

gosling, and in another compartment should be put a salmon, and in

another should be put a pigeon, and in another should be put pallees, in

another small birds which should be stuffed with guein cheese and beef

marrow, in another compartment large pieces of fair and large fresh eels

and partridges, in another large pieces of fresh trout, and in another

and last compartment - if you do not want any more things - fat capons.

[Du fait de cuisine (France, 1420)]

 

To make a Pye of Humbles. Take your humbles being perboiled, and choppe

them verye small with a good quantitye of Mutton sewet, and halfe a

handfull of hearbes folowing, thime, margarom, borage, perseley, and a

little rosemary, and season the same being chopped, with pepper, cloues

and mace, and so close your pye and bake him. [The Good Housewife's

Jewell (England, 1596)]

 

To bake the Humbles of a Deere. Mince them verie small, and season them

with pepper, Cinamon and Ginger, and suger if you will, and Cloues and

mace, and dates and currants, and if you will, mince Almondes and put

vnto them, and when it is baked, you must put in fine fat, and put in

suger, cinamon and Ginger, and let it boile, and when it is minced, put

them together. [The Good Housewife's Jewell (England, 1596)]

 

To make a Tarte of an eare of Veale. Take two pound of great Raisons,

and washe them cleane, and pick them, and take out the stones of them,

and take two Kidneyes of Veale, and a peece of the legge which is leane,

and boyle them altogether in a pot with the straint of the broth of

mutton, and boyle it, and let it boyle the space of one howre, then take

it vp and choppe it fine, and temper it with crummes of bread finely

grated, ant take nine yolks of egs, & temper them altogether, and season

them with sinamon, ginger, suger, and small Raisins, great raisons

minced, Dates and Saffron. Then take fine flowre and water, and three

yolkes of Egges, Butter and saffron, and make them like a round Tart

close with a couer of the same paste, and set him in the Ouen, and let

him stand one howre, then take him forth, and endore it with Butter and

cast a powder of synamon, Ginger, and suger, and so serue it. [The Good

Housewife's Jewell (England, 1596)]

 

To make a florentine. Take the kidneis of a loyne of veale that is

roasted, and when it is cold shredde it fine, and grate as it were half

a Manchette very fine, and take eight yolkes of Egges, and a handfull of

currans, and eight dates finely shred, a little senamon, a little ginger

a litle suger and a litle salt, and mingle them with the kidneyes, then

take a handfull of fine flowre and two yolkes of egges, and as much

butter as two egges, and put into your flowre, then take a little

seeting licquor, and make your paste and driue it abroad very thinne,

then strake your dishe with a little butter, and lay your paste in a

dish & fill it with your meate, then drawe an other sheet of paste

thinne and couer it withall, cut it handsomly vpon the top, and by the

sides, and then put it into the Ouen, and when it is halfe baked drawe

it out, and take two or three feathers, and a little rosewater, and

wette all the couer with it, and haue a handfull of suger finely beaten,

and strawe vpon it, and see that the Rosewater wet in euery place, and

so set it in the ouen againe, and that will make a faire ise vpon it, if

your Ouen be not hotte inough to reare vp your ise, then put a little

fire in the Ouens mouth. [The Good Housewife's Jewell (England, 1596)]

 

60 To make a veal pie. Take pieces of veal from the leg and boil them in

water, about as long as it takes to hard boil an egg. Afterwards take

them out and chop the meat small, and take suet from the kidneys and cut

it small and chop it with the veal. And when it is finely chopped, then

put it in a bowl and put some wine into it and an ample ladelful of

broth , pepper and a little mace, which should be whole. Crush it a

little by hand so that it in small pieces, put in it raisins and saffron

and stir it all up together with a spoon, put cinnamon in it also, and

taste it, however it seems good to you. [Das Kuchbuch der Sabina

Welserin (Germany, 16th c.)]

 

68 To make a quince pie. Peel the quinces and cut the core cleanly out

with a knife, fry them in fat. After that stuff the quinces with

currants, sugar, cinnamon and cloves. Afterwards take beef marrow or

finely chopped kidney suet or skimmed fat from some other meat and put

good Malavosia or Reinfal on it, sugar, cinnamon and cloves, however it

seems good to you. The dough for the pie is found in number [sixty one].

