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haggis-msg - 2/12/11

 

Scottish haggis recipes. comments on haggis. Both meat and non-meat items cooked in a sheep's stomach or similar container.

 

NOTE: See also the files: sausages-msg, organ-meats-msg, lamb-mutton-msg, fd-Scotland-msg, pig-to-sausag-art, livestock-msg, butchering-msg.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I  have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done  a limited amount  of  editing. Messages having to do  with separate topics  were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the  message IDs  were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make  no claims  as  to the accuracy  of  the information  given  by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time  and  efforts of  those who have written  these messages. The copyright status  of these messages  is  unclear  at this time. If information  is  published  from  these  messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

   Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                         Stefan at florilegium.org

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From: LIB_JLC at vax1.utulsa.edu

To: markh at risc

Subject: haggis recipes

Date: 1/9/98

 

Here's a few recipes: one is quite edible, one may be of interest

if you have access to game, and one is traditional.  They are from

THE SCOTS KITCHEN: ITS TRADITIONS AND LORE WITH OLD-TIME RECIPES by

F. Marian McNeill (London: Blackie & Son Ltd., 1947), a legacy from

my husband's Campbell grandmother.  You can usually get suet, and

sometimes marrow, from a butcher.  If you can't acquire marrow,

substitute an equal amount of butter.  As you can imagine, haggis

is quite fatty, and may be a bit rich for modern tastes.  The fats

do help the assemblage hold together, so if you're going to cut the

amount of fat, be sure not to cut back too much.

 

 

HAGGIS ROYAL [From the Minutes of Sederun of the Cleikum Club -

that's what the book says, I've no idea what it means]

 

Ingredients: Mutton, suet, beef-marrow, bread-crumbs or oatmeal,

anchovies, parsley, lemon, pepper, cayenne, eggs, red wine.  [The

anchovies and cayenne are, no doubt, optional]

 

Three pounds of leg of mutton chopped, a pound of suet chopped, a

little, or rather as much beef-marrow as you can spare, the crumb

of a penny loaf (our own nutty-flavoured browned oatmeal, by the

way, far better)[I'd say 1 to 1 1/2 cups of crumbs or toasted

oatmeal], the beat yolks of four eggs, a half-pint of red wine,

three mellow fresh anchovies boned, minced parsley, lemon grate

(grated peel), white pepper, crystals of cayenne to taste -

crystals alone ensure a perfect diffusion of the flavour - blend

the ingredients well, truss them neatly in a veal caul [stomach],

bake in a deep dish, in a quick oven, and turn out. [I'd suggest

375F for 1/2 hour, then turn down to 350F till done]  Serve hot as

fire, with brown gravy, and venison sauce.

 

 

DEER HAGGIS

(From the Kitchen of a Highland Chief)

 

Ingredients: Deer's heart, liver, and suet, coarse oatmeal,

onions, black pepper, salt, paste [pastry]

 

Boil the heart and a piece of the liver of a deer.  When cold,

mince the heart very fine and grate a teacupful of the liver.  To

these add a teacupful of coarse oatmeal, previously toasted in the

oven or before the fire, three finely chopped onions, a

tablespoonful of salt, and a strong seasoning of black pepper.  Mix

all well together.  Put into a pudding-basin, cover with paste as

for a beef-steak pudding, and boil for four hours.  Serve in the

basin, very hot. [Basically a top-crust pie]

 

[The cooking method, I think, is akin to that of cooking pate': you

put the dish either into a double-boiler, or set the dish into a

larger pan of water to boil, or set it into a large pan of water

and put it in the oven, as you would a custard.]

 

 

MEG DODD'S HAGGIS [the traditional style everyone thinks of]

"The exact formula by which the Prize Haggis was prepared at the

famous Competition of Haggises held in Edinburgh, when the Cleikum

Haggis carried the stakes"

 

Ingredients: Sheep's pluck [lungs, heart, and liver] and paunch,

beef-suet, onions, oatmeal, pepper, salt, cayenne, lemon or

vinegar.

 

Clean a sheep's pluck thoroughly.  Make incisions in the heart and

liver to allow the blood to flow out, and parboil the whole,

letting the windpipe lie over the side of the pot to permit the

dishcarge of impurities; the water may be changed after a few

minutes' boiling for fresh water.  A half-hour's boiling will be

sufficient; but throw back the half of the liver to boil till it

will grate easily; take the heart, the half of the liver, and part

of the lights [lungs], trimming away all skins and black-looking

parts, and mince them together.  Mince also a pound of good beef-

suet and four or more onions.  Grate the other half of the liver.

Have a dozen of small onions peeled and scalded in two waters

[twice parboiled] to mix with this mince.  Have ready some finely

ground oatmeal, toasted slowly before the fire for hours, till it

is of a light brown colour and perfectly dry.  Less than two

teacupfuls of meal will do for this quantity of meat.  Spread the

mince on a board and strew the meal lightly over it, with a high

seasoning of pepper, salt, and a little cayenne, first well mixed.

Have a haggis bag (i.e. a sheep's paunch) perfectly clean, and see

that there be no thin part in it, else your whole labour will be

lost by its bursting.

   Some cooks use two bags, one as an outer case.  Put in the

meat with a half-pint of good beef gravy, or as much strong broth

as will make it a very thick stew.  Be careful not to fill the bag

too full, but allow the meat room to swell; add the juice of a

lemon or a little good vinegar; press out the air and sew up the

bag, prick it with a large neelde when it first swells in the pot

to prevent bursting; let it boil slowly for three hours if large.

 

"This is a genuine Scotch haggis; the lemon and cayenne may be

omitted, and instead of beef-gravy, a little of the broth in which

the pluck is parboiled may be taken.  A finer haggis may be made by

parboiling and skinning sheep's tongues and kidneys, and

substituting these minced for the most of the lights, and soaked

bread or crisped crumbs for the toasted meal.  There are, moreover,

sundry modern refinements on the above recipe - such as eggs, milk,

pounded biscuit, &c. - but these, by good judges, are not deemed

improvements. Some cooks use the small fat tripes, as in making

lamb's haggis."

 

Dunstana Talana the Violet

Northkeep, Ansteorra

Jennifer Carlson

Tulsa, Oklahoma

JLC at vax2.utulsa.edu

 

 

From: ANDERSJC at howdy.princeton.EDU (JANET ANDERSON - Ext 6639)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Haggis

Date: 27 Mar 1996 13:37:19 -0500

Organization: Princeton University

 

My home parish (outside Philadelphia) used to have "theme

refreshments" on appropriate Sundays, i.e. on St. David's Day we

would have Welsh delicacies, and on one St. Andrew's Day somebody

provided a (canned) haggis for those who were brave enough to try it.

I love exotic foods and figured it couldn't possibly be as bad as its

reputation, so I tried it.

 

I was wrong.  It was.  Once was enough to last me for the rest of my

life.

 

Dorigen

 

 

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

From: nhanger at windhaven.mv.com (Nancy C. Hanger)

Subject: Re: Haggis

Organization: MV Communications, Inc.

Date: Sun, 31 Mar 1996 15:56:12 GMT

 

"ld. Ian Gourdon/ MKA: Dan Stratton" <agincort at imperium.net> wrote:

 

>>                 Mors Plumatahaggis, lovely haggis, beautiful haggis...

>haggis, like sex, is wonderful when it's good, and when it's not so good,

>it's still pretty good...when served with the proper scotch. still let's

>not forget the third ingredient of a really proper session of the  

>'eating of the haggis', which is mashed 'neeps', eh?     Ian Gourdon

 

=Tatties= and neeps. And good whiskey. (Always good whiskey....)

 

And, as someone who despises liver to the point of gagging when it is

even mentioned, I might add, I =adore= good haggis. Good haggis should

be peppery and dry and a delight to the senses. Some of the best I've

ever had was from a small family butcher's in Inverness. I'm obviously

very lucky not to ever have had bad haggis--I hate to think of the

consequences for my hosts <g>.

 

I think the lesson here is: don't eat haggis outside of Scotland. But

we already knew that, didn't we?

 

--Branwyn Mwrheyd--

 

 

From: dickeney at access1.digex.net (Dick Eney)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Haggis

Date: 29 Mar 1996 21:50:52 -0500

Organization: Express Access Online Communications, Greenbelt, MD USA

 

JANET ANDERSON - Ext 6639 <ANDERSJC at howdy.princeton.EDU> wrote:

>My home parish (outside Philadelphia) used to have "theme

>refreshments" on appropriate Sundays, i.e. on St. David's Day we

>would have Welsh delicacies, and on one St. Andrew's Day somebody

>provided a (canned) haggis for those who were brave enough to try it.

>I love exotic foods and figured it couldn't possibly be as bad as its

>reputation, so I tried it.

>I was wrong.  It was.  Once was enough to last me for the rest of my

>life.

Jackson has the gout.  Tamar reports that the haggis she had over an open

fire in the mountains overlooking Loch Ness was quite good.  And

so was the one I had as an appetizer in Glasgow one evening, but maybe

that was the mild mustard sauce...

 

|---------Master Vuong Manh, C.P., Storvik, Atlantia---------|

|----------------(dickeney at access.digex.net)-----------------|

 

 

From: ejpiii at delphi.com

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Haggis

Date: Fri, 29 Mar 96 22:12:50 -0500

Organization: Delphi (info at delphi.com email, 800-695-4005 voice)

Well, all the Haggis I tried in UK was great, much to my surprise. I am

normally into really spicy stuff, but it was good. All I have had over

here was pretty bad though.

Eddward

 

 

From: corun at access4.digex.net (Corun MacAnndra)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Haggis

Date: 2 Apr 1996 06:55:34 -0500

Organization: Express Access Online Communications, Greenbelt, MD USA

 

William Underhill <trode at islandnet.com> wrote:

>Nancy C. Hanger (nhanger at windhaven.mv.com) wrote:

>>And, as someone who despises liver to the point of gagging when it is

>>even mentioned, I might add, I =adore= good haggis. Good haggis should

>>be peppery and dry and a delight to the senses. Some of the best I've

>>ever had was from a small family butcher's in Inverness. I'm obviously

>>very lucky not to ever have had bad haggis--I hate to think of the

>>consequences for my hosts <g>.

>> 

>>I think the lesson here is: don't eat haggis outside of Scotland. But

>>we already knew that, didn't we?

> Oh, say not so, milady! I have had good, in fact, excellent haggis right

>here (in An Tir). Granted, it was home-made, not boughten, but it was

>definitely outside of Scotland. Of course, there was cock-a-leekie pie,

>taties and bashed 'neeps, as well as a 40 oz. bottle of Glenmorangie for

>after. We even made a point of reading "To A Haggis", which, though not

>period, certainly lent to the general "Scottishness" of the occasion (not

>an event, a family birthday party).

 

I have been told that there is a law in Scotland that states that haggis

served in restaurants must be made in the intestine rather than the stomach.

So what you are getting is, in essence, a sausage. The intestine casing

would not have the same flavour as the stomach (or tripe as it's called).

I can't verify that this law is on the books, and I don't even recall who

told me at this point. But if true, then it would slant one's opinion of

haggis.

 

Now I will add that I've never been to Scotland (though that will change),

and have no desire to eat haggis in any form. My Lady, who is in Scotland

now, had occsion to attend the annual Robert Burns dinner at St. Andrews.

The traditional meal is haggis, and she claims it is vile. Still in all,

it's a matter of personal taste.

 

In service,

Corun

 

===============================================================================

   Corun MacAnndra   |

Dark Horde by birth |              Gort, Klaatu mirabile dictu

   Moritu by choice  |                     from The Day The Earth Spoke Latin

 

 

From: s.krossa at aberdeen.ac.uk (Sharon Krossa)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Haggis

Date: Mon, 15 Apr 1996 09:29:45 +0000

Organization: Phuture PhuDs

 

[My apologies if this is rather a late contribution to this thread: I've

been away from my net connection for many weeks except periodic visits just

long enough to download but not to post replies!]

 

jan.frelin at pub.MIL.SE (jan frelin) wrote:

 

>Tracy <treith at hevanet.com> replied:

>I beg to differ. On a visit to Edinburgh, we crashed with a couple of the

>locals of the shire of Harpelstane, and they invited us for a dinner of

>Haggis (with  'nips and 'taters) and malt whisky. The whisky helped, I'm

>sure, but I found the dinner quite pleasant. I can recommend to anyone!

 

It's neeps and tatties... ;-) but oh, how I long for tater-tots! (I wanna

go HOOOOOMMMMMMEEEEE!)

 

If you like sausages, you will very probably like haggis. If you don't,

well, you've got no taste! ;-) Haggis is simply the Scottish varient on the

sausage theme. No more, no less.

 

Regarding canned haggis, or any haggis really: You need to read the label

carefully. A surprising number of canned haggis and other haggises (ie, the

ones that come with ingrediants tags) are made with beef, without any

sheep, but including other strange things that have no place being in a

haggis. So read the label, make sure it's made with real sheep! I had a

very embarrassing and disappointing experience with Baxter's canned haggis.

I had brought some home to the USA to show my friends how lovely haggis

was, but instead of getting Grant's haggis, the canned variety I normally

get when a butcher's haggis isn't practical, I bought Baxter's, on the

grounds they were supposed to be this outstanding highland canning company.

Big mistake. It tasted like mediocre beef hash, and nothing at all like

haggis. I tried to tell my friends this wasn't at all like *real* haggis,

but I worry the damage may have been done!

 

Haggis made by a good butcher is, of course, far superior to any canned

variety, but canned haggis is better than none -- if it's the right brand!

I imagine I shall be getting care packages of Grant's from my Scottish

friends when I return to the USA permanently...

