Home Page

Stefan's Florilegium

meat-stuffed-msg



This document is also available in: text or RTF formats.

meat-stuffed-msg - 4/20/05

 

Period recipes for various things stuffed into a meat shell. Farced meat.

 

NOTE: See also the files: Ital-Stuffing-art, Gos-Farced-art, veg-stuffed-msg, pasta-stufed-msg, pierogies-msg, bread-stuffed-msg, sausages-msg. haggis-msg, organ-meats-msg.

 

************************************************************************

NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

    Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                          Stefan at florilegium.org

************************************************************************

 

From: Deb Hense <debh>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Medieval comfort food!!

Date: 5 Oct 1995 16:21:33 GMT

Organization: Microware Systems Corporation, Des Moines, Iowa

 

I'm sorry I've been out of the loop lately. Angharad/Terry asked for a

specific reference on the molded lamb's leg.  I have provided it below.  My

original response was given under the impression that the person inquiring

about meatloaf, wanted to introduce someone to period flavored dishes under the

guise of something familiar. Using forcemeats shaped as a meatloaf, would

introduce the person to the flavors of medieval times, while providing them the

comfort of eating something familiar.  It would be just another meatloaf,

flavored differently, but tasty nonetheless. The next step would be to

introduce the same recipe in its originally intended form, then inform the

person that it tastes just like the meatloaf they had last week.  I do this to

my family all the time and it works like a charm.  

 

I see that it is not Goodman of Paris, but Le Viander, I apologize.  When I did

the four course menu for competition, I used both sources for the recipes.

Again, sorry about the mixup.

 

Kateryn de Develyn

 

Stuffed Shoulder of Mutton

[212] Stuffed Shoulder of Mutton

Le Viander of Taillevent

Shoulder of mutton should be cooked in a pan on the fire, as well as legs of

mutton or pork - do not overcook them, then let them cool; the meat is taken

off from around the bones and is chopped up very fine, and the meat for

mangonels and towers similiarly; then get pine nut paste, currants, and a large

egg omlette fried in white bacon fat, and cut them into small pieces the size

of large dice, and keep them from burning; take all of these ingrediantes along

with crumbled creamy chees, and put everything into a clean pan or bowl and mix

them thoroughly together. Then you need sheep cauls; spread them out, sprinkle

them with fine spice powder and set the bones on them without the stuffing then

wrap up and pack around the bones, wrapping them withthe sheeps caul and sew

them together with little skewers of wood to keep the meat from falling away

from around the shoulder - as cooks help know how to do.

 

My version:

        1 shoulder of lamb

2 lamb shanks - the shanks had bones in them whereas the lamb shoulder was

boneless.

1 cup pine nuts - crushed fine into a paste. (easy to do as they are very

moist)

1 cup currants

3 egg omlette fried in bacon fat

1 cup shredded mozerella cheese

chicken skin - I used the skin of chicken because I was unable to obtain sheeps

cauls.

Roast the meat, then chop it very fine. Chop the egg omelette into small pieces

and add to the meat mixture. Next mix the pine nuts, currents, and

cheesetogether and add to the meat and egg mixture., Mold the meat mixture to

one of the lamb shank bones. Next, wrap the chicken skin around the molded

stuffing, and sew the chicken skin together using bamboo skewers. Then baked

this stuffed shoulder of mutton until the skin is cooked (approximately 45

minutes  at  375 degrees).

 

 

Date: Sun, 5 Oct 1997 07:42:25 -0500

From: "Decker, Terry D." <TerryD at Health.State.OK.US>

Subject: RE: SC - honey dormice recipe

 

>Back on Thursday, Sept. 25, Aine said:

>>not to mention taste testing all those honey dormice.....

>

>Recipe, please!  And where did you get the dormice?

>

>Stefan li Rous

 

 

Stuffed Dormice

 

Recipe By     : Apicius

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

NOTES : Glires:  Isicio pocino, item pulpis ex omin membro glirium

trito, cum pipere, nucleis, lasere, liquamine farcies glires et sutos in

tegula positos mittes in furnum aut farsos in cilbano coques.

 

Dormice:  Stuffed dormice with pork filling, and with the meat of whole

dormice ground with pepper, pine nuts, silphium, and garum.  Sew up and

place on a baking tile, and put them in the oven; or cook the stuffed

[dormice] in a pan.

 

Translation from Giacosa, Ilaria Gozzini; A Taste of Ancient Rome,

University of Chicago Press, 1992.

