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eels-msg - 5/25/13

 

Medieval eel dishes. Cleaning and cooking eel.

 

NOTE: See also the files: fish-msg, seafood-msg, stockfish-msg, sauces-msg,  pickled-foods-msg, food-sources-msg.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I  have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I  have done  a limited amount of  editing. Messages having to do  with separate topics  were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the  message IDs  were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make  no claims  as  to the accuracy  of  the information  given  by the individual authors.

 

Please  respect the time  and efforts of  those who have written  these messages. The  copyright status  of these messages  is  unclear  at this time. If  information  is  published  from these  messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

    Mark S. Harris                 AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                         Stefan at florilegium.org

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From: Tom Brady <tabrady at mindspring.com>

Date: Fri, 18 Apr 1997 09:26:07 -0400

Subject: Re: SC - peacocks and eels

 

At 10:18 PM 4/17/97 -0600, Stefan li Rous wrote, quoting me:

 

>- -Duncan (...and don't even get me started on the eel stew...)

>Please do explain the eel stew. Eel is something I'd like to try

>at least once. If it was methodology, I'd like to know what NOT to

>do as well as what to do right. Where did you find the eels?

 

In truth, I'm not sure where they obtained the eels, but they arrived

frozen. At one of the precooks, we thawed, skinned, and gutted twenty or

thirty eels. The thing that stuck with me the most was the pungent aroma of

eel blood - a sickly-sweet odor that was so appalling I couldn't even

approach the eel stew without remembering it. Needless to say, I can't

really comment on how they were cooked, since I stayed as far from them as

possible. I remember that they had buckets of the stuff left over after the

feast, too. (Katerine - do you remember how they were cooked?)

 

- -Duncan, with fond memories of that precook, and of watching a vet school

friend gleefully dissecting an eel, with commentary (Her: "Oooh! Look!

Here's the stomach!" Us: "Yeccch!")

- -------------------------------------------------------------------------

Tom Brady    tabrady at mindspring.com   SCA: Duncan MacKinnon of Tobermory

 

 

From: gfrose at cotton.vislab.olemiss.edu (Terry Nutter)

Date: Fri, 18 Apr 1997 10:51:26 -0500

Subject: Re: SC - peacocks and eels

 

Hi.  Duncan asks:

 

>In truth, I'm not sure where they obtained the eels, but they arrived

>frozen. At one of the precooks, we thawed, skinned, and gutted twenty or

>thirty eels. The thing that stuck with me the most was the pungent aroma of

>eel blood - a sickly-sweet odor that was so appalling I couldn't even

>approach the eel stew without remembering it. Needless to say, I can't

>really comment on how they were cooked, since I stayed as far from them as

>possible. I remember that they had buckets of the stuff left over after the

>feast, too. (Katerine - do you remember how they were cooked?)

 

That was Vinnie's feast, and I was ill during that period, and didn't

participate.  I do know that the dish was essentially stewed eel in

a broth with fruit, and was chosen precisely to overwhelm most of the

eel flavor, so that the more timid would not find it too offputting.

(I think that was a bad choice: the reason one sees so many eel recipes

is that they tasted good.  If you're going to serve it at all, it

seems to me one should go for a typical recipe.)  As I recall, they didn't

have enough to test it beforehand with eel -- another thing I would do

differently.  But these were largely the autocrat's decisions, not the

cook's.

 

Cheers,

- -- Katerine/Terry

 

 

From: Leslie  Watson <Leslie.Wat at hwcn.org>

Date: Fri, 18 Apr 1997 08:53:40 -0400 (EDT)

Subject: Re: SC - peacocks and eels

 

On 17 Apr 1997, Mark Harris wrote:

> Please do explain the eel stew. Eel is something I'd like to try

> at least once. If it was methodology, I'd like to know what NOT to

> do as well as what to do right. Where did you find the eels?

>

>   Stefan li Rous

 

We are lucky where I live we can find live eels at our local farmers

market.  Try there or a sea food market.

 

Abihilin

 

 

Date: Thu, 23 Oct 1997 10:14:33 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - eels? fish cultivation?

 

Mark Harris wrote:

>

> Par Leijonhufvud said:

> > like gravlax, smoked eel, smooked salmon, etc.

>

> Ah, ha! So eel *is* still available in some places. That's another

> item that I've wanted to try since I started studying medieval foods

> and reading this list.

 

Smoked eel is a pretty big deal all across Northern Europe. And rightly

so.