 

Sharon Krossa, who loves haggis, even the canned sort, and is very

sensitive to slights to the haggisly honour

 

skrossa at svpal.org (permanent) -or- s.krossa at aberdeen.ac.uk (until June 1996)

 

 

From: s.krossa at aberdeen.ac.uk (Sharon Krossa)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Haggis

Date: Mon, 15 Apr 1996 23:41:46 +0000

Organization: Phuture PhuDs

 

In article <4kube0$5f0 at info.abdn.ac.uk>,

Jim_Dunn at abdn.ac.uk (Jim Dunn) wrote:

 

>Sharon Krossa  (s.krossa at aberdeen.ac.uk)  wrote:

>> Regarding canned haggis, or any haggis really: You need to read the label

>> carefully. A surprising number of canned haggis and other haggises (ie, the

>> ones that come with ingrediants tags) are made with beef, without any

>> sheep, but including other strange things that have no place being in a

>> haggis. So read the label, make sure it's made with real sheep! I had a

>> very embarrassing and disappointing experience with Baxter's canned haggis.

>> I had brought some home to the USA to show my friends how lovely haggis

>> was, but instead of getting Grant's haggis, the canned variety I normally

>> get when a butcher's haggis isn't practical, I bought Baxter's, on the

>> grounds they were supposed to be this outstanding highland canning company.

>> Big mistake. It tasted like mediocre beef hash, and nothing at all like

>> haggis. I tried to tell my friends this wasn't at all like *real* haggis,

>> but I worry the damage may have been done!

>Didn't you mean mediocre mutton hash?  I imagine you did check the label,

>even for a firm with the reputation of  Baxters!  Anyway,  that's just me

>teasing.

 

No no no :) I meant beef hash. There was no mutton, lamb, or sheep of any

kind in the Baxter's product (I hesitate to even call it haggis). If I

recall correctly it had diced potato in it too, or at least by taste it

seemed so. It was most odd. (And yes, the label did say haggis, NOT

stovies!) That experience was the one that taught me to always read the

label. (Proper shocked I was, too -- imagine! Baxter's! And after all their

lovely cosy commercials too...)

 

>The following is a serious question,  though,  which I hope

>Sharon will answer.  Nowadays,  all the haggises I encounter seem to

>contain oatmeal as their main cereal ingredient.  However,  when I was a

>lad, I believe the typical average haggis contained barley rather than

>oatmeal. Is my memory faulty  (or at that age couldn't I tell the

> difference)  or is there a regional variation  -  after all,  here I am in

>the North-East  of  Scotland  but I came from the  South-West?  Or could

>it be that haggises have evolved?

 

Come now, Jim, you'll know better than I! I've only ever lived in the

North-East of Scotland... erm, I mean to say, the only place in Scotland

I've ever lived is the North-East, and I thought oatmeal was the standard

thing. But then, I only arrived here the first time about 10 years ago! The

best haggis I ever had though (strange as it may seem) was a deep fried one

on the isle of Mull in a little chippy there about 6 years ago. I couldn't

tell you though if it had oats or barley. I don't know why it was so good,

but I've never forgotten it! That was my first fried haggis, and I've been

desperately trying to find one as good ever since... The New Dolphin (off

Union St. up by Holburn Jct) is nae bad, but can't really hold a candle to

that chippy on Mull!

 

I've dug out "Scottish Cookery" by Catherine Brown (its a cookbook, not a

history book -- I do have some!), though, and she says of haggis:

"15th-century recipes use the liver and the blood of the sheep, while later

recipes in the 17th century, referring to making a 'Haggas Pudding in the

Sheep's Paunch' use a wider variety of ingredients -- parsley, savoury,

thyme, onions, beef, suet, oatmeal, cloves, mace, pepper and salt, sewn up

and boiled; seved with a hole cut in the top and filled with butter melted

with two or three eggs. Another recipe uses a calve's paunch and the

entrails minced together with grated bread, yoks of eggs, cream, spice,

dried fruits and herbs, seved as a sweet with sugar and almonds: while yet

another recipe uses oatmeal steeped and boiled, mixed with spices, raisins,

onions and herbs." Elsewhere she says modern butchers keep secret their

permutations, but her basic recipe that includes sheep pluck, pinhead

oatmeal, suet, onion, salt, pepper, and mixed herbs is "a traditional

recipe which most butchers will tell you is basically what they work from,

though no two of them will produce the same haggis." She doesn't say

anything about barley, maybe its a South-West thing -- it does sound like

there is more room for variation that we thought! But I still say -- not

for beef! (Brown does say people get very picky about how they like their

haggis, so it seems there is reason for the butchers to shun uniformity!

Mark me down under the "no beef in the haggis" column)

 

Sharon Krossa, wondering why Jim isn't off Software Engineering something

and realizing with shock she's apparently not all alone in Aberdeen!

 

PS Brown's book lists a bunch of historical cookery sources in the back,

but doesn't tell which were the ones that told about haggis

 

skrossa at svpal.org (permanent) -or- s.krossa at aberdeen.ac.uk (until June 1996)

 

 

From: s.krossa at aberdeen.ac.uk (Sharon Krossa)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Haggis

Date: Mon, 15 Apr 1996 09:29:49 +0000

Organization: Phuture PhuDs

 

Magorn <mgallehe at dcez.dcez.com> wrote:

>a certain group of wierdos with whom i ocassionally hang out are trying

>to get a group of people together to Put on kilts and pipes and go into a

>MC Donalds and Loudly and indignantly demand 15 orders of McHaggis to go....

 

Fast food haggis... not as weird as you think! In Scotland, at the fish and

chip shops, you can also get haggis, dipped in batter and deep fat fried

:-) McDonalds in Scotland, however, have yet to catch on...

 

Sharon Krossa, who doesn't like fish but still frequents the chippies!

skrossa at svpal.org (permanent) -or- s.krossa at aberdeen.ac.uk (until June 1996)

 

 

From: IVANOR at delphi.com

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Haggis

Date: 20 Apr 1996 01:37:23 GMT

Organization: Delphi Internet Services Corporation

 

Quoting Jim_Dunn from a message in rec.org.sca

   >that's just me teasing.  The following is a serious question,  though,

   >which I hope Sharon  will answer.  Nowadays,  all the haggises I

   >encounter seem to contain oatmeal as their main cereal ingredient.

   >However,  when I was a lad,  I believe the typical average haggis

   >contained barley rather than oatmeal.  Is my memory faulty  (or at

   >that age couldn't I tell the difference)  or is there a regional

   >variation  -  after all,  here I am in the  North-East  of  Scotland

   >but I came from the  South-West?  Or could it be that haggises have

   >evolved?

 

I've never heard of haggis made with anything but oats, nor does my Scots

cookbook mention any change (and it has a surprising amount of history...

which enabled me to cook a Scottish feast some years ago.)

 

Carolyn Boselli   ivanor at delphi.com   Host of CF35..SCAdians on Delphi

ivanor at localnet.com                                                  

 

 

From: "Aonghas MacLeoid (B.G. Morris)" <hylndr at ionline.net>

Date: Tue, 15 Apr 1997 21:37:02 -0400

Subject: SC - Re: sca-cooks Re[2]: Atholbrose.

 

Please refer to my homepage (address to be found under my signature) and

click on the *highlighted* haggis, to find out more info on this most

famous of Scottish dishes.

 

Regards,

Aonghas

 

hylndr at ionline.net

http://www.ionline.net/~hylndr/

 

 

From: Mara Riley <corbie at radix.net>

Newsgroups:rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Haggis

Date: Wed, 30 Apr 1997 17:41:34 -0400

 

I've had haggis; thought it was halfway decent.  It did need more

spices, though.  (I know, that's considered a crime or something! :D)

 

To me, haggis tasted rather like a liver sausage with a bit of a muttony

taste. I like beef liver, myself; someone who doesn't like liver

probably won't like haggis either.

 

And yes, the organ meats are the most nutritious parts of the animal.  

 

I buy my sausage at a local deli which makes them fresh.  These are

GREAT sausage, and guess what they use for the casings?  Intestines,

which is what people have used for sausage casings for centuries.  Which

makes haggis different only in the method of cooking it, I guess!

 

Corbie

 

 

From: "Deb Hense" <debh at microware.com>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Haggis (was: tartan something...

Date: 30 Apr 1997 19:30:20 GMT

Organization: Microware Systems Corp

 

dam at galasphere347.dcs.gal.ac.uk wrote on Tuesday, April 29 at 9:37 am:

> But it is a fact. Haggis was what was raided from the bins, usually kitchen

> scraps and slaughter discards mixed with oatmeal. How else do you explain

> people eating sheeps stomach, lungs and heart?? No one in their right mind

> would eat such a concoction unless they were living in poverty and on the edge

> of starvation. Sometimes I wonder if maybe Burns was having a joke at

> everyone's expense, and they all fell for it! Was it the deep fried Mars bar

> of its day? A running joke that took on a life of its own? Oh well, maybe

> we'll have stovies elevated to haute cuisine one day..hmmm..

>

> Glasgow.

 

Sorry, but I have made a small study in this area - especially with regards

to sausages.  The lungs and heart are commonly known in period as the

*lights* of an animal. They were often used in sausages, or thrown into

stews, or served up as a special dish. The stomachs and intestines were the

skins or holders of these special dishes or sausages. This is true in all

the countries/cultures that I have studied so far.  Heart is still a

specialty item in many countries, and you can still get it in many of the

ole US of A grocery stores.

 

It is only in the past 100 years that use of these animal parts for human

consumption has fallen off, and it is now ground into animal foods or

otherwise used. Much of our sausage casings are now made out of something

like cellulose (sp?) instead of intestines. Because much of period was much

closer to its agrarian roots than modern society (especially in the US) is,

they were much less wasteful of their food sources. Take a good look at

some of those period cookbooks. Many of them contain recipes calling for

the *lights* of such and such an animal. Look it up in the OE.  These

recipes were not written down for the people who lived in poverty (few of

whom could actually read) - but for the merchant (read middle) and

upper-classes.

 

As to whether Haggis tastes good or not. I've had great haggis and I've had

really bad haggis.  Methinks it doth depend entirely on the cook.

 

Kateryn de Develyn

Who once wrote a little cookbook which contained a lot of period sausage

recipes!

 

 

From: ALBAN at delphi.COM

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: haggis

Date: 4 May 1997 03:09:17 -0400

 

One EPotter asked

>What is the etymology of "haggis"?  Is there any record of when the

>dish may have been introduced?  

 

From my copy of the CD-ROM edition of the Oxford English Dictionary:

>>haggis: [Derivation unknown. The analogy of most terms of cookery

suggests a French source; but no corresp. F. word or form has been

found. The conjecture that it represents F. hachis 'hash', with

assimilation to hag, hack, to chop, has app. no basis of fact; F. hachis is

not known so early, and the earlier forms of the Eng. word are more

remote from it. Whether the word is connected with hag vb., evidence

does not show.]

<< 

 

and the first quote in the OED dates it to 1420.

Alban

 

 

Date: Thu, 24 Jul 1997 23:39:19 -0700 (PDT)

From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Re- Welcome to Errick

 

There is a period haggis recipe, under that name, in Two Fifteenth Century

Cookery Books; I have never tried it.

 

Elizabeth/Betty

 

 

Date: Tue, 29 Jul 1997 08:34:42 -0500

From: gfrose at cotton.vislab.olemiss.edu (Terry Nutter)

Subject: Re: SC - Re- Welcome to Errick

 

Hi, Katerine here.  Elizabeth of Dendermonde mentions the recipe for

haggis under that name in Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books.  There

are also recipes for haggis (under that name) in Diversa Servicia (in

Cury on Inglysch; recipe 15) and in Liber Cure Cocorum (recipe 125);

for haggis of almayne (under that name or a corruption) in TFCCB (first

MS, Leche Viaunds recipe 50, and second MS, recipe 84) and An Ordinance

of Pottage (recipe 104); for haggis of a sheep (TFCCB, first MS,

Leche Viaunds recipe 25); and for haggis under other names (fraunche

mele or a variant of that, and an entrayle) in TFCCB first MS LV 21 and

26, Liber Cure Cocorum 86, and Noble Boke of Cookery 243.

 

I've never made any of them.

 

Cheers,

- -- Katerine/Terry

 

 

Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 00:34:40 EST

From: korrin.daardain at juno.com (Korrin S DaArdain)

Subject: SC - RE: haggis

 

Did someone say:

 

       Haggis

 

       1 Sheep's stomach bag plus the pluck (lights, liver and heart)

       1/4 pint beef stock

       1 lb Lean mutton

       6 oz Fine oatmeal

       8 oz Shredded suet

       2 lg Onions, chopped

       Salt and pepper

       about 1/4 pint beef stock.

       Soak the stomach bag in salted water overnight. Place the pluck

(lights, liver and heart) in a saucepan with the windpipe hanging over

the edge. Cover with water and boil for 1 1/2 hours. Impurities will pass

out through the windpipe and it is advisable to place a basin under it to

catch any drips. Drain well and cool. Remove the windpipe and any gristle

or skin. Mince the liver and heart with the mutton. (Add some of the

lights before mincing if you wish.) Toast the oatmeal gently until pale

golden brown and crisp. Combine with minced mixture, suet and onion.

Season well and add sufficient stock to moisten well. Pack into the

stomach bag, filling it just over half-full as the stuffing will swell

during cooking. Sew up the bag tightly or secure each end with string.

Put an upturned plate in the base of a saucepan of boiling water, stand

the haggis on this and bring back to the boil. Prick the haggis all over

with a large needle to avoid bursting and boil steadily for 3 to 4 hours.

Makes 6 to 8 servings.

 

Korrin S. DaArdain

Dodging trees in the

Kingdom of An Tir.

Korrin.DaArdain at Juno.com

 

 

From: Larry Johnson <ljohnsn1 at idt.net>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Hagus?