 

Stuffed Dormouse:  Is stuffed with forcemeat of pork and small pieces of

dormouse meat trimmings, all pounded with pepper, nuts, laser, broth.

Put the dormouse thus stuffed in an earthen casserole, roast it in the

oven, or boil it in the stock pot.

 

Translation from Vehling, Joseph Dommers; APICIUS Cookery and Dining in

Imperial Rome,dover Publications, 1977.

 

 

Vehling notes that the Soouther European dormouse is an arboreal rodent

the size of a rat (one of my six new things before breakfast).

He goes on to state "Dormouse, as an article of diet, should not

astonish Americans who relish squirrel, opossum, muskrat, "coon," etc."

 

Giacosa shows this recipe as Apicius 397.  Vehling shows it as Apicius

396.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Sun, 05 Oct 1997 09:49:58 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - honey dormice recipe

 

Decker, Terry D. wrote:

 

<snip>

 

> Recipe By     : Apicius

> - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

>

> NOTES : Glires:  Isicio pocino, item pulpis ex omin membro glirium

> trito, cum pipere, nucleis, lasere, liquamine farcies glires et sutos in

> tegula positos mittes in furnum aut farsos in cilbano coques.

>

> Dormice:  Stuffed dormice with pork filling, and with the meat of whole

> dormice ground with pepper, pine nuts, silphium, and garum.  Sew up and

> place on a baking tile, and put them in the oven; or cook the stuffed

> [dormice] in a pan.

>

> Translation from Giacosa, Ilaria Gozzini; A Taste of Ancient Rome,

> University of Chicago Press, 1992.

>

> Stuffed Dormouse:  Is stuffed with forcemeat of pork and small pieces of

> dormouse meat trimmings, all pounded with pepper, nuts, laser, broth.

> Put the dormouse thus stuffed in an earthen casserole, roast it in the

> oven, or boil it in the stock pot.

 

Just thought I'd throw a small note in here: laser and silphium are not

the same thing. IIRC (which is as close as you're going to get on a

Sunday morning before I've had my tea) silphium was a more or less

unidentified (at least to us) plant resin which appears to have gone

extinct or otherwise unavailable between the lifetime of Marcus Gavinus

Apicius, and the time at which the earliest Apicius manuscript (7th

century?) is dated. Laser appears to be the more readily available

substitute for silphium, and is believed to be asafeotida gum,

presumably ground to a powder. This is available as an extract in some

herb or health-food stores, and as the genuine article, powdered resin,

in Indian markets under the name "hing powder".

 

G. Tacitus Adamantius, always interested in Soul Food ;  )

 

 

Date: Sat, 14 Feb 1998 13:45:49 -0500 (EST)

From: Stephen Bloch <sbloch at adl15.adelphi.edu>

Subject: Re: SC - lamb recipe

 

> Once upon a time we had a cooking workshop (this was in the days when we

> wondered how practical 'field cooking' was. In my Backyard, over an open

> fire, I prepared the following recipe (with changes as noted)

>

> Take one camel. (I couldn't find anywhere to take it from, so I skipped

> that bit. Plus we were feeding 20 people, all of whom were cooking

> something. It seemed like overkill.)

>

> Take one sheep   (which I did. without the neck opened. The butcher

> kindly got me one like that)

>

> Stick it in the camel (No camel. Well, what can you do)

>

> Take some ducks, geese, or chickens. (I got some chickens, and a buch of

> bits as well.)

>

> Put capons or quail in them. (quail went into chickens, ducks got capons

> filled with chicken breast)

>

> fill the rest with rice, pistachios, sultanas, figs and some other nut (I

> forget. I partially cooked the rice first)

>

> Put it on a spit over the fire, and cook it.

>

> What was amazing was that over about 8 hours, we ate nearly all the lamb,

> all the quails and most of the rest. It was really good.

>

> Unfortuantely I don't have any documentation.

 

I'm glad to see that somebody has actually tried this. Here's your

documentation.  The following appears in the 13th-century Arabo-

Andalusian _Manuscrito Anonimo_, and is reprinted in Cariadoc's

Collection, volume II:

 

Roast Calf, which was made for the Sayyid Abu-L-'Ala in Ceuta

 

Take a young, plump ram, skinned and cleaned; open it deeply between

the thighs and carefully take out all the entrails that are in its

belly.  Then put in the interior a stuffed goose and into its belly a

stuffed hen and in the belly of the hen a stuffed pigeon and in the

belly of the pigeon a stuffed thrush and in the belly of this a small

bird, stuffed or fried, all this stuffed and sprinkled with the sauce

described for stuffing; sew up this opening and place the ram in a hot

tannur  and leave it until it is browned and ready; sprinkle it with

that sauce and then place it in the body cavity of a calf which has

been prepared clean; sew it up and place it in the hot tannur  and

leave it until it is done and browned; then take it out and present

it.