> Since it's been five or six months since it was last asked, anyone

> have any sources for eel? It's not common these days but apparently

> was commonly raised in medieval fish and mill ponds much as we raise

> catfish today. Anybody know what else was raised in medieval ponds?

> Did they raise any fish such as catfish? Catfish may be North American.

 

I seem to recall that the carp was raised in artificial ponds in

Britain, to which they are not, IIRC, indigenous. I also have a vague

recollection of catfish being mentioned in Izaak Walton's "The Compleat

Angler", roughly contemporary to both Digby and Samuel Pepys. As for

eels, they are migratory. Specifically, they behave in a manner opposite

to the way in which salmon, shad, and some trout migrate and spawn.

Those fish are what is known as anadromous, meaning they leave the ocean

and swim into rivers and streams to spawn. Eels live in rivers and

streams, and swim out to sea, specifically the Sargasso Sea, to spawn. I

believe that eels (and also lampreys, BTW) are available frozen, shipped

commercially from Canada. You could probably get your local fish market

to inquire and/or order you some. Or, live eels could probably be picked

up at the ubiquitous Asian market ;  ) .

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Thu, 23 Oct 1997 14:45:53 EDT

From: melc2newton at juno.com (Michael P Newton)

Subject: Re: SC - eels? fish cultivation?

 

On 22 Oct 1997 22:53:44 U "Mark Harris" <mark_harris at risc.sps.mot.com>

writes:

>Par Leijonhufvud said:

>> like gravlax, smoked eel, smooked salmon, etc.

>Ah, ha! So eel *is* still available in some places. That's another

>item that I've wanted to try since I started studying medieval foods

>and reading this list.

>Since it's been five or six months since it was last asked, anyone

>have any sources for eel? It's not common these days but apparently

>was commonly raised in medieval fish and mill ponds much as we raise

>catfish today. Anybody know what else was raised in medieval ponds?

>Did they raise any fish such as catfish? Catfish may be North

>American.

>Stefan li Rous

 

I've been itching to make an eel soup ever since I found a recipe in My

copy of _Splendid Soups_ by James Peterson. Not only does he give the

recipe, but he also tells how to skin it. (For those of you who disliked

desiccating in Biology, you may want to skip this part.)

 

"To clean an eel, grab it at the base of the neck with a towel and whack

its head on the kitchen counter (you need the towel; eels are slippery

and may get loose and end up hiding under the stove) This first step,

presumably to kill it or at least stun the eel into docility, makes no

visible change in its behavior; an eel with its head bashed in will still

wrap firmly around your arm as you grip its neck.

Next, make a slit around the base of its neck and first pull the skin

away with a pair of pliers' then peel it off like a glove, using a towel.

Gut the eel starting at the base of the head by slitting into the cavity

under cold running water. Be forewarned: none of this does anything to

slow down the eel. And last, cutting the skinless eel into inch-long

segments still does nothing to abate its electrical energy -- each of the

pieces continues to twitch, including the head, with the mouth

continuously opening and closing. Still interested?"

 

I am! Anyone want to help?

Lady Beatrix

 

 

Date: Thu, 23 Oct 1997 16:34:04 -0700 (PDT)

From: "Mike C. Baker" <kihe at rocketmail.com>

Subject: Re: SC - eels? fish cultivation?

 

> I've been itching to make an eel soup ever since I found a

> recipe in My copy of _Splendid Soups_ by James Peterson.

> Not only does he give the recipe, but he also tells how to

> skin it. (For those of you who disliked

> desiccating in Biology, you may want to skip this part.)

> "To clean an eel, grab it at the base of the neck with

> a towel and whack its head on the kitchen counter (you

> need the towel; eels are slippery and may get loose and

> end up hiding under the stove) This first step,

> presumably to kill it or at least stun the eel

> into docility, makes no visible change in its

> behavior; an eel with its head bashed in will still

> wrap firmly around your arm as you grip its neck.

 

A stiff wire or awl inserted into the skull from the "top" can

replace the "whack on the counter". With practice and instruction it

is fairly easy, but be warned that you have to find just the right

hole in the catfish skull for this to work optimally: this action is

sometimes called "pithing", and is more reliable / useful for

catfish. (Unless, of course, you've been trained in using a hammer

instead...) For sanitary and other reasons, I prefer to clean eel

and catfish outdoors. One major reason for this is because that's

how I've always done it, but another important consideration

is "right tools for the job" and where they can best be set up.