Date: Tue, 14 Apr 1998 23:00:25 -0700

Organization: IDT

 

Michael Pruitt wrote:

> Does anybody have a recipe for hagus?  Thanks for any help.

 

Haggis recipes coming up, go to http://www/smart.net/~haggis.html and

you will have haggis coming out your ear.

 

One word of advice on using the oatmeal,  try to find the Irish Oatmeal,

it is more granular in consistancy,  don't use Quaker Rolled Oats as the

haggis will turn out to be hard as a brick. There are lots of good

recipes on this list.

 

 

From: Larry Johnson <ljohnsn1 at idt.net>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Hagus?

Date: Wed, 15 Apr 1998 10:13:05 -0700

Organization: IDT

 

>     Take all the leftovers from the butchering of  a sheep , stuff into its

>     stomache , cook

> Shear the sheep close.  Wet it down, and roll it in oats.  Cut off the

> hooves, turn inside out, bake.

 

Good ones!! HAHAHAHAHahahaha 8>)  I'll have to pass those along at the Scottish

Games.

 

HAGGIS (from A Feast if Scotland, Janet Warren)

 

Stomach bag and pluck (heart, liver and lights [lungs] of a sheep)

2 onions, peeled

2 cups pinhead oatmeal  (Irish oatmeal)

1 2/3 cup suet

salt and pepper

trussing needle and fine string

 

Thoroughly wash the stomach bag in cold water, Turn it inside out and scald it,

then scrape the surface with a knife.  Soak it in cold salted water overnight.

Next day remove the bag from the water and leave it to one side while preparing

the filling.  Wash the pluck, put it into a pan with the windpipe hanging over the side of the bowl, to let out any impurities.  Cover the pluck with cold water, add 1 teaspoon of salt and bring to a boil.  Skim the surface, the simmer for 1 1/2 to 2 hours.  Meanwhile, parboil the onions, drain, reserving the liquid, and chop them roughly.  Also toast  the pinhead oatmeal until golden brown. Drain the pluck when ready and cut away the windpipe and any excess gristle. Mince half the liver with all the heart and lights, then stir in the shredded suet, the toasted oatmeal and the onions.  Season well with salt and pepper. Moisten with as much of the onion or pluck water as necessary to make the mixture soft.  With the rough surface of the bag outside, fill it just over half full, the oatmeal will swell during cooking, and sew the ends together with the trussing needle and fine string. Prick the bag in places with the needle.  Place the haggis on an enamel plate and put it into a pan of boiling water.  Cover the pan and cook for about 3 hours, adding more boiling water when necessary to keep the haggis covered.  Serve with the traditional accompaniment of Tatties-an'-Neeps (mashed potatoes and mashed turnips mixed together) and a fine single malt scotch.

 

FYI-- a sheep's stomach is hard to find, so a very large boiling bag works well.

Using the lungs of a sheep is not allowed by the FDA.  You can substitute other

organ meats for the lungs.

 

SLAINTE

Yours aye

Labhruinn MacIain an Mor

 

 

Date: Thu, 28 May 1998 10:31:30 -0400

From: renfrow at skylands.net (Cindy Renfrow)

Subject: Re: SC - Haggis??

 

>Anybody got a period haggis recipe??

>bill

 

Oy! You would make me boot up *that* program, wouldn't you!  I have

several period haggis recipes in "Take a Thousand Eggs or More"; some call

for the stomach of a sheep, others for that of a porpoise.  ([th] has been

substituted for 'thorn)

 

Harleian MS. 279 - Leche Vyaundez, c. 1430

xxv. Hagws of a schepe.  Take [th]e Roppis with [th]e talour, & parboyle

hem; [th]an hakke hem smal; grynd pepir, & Safroun, & brede, & [3]olkys of

Eyroun, & Raw kreme or swete Mylke:  do al to-gederys, & do in [th]e grete

wombe of the Schepe, [th]at is, the mawe; & [th]an se[th]e hym an serue

forth ynne.

 

Harleian MS. 279 - Leche Vyaundez

xl. Puddyng of purpaysse.  Take [th]e Blode of hym, & [th]e grece of hym

self, & Ote-mele, & Salt, & Pepir, & Gyngere, & melle [th]ese to-gederys

wel, & [th]an putte [th]is in [th]e Gutte of [th]e purpays, & [th]an lat it

se[th]e esyli, & not hard, a good whylys; & [th]an take hym vppe, & broyle

hym a lytil, & [th]an serue f[orth].

 

Cindy Renfrow/Sincgiefu

renfrow at skylands.net

Author & Publisher of "Take a Thousand Eggs or More, A Collection of 15th

Century Recipes" and "A Sip Through Time, A Collection of Old Brewing

Recipes"

 

 

Date: Thu, 28 May 1998 11:10:06 -0500

From: mfgunter at fnc.fujitsu.com (Michael F. Gunter)

Subject: Re: SC - Haggis??

 

Thanks Sincgiefu,

 

These are wonderful recipes. But......

 

> Harleian MS. 279 - Leche Vyaundez, c. 1430

> xxv.  Hagws of a schepe.  Take [th]e Roppis with [th]e talour, & parboyle

> hem; [th]an hakke hem smal; grynd pepir, & Safroun, & brede, & [3]olkys of

> Eyroun, & Raw kreme or swete Mylke:  do al to-gederys, & do in [th]e grete

> wombe of the Schepe, [th]at is, the mawe; & [th]an se[th]e hym an serue

> forth ynne.

 

I take it "Roppis" to be the intestines and tripe, but what is talour? At

first thought it would be "tallow" but I feel it would more likely indicate

organ meats like the liver, kidneys, etc...

 

Then ground and mixed with pepper, saffron, breadcrumbs, egg yolks, and

cream or milk. Boiled in the stomach.

 

To tell you the truth, it sounds kinda tasty.

 

> Harleian MS. 279 - Leche Vyaundez

> xl.  Puddyng of purpaysse.  Take [th]e Blode of hym, & [th]e grece of hym

> self, & Ote-mele, & Salt, & Pepir, & Gyngere, & melle [th]ese to-gederys

> wel, & [th]an putte [th]is in [th]e Gutte of [th]e purpays, & [th]an lat it

> se[th]e esyli, & not hard, a good whylys; & [th]an take hym vppe, & broyle

> hym a lytil, & [th]an serue f[orth].

 

Is this the mammal? Although it seems good I won't knowingly eat mammilian

dolphin or porpose. Sorry Ras, I'm too much of a liberal to eat animals

I consider intelligent.

 

> Cindy Renfrow/Sincgiefu

 

Gunthar

 

 

Date: Thu, 28 May 1998 12:42:23 -0400

From: renfrow at skylands.net (Cindy Renfrow)

Subject: Re: SC - Haggis??

 

>Thanks Sincgiefu,

>These are wonderful recipes. But......

 

Sorry , here you go! (I thought everyone here read M.E. by now - y'all do

know there's going to be a quiz next Friday, don't you? ;-) )

 

>> Harleian MS. 279 - Leche Vyaundez, c. 1430

>> xxv.  Hagws of a schepe.  Take [th]e Roppis with [th]e talour, & parboyle

>> hem; [th]an hakke hem smal; grynd pepir, & Safroun, & brede, & [3]olkys of

>> Eyroun, & Raw kreme or swete Mylke:  do al to-gederys, & do in [th]e grete

>> wombe of the Schepe, [th]at is, the mawe; & [th]an se[th]e hym an serue

>> forth ynne.

 

25. Haggis of a sheep.  Take the Guts with the tallow, & parboil them;

then hack them small; grind pepper, & Saffron, & bread, & yolks of Eggs, &

Raw cream or sweet Milk:  put all together, & put in the great stomach of

the Sheep, that is, the stomach; & then seethe him and serve forth in.

 

>I take it "Roppis" to be the intestines and tripe, but what is talour? At

>first thought it would be "tallow" but I feel it would more likely indicate

>organ meats like the liver, kidneys, etc...

>Then ground and mixed with pepper, saffron, breadcrumbs, egg yolks, and

>cream or milk. Boiled in the stomach.

>To tell you the truth, it sounds kinda tasty.

>> Harleian MS. 279 - Leche Vyaundez

>> xl.  Puddyng of purpaysse.  Take [th]e Blode of hym, & [th]e grece of hym

>> self, & Ote-mele, & Salt, & Pepir, & Gyngere, & melle [th]ese to-gederys

>> wel, & [th]an putte [th]is in [th]e Gutte of [th]e purpays, & [th]an lat it

>> se[th]e esyli, & not hard, a good whylys; & [th]an take hym vppe, & broyle

>> hym a lytil, & [th]an serue f[orth].

 

40. Pudding of porpoise.   Take the Blood of him, & the grease of him

self, & Oatmeal, & Salt, & Pepper, & Ginger, & mix these together well, &

then put this in the Gut of the porpoise, & then let it seethe gently, &

not hard, a good while; & then take him up, & broil him a little, & then

serve f[orth].

 

>Is this the mammal? Although it seems good I won't knowlingly eat mammilian

>dolphin or porpous. Sorry Ras, I'm too much of a liberal to eat animals

>I consider intelligent.

 

Yes, it's the mammal.

 

Cindy Renfrow/Sincgiefu

renfrow at skylands.net

Author & Publisher of "Take a Thousand Eggs or More, A Collection of 15th

Century Recipes" and "A Sip Through Time, A Collection of Old Brewing

Recipes"

 

 

Date: Thu, 28 May 1998 12:12:06 -0700

From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Haggis??

 

At 9:42 PM -0500 5/27/98, William Seibert wrote:

>Anybody got a period haggis recipe??

 

Yes, but it's English.

 

Hagws of a schepe (Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery Books p. 39)

 

Take the Roppis [i.e. guts] with the talour [tallow=fat], & parboyle hem;

than hakke hem smal; grynd pepir, & Safroun, & brede, & yolkys of Eyroun, &

Raw kreme or swete Mylke: do al to-gederys, & do in the grete wombe of the

Schepe, that is, the maw [stomach]; & than sethe hym and serue forth ynne.

[thorns replaced by th's]

 

I haven't tried it, but it seems straightforward enough, if you can get the

ingredients. I would find a modern haggis recipe to tell you how long to

boil it and such.

 

Elizabeth/Betty Cook

 

 

Date: Fri, 29 May 1998 02:45:19 EDT

From: korrin.daardain at juno.com (Korrin S DaArdain)

Subject: SC - Haggis: Traditional, Mock Lamb, & Mock Beef.

 

Greetings All,

       I have three recipes for Haggis in my collection.

       Enjoy.

 

Korrin S. DaArdain

Kingdom of An Tir.

Korrin.DaArdain at Juno.com

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

       Haggis

_     From A Feast of Scotland, by Janet Warren. Posted by Dorothy

Flatman, Clackamas, Oregon, USA (Fidonet 1:105/86)

       1 Stomach bag and pluck (heart liver and lungs of a sheep (You

can substitute a selection of organ meats))

       2 Onions; peeled

       2 c  Pinhead oatmeal; (Irish oatmeal)

       1 2/3 c  Suet

       Salt & pepper

       1 trussing needle and fine string

       Thoroughly wash the stomach bag in cold water.  Turn it inside

out and scald it, then scrape the surface with a knife. Soak it in cold

salted water overnight. Next day remove the bag from the water and leave

it on one side while preparing the filling. Wash the pluck. Put it into a

pan, with the windpipe hanging over the side into a bowl, to let out any

impurities. Cover the pluck with cold water, add 1 teaspoon of salt and

bring the water to a boil. Skim the surface, then simmer for 1 1/2 to 2

hours. Meanwhile parboil the onions, drain, reserving the liquid, and

chop them roughly. Also toast the pinhead oatmeal until golden brown.

Drain the pluck when ready and cut away the windpipe and any excess

gristle. Mince half the liver with all the heart and lights, then stir in

the shredded suet, the toasted oatmeal and the onions. Season well with

salt and pepper. Moisten with as much of the onion or pluck water as

necessary to make the mixture soft. With the rough surface of the bag

outside fill it just over half full, the oatmeal will swell during

cooking, and sew the ends together with the trussing needle and fine

string. Prick the bag in places with the needle. Place the haggis on and

enamel plate and put it into a pan of boiling water. Cover the pan and

cook for about 3 hours, adding more boiling water when necessary to keep

the haggis covered. Serve with the traditional accompaniment of

Tatties-an'Neeps. (Mashed potatoes and mashed turnips.)

 

       This is typically served on Burns' Night, January 25, when

Scotland celebrates the birth of their greatest poet, Robert Burns, who

was born in Ayrshire on that date in 1759. During the celebration, Burns

poems are read, and the haggis is addressed by a member of the party,

ceremonially, in the for of verses from Burns' poem, "Address to a

Haggis" A typical meal for Burn's night would include, Cock-a-Leekie,

Haggis with Tattie-an'-neeps, Roastit Beef, Tipsy Laird, and Dunlop

Cheese.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

       Haggis, Mock Lamb

       From Country Living, March, 1991. Posted by Dorothy Flatman,

Clackamas, Oregon, USA (Fidonet 1:105/86)

       1 lb Boneless lamb shoulder or Breast, cut into pieces, or Use

ground lamb

       1/2 lb Lamb liver; cut into pieces

       1/2 c  Water

       1 sm Onion; coarsely chopped

       1 lg Egg

       3/4 ts Salt

       3/4 ts Pepper, black

       1/2 ts Sugar

       1/4 ts Ginger, ground

       1/8 ts Cloves, ground

       1/8 ts Nutmeg, ground

       1 c  Oats, rolled, old fashioned

       Heat oven to 350-F. Grease an 8 1/2 by 4 1/2 inch loaf pan. In

food processor with chopping blade, process together half of the lamb,

the liver, water, onion, egg, salt, pepper, sugar, ginger, cloves, and

nutmeg until well combined. Add the remaining half of the lamb and the

oats; process until well combined. Spoon lamb mixture into the greased

pan; pat surface to level. Bake 45 to 55 minutes or until center feels

firm when gently pressed. Cool 5 minutes in pan; un-mold onto platter;

slice and serve.        Notes: This skinless haggis is planned for

American tastes, yet contains many of the ingredients found in the real

thing. You can un-mold the loaf and serve it in place of the purchased

haggis recipes.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

       Haggis, Mock Beef

_     From Lillian Beckwith's Hebridean Cookbook by Lillian Beckwith.