 

                                        mar-Joshua ibn-Eleazar ha-Shalib

                                                 Stephen Bloch

                                           sbloch at panther.adelphi.edu

 

 

Date: Wed, 10 Feb 1999 21:01:31 -0500

From: "Robin Carroll-Mann" <harper at idt.net>

Subject: Re: SC - Recipe request for Ras

 

And it came to pass on 9 Feb 99,, that LrdRas at aol.com wrote:

> Recipe plaese? original, OK. Translation, preferred.

 

Okay... from _Libro del Arte de Cozina_, 1599:

 

Pastel de conejo de las Indias -- Pastry of Rabbit of the Indies

(Guinea Pig)

 

The rabbit of India must be scalded with hot water in the manner

that one scalds suckling pigs, or it must be flayed, remove the

entrails, and stuff it like the domestic rabbit, and cover it with

pastry, as we said in the previous chapter.

 

[The previous "chapter" is a recipe for rabbit pie, and it goes as

follows:]

 

To Make Pastry of Domestic Rabbits

 

Take the rabbit and cut off the head, and the feet, take out the

entrails and wash it with many waters, and stuff it with a mixture

made of chopped lard, ham, and its liver cleaned of the bile, mint,

chopped marjoram, sour grapes, pepper, cinnamon, cloves,

nutmeg, and salt, raw egg yolks, and when it is full sew up the

opening, and the rabbit sprinkled with the said mixture, put it in a

pastry made in the manner of "nauezilla" with some little slices of

bacon underneath, having taken out the legs, put them upon the

rabbit with as many more little slices of fat pork, and sprinkle all

with the same spices, cover the pastry, and make it cook in the

oven, and serve it hot.

 

Brighid

Lady Brighid ni Chiarain

Settmour Swamp, East (NJ)

 

 

Date: Thu, 9 Sep 1999 21:40:25 -0000

From: "=?iso-8859-1?Q?Nanna_R=F6gnvaldard=F3ttir?=" <nannar at isholf.is>

Subject: Re: SC - OT - stuffed camel

 

Helen wrote:

>>Then she gives a recipe for Quozi mahshi - a whole lamb

>

>I would love to see this recipe!

 

Quozi mahshi - Stuffed Roast Lamb

(from Traditional Arabic Cooking by Miriam Al Hashimi)

 

Serves 25

 

20-25 lb (10-12 kg) lamb

8 tbps lemon juice

8 cloves garlic, crushed

10 cups long-grain rice

4 large onions, finely chopped

1 cup almonds or cashews

1/2 cup pistachios

1/2 cup pine nuts

4 tbps baharat

2 tsp turmeric

1 tsp saffron threads

1/2 cup rose water (optional)

8 1/2 cups water

1/2 cup oil

salt

 

Rub the cleaned lamb with 3 tbps baharat, 2 tsp turmeric, garlic, lemon

juice, salt and 1/2 cup oil. Cover and leave overnight to marinate. Soak the

saffron in rose water for 10 minutes. Wash and drain the rice. To make the

stuffing, sauté the onions in the remaining oil. Add 1 tbsp baharat, salt

and the rice for a further 2 minutes. Add the water and bring to the boil,

stirring occasionally. Blanch the almonds to remove the skins. Add the nuts

and saffron rose water. Cover thigthly and leave to stand until the liquid

has been absorbed. Stuff the cavity of the lamb with the rice filling. Sew

up the opening with strong thread. Grill over charcoal for 5-7 hours, or

roast in a moderate oven until tender, basting occasionally with marinade.

The lamb may be covered to prevent dryness. Serve the lamb on a large tray

or platter, surrounded with the rice stuffing. (Traditionally the succulent

meat is served by pulling off pieces, but it can equally well be carved.)

 

*baharat - Arab spice blend, can vary very widely. The one recommended in

the book has 6 tbsps black peppercorns, 3 tbsps coriander seeds, 3 tbsps

cinnamon or cassia, 3 tbsps cloves, 4 tbsps cumin, 2 tsps cardamom, 3 tbsps

nutmeg, 6 tbsps paprika - all ground or grated, then mixed well and stored

in an airtight container.