 

Instead of holding onto the eel / catfish with hands&towel only,

put together at least a portable cleaning station.  A length of

heavy cord, or an old cord-style stringer, or heavy-gauge wire; two

pairs of pliers (add a pair of diagonal cutters for catfish and

other species with heavy spines in the forward fins); knives; water

bucket; ladle; meat pan; and gut bucket.

 

Find a tree, closeline, or other overhead support. Tie one end of

the cord to this support and feed the other end throught the

critters mouth, out through the gills, and hang at a convenient

height. Repeating with additional cords can speed the process if you

are cleaning multiple fish. Rinse externally with water, clip and

remove spines from forefins (three on most catfish, been too long

since I handled eel to remember their configuration) pith/use

hammer, and rinse again.

 

> Next, make a slit around the base of its neck and first

> pull the skin away with a pair of pliers' then peel it

> off like a glove, using a towel.

 

using TWO pair of pliers, towel optional but at hand for cleanup, it

is much easier to peel that outer skin easily. Grasp skin on both

sides of the critter's body and pull straight down. Rinse again, or

have an assistant rinse continually as the skinning progresses.

 

When suspended as described above, and peeling with two pair, it is

often unnecessary to make an extra incision in order to reach the

guts. (Sometimes they conveniently fall out along with the skin, so

it is usually a good idea to be working over the top of the gut

bucket.) Take care to avoid breaking the gall bladder; inspect the

liver for worms; etc.

 

Rinse again.

 

> Gut the eel starting at the base of the head by slitting into

> the cavity under cold running water. Be forewarned: none of

> this does anything to slow down the eel.

 

After gutting (and rinsing some more), using those same pliers go

back and remove any remaining fins (ventral in particular) and the

tail by the expedient of slicing into the meat on either side of the

fin and yanking the fin itself out with a practised twist o' the

wrist. Cut deeply into the meat all around the body at the highest

point where skin has been removed, all the way to the back bone.

Twist and crack, usually being careful to try and leave the spinal

cord behind. Rinse well and place carcass in meat pan (which should

already be full of cold water).

 

(Alright, so there is the matter of practice and experience to

consider as well, and I'm certain I must be leaving *something*

important out...)

 

> And last, cutting the

> skinless eel into inch-long segments still does nothing to

> abate its electrical energy -- each of the

> pieces continues to twitch, including the head, with the mouth

> continuously opening and closing.

 

> Lady Beatrix

===

Kihe Blackeagle (the Dreamsinger Bard) /

Amr ibn Majid al-Bakri al-Amra (AoA in SCA, so: al-Sayyid) /

Alt. e-mail: KiheBard at aol.com MikeCBaker at aol.com

 

 

Date: 23 Oct 1997 09:08:26 -0700

From: "Marisa Herzog" <marisa_herzog at macmail.ucsc.edu>

Subject: Re: SC - eels? fish cultivat

 

<snip>

Since it's been five or six months since it was last asked, anyone

have any sources for eel? It's not common these days but <snip>

 

I'd go in the nearest sushi bar and ask where they get theirs...  Good sushi

bars serve both fresh and salt water eel (tho' one is seasonal I think).  So

they would know where to get it.

- -brid

 

 

Date: Thu, 23 Oct 1997 19:09:14 -0400 (EDT)

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: SC - EELS-Source

 

<< Since it's been five or six months since it was last asked, anyone

have any sources for eel? >>

 

The eel that we used for Will's Revenge was special ordered from Wegman's.

They only charged $1.99 / pound.

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Thu, 23 Oct 1997 20:23:38 -0400 (EDT)

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - eels? fish cultivation?

 

<< each of the

pieces continues to twitch, including the head, with the mouth

continuously opening and closing. Still interested?"

I am! Anyone want to help?

Lady Beatrix >>

 

:-). You neglected to mention that unthawed cleaned, frozen eels still

wiggle about in the pan.

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Thu, 23 Oct 1997 20:30:58 -0400 (EDT)

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - eels? fish cultivat

 

<< Good sushi bars serve both fresh and salt water eel (tho' one is seasonal I think) >>

 

Techniquely fresh water eels (the young or those in between breeding seasons)

are seasonal. They also taste "fishier" than salt water eels.

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Tue, 28 Oct 1997 18:18:16 EST

From: melc2newton at juno.com (Michael P Newton)

Subject: SC - Tying together threads

 

Saw this in "Festive Ukrainian Cooking" by Marta Pisetska Farley.