Posted by Dorothy Flatman, Clackamas, Oregon, USA (Fidonet 1:105/86)

       1/2 lb Liver

       1/2 lb Beef, minced

       2 md Onions

       6 oz Oatmeal, medium

       6 oz Suet; shredded

       1 ts Salt

       1 pn Pepper

       1 pn Nutmeg; grated

       1/3 c  Water in which liver had been boiled

       1 pn Cayenne pepper

 

       "Haggis, "The great Chieftain of the pudding' race", as Robert

Burns, described it, is indeed a toothsome morsel and it is a great pity

that many English people look upon it as more a Scottish joke than a good

Scottish dish. However since Haggis is made from the stomach, lungs and

other internals of a sheep it is a rather gruesome sight during certain

stages of its cooking, as anyone who has witnessed the process will

agree. The lung must be first be heating in a pan of hot water with the

trachea hanging over the side to allow any blood and froth to escape and

the stomach bag must be cleaned and scraped very thoroughly before it is

used. I must say from experience that it takes needs a fairly robust

stomach to first prepare and then eat it. If you can buy prepared haggis

I do strongly recommend you to try it. All you need to do is slice it and

fry it in a lightly greased frying pan. If you cannot buy ready-made

haggis, then the following is tasty substitute.."

 

       Boil the liver for five minutes. Drain and put aside to cool.

Toast the oatmeal in a dry frying pan or in the oven until it begins to

turn a pale brown. Peel and mince the onions and the liver. Mix all the

ingredients with the seasoning and stir in some of the water in which the

liver has been boiled. The mixture should be thoroughly moist but not

wet. Have ready a greased basin large enough to give the mixture room to

swell. Cover with grease proof paper and a cloth and boil or steam for

three hours.    The traditional way to serve haggis is with mashed

potatoes and turnips - "tatties and neeps", as they are called in

Scotland - and to give the meal a truly Scottish flavor you should serve

a glass of whiskey along with it.

 

       I like to let the mock haggis go cold and then slice it and heat

it through in a frying pan (without fat) until golden brown on both

sides. This way it is very good with poached eggs and even with chips.

       Note: if your mince looks to be on the fatty side, then cut down

the quantity of suet to 4 oz (100grams).

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

 

Date: Sun, 4 Oct 1998 08:47:58 -0700

From: "Anne-Marie Rousseau" <acrouss at gte.net>

Subject: Haggis and lamb tummies was Re: SC - More lamb

 

Hi from Anne-Marie, resident ex-farmgirl and ruminent breeder :)

Phlip asks:

> > . I would appreciate recipes for blood sausage and black pudding,

> > possibly a haggis, if someone can specify WHICH stomach, and any other

> > parts not mentioned.

 

any "ethnic" scottish cookbook will have a recipe for such things, as well

as Robert May, etc if you want a period source.

 

Now that you mention it, I dont think any of the sources I've looked at

ever actually mention which part of the digestive tract, other than to say

"stomach" (or some other equally unhelpful word). Now, as for which

stomach, actually, technically, I'm betting they want the rumen, the big

empty bit, which actually, technically isnt part of the stomach at all, but

is a pouch off the esophagus. You got your rumen, your omassum and your

reticulum, see, and then you got your abomasum, which actually the stomach

bit. Dont mind me...I did a 4H demonstration on this when I was 12 :).

Each bit does something different, see, and the rumen is the biggest and

hollowest, so that's why I'm thinking its the "sheeps maw"  or "paunch"

mentioned in the sources.

 

As for other bits, they mention the liver and heart (self explanitory), the

lights (lungs), and one of my books specifies the tongue as well.

 

- --Anne-Marie d'Ailleurs

mka Anne-Marie Rousseau

Madrone/An Tir

Seattle/WA

 

 

Date: Mon, 19 Oct 1998 08:04:58 -0700

From: "Anne-Marie Rousseau" <acrouss at gte.net>

Subject: Re: Haggis and lamb lungs was Re: SC - More lamb

 

>       I, too have been considering making a Haggis, and have done some

> looking around on the net for more information.  I learned something that

> actually has be a bit relvieved.

>       Acording to the Haggis Web page (funny that there is such a thing,

> huh?)  the FDA had decreed that sheep lung is not fit for human consumption.

> This is why haggis is not imported.  I would assume that would mean you also

> could not get the lung from a butcher, or from the processing house you

> might.

>       Alys D.

 

Hi from AM

I'm sure that its not that the FDA "doesnt consider the lung fit for human

consumption", but that they're afraid of the really rather nastie cooties

one can get specifically from sheeps lungs. (can you say liver flukes?).

These guys encyst in the lung and a cursory visual exam may or may not get

them. You CAN find lungs in the country, but it takes some digging. I think

there's a butcher here in Seattle who specializes in...ahem....special

bits? I could of sworn I saw the list on the wall include "lights" next to

the Rocky Mountains Oysters, sweet breads, etc. Another possibility is to

buy the sheep yourself, ie totally skip the FDA. I'd be very careful WHO I

bought it from though...if a single sheep coughed when I was there, and the

pasture wasnt bone dry I doubt I'd eat the lungs (the fluke has a water

born stage...the sheep get it from eating grasses grown in watery pasture.

Migrates to the lung. Normally it encysts there for a bit, then hatches,

and crawls up the esophagus (hence the cough), gets swallowed and out in

the feces, back to the water. Rather tidy! probably more info than you

wanted, sorry!)

 

Anyway, the point is, the FDA isn’t making some sort of value judgement, the

rule is there for a very good reason. You can probably get around it if you

want to, but be very careful!

 

- --Anne-Marie

 

 

Date: Mon, 19 Oct 1998 09:04:42 -0400

From: Phil & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: Haggis and lamb tummies was Re: SC - More lamb

 

Weiszbrod, Barbara A wrote:

>         I, too have been considering making a Haggis, and have done some

> looking around on the net for more information.  I learned something that

> actually has be a bit relvieved.

>         Acording to the Haggis Web page (funny that there is such a thing,

> huh?)  the FDA had decreed that sheep lung is not fit for human consumption.

> This is why haggis is not imported.  I would assume that would mean you also

> could not get the lung from a butcher, or from the processing house you

> might.

>         The reason I find this comforting is that I can handle cooking the

> hart and the liver, but the idea  of lungs in a pot with the trachia hanging

> out the side is too much for this city girl.  Yucky.

>         Alys D.

 

You can make quite a good "faux" haggis using lamb hearts and liver, which

will cut down on the livery flavor many Americans don't approve of anyway,

and substituting spleens in equal weight for the lungs. If you have a good

"ethnic" butcher, one whose name ends in a vowel ;  ), etc., he should either

have pork spleen or be able to order some for you. (Ask about milts or melt if

he looks blank when you ask for spleen, or there may be another local term.)

Spleen is vaguely similar to lungs in flavor, color, and, when ground up as

for haggis, texture (lungs are ordinarily relatively spongy, which can be

solved by parboiling them and cooling under a weighted plate or board, but for

haggis this is not a problem). Haggises made without lights tend to be paler

in color and more bland, more like liverwurst, but spleens will help give the

distinctive dark color and rich flavor a haggis should have, even if they're

not authentic sheep's lungs. Spleen, BTW, is a flat strip of dark red organ

meat, with a thin line of fat running along the center line.

 

By the way, I highly recommend using haggis recipes that _do_ call for suet

over ones that don't, and the other essential is that while the more exotic

spices seem to have been rare in the Scottish Highlands until the 19th century

or so, you can accomplish a lot for the flavor with judiciously applied salt

and pepper. I recommend seasoning your ground filling and tasting it (since

your meats will have already been cooked), bearing in mind that this is

supposed to be a sausage.

 

Oh, and never, ever, use rolled oats. The only thing they're good for is

oatmeal cookies, and that's debatable when you place them side by side with

the same cookie made with real oatmeal.

 

Adamantius

Østgardr, East

 

 

Date: Mon, 19 Oct 1998 14:38:26 EDT

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: SC - The Problems with Lungs

 

tyrca at yahoo.com writes:

<< Perhaps there is another way to cook them, >>

 

My experience with cooking lungs is that the trachea should be draped over the

pot rim as suggested. I have removed it and found that the lungs puff up with

the hot air and steam from cooking. They then float around on the surface like

some bizaare sea creature. If the lungs are slit, the slit seems to adhere to

the underlying lissue and you get an irregular blob floating about. Either

way, floating causes uneven cooking, which is a bad thing. I have also cut

them in pieces which causes a decernable flavor difference in the finished

product.

 

In smaller animals the problem of floating is not quite so bad. In fact, the

garbage that I served with the Roasted Rabbit at Will's contained not only

the heart, livers  spleen and kidneys of the rabbit but also the lungs. They

seemed to cook well and the air sort of disappereared aftem repeated

submersions and stirrings.

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Sun, 25 Oct 1998 10:13:18 -0500

From: James Gilly / Alasdair mac Iain <alasdair.maciain at snet.net>

Subject: RE: Haggis and lamb tummies was Re: SC - More lamb

 

At 09:39 19-10-98 -0500, Alys wrote, regarding haggis:

>hmmmm, do you think it would dry out too much if I put it in a chaffing

>dish? Or is room temp warm enough?  And if it is room temp, is there a

>worry about health problems?  It gets cooked so long I would think that any

>beasties in it would be dead.

 

>From *Scottish Cookery*:

 

Other ways of serving:

   'Haggis meat, by those who cannot admire the natural shape,' says Meg

Dods, 'may be poured out of the bag, and *served in a deep dish*.  No dish

heats up better.'  It is also a very practical way of serving haggis to

large numbers provided it is well covered to prevent drying out.  Knobs of

butter dotted over the top surface are a good idea.

 

[*Scottish Cookery*, Catherine Brown, p 149.  Copyright 1989 by Catherine

Brown.]

 

Alasdair mac Iain

 

 

Date: Sun, 25 Oct 1998 10:14:55 -0500

From: James Gilly / Alasdair mac Iain <alasdair.maciain at snet.net>

Subject: RE: Haggis and lamb tummies was Re: SC - More lamb

 

At 09:11 19-10-98 -0500, Alys wrote:

>The point (as far as I can tell) of hanging the tracea out of the pot is to

>let gases escape from the lungs and in doing so prevent it from exploding.

>That would really be gross!  The receipes that I have found tell you to

>discard it after the cooking is complete..

 

>From *Scottish Cookery*:

 

   My first haggis-making exploits were as a student when the whole

process took the best part of a day to complete.  The raw Sheep's Pluck*,

while not a pretty sight, didn't worry me at all but the windpipe hanging

over the side of the pot which the whole pluck was cooking in, quietly

disgorging the blood and other impurities from the lungs into a jar which

we had placed on the cooker, did not appeal.

 

   * A Sheep's Pluck is the part of the animal which has been 'plucked'

out of the belly and includes the liver, heart and lungs which are all

joined together with the windpipe at one end.

 

[*Scottish Cookery*, Catherine Brown, pp 147-148.  Copyright 1989 by

Catherine Brown.]

 

Instructions for actually making the haggis (the day after the pluch has

been cooked) include "cut off the windpipe, trim away all skin and black

parts."

 

Alasdair mac Iain

 

 

Date: Sun, 15 Nov 1998 10:00:05 -0500

From: James Gilly / Alasdair mac Iain <alasdair.maciain at snet.net>

Subject: SC - Haggis

 

HAGGIS

 

   Walk into any butcher's shop in Scotland and ask how many pounds of

haggis they make in a week - you will be astonished.  And this, for every

week of the year; not just at the national festivals of St Andrew's Day and

Burns' night when demand often outstrips supply and butchers are frequently

sold out by the end of the morning.  If the desire for haggis is strong at

home, it becomes an obsession for exiled Scots who have vast quantities

air-freighted to all parts of the globe for these two nights of the year.

 

   Ny first haggis-making exploits were as a student when the whole

process took the best part of a day to complete.  The raw Sheep's Pluck*,

while not a pretty sight, didn't worry me at all but the windpipe hanging

over the side of the pot which the whole pluck was cooking in, quietly

disgorging the blood and other impurities from the lungs into a jar which

we had placed on the cooker, did not appeal.  It was about ten years before

I had another go, when I was working in a hotel which bought whole sheep

and as the plucks started filling up the precious deep freeze space,

prompted by necessity, I got out my old Haggis recipe in *The Glasgow

Cookery Book* (John Smith, Glasgow, Revised Edition, 1962).

 

   It is a traditional recipe which most butchers will tell you is

basically what they work from, though no two of them will produce the same

haggis. Variations are secret and have been developed over many years

testing the Scottish palate for preferences.  Haggis lovers have very

definite ideas about the best qualities of haggis and a competition is held

each year to find the best butcher's haggis.

 

* A Sheep's Pluck is the part of the animal which has been 'plucked' out of

the belly and includes the liver, heart and lungs which are all joined

together with the windpipe at one end.