 

Claudia Roden also has a recipe in her A Book of Middle Eastern Food but

that is a smaller lamb (or goat) - it is rubbed with onion juice, coriander

and ginger, and stuffed with rice, onions, saffron, almonds,

pistachio nuts, walnuts, and raisins - this one is roasted in the oven for

about 2 hours, or barbecued.

 

And - I had overlooked this - maybe here is the origin of the stuffed camel

stories - Roden says: "The lamb can also be boned before it is stuffed. I

have seen baby lambs served at weddings, made to look like miniature camels,

their boneless backs shaped into a hump."

 

Nanna

 

 

Date: Thu, 28 Jun 2001 20:30:00 +0200

From: Volker Bach <bachv at paganet.de>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Meat and not potatoes feast

 

Susan Fox-Davis schrieb:

> Giano describes:

> >Another thing I have become quite addicted to is

> >Taillevent's 'roti de porc farci' - pork roast

> >filled with a farce made from gruyere cheese, ham,

> >hard-boiled egg yolk, salt, pepper, and powdered

> >ginger. It's quick to prepare, too. I haven't

> >tried it on an open fire, though (a smaller,

> >non-period version with stuffed pork chops at a

> >barbecue worked fine, but that's soooo tacky)

>

> I don't find it all that tacky.  What's more, dividing the

> meat into individual chops gives you better portion control.

> What proportions of ingredients do you use for the farce?

> I want to try this.

 

I use 1/2lb ham, 1/2lb cheese, 2 egg yolks, 1-3

tsp ginger, salt and pepper to taste for a 2-3lb

roast. There's usually some over. The same amount

worked for eight chops, again with a half cup left

over.

 

Giano

 

 

Date: Mon, 02 Jul 2001 21:24:45 +0200

From: Volker Bach <bachv at paganet.de>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Meat and not potatoes feast

 

> Do you have a recipe for the stuffed pork roast?

 

From memory:

 

a 2-3lb pork roast, either for rolling up or cut

open to stuff

 

200 grammes Gruyere or Emmental cheese (I don't

know what would be period, but the redaction I

used suggests these two and they work fine)

 

200 grammen boiled ham

 

2 hard-boiled egg yolks

 

2-3 tblsp ground ginger

 

a pinch of nutmeg, cloves or cardamon (all work,

and I don't recall what the original called for)

 

salt and pepper to taste

 

olive oil to grease pan and roast

 

Mache es also (as they say in German period

cookbooks): put the ham, cheese, egg yolks, ginger

and nutmeg into a food processor (or mortar, if

you're feeling masochistic) and blend into a

paste. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Stuff

into the roast. Rub the outside of the roast with

olive oil and bake or grill (takes about 1 - 1 1/2

hours).

 

Giano

 

 

From: "Marcus Antaya" <mjantaya at home.com>

To: <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Massively expensive feast WAS: Smithsonian Stuff

Date: Sun, 8 Jul 2001 12:19:40 -0400

 

The actual recipie (and I do have it somewhere) is

 

52 Hard Boiled Eggs

26 Chickens

2 goats

1 camel

 

put 2 eggs per chicken, put the chickens equally in the goat (or sheep) and

stuff all into camel.  Roast on a spit for 2 days...

 

it's a bedouin wedding feast. Documentable, I think....grin

 

Gyric

 

 

Date: Thu, 5 Sep 2002 22:27:35 -0400

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

From: "Cindy M. Renfrow" <cindy at thousandeggs.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Lookin for Farced type Chicken

 

Hi. There are 2 farced chicken recipes in Le Menagier & IIRC another in 2

15th C. Cookery Books. These call for the chicken or the necks to be

de-fleshed & filled with other meats.

 

Cindy

 

>I was wondering if there are any farced chicken recepits that involve

>deboning the chicken before you stuff them so that you can slice the chicken

>and have a pretty looking slice of chicken with the stuffing in the middle.

>

>If not, are there any period recepits that might be modified as an "artistic

>choice"? This is for something that taste and presentation are more

>important than period-ness.(Gack! Did I actually just say that? Double

>Gack!)

>

>Serena da Riva

 

 

Date: Fri, 6 Sep 2002 07:32:56 -0700 (PDT)

From: Louise Smithson <helewyse at yahoo.com>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re: Looking for Farced type chicken.