[Das Kuchbuch der Sabina Welserin (Germany, 16th c.)]

 

196 Brisetten are made in the following manner. Cut veal from the

haunch, cut it into fine, thin strips about a finger's thickness and

beat them thoroughly on both sides with the back of a knife. Take kidney

suet and chop it small, mix with it all savory herbs, such as parsley,

marjoram, sage and what ever savory herbs you can obtain, and salt,

pepper and cinnamon among them. And if it should not be moist enough,

you could add meat broth. And spread it on both sides of the veal

strips. Afterwards roll them up together and stick them on spits and set

a frying pan under them. Roast them well in their juices, and baste them

often in the juices which run out, and that which normally runs out and

remains with the broth in the fat pan, pour it over it and serve it

thus. It is a good dish. [Das Kuchbuch der Sabina Welserin (Germany,

16th c.)]

 

54. THICK GOURDS WITH MEAT BROTH. Take gourds, and scrape them very well

so that they become very white and clean. And then cut them into very

long thin slices; and take good fatty bacon, and a piece of mutton

together with the bacon, and when everything is very well melted, strain

it through a sieve and cast it in the pot where the gourds must cook

with the fatty bacon, and stir it constantly with a stick; and cast in

an onion, and gently fry it with the gourds; and when they are gently

fried, take good kidney suet of a sheep, and set it to cook separately

with a pair or two of squabs; and you will make good broth which is

well-salted; and when the broth is made, little by little cast it upon

the gourds, and always take the fattiest [broth]; and when the gourds

are well-cooked, and quite mushy, take almond milk or milk of goats or

sheep ? but the almond milk is never lacking ? and cast the milk in

the pot; and when the milk is cooked with the gourds, turn them about

with a haravillo in such a manner that not even the smallest piece of

gourd remains undissolved; and cast good cheese of Aragon which is

grated and very fine, in with the gourds; and when this is done take two

egg yolks for each dish, well-beaten with verjuice, then mix them with

the gourds; then make [them] in such a manner that they taste a little

of verjuice; and then prepare dishes, and cast upon them sugar and

cinnamon. [Libre del Coch (Spain, 1520)]

 

A Florentine of a Cony, the wing of a Capon, or the Kidney, of a Veale.

MJnce any of these with sweet Hearbes, parboyld Currens, a Date or two

minst small, a pieece of a preserued Orenge, or Lemmon, minst as small

as your Date. Season it with Ginger, Sinamon, Nutmeg, and Sugar: then

take the yolkes of two new laid Egges, a spoonefull of sweet Creame, a

piece of a short Cake grated, and Marrow cut in short pieces. Bake this

in a dish betweene two leaues of puff-paste, put a little Rosewater to

it before you close your Paste. When it is baked shaue on Sugar. [A NEVV

BOOKE of Cookerie (England, 1615)]

 

To make Kicks-Hawes. TAke the Kidney of a Ueale, or Lambe, or if you

haue neither of both, then take the Eare of a Mutton, fat and all. Boyle

it, and mince it fine: season it with Nutmeg, Pepper, and Salt. Then

take two or three Egges, a spoonefull of Rosewater, two or three

spoonefuls of Sack, as much grated Bread, as will worke them like

Lithpaste. Then floure your moulds, and fill them with that paste: then

roule a thinne sheet of paste, wet it and couer it ouer: frye them, and

turne them into small Dishes, and keepe them warme in the Ouen, serue

them at Dinner, or Supper. Jf you will bake them then you may turne them

into the Dish raw, out of your moulds, and Jce them with Rosewater and

Sugar, and set them in the Ouen, when your Pyes are halfe bakte. [A NEVV

BOOKE of Cookerie (England, 1615)]

 

To mak nombles tak hert middrif and kidney and hew them smalle and prise

out the blod and sethe them in water and ale and colour it with brown

bred or with blod and fors it with canell and galingalle and when it

boilithe kole it a litille with ale and serwe it. [A Noble Boke off

Cookry (England, 1468)]

 