 

   Qualities of a good Haggis

   The flavour is a matter of taste, with some liking it spicy and 'hot'

with plenty of pepper, while others prefer a milder flavour with more herbs

than spices.  Relative proportions of meat to oatmeal, suet and onions also

depend on individual preferences as does the type of offal used.  Some

butchers will use ox liver because their customers prefer the flavour,

while others stick to the traditional sheep's - there are all kinds of

ermutations which make haggis eating something of an adventure.

   More a question of quality, the meat should have no tough gristly bits

sometimes found in a badly-made haggis and the texture should be moist and

firm, rather than dry and crumbly.

 

Traditional method

   1 sheep's bag and pluck

   4 oz/125 g suet, finely chopped (1 c)

   4 medium onions, finely chopped

   1/2 lb/250 g pinhead oatmeal (2 c)

   2-4 tablespoons salt

   1 level teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

   1 level teaspoon dries mixed herbs (2 for fresh)

 

Preparing the pluck and bag

   Wash the bag in cold water, scrape and clean well.  Leave overnight in

cold water.  Wash the pluck and put it ina pan of boiling water.  Let the

windpipe lie over the side of the pot and have a small jar underneath to

catch the drips.  Simmer gently till all are tender - this depends on the

age of the animal but is usually between one and two hours.  Place the

cooked pluck in a large basin, cover with the liquid which it was boiled in

and leave overnight.

 

Making the Haggis

(The next day)

   Toast the oatmeal in the oven till thoroughly dried-out but not

browned. Cut off the windpipe, trim away all skin and black parts.  Chop

or mince the heart and lungs, grate the liver.  Add the oatmeal, salt,

pepper, herbs and about 1 pt/1/2 L (2 1/2 c) of the liquid the pluck was

boiled in.  Mix well, fill the bag rather more than half full of the

ixture. Press out the air, sew up and prick with a long needle.  Place in

boiling water, simmer for 3 hours, pricking again when it swells.  The bag

may be cut into several pieces to make smaller haggis in which case cook

for only 1 1/2-2 hours.

 

   Serve hot with 'tatties' - Creamed Potatoes flavoured with nutmeg (see

p. 181); 'neeps' - Mashed Turnip flavoured with allspice (see p. 194) and a

good blended whisky.

 

Other ways of serving

   'Haggis meat, by those who cannot admire the natural shape,' says Meg

Dods, 'may be poured out of the bag, and *served in a deep dish*.  No dish

heats up better.'  It is also a very practical way of serving haggis to

large numbers provided it is well covered to prevent drying out.  Knobs of

butter dotted over the top surface are a good idea.  Slices of haggis can

be grilled, fried or wrapped in foil and baked in the oven with a bit of

butter on top.  The slices can be served as part of a Mixed Grill or for

breakfast with bacon and egg.  It is very good fried and served simply with

fried onions or with an onion sauce lightly flavoured with whisky.  I have

had a slice of fried haggis served in a roll and described as a

'Haggisburger'. It was served with a whisky-flavoured chutney and was an

excellent snack.  It can also be used with mince in a Shepherd's Pie.

   Provided you are careful about the dominating flavour it can be used

as a stuffing.  It should not be used with delicately-flavoured meat like

chicken unless it is a very mild haggis.  Other ingredients can be added to

the haggis such as nuts or cooked rice.  Mixing in a little tomato sauce

(see p. 257) can work well.

 

   An Edinburgh butcher, well-known for his quality haggis, Charles

MacSween has recently made a vegetarian haggis with an excellent flavour

which is proving popular.  It has a variety of vegetables, spices, oatmeal

and brown rice.

 

   Perhaps the most unusual idea is that of serving cold haggis.  Some

years ago I met a chef whose local butcher made such a good haggis that he

served a slice of it cold with hot toast as a starter course.  It seemed

that he used pork fat and meat rather than suet along with a delicate

combination of herbs and spices with excellent results.

 

   Variations in other recipes include adding the juice of a lemon or a

little 'good vinegar'.  Even flavouring with cayenne pepper.  Quantities of

oatmeal and suet vary a lot with up to 2 lb/1 kg oatmeal and 1 lb/500 g

suet to a singlepluck.  Some are boiled for up to 6 hours.  Meg Dods says

that, 'A finer haggis may be made by parboiling and skinning sheep's

tongues and kidneys, and substituting these minced, for most ot the lights,

and soaked bread or crisped crumbs for the toasted meal.'  For those who

can't face a whole pluck she also says that the parboiled minced meat from

a sheep's head can be used for haggis.

 

Origins of Haggis Pudding

   Like pies, puddings have always been made with a collection of

miscellaneous ingredients; the one under a pie crust, the other boiled in

the stomach bag of an animal.  The term 'pudding' came from the habit in

15th and 16th centuries of referring to the entrails of animals and men as

'puddings'.

 

   Pudding Lane in London is thought to have derived its name, not from

an association with edible puddings, but because 'the butchers of Eastcheap

have their scalding-houses for hogs there, and their puddings, with other

filth of beasts, are voided down that way to their Dung-boats on the

Thames.'

 

   From the 15th century to about the 18th century, recipes for early

puddings are closely connected with something called a 'Haggis' or 'Haggas'

pudding. The general principle involved the use of the stomach bag with a

filling of the cooked entrails plus some other ingredients.  15th-century

recipes use the liver and the blood of the sheep, while later recipes in

the 17th century. referring to making a 'Haggas Pudding in the Sheep's

Paunch' use a wider variety of ingredients - parsley, savoury, thyme,

onions, beef, suet, oatmeal, cloves, mace, pepper and salt, sewn up and

boiled; served with a hole cut in the top and filled with butter melted

with two or three eggs.  Another recipe uses a calve's paunch* and the

entrails minced together with grated bread, yolks of eggs, cream, spices,

dried fruits and herbs, served as a sweet with sugar and almonds; while yet

another recipe uses oatmeal steeped and boiled, mixed with spices, raisins,

onions and herbs.

 

   Although the derivation is obscure, some etymologists claim that the

term may have been transferred from the now obsolete name for a magpie

which was 'Haggiss' or 'Haggess'.  A medieval comparison may have been

drawn between the magpie's habit of collecting and forming an accumulation

of varied articles and the same general principle applied instead to

ingredients for the pudding.  This analogy is carried even further, with

the unproven theory that another early word for the magpie may be

responsible for the word 'pie' since at one time the magpie was known as a

'maggot-pie' or a 'Margaret-pie' or even simply as a 'pie'.

 

   Whether the habits of the magpie had anything to do with what we know

to-day as puddings and pies, the Haggis pudding has a British rather than a

Scottish pedigree with the English making Haggis well into the 18th

century. The Scots' deeply rooted instincts, bred by centuries of

surviving at poverty levels, to use up all the odds and ends of an animal

seems to me the best reason why we have continued to make it.  The fact

that we actually still like to eat it is proof enough of its virtue.

 

* Baxters of Fochabers made one of the largest Haggis, weighing 170 lb, by

stuffing the mixture into the interior of two cows' stomachs which had been

sewn together

 

[*Scottish Cookery*, by Catherine Brown, pp 147-150.  Copyright 1989

Catherine Brown.  First published 1985; new edition 1989; reprinted 1990.

Richard Drew Publishing Ltd, Glasgow.]

 

**********   **********   **********

 

Alasdair mac Iain

 

Laird Alasdair mac Iain of Elderslie

Dun an Leomhain Bhig

Canton of Dragon's Aerie [southeastern CT]

Barony Beyond the Mountain  [northern & southeastern CT]

East Kingdom

 

 

Date: Sun, 15 Nov 1998 13:44:35 EST

From: Mordonna22 at aol.com

Subject: SC - Faux Haggis

 

kathleen.hogan at juno.com writes:

> I have a couple of haggis recipes.  I

> even had an Irish ex-boyfriend who made it for me once.  I love the

> stuff, but can't get the ingredients around here.

 

My Scots Grandmother (Naomi Morganna LeFay Hardy DuBose) taught me to make a

beef version of Haggis:

1/4 LB beef suet

1 beef liver

1 beef heart

1 beef tripe

Beef kidneys, lungs, pancreas, spleen, etc. as available.

4 small onions

2 dried chilies

2 tsp. salt

1 Tbs. ground pepper

1 to 2 cups water

 

Place in a heavy stew pot and bring to a boil at high heat, then reduce to

medium low heat and simmer for 2 1/2 to 3 hours or until very tender.

Chop fine and add 1 cup fine oatmeal or barley and 1 quart of water.  Return

to high heat and bring back to a boil, cover and remove from heat and allow

to stand for 20 minutes without peeking.  As Ras said, "DO NOT LIFT THE LID"

 

Serve immediately or chill and slice and serve with toast and mustard.

 

Mordonna (Because the Haralds won't allow my true name) DuBois

Barony of Atenveldt

Kingdom of Atenveldt

 

 

Date: Fri, 27 Aug 1999 00:58:03 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Pennsic Potluck

 

Stefan li Rous wrote:

> In one of the food classes I was in at Pennsic, taught by Honour Horne-Jaruk

> (Alizaunde, Demoiselle de Bregeuf) she said that haggis within out period

> was the food of the nobility and was composed of dried fruit in the stomach

> rather than the lights. She said that later on it became the food of the

> lower classes and that was when the fruit was replaced by the organ meats

> and lungs and such.

 

Haggis was _a_ food of the nobility, if we can judge from the extant

recipes, which suggest that foods called haggis were eaten in medieval

England, specifically 14th-15th century. They do seem to bear little

resemblance to th' Graet Chieftain of th' Puddin' Race. It seems likely

that a haggis, in general terms, was a pudding boiled in a stomach bag.

I recall an early recipe for a haggis (presumably a faux haggis or some

kinda warner) made from poached eggs. Another close approximation would

be a fronchemoyle, again, a variant on the white pudding theme, boiled

in a stomach sack.

 

There are several English haggis recipes that are nearly

indistinguishable from a white pudding recipe, generally involving

breadcrumbs instead of oats (although even now some white puds do call

for oats), with suet, cream, spices, and in some cases, I believe, fruit

such as dried Raisins of Corance.

 

I don't know that I accept the idea, though, that haggis became a food

of the lower classes; I guess that depends on what one considers lower

classes. In Scotland, the farmers who butchered mutton and ate the

innards that wouldn't keep well, and the nobles who hunted for various

types of deer and made haggis from their innards, aren't what I'd call

especially lower classes.

 

What I think has happened is either that the dish evolved over time

without especially crossing borders of socio-economic class (at least

none it hadn't crossed long since), or that we have early documentation

of a regional variant distinct from another regional variant, for which

we have later documentation. The two dishes may well have co-existed, in

fact almost certainly did, I think.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Fri, 27 Aug 1999 09:04:55 -0000

From: "=?iso-8859-1?Q?Nanna_R=F6gnvaldard=F3ttir?=" <nannar at isholf.is>

Subject: Re: SC - Pennsic Potluck

 

Stefan wrote:

>While I have several haggis recipes in my haggis-msg file, they can best

>be described as traditional and I believe are undated.

>Does anyone have evidence to confirm or deny her comments?

 

No, but here is a recipe from the Danish cookbook:

 

How to stuff a sheep´s stomach

 

Take lean veal and pork fat and chop it small together. Add some small

raisins and four beaten eggs. Salt to taste and season with some herbs and

take care, when you add the eggs, that the mixture is neither too thick nor

too thin. Stuff the sheep´s stomach with this, so that each stomach is only

half filled, and close it. Place it in boiling water and cook it as other

sausages, until it is well cooked and hard. Take it out of the water and cut

it in nice slices. Make a nice brown sauce of gingerbread and wine and add

some herbs, so it has a lively taste. Add the slices to the sauce, salt it,

taste for seasonings, then serve it forth.

 

[The cookbook mentioned is:

The recipe comes from "Koge Bog: Indeholdendis et hundrede fornødene stycker

Som ere om Brygning, Bagning, Kogen, Brendewijn oc Miød at berede, aare

nyttelig udi husholding, etc., Som tilforn icke paa vort Danske Sprog udi

Tryck er udgangen", Copenhagen, 1616. As the title says, this is the oldest

printed Danish cookbook, and it has one hundred recipes. - Stefan.]

 

Nanna

 

 

Date: Fri, 27 Aug 1999 11:57:06 -0400

From: renfrow at skylands.net (Cindy Renfrow)

Subject: Re: SC - Pennsic Potluck

 

<snip>

 

>In one of the food classes I was in at Pennsic, taught by Honour Horne-Jaruk

>(Alizaunde, Demoiselle de Bregeuf) she said that haggis within out period

>was the food of the nobility and was composed of dried fruit in the stomach

>rather than the lights. She said that later on it became the food of the

>lower classes and that was when the fruit was replaced by the organ meats

>and lungs and such.

>While I have several haggis recipes in my haggis-msg file, they can best

>be described as traditional and I believe are undated.

>Does anyone have evidence to confirm or deny her comments?

<snip>

 

Here are the haggis & haggis-like recipes from Harleian 279, c. 1430:

 

Harleian MS. 279 - Leche Vyaundez

xxj. An Entrayle.  Take a chepis wombe; take Polettys y-rostyd, & hew hem;

[th]en take Porke, chese, & Spicery, & do it on a morter, & grynd alle

y-fere; [th]en take it vppe with Eyroun y-swonge, & do in [th]e wombe, &

Salt, & se[th]e hem tyl he be y-nowe, & serue forth.

 

Harleian MS. 279 - Leche Vyaundez

xxv. Hagws of a schepe.  Take [th]e Roppis with [th]e talour, & parboyle

hem; [th]an hakke hem smal; grynd pepir, & Safroun, & brede, & [3]olkys of

Eyroun, & Raw kreme or swete Mylke:  do al to-gederys, & do in [th]e grete

wombe of the Schepe, [th]at is, the mawe; & [th]an se[th]e hym an serue

forth ynne.