 

Serena da Riva asked:

> I was wondering if there are any farced chicken

recepits that involve deboning the chicken before you

stuff them so that you can slice the chicken  and have

a pretty looking slice of chicken with the stuffing in

the middle.<

 

This recipe from Libro di cucina/ Libro per cuoco

(14th/15th c.) may be what you are looking for:

 

LVII. Polastri pini e boni.

Se tu voy fare polastri pieni per XII persone, toy li

polastri infilali e poy li pella ben mondi, e poy

trazi fuora quello dentro; poy toy una libre de

mandole ben monde e ben maxenate e colate; toy in fina

viij caxe passi ben dolze e toy XII ova; toy

petrosemolo e mente e altre herbe bone e lavale ben e

pestale ben con lo chaxo, e toy tre onze de specie non

zafaranate, e toy le herbe el caso e l' ova insiema e

fa pastume e distempera con lo late de la mandola e fa

ch' el sea el  pastume a modo de quello delle

fritelle; e poy toy li polastri ben lavati e ben mondi

e implili in fra pelle e carne e dentro, e po' li

chossi bene fino che il pastume non esca e ser=E0 bono.

 

LVII. Hen stuffed and good.

If you want to make stuffed hens for 12 persons take

the hens and thread on a skewer and then the skin well

peeled, and then pull forth from within (debone, leave

the skin intact, thread on a skewer?); then take a

pound of almonds well peeled and crushed and strained;

take in total 8 cheeses strained well sweet and take

12 eggs; take parsley and mint and other good herbs

and wash well and paste well with the cheese, and take

three ounces of spices without saffron, and take the

herbs and cheese and eggs together and make a paste

and temper with the almond milk and make that it is a

paste in the mode of that of a fritter, and then take

the chicken well washed and peeled and stuff in

between the skin and the meat and within, and then

close well so the filling does not come out and it

will be good.

 

* My understanding is that the skin is loosened from

the chicken and the bones pulled out (may also just

mean the innards). The chicken is then stuffed inside

and between the skin and the meat, making essentially

a large chicken sausage.  The only reference to

cooking method is that of =93infilare=94 to skewer, which

appears to indicate that the resultant =93chicken=94 is

skewered and roasted.

 

Helewyse

 

 

Date: Wed, 11 Sep 2002 11:12:37 -0400

From: johnna holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Botched Chicken Attempt

 

If you ever feel up to trying it again, There are clear instructions

with pictures of how to debone

a chicken without a breaking the skin. See The Good Cook Poultry volume

that was put out by Time Life in the 1980's.

Your public library ought to have the set on the shelf or a

larger library in the area should have them. Basicly you turn the

chicken inside out removing the bones as you go. Go slow and use a very

sharp knife. You then stuff the chicken and roast it. When it is carved

it reveals that it only contains a stuffing and meat. No bones.

It makes a whizbang presentation dish. I had it all documented because I

entered this as part of the French meal I did when I won the culinary

parts of Midrealm Penthalon.

 

Johnnae llyn Lewis  Johnna Holloway

 

Barbara Benson wrote:snipped

Oh, that poor, poor chicken.

 

> Serena da Riva

> She who is desperate now!

 

 

Date: Sun, 24 Nov 2002 11:20:44 -0800

From: Susan Fox-Davis <selene at earthlink.net>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] roasting meat question

 

> A while back I read about a feast where they roasted a steer, stuffed with a

> deer, stuffed with a pig, then a lamb, then a goose, then a ...... I am sure

> none of this is in the right order, but it was a bunch of animals, a smaller

> one in the cavity of the next larger, and so on and so on, etc.

>

> Question..Does anyone have any idea what I am referring to? Any idea where

> or even how I would check?

>

> Isabella

 

Culinary Taxidermy - stuffing foods with other foods

http://www.halfbakery.com/idea/Culinary_20Taxidermy

 

Whole Stuffed Camel recipe from Saudi Arabia

Camel stuffed with lambs stuffed with chickens stuffed with eggs, rice in any

space that was left

http://home.tiac.net/~cri/1997/camel.html

 

Illustrated procedure for the Turducken

http://casa.colorado.edu/~kachun/tdc_recipe.shtml

 

Know that I mean it in the nicest possible way when I say: get stuffed!

 

Best, Selene Colfox

 

 

Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 14:19:14 -0500

From: Randy Goldberg MD <goldbergr1 at cox.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] colonial turkey, was how to carve a turkey

To: Cooks withi the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

On Fri, 21 Nov 2003 11:19:51 -0500, kirsten at fabricdragon.com wrote:

> force meat?

 

Forcemeat is the literal English translation of a French cooking term

Which essentially means "stuffing".

 

Avraham

 

<the end>



Formatting copyright © Mark S. Harris (THLord Stefan li Rous).
All other copyrights are property of the original article and message authors.

Comments to the Editor: stefan at florilegium.org