To make a veal loin stuffed & roasted. Take good stuffing herbs, & chop

them very finely, make them fried in butter: put therein 4 egg yolks,

nutmeg, ginger, cinnamon, a little sugar, salt, & make it a little

cooked, not too much: then chop a salted lemon mixed with the stuffing:

then take a loin of veal that is a little parboiled: then put the

stuffing under the kidney of the veal, & cover it with a doubled caul of

veal, & attach it with skewers that nothing falls out, then when cooked

take the kidney out, & chop it: put therein two egg yolks, a little

sugar & cinnamon, a little salt, & put the aforesaid kidney on the

toasted bread, & put it in a tart pan with butter therein, & put covers

on them with fire, that the roasts will be well chaffed a little, & put

all around the plate where the loin of veal is, & cast all the fat on

the loin with vinegar, & oranges cut into pieces thereon. [Ouverture de

Cuisine (France, 1604)]

 

Paupiettes. Take beef marrow or fat from the beef kidney, and slice it

into bits as long and fat as a man's finger. Refresh them in hot water.

Do nothing but insert and remove the beef marrow, but refresh the fat

more generously. Have a shin of veal, remove the meat from the bones as

intact as you can, cut it into strips as thin as a thick wafer, and

stand them on a clean dresser. Wrap the marrow bits in your veal strips

with a little white salt and Fine or White Powder. Have a very slender

iron spit and spit them. Have some of the batter suitable for Small

Crisps, and coat them with it when the marrow is well cooked. [Le

Viandier de Taillevent (France, 1380)]

 

 

Date: Sat, 7 May 2011 01:03:41 -0400

From: Sharon Palmer <ranvaig at columbus.rr.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] recipe for kidneys?

 

> Anyone have a period recipe (and/or interpretation of it) for kidneys?

 

Rumpolt has some kidney recipes, mostly still untranslated.

 

Ranvaig

 

 

Date: Mon, 23 May 2011 02:16:20 -0500

From: Sharon Palmer <ranvaig at columbus.rr.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Food, glorious food! (mostly OOP)

 

<<< So does anyone know of any other recipes I

should add to the organ-meats-msg file in the

Florilegium? Can you even buy brains these days?

Or is that a prohibited item to sell, like lungs? >>>

 

Rumpolt has many recipes for brains and other

organ meats.  Here are a couple for brains.

 

Spensaw (Piglet) 3.  To make brain sausage.

Take ears/ that are well boiled/ from a pig/ chop

it small with the brain and tongues/ a little

wide meat?? that is fatty/ and take a fresh bacon

with it/ chop it all together/ and mix with

pepper/ ginger/ eggs and saffron/ and when it is

mixed/ then take pig intestines/ and stuff it in

there/ and parboil it in a hot water/ and when it

is parboiled/ then let it become cold/ set again

to (the fire) with a beef broth/ and let cook

until completely to the place (completely done)/

and when it is boiled/ then dress it with a good

chicken broth/ like this it is good and well

tasting.

 

Gan? 11. Take the brain of the goose/ when it is

cooked/ and grate a weck bread/ that is sliced/

chop it through each other/ put some egg yolks/

and a little ginger in it/ do not over salt it/

take a tart pan and butter in it/ make it hot/

and take a wooden spoon full/ put it in the hot

fat/ turn over often/ and make it/ that it fries

nicely/ because it will fry quickly.  Make a

little piece six or seven/ that will be a dish

full/ because you must have many from a goose/

that the bowl will be full.  And one calls this

dish durtelet (tartelet) of goose brain.

 

Zugem?? 154.  Pottage (muss) of deer brain.  Take

the brain/ cook it/ and beat with egg yolks/

pepper and ginger/ strain together/ put butter in

it/ let simmer together/ like this it is a good

pottage.

 

Zugem?? 155.  Pottage from roe deer head.  Take

the meat (that is) on the head with the brain/

and pound with black raisins/ strain with wine or

with beef broth/ which/ as it happened/ so mix

with cinnamon and cloves/ put a little butter in

it/ and stir well/ until it boils/ give warm on a

table/ like this it is also a good pottage.

 

Ranvaig

 

<the end>



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