 

Harleian MS. 279 - Leche Vyaundez

xxvj. Frawnchemyle.  Nym Eyroun with [th]e whyte, & gratid Brede, & chepis

talow, Also grete as dyse; nym Pepir, Safroun, & grynd alle to-gederys, &

do in [th]e wombe of [th]e chepe, [th]at is, [th]e mawe; & se[th]e hem wyl,

& serue forth.

 

Harleian MS. 279 - Leche Vyaundez

xl. Puddyng of purpaysse.  Take [th]e Blode of hym, & [th]e grece of hym

self, & Ote-mele, & Salt, & Pepir, & Gyngere, & melle [th]ese to-gederys

wel, & [th]an putte [th]is in [th]e Gutte of [th]e purpays, & [th]an lat it

se[th]e esyli, & not hard, a good whylys; & [th]an take hym vppe, & broyle

hym a lytil, & [th]an serue f[orth].

 

Not a raisin in sight.

 

Cindy Renfrow/Sincgiefu

renfrow at skylands.net

 

 

Date: Fri, 27 Aug 1999 09:57:45 PDT

From: "pat fee" <lcatherinemc at hotmail.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Pennsic Potluck

 

There is a recipe for Haggis in my family cook book.  If I remember right

it is made with oats, bits of pre cooked mutton,leeks, currents, cream, or

good stock, with what ever dried fruit here was, and a bit of honey. This

was cooked slightly to soften the oats, then stuffed in the "bag" and cooked

for an unbelievable length of time, 6 hours I think.

 

Lady Katherine McGuire

 

 

Date: Sat, 28 Aug 1999 05:12:07 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Pennsic Potluck

 

Stefan li Rous wrote:

> To which Adamantius replied:

> <snip>

> > I recall an early recipe for a haggis (presumably a faux haggis or some

> > kinda warner) made from poached eggs. Another close approximation would

> > be a fronchemoyle, again, a variant on the white pudding theme, boiled

> > in a stomach sack.

> >

> > There are several English haggis recipes that are nearly

> > indistinguishable from a white pudding recipe, generally involving

> > breadcrumbs instead of oats (although even now some white puds do call

> > for oats), with suet, cream, spices, and in some cases, I believe, fruit

> > such as dried Raisins of Corance.

> Ok, what is a fronchemoyle or even a white pudding?

 

A white pudding is, for practical purposes, a sausage made from either a

light-colored meat, fat, a starch element like rice, breadcrumbs or

oats, with or without cream and/or eggs, and in some cases the starch

and fat, with spices and salt, but without meat. They're cheap and

filling, and probably derive from the need for dietary fat in the days

before central heating. There are really elegant French versions today

involving capon breast, rabbit meat, cream, etc., while at the other end

of the scale you have some UK versions which have been known to resemble

well-seasoned modelling clay, based primarily on cracker crumbs and pork

fat (And even those aren't any worse than, say, scrapple. Yes, Elysant,

there are some good British ones too! Just trying to define a range from

my perceived best to worst.)

 

Probably the simplest and best explanation would be to say they're black

puddings without the blood.

 

As for Fronchemoyle, I believe Cindy Renfrow posted a recipe from a

15th-century Harleian MS, there's also one in MS Douce 257, c. ~1381

C.E. The name supposedly derives from the name of the second stomach of

cows, sheep, and other ruminants. It's a pudding boiled in a stomach,

like haggis, made from breadcrumbs, diced fat (in this case sheep's suet

or tallow), eggs, pepper, saffron, and probably salt, boiled and served

in slices. Probably quite a lot like the stuffed derma you can get in

Kosher delis in New York.

 

> > I don't know that I accept the idea, though, that haggis became a food

> > of the lower classes; I guess that depends on what one considers lower

> > classes. In Scotland, the farmers who butchered mutton and ate the

> > innards that wouldn't keep well, and the nobles who hunted for various

> > types of deer and made haggis from their innards, aren't what I'd call

> > especially lower classes.

> Ok. Do we have any haggis recipes from before 1600? Are these English

> haggis recipes that you mention from before 1600?

 

Cindy posted at least one recipe from before 1600 that does indeed call

for organ meats (intestines and the attached fat, or Ropis and their

Tallow, or some such) boiled and chopped. As you've spotted, though, no

fruit. Pat Fee mentioned fruit in her family cookbook. I wonder if

perhaps this is a lowland Scots version of haggis, and when it's from?

The English versions of haggis that call for breadcrumbs and cream are

pretty late as a general thing. There's one, I think, in Gervase

Markham's _The English Hus-Wife_ , published in 1615 but the recipes

appear to be older than that. There may be one in Kenelm Digby's book,

and I think there's one in Giulielma Penn's recipe collection (late 17th

century) and in Martha Washington's Boke of Cookery. The latter, I

believe, calls for fruit, but I'm not sure, and I'll have to go digging

through books another time.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Sat, 28 Aug 1999 09:15:36 PDT

From: "pat fee" <lcatherinemc at hotmail.com>

Subject: Re: SC - haggis

 

>From: Stefan li Rous <stefan at texas.net>

>Lady Katherine McGuire said:

> >   There is a recipe for Haggis in my family cook book.  If I remember right

> > it is made with oats, bits of pre cooked mutton,leeks, currents, cream, or

> > good stock, with what ever dried fruit here was, and a bit of honey. This

> > was cooked slightly to soften the oats, then stuffed in the "bag" and cooked

> > for an unbelievable length of time, 6 hours I think.

>Thank you. Your cookbook does cover a wide spread of years. Is there any

>indication of when this particular recipe dates from? Interesting. Fruit

>and cream and mutton and oats. It seems to incorporate a wide variety of

>what I was beginning think of as different types of haggis.

 

  I called the photographer who is working on the book and she looked up the

haggis recipe I remembered.  The first date on it was 1594.  She looked

through the section that the recipe was from and yes there were several

others some just oats suet and leeks, some with organ meats and veggies, But

the one  spoke of has a note that seems to be atranslation of a note from

the 1594 addition, This appeared on a 1878 recopy. it said in effect that

this haggis had been served to a member of the English royal family on a

visit to his Scots hunting lodge, and that it was a sore wast of good

provider, as the person of royal birth had consumed enough to feed the

household for a week. I went down to her studio this morning to see this for

myself. There was also an added note that I copied and had my mother-in-law

see if she could translate,that said that this haggis was not a proper

haggis as it was designed to show the guest the wealth of the family and

proper haggis( I think this refers to the haggis made with oats, leftover

meat,leeks and broth. was a "goode fillen" for a honest hard working

Scotsman

 

Lady Katherine McGuire

 

 

Date: Sun, 29 Aug 1999 01:58:16 -0500

From: LYN M PARKINSON <allilyn at juno.com>

Subject: Re: SC - haggis

 

Stefan writes >> It seems to incorporate a wide variety of

what I was beginning think of as different types of haggis.<<

 

I recall seeing some period drawings of cooks working over huge

cauldrons, which seem to contain a number of different items.  Dorothy

Hartly describes the technique of cooking multiple items in one pot,

which seems to have gone on into her lifetime, in some parts of England.

 

Perhaps our various haggis -es [haggii?] are, originally, simply

combinations than can be easily cooked in this most convenient

container--an animal's stomach.  It later becomes Robert Burns' version.

 

Allison

allilyn at juno.com, Barony Marche of the Debatable Lands, Pittsburgh, PA

Kingdom of Aethelmearc

 

 

Date: Mon, 17 Apr 2000 15:04:33 -0400

From: Elaine Koogler <ekoogler at chesapeake.net>

Subject: Re: SC - Trimarian Haggis

 

Some years ago, I picked up a Scottish "Cookery Book" put out by The Scottish

Women's Rural Institutes, which has several recipes for haggis, including the

following Sweet Haggis (it still uses a sheep's stomach, but you could still use

a "bag"):

 

3 1/2 lbs. oatmeal, 2 lbs. suet,  2 lbs. raisins or sultannas, 1 tablespoon

salt, l level dessertspoon black pepper, 3 dessertspoons sugar, 1 breakfast cup

cold water.

 

Method: Mix all together and put into haggis bag (sheep's or pig's stomach),

sew up.  Prick with a fork, tie in cloth, put into boiling water and boil for 3

hours.

 

What you describe also could pass for a Clootie Dumpling:

 

3 oz. flour, 3  ozs. breadcrumbs, 3 ozs. chopped suet, 1 teaspoon ground

cinnamon, 2 ozs. sultannas, 1 teaspoon ground ginger or a grate of nutmeg, 2

ozs. currants, 1/2 tsp. bicarbonate of soda, 2 ozs. brown sugar,  1

tablespoonful syrup, about 3/4 cup sour milk or buttermilk.

 

Mix all together with enough milk to make a fairly soft consistency. Dip a

pudding cloth into boiling water and wring it.  Dredge it well with flour, set

it in a basin and spoon in the mixture.  Draw together evenly; leave enough room

for the pudding to swell and tie tightly with string.  Place a plate in the

bottom of the steaming pan.  Have enough boiling water to well-cover the

dumpling. Simmer for fully 2 hours, adding more boiling water at intervals.

Turn out on to hot ashet (sic)   Dredge with caster sugar and serve with hot

sauce.

 

Both of these sound great, though I've tried neither...and am not sure what

"syrup" is, though it could be the "golden syrup" we discussed on another

thread. As to what a hot "ashet" is, I haven't a clue.  Nor do I know what the

"hot sauce" is...there was no recipe for it!

 

Kiri

 

 

Date: Mon, 21 Aug 2000 09:05:09 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Haggis and Strawberries

 

Lee-Gwen Booth wrote:

> I was having a discussion with a (non-cook) SCA friend and she mentioned

> that she felt that Haggis would have only been a peasant dish in period (her

> grandparents were Scottish and she says they never ate Haggis partly for

> this reason).

 

The prejudice about offal being a food for the poor is comparatively

modern, and haggis has, as far as I know, always been considered a

rather festive dish (think, even in modern terms, of its presentation,

flamed with whisky, accompanied by pipes, etc.). This is compounded by

the fact that haggis has traditionally been made with the innards of

fresh venison about as often as with those of sheep. You could argue

that the shift in the socio-economic status of the dish occurred when

sheep farming became considered less of an occupation for the

well-to-do, but the fact is that there are several haggis recipes (some

resembling modern recipes made with offal, fat, and some kind of grain

or starch product, some not) in the known English medieval and

renaissance recipe sources. These sources pretty much have to be viewed

as either A) specifically aimed at the noble and/or the wealthy, or B)

hand-copied or printed books that were expensive until the seventeenth

century or so, in which case, see A) above.

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Mon, 21 Aug 2000 18:40:40 -0700

From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Haggis and Strawberries

 

At 3:57 PM +1000 8/21/00, Lee-Gwen Booth wrote:

>I was having a discussion with a (non-cook) SCA friend and she mentioned

>that she felt that Haggis would have only been a peasant dish in period (her

>grandparents were Scottish and she says they never ate Haggis partly for

>this reason).

 

She is mistaken. Haggis shows up in _Two Fifteenth Century Cookery

Books_, which is clearly a collection of recipes for the nobility.

 

David/Cariadoc

http://www.daviddfriedman.com/

 

 

Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2000 09:29:17 -0500

From: Elaine Koogler <ekoogler at chesapeake.net>

Subject: SC - Haggis, revisited

 

I have visited a site on the web, www.scottish-haggis.com,

the website for McKean's of Scotland.  They have a

variety of haggis which they sell, along with other things.  They also

offer information on how to cook the "beastie".

 

Kiri

 

 

Date: Wed, 03 Jan 2001 12:15:03 -0800

From: Susan Fox-Davis <selene at earthlink.net>

Subject: Re: SC - Presents

 

Stefan li Rous wrote:

> Selene said:

> > In other gifties, I got PLEYN DELIGHT

> > and Clarissa Dickson Wright's little book on the Haggis.  The more of

> > her stuff

> > I read, the more I wish we had her in the SCA, I know there are SCA

> > people in the UK.

> I've not heard of this book (or author) before. More details please.

> Does she give any documentably period recipes for haggis? For that

> matter, I'm sure any documentably period Scottish recipes at all would

> be of interest to many.

 

"The Haggis : A Little History" by Clarissa Dickson Wright, Not really helpful

for official documentation but lots of fun, it's just a wee trinket of a

booklet, a four-inch square hardcover, you know the type.  She does trace the

history of haggis, both etymologically and gastronomically, back through SCA

period and long before.  The details and ordering information are on Amazon

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1565543645/ref=cm_mp_wl/105-4876789-9255153?colid=3CH33WX3IDH3Q

 

Selene

 

 

Date: Tue, 1 May 2001 20:46:26 EDT

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: SC - Haggis Recipe-OOP

 

craig.jones at airservices.gov.au writes:

<< Anyone got a recipe for haggis?  Ras, surely you can help? >>

 

A Detailed Haggis Recipe

(from Michael Prothro)

 

       1 sheep's stomach, thoroughly cleaned

       The liver, heart, and lights (lungs) of the sheep

       1 lb Beef suet

       2 large Onions

       2 tb Salt

       1 ts Freshly ground black pepper

       1/2 ts Cayenne or red pepper

       1/2 ts Allspice

       2 lb Dry oatmeal (the old-fashioned, slow-cooking kind)

       2-3 cups broth (in which the liver, heart and lights were cooked)

 

What you need: Canning kettle or a large spaghetti pot, 16- to 20 quart size

with a lid to fit it; meat grinder; cheesecloth

 

What to do: If the butcher has not already cut apart and trimmed the heart,

liver and lungs, do that first.  It involves cutting the lungs off the

windpipe, cutting the heart off the large blood vessels and cutting it open

to rinse it, so that it can cook more

quickly. The liver, too, has to be freed from the rest. Put them in a 4-quart

pot with 2 to 3 cups water, bring to a boil, and simmer for about an hour and

a half. Let it all cool, and keep the broth.

 

Run the liver and heart through the meat grinder. Take the lungs and cut out

as much of the gristly part as you easily can, then run them through the

grinder, too. Next, put the raw beef suet through the grinder. As you finish

grinding each thing, put it in the big kettle. Peel, slice and chop the

onions, then add them to the meat in the kettle. Add the salt and spices and

mix.

 

The oatmeal comes next, and while it is customary to toast it or brown it

very lightly in the oven or in a heavy bottomed pan on top of the stove, this

is not absolutely necessary. When the oatmeal has been thoroughly mixed with

the rest of it, add the

2 cups of the broth left from boiling the meat. See if when you take a

handful, it sticks together. If it does, do not add the third cup of broth.

If it is still crumbly and will not hold together very well, add the rest of

the broth and mix thoroughly. Have

the stomach smooth side out and stuff it with the mixture, about

three-quarters full. Sew up the openings. Wrap it in cheesecloth, so that

when it is cooked you can handle it.

 

Now, wash out the kettle and bring about 2 gallons of water to a boil in it.

Put in the haggis and prick it all over with a skewer so that it does not

burst. You will want to do this a couple of times early in the cooking span.

Boil the haggis gently for about 4 or 5 hours. If you did not have any

cheesecloth for wrapping the haggis, you can use a large clean dishtowel.

Work it under with kitchen spoons to make a sling with which you can lift out

the haggis in one piece. You will probably want to wear lined rubber gloves

to protect your hands from the hot water while you lift it out with the wet

cloth. (You put the dish cloth in the pot only after the haggis is done; you

do not cook the towel with the haggis as you would the cheesecloth.)

 

Note: Even if the butcher has cleaned the stomach, you will probably want to

go over it again. Turn the stomach shaggy side out and rinse. Rub it in a

sinkful of cold water. Change the water and repeat as many times as necessary, until the water stays pretty clear and handling it does not produce much sediment as the water drains out of the sink.

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 21:40:50 +0200

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

From: "Cindy M. Renfrow" <cindy at thousandeggs.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Re: Liber Cure Cocorum

 

>A fifteenth century cookbook with a recipe for

>Haggis (pp. 52 and 53)?   Huzzah!  Could this be

>the long awaited period reference to the Queen of

>Sausages?

>Mordonna

 

There are plenty of haggis recipes in Harl. 279 & 4016.   Here's just

one example.

 

Harleian MS. 279 - Leche Vyaundez

 

xxv. Hagws of a schepe.  Take [th]e Roppis with [th]e talour, & parboyle

hem; [th]an hakke hem smal; grynd pepir, & Safroun, & brede, & 3olkys of

Eyroun, & Raw kreme or swete Mylke:  do al to-gederys, & do in [th]e grete

wombe of the Schepe, [th]at is, the mawe; & [th]an se[the hym an serue

forth ynne.

 

 

25. Haggis of a sheep.  Take the Guts with the tallow, & parboil them;

then hack them small; grind pepper, & Saffron, & bread, & yolks of Eggs, &

Raw cream or sweet Milk:  put all together, & put in the great stomach of

the Sheep, that is, the stomach; & then seethe him and serve forth in.

 

Cindy

 

 

Date: Tue, 22 May 2001 18:34:40 +0200

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

From: "Cindy M. Renfrow" <cindy at thousandeggs.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] period haggis recipes

 

>Thank you, Cindy! I've got a number of recipes for haggis in my

>haggis-msg file that I've collected over the years. Some are

>"traditional". Some are definitely post-period, involving things

>like red peppers. A few, such as this one, are period but best

>described as "vegetarian" haggis.

>Do you have any period recipes that besides the grains and other

>fillers, include the other organ meats? The "traditional" recipes

>seem to include these, but the only documentably period recipes I

>have so far don't.

 

I see we've had part of this conversation before.

 

Well, here's this recipe that includes pork, cheese, & pullets, but most of

the haggis recipes just use tallow & filler, unless you count "roppis" as

including organs other than the intestines.  I think the dish was intended

as a type of savory pudding, used as a meal extender.

 

Harleian MS. 279 - Leche Vyaundez

 

xxj. An Entrayle.  Take a chepis wombe; take Polettys y-rostyd, & hew hem;

[th]en take Porke, chese, & Spicery, & do it on a morter, & grynd alle

y-fere; [th]en take it vppe with Eyroun y-swonge, & do in [th]e wombe, &

Salt, & se[th]e hem tyl he be y-nowe, & serue forth.

 

21. An Entrail.  Take a sheep's stomach; take Pullets roasted, & hew them;

then take Pork, cheese, & Spicery, & put it in a mortar, & grind all

together; then take it up with Eggs mixed, & put in the stomach, & Salt, &

seethe them till he is enough, & serve forth.

 

Cindy

 

 

Date: Mon, 20 Aug 2001 11:28:03 -0700

From: Susan Fox-Davis <selene at earthlink.net>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Haggis: [Fwd: News of the Weird]

 

Elizabeth A Heckert wrote:

> On Mon, 20 Aug 2001 09:39:57 -0400 "Philip W. Troy & Susan Troy"

> <troy at asan.com> writes:

> > While I don't consider myself a real authority on the subject, I will state

> > that none of the dozens of haggises I have encountered myself have been

> > gray,

>     So what is good haggis like?  I had some at the Richmond Highland

> games and Bleeaahh!  I happen to love scrapple, although I haven't had

> any in years, and that was wonderfully spiced.  The haggis had all the

> qualities I despise in oatmeal:  bland, glutinous and heavy.  If it had

> been spiced a bit, I would have enjoyed it, and from scotch eggs to

> scones, the rest of the food at that fair is fantastic ... well maybe not

> the deep-fried Mars bars, but then I've never worked up the intestinal

> fortitude to try those ...

>     Elizabeth

 

The reason that Haggis made by most Americans is goopy and awful is because

they use American rolled oats.  Using steel-cut oats, the result is more like

the real thing, a kind of oatmeal dressing with lamb giblets.  I use plenty

of onions and a large pinch of sage as well as salt and pepper.  The color

can be improved with the addition of commercial browning or just by sauteeing

the organ meats, onions and/or toasting the oatmeal before stuffing into the

paunch.   But any steamed pudding is going to have a generally pale color as

compared with baked or roasted products, just deal with it.

 

Selene, Caid

 

 

Date: Mon, 20 Aug 2001 16:51:56 -0400

From: "Philip W. Troy & Susan Troy" <troy at asan.com>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Haggis: [Fwd: News of the Weird]

 

Elizabeth A Heckert wrote:

>     Steel cut oats makes sense!  It's the only way you can get me within

> ten feet of oatmeal.  Also, as I said, the stuff I had tasted like

> wallpaper paste.  The funny thing is, I don't even remember the colour of

> it, it must have looked fairly innocuous!

 

Ecchhh. Actually, it's possible to use rolled oats in haggis, but the

proportions need to be a little different. A proper haggis should be

sort of hashy in consistency, sort of like a moist pilaf. One of the

main secrets of attaining this consistency is to use a recipe that calls

for added fat, rather than one which omits things like a small amount of

grated suet. People do weird things like substituting a lot of liquid

for the fat, creating a sloppy goo, or nothing in place of it, creating

dry modelling clay. But 99% of all substandard haggis I've seen has been

because the cook simply forgot that HAGGIS IS A *&$%^# at *&%# SAUSAGE.

There is no such thing as an effective haggis without salt or a viable

substitute. Ditto pepper, at the very least. Pennyroyal, or, for the

squeamish, mint, are helpful additions, as is a pinch of nutmeg,

although this is a little New Wave by haggis standards. Thyme is a good

addition in lieu of the mints.

 

So, we're talking about a sausage filled with dark-brown meats, mixed

with onion, [usually] brown toasted oats, fat and herbs. Brown ales of

various kinds occasionally go in to moisten the filling. The filling,

when mixed and cooked, tends to look like darkish buckwheat kasha. How

could it be gray?

 

I submit the possibility that while there may be, or have been, some

small percentage of gray haggis(es), they are probably not the norm, and

I suspect that a lot of people who discuss the grayness of haggis have

never actually tried it or even seen it.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Tue, 30 Aug 2005 16:46:04 -0400

From: "Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius"

        <adamantius.magister at verizon.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] haggis?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

On Aug 30, 2005, at 4:30 PM, Kathleen A Roberts wrote:

> i may find myself entering a haggis cooking competition, if the

> autocrats indeed go through with it.  (throw down a gauntlet at ME,

> will ye!?!?!?!) 8)

> anyone got any tried and true recipes?  i know the alton brown

> recipe, and several similar, but usually see 'spices' in the recipe

> as opposed to exactly what spices. now, i know what you put in

> scrapply, but that's a different animal...  literally, i guess.

> oh yeah, and good scotch to go with it.

 

I have a good one that I usually use, someplace. It's a synthesis of

several published recipes, mostly the Elizabeth Luard version in "The

Old World Kitchen", and some of the one in one of the Jeff Smith

books. I think he advocates salt and pepper, plus, IIRC, nutmeg, and

mint in lieu of pennyroyal. I'll see if I can locate it.

 

90% of the bad haggises I've encountered over the years have been

made with insufficient salt and pepper. It's a floggin' sausage, and

should be aggressively seasoned. Fresh-ground pepper is best. Also,

my experience is that it is insanity to leave out the suet. Steer

clear of the recipes that don't use them; it's not like leaving it

out will make a low-cholesterol product; it's just a drier, slightly

lower-cholesterol product.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Wed, 31 Aug 2005 09:04:07 +1200

From: Adele de Maisieres <ladyadele at paradise.net.nz>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] haggis?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius wrote:

> 90% of the bad haggises I've encountered over the years have been

> made with insufficient salt and pepper. It's a floggin' sausage, and

> should be aggressively seasoned. Fresh-ground pepper is best. Also,

> my experience is that it is insanity to leave out the suet. Steer

> clear of the recipes that don't use them; it's not like leaving it

> out will make a low-cholesterol product; it's just a drier, slightly

> lower-cholesterol product.

 

Another common cause of Bad Haggis is the use of the wrong kind of

oats-- ie rolled or flaked oats rather than steel-cut oats.  The right

oats make it lightish, slightly dryish, and slightly crumbly.  The wrong

oats make it solid, heavy, and gooey.

 

I agree on the seasoning-- salt and plenty of freshly ground pepper,

plus a little nutmeg or mace, or if you're inclined that way, a little

allspice.

--

Adele de Maisieres

 

 

Date: Tue, 30 Aug 2005 18:20:31 -0400

From: "Mairi Ceilidh" <jjterlouw at earthlink.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] haggis?

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

This is from a post I sent to a local cooks list quite some time ago.

Getting the ingredients to make a proper haggis is very difficult lately, so

I developed a recipe that works well, and seems to be acceptable even to

native Scots.  I am posting both a traditional recipe, and my version for

use when the ingredients aren't available (i.e.:  when you don't have  

your own sheep to butcher).

 

Enjoy! I enjoy making haggis and eating it.

 

Traditional Haggis

 

1 sheep's lungs (may be omitted if not available)

1 sheep's stomach

1 sheep heart

1 sheep liver

1 pound fresh suet (kidney leaf fat is preferred)

1 cup oatmeal (steel cut, not rolled oats)

3 onions, finely chopped

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

1/2 teaspoon nutmeg

1/2 cup stock

1/2 cup Single Malt Whisky

 

Wash lungs and stomach well, rub with salt and rinse. Remove membranes and

excess fat. Soak in cold salted water for several hours. Place the lungs in

a pan of cold water with the windpipe hanging over the edge (to facilitate

the removal of any impurities) and slowly bring to a boil.  Reduce heat and

simmer for about 20 minutes.  Chop fairly finely.  Turn stomach inside out

for stuffing. Cover heart and liver with cold water. Bring to a boil, reduce

heat, cover and simmer for 30 minutes. Chop heart and coarsely grate liver.

Toast oatmeal in a skillet on top of the stove, stirring frequently, until

golden. Chop suet finely.  Combine all ingredients and mix well. Loosely

pack mixture into stomach, about two-thirds full. Remember, oatmeal expands

in cooking. Press any air out of stomach and truss securely. Put into

boiling water to cover. Simmer for 3 hours, uncovered, adding more water as

needed to maintain water level. Prick stomach several times with a sharp

needle when it begins to swell; this keeps the bag from bursting. Place on a

hot platter, removing trussing strings.

 

Have a piper play Scotland the Brave as the platter is carried to the table.

Have a bard ready, sgine dubh in hand, to pay honor to the haggis in the

time honored words of the National Poet of Scotland (Ode to the Haggis by

Robert Burns).  Serve with Tatties and Neeps (potatoes and turnips, boiled

and mashed together), Oat Cakes and Single Malt.  Listen for the change in

your patterns of speech.

 

Now, it is all very well and good to provide recipes like this, but it is

seldom that one has a chance to lay hands on all the authentic ingredients.

For that reason, I developed a version that seems to be acceptable to native

Scots and cause less aversion in PA Americans (yes, that stands for pansy

a$$).

 

Mother Mairi's Haggis

 

1 lb. ground lamb

1 lb. chicken livers

1 lb. hard leaf suet

1-2 large onions

1 cup McCann's Steel Cut Oats (available at Publix)

Salt, Pepper, Nutmeg to taste

1/2 cup broth (from cooking livers)

1/2 cup Single Malt

 

Chop onions and sauté with ground lamb.  Boil livers in just enough salted

water. Cool and grate.  Chop suet finely.  (The chopping can be done in a

food processor).  Toast the oats until they are light golden brown.  Mix all

ingredients, and wrap in a double layer of cheese cloth (or place in a

pudding bag).  Be sure to do this over the pot in which you plan to cook the

haggis so that none of the juices are lost.  Wrap tightly and put in pop

with the fold down.  Add water to cover and bring to a boil.  Reduce heat

and simmer for 1 1/2-2 hours.  Remove to a plate and open cheese cloth

carefully. Even more carefully transfer haggis to a large sheet of plastic

wrap. Fold plastic to completely encase and place on a heated serving

platter. (Putting it in the plastic facilitates serving and makes the bards

performance work better when he plunges the sgine dubh into the "steaming,

reeking pudding".)  Serve as noted above.

 

Have fun!  Haggis is not the evil some make it out to be (neither is fruit

cake). Most people who turn up their noses at organ meats are to ignorant

or prejudiced to try them.  I have no patience with those who would condemn

things they have never tasted.  Just don't offer me chilled monkey brains or

eyeball soup.  Even I have my limits.

 

Mairi Ceilidh

 

 

Date: Tue, 12 Dec 2006 13:27:12 -0500

From: silverr0se at aol.com

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] looking for maire's haggis recipe

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

 

  I can testify that _this_ haggis is absolutely delicious and still  

fun for freaking out otherwise stalwart fighter-types.

 

Renata

 

 

-----Original Message-----

From: selene at earthlink.net

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

Sent: Tue, 12 Dec 2006 7:37 AM

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] looking for maire's haggis recipe

 

I have a haggis-inspired sweet pudding recipe:  Sweet Haggis

 

Adapted from the Scottish Womens' Rural Association Cookery Book

 

A subtletie of sorts, really a steamed oat pudding with no nasty old

sheep-guts.

 

1/4 lb. beef suet

1/2 cup raisins

2 cups oatmeal [toast it first]

2 tsp. salt

1/2 tsp. pepper

3 tbsp. sugar

1/2 cup cold water

muslin bag to cook it in

 

Toast oatmeal at 400?F for 10 minutes. Skin and chop or grate suet

finely. Mix all ingredients together until soft consistancy. Wet muslin

bag and put mixture into it until more than half full [to allow for

expansion of oatmeal]. Sew or tie up tightly and put it on an old plate

inside a large pot of boiling water. Boil for 3 hours; then serve with

all due ceremony, perhaps accompanied with fake bagpipes and fake  

poetry.

 

I use half steel-cut and half rolled oats, the former for chewy

consistancy and the latter for binding power. The true vegetarian crowd

can use shortening in a pinch. I also like to add 1 tsp. mixed spice to

the mix.

 

Happy Hogmany,

Selene

 

 

Date: Thu, 04 Jan 2007 15:38:37 -0500

From: "Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius" <adamantius1 at verizon.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] haggis question

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

On Jan 4, 2007, at 3:00 PM, Kathleen A Roberts wrote:

 

> while fixating on early irish food research, a question

> popped to mind...

> is haggis strictly scottish, never traveling beyond the

> borders, or would it be a dish that would have been

> known/done/served around the british?  is it merely a

> generalized pudding or a country specific treasure?

 

There are non-Scottish references to haggis; I suppose it's

conceivable they might be more or less coincidental. So, for example,

we have 14th or 15th-century English recipes for Haggas d'Almayne

(whose name suggests a German origin, which is odd, in a way).

 

But in addition, we have northern English and Lowland Scots haggis

recipes that are distinctly different, but still recognizable

variants (for example, one in which the gut is cooked and chopped

into the pudding rather than used as a casing, or an 18th-century

English one that calls for cream and breadcrumbs instead of oats).

 

> i suppose this comes from looking for things people have

> heard of and that there are recipes for as opposed to the

> dominant 'nothing written down' i keep banging into with

> the irish food.

 

We just don't seem to have a lot of the same type of evidence for

Scottish and Irish foods that we have, say, for English eating habits

in period. There's some, but probably not as much or of the same

type. It would be tempting to assume that there's some very old Irish

haggis equivalent (if that's where you're going with this), but apart

from English-style white puddings, drisheen (which is sort of like

sheep's-blood cheese), and a mock goose in modern Irish cuisine that

calls for a hog's maw to be stuffed with potatoes, onions, and fat,

and roasted, I'm not aware of any real evidence for one.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Fri, 05 Jan 2007 15:03:47 -0500

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] haggis question

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

It may not always have been a sheep's stomach.

Wikipedia mentions

 

It's unknown who discovered and prepared this for the first time. The

most likely origin of the dish is from the days of the old Scottish

cattle drovers <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cattle_drovers>;. When the

men left the highlands <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scottish_Highlands>;

to drive their cattle to market <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Market>; in

Edinburgh <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edinburgh>; the women would

prepare rations for them to eat during the long journey down through the

glens <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glen>;. They used the ingredients

that were most readily available in their homes and conveniently

packaged them in a sheep's stomach allowing for easy transportation

during the journey.

 

Another theory, put forward by food historian Clarissa Dickson-Wright

<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clarissa_Dickson-Wright>;, is that haggis

was invented as a way of cooking quick-spoiling offal

<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Offal>; near the site of a hunt, without

the need to carry along an additional cooking vessel. The liver and

kidneys could be grilled <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grill>; directly

over a fire, but this treatment was unsuitable for the stomach,

intestines, or lungs. Chopping up the lungs and stuffing the stomach

with them and whatever fillers might have been on hand, then boiling the

assembly ? likely in a vessel made from the animal's hide

<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Animal%27s_hide>; ? was one way to make

sure these parts did not go to waste. (Dickson-Wright 12).Dickson

Wright, Clarissa <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clarissa_Dickson_Wright>;

(1998). /The Haggis: A Little History/. Pelican Publishing Company. ISBN

1-56554-364-5

<http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?

title=Special:Booksources&isbn=1565543645>.

 

Other theories are based on Scottish slaughtering practices. When a

Chieftan or Laird required an animal to be slaughtered for meat (whether

sheep or cattle) the workmen were allowed to keep the offal as their  

share.

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Fri, 01 Jan 2010 09:41:54 -0500

From: "Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius" <adamantius1 at verizon.net>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] 'Tis the season.

 

On Jan 1, 2010, at 2:35 AM, Antonia di Benedetto Calvo wrote:

> I also think lungs + the right oats are what make a really nice texture.

 

They do. I have pretty severe issues with rolled oats in most applications, except maybe brewing. If you do ever do have occasion to make a haggis without lungs, a roughly equivalent amount of spleen (we get pork ones around here) work pretty well as a better option than simply omitting the ultra-rich, flavorful, gamy, slightly spongy meat. When it's ground the texture issues are largely irrelevant anyway.

 

I guess one could argue that making a haggis without having access to freshly slaughtered sheep parts is sort of like putting the cart before the sheep anyway, so by extension, a lot of what might have been seen as sacrosanct could be... well... reexamined.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Sun, 9 Aug 2009 09:06:39 -0500

From: "Terry Decker" <t.d.decker at att.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Haggis Tempest

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

"HAGGIS was invented by the English before being hijacked by Scottish

nationalists, a food historian has claimed.

Catherine Brown has discovered references to the dish in a recipe book

dated 1615, /The English Hus-wife/ by Gervase Markham."

 

<clipped>

 

Johnnae

==============

 

I'm having a little line trouble with my connection, so I'm not able to pull in all the articles, so if I err pray forgive me.

 

As I understand Brown's argument, haggis first appears in Markham, the

Scottish use of the term haggis only begins in the 18th Century, ergo haggis is an English dish only recently adopted by the Scots.

 

While the recipe in Markham may be the closest to modern haggis, there are recipes for the dish in Liber Cure Cocurum and the Two Fifteenth Century Cookery Books, predating Markham by almost 200 years.  As for the late adoption of haggis by the Scots, William Dunbar uses the term in The Flyting of Dunbar and Kennedie, written in the first decade of the 16th Century, a century before Markham. Haggis may have been an English dish originally (possibly adopted and adapted from the Romans), but it's not as recent addition to the Scottish table as Ms Brown seems to think.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Fri, 01 Jan 2010 02:19:42 -0500

From: "Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius" <adamantius1 at verizon.net>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] 'Tis the season.

 

On Jan 1, 2010, at 1:40 AM, Antonia di Benedetto Calvo wrote:

<<< My understanding is that US shoppers have the same problem we do in NZ-- the authorities are hysterical and have banned sheep's lungs, which makes it a lot trickier to produce a haggis. >>>

 

Seriously? Lungs are lungs. It's really the fat that makes the difference. I've made perfectly decent haggis using veal livers and hearts, pork spleens in lieu of lungs (basically you need some fairly vascular tissue, lots of blood and strong, gamy flavors). Not indistinguishable from the same thing made from sheep parts, but very similar, and for the many, many people who haven't tried the real thing, and many who have, it comes pretty close.

 

I wouldn't say it's exactly the same, but it's close enough to quash the "the best is the enemy of the good" crowd.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Sun, 6 Feb 2011 12:47:31 -0800

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] [SCA-cooks] haggis

 

RESEND with special characters replaced with plain vowels and (much)

additional info.

 

There is a 16th c. recipe for a Persian dish called gipa (hard g, as

is good), which is strikingly like haggis. Here is the current

version of my translation from Fragner's German translation:

 

Bert G. Fragner

"Zur Erforschung der kulinarischen Kultur Irans"

(Toward an Exploration of Iranian Culinary Arts)

in Die Welt des Islams 23-24 (1984), pp. 320-360.

 

From Maddatal-hayat, resala dar 'elm-e tabbaki

("The substance of life, a treatise on the art of cooking")

written in 1003 AH (September 16, 1594 to Sept. 1595 CE)

by Master Ostad Nurollah, Chief Court Cook of Shah 'Abbas I (r. 1587-1629)

 

gipa-polaw (n.40)

in Fragner, pp. 350-351

 

Know that, cooked according to rule and regulation, gipa is a tasty

dish, when it is prepared properly. Thus it is done: Clean rumen

stomachs, abdominal networks and mesentery[i.] / chitterlings

(shirdan va charba-ye ruda va shekanba) of sheep several times and

afterwards rub with Iraqi soap (?, sabun-e 'eraqi) using a napkin and

then rinse again. Then shred/chop a lot of meat, and it is important

that it has no bones. Fat-tail from sheep is used in large

quantities, such that cracklings are processed and removed. [In the

hot fat] put onions in the weight of two mann according to Tabriz

measurement, also fifty mesqal[ii.] of spices, valerian (?,

sonbola[iii.]) and davala (probably a kind tree lichen) in necessary

quantity, and finally a half-mann of rice. Some people add saffron as

well. The quantity of meat should be two mann and tail fat equal to

one mann -- these are the ingredients for a whole meal. All this is

mixed [over the fire]. The lower the liquid, the better it is,

because so much onion is used for this dish. If one uses too much

liquid, the food loses its consistency and is overcooked. Now the

sheep's rumen and the other [innards] are filled, as should be, so

they do not burst. Once they are filled, they are sewn shut, placed

in a kettle and cooked, until they are soft. Then wipe them off and

wash them in cold water. If one lines the bottom of the kettle with

sheep ribs, [the gipa] is particularly good. The latter is a creation

of my very own self! Then layer the rumen stomach and the other

[guts] nicely [in a vessel] over one another, drip fat and clear meat

soup (shorba) there over and let the whole marinade. The fire must be

set up so [low] that the dish simmers very slowly until morning and,

when it is done, is not burned, but soft and lightly browned. In the

morning, place a thin flat bread on it and the gipa done.

 

40) gipa is obviously a very traditional category of dishes in which

rice is combined with offal. In cookbooks from the 20th century

gipa-dishes are no longer mentioned with one exception. Only Forough

Hekmat (The Art of Persian Cooking, Tehran, 1961, p. 82 f.) describes

two gipa recipes. With regard to Boshaq-e at'ema[iv.], he says

explicitly that we are dealing with very old-fashioned food, that

traditionally was eaten in the early morning (similarly to

kalla-pacha, soup made from sheep's heads and feet). As already

mentioned, Ba'urchi-Baghdadi[v.] (1521) still gives a total of nine

gipa recipes (Karnama, p. 166-172).

 

*** my notes ***

 

[1.] Mesentery

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mesentery

(not sure what American butchers call it, if they call it anything...

anyone know?)

 

[ii.] mesqal = mithqal

 

[iii.] sonbola = sumbul, which often = jatamansi = spikenard

 

[iv.] Boshaq-e at'ema (died 1426 or 1436) was a poet, author, and

lexicographer who wrote works in the language of food, but whose

subtext was social and political criticism. Boshaq is a contraction

of Abu Ishaq, meaning Father of Isaac; standard naming form in the

area, to call a married adult after the name of their first born son

(a woman could be Umm Ishaq, Mother of Isaac). ''-e at'ema'' means

''of food''.

 

[v.] Mohammad 'Ali Ba'urchi-Baghdadi is the author of the oldest

known Persian recipe collection, Kar-nameh (or Karnama) dar bab-e

tabbakhi va san'at-e an ("Manual on cooking and its craft"), written

for a Safavid prince and dated 1521. The Mongolian word "ba'urchi"

means "cook" and he came from a Turkish-speaking family. His father

was a trained chef in the service of the Aq-Qoyunlu Prince Budaq

Mirza and taught his son his skill. Some scholars have speculated

that Nurollah was a descendant of Ba'urchi Baghdadi, as several of

Nurollah's ancestors had been involved in the earlier Safavid court

kitchen.

 

(side note: Alot is the name of a town in India, not a word in

English. If one means a large quantity, it is two words: a lot)

--

Urtatim [that's err-tah-TEEM]

the persona formerly known as Anahita

 

<the end>



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