 

        Eel in Aspic

        (Kholodets' z vuhra)

 

3 lbs. fresh eel, eviscerated

3 fish heads and trimmings

2 carrots

3 medium onions

1 bay leaf

4 peppercorns

2 Tbsp. sugar

1 envelope gelatin

juice of one lemon

2-3 tsp.salt

1 tsp. white pepper or to taste

parsley and lemon wedges

 

Rinse eel in running cold water. Make an incision at the base of the

head, pry up the skin around the head with a sharp knife, grab loosened

skin and, with a gentle but firm tug, skin the fish.(Just like turning a

glove inside out.) Rub with 1 tsp. salt and cut into 2 inch portions.

 

In a large kettle, cover skin, heads, trimmings, carrots,onions, bay

leaf, peppercorns,and sugar with cold water and bring to a boil. Simmer

over low heat for 30 minutes. Pour liquid into a pan; reserve carrots for

garnish.

 

Poach eel in 2 cups broth until flesh is white and just cooked through.

Remove with slotted spoon to a plate and cover. Combine liquids and

strain through a fine sieve. If there is more than 3 cups, reduce by

simmering. Heat 1 cup of liquid to boiling, dissolve gelatin, and add to

broth. Season to taste (seasoning should be pronounced, since cold

temperature masks flavors). Add lemon juice. Pour 1 inch gelatin mixture

in a glass or enamel platter and chill. When set, arrange eel and cooked

carrots and cover with remaining broth. Refrigerate overnight or until

aspic is set.

 

Serve in porions garnished with lemon and parsley.

 

Lady Beatrix

 

 

Date: Thu, 04 Nov 1999 04:37:47 +0100

From: Thomas Gloning <Thomas.Gloning at germanistik.uni-giessen.de>

Subject: SC - eel (some German references)

 

I cannot come up with a particular favorite eel recipe, but here are

some references for 16th century German eel recipes, including some pie

recipes.

 

- -- Sabina Welser Nr. 118 (look at Valoise Armstrong's translation, that

is online)

 

- -- Nuernberger Kochbuch 1609, Nr. 9 (ähel Bratten)

 

- -- Frantz de Rontzier 1598:

p. 183: living eels in a roasted pig

p. 376-78: (15 eel recipes, mainly in some kind of broth)

p. 437-39: (10 recipes with roasted eel)

p. 470-71: "Posteten von Ahlen" 'pies from eel' (6 recipes)

p. 538 (a living eel is served forth between some dishes)

 

There are more, but I am aware that the question was not for references

but for recipes that are "probatum".

 

(One of Portugal's favorite dishes (today or for tourists) is lamprey.

Alas, it was Henry _I._, who is said to have died by eating too much of

them ... There would be a wealth of lamprey recipes. Something for

spring.)

 

Thomas

 

 

Date: Thu, 04 Nov 1999 02:28:14 EST

From: Korrin S DaArdain <korrin.daardain at juno.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Eel?

 

Here are the eel recipes that I have in my collection. I have not had or

made either of them.

Enjoy.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

        Eel in Aspic (Kholodets' z vuhra)

        From "Festive Ukrainian Cooking" by Marta Pisetska Farley. Posted

by Lady Beatrix / Michael P Newton (melc2newton at juno.com)

        3 lbs. fresh eel, eviscerated

        3 fish heads and trimmings

        2 carrots

        3 medium onions

        1 bay leaf

        4 peppercorns

        2 Tbs.. sugar

        1 envelope gelatin

        juice of one lemon

        2-3 tsp. salt

        1 tsp. white pepper or to taste

        parsley and lemon wedges

        Rinse eel in running cold water. Make an incision at the base of

the head, pry up the skin around the head with a sharp knife, grab

loosened skin and, with a gentle but firm tug, skin the fish.(Just like

turning a glove inside out.) Rub with 1 tsp. salt and cut into 2 inch

portions. In a large kettle, cover skin, heads, trimmings, carrots,

onions, bay leaf, peppercorns, and sugar with cold water and bring to a

boil. Simmer over low heat for 30 minutes. Pour liquid into a pan;

reserve carrots for garnish. Poach eel in 2 cups broth until flesh is

white and just cooked through. Remove with slotted spoon to a plate and

cover. Combine liquids and strain through a fine sieve. If there is more

than 3 cups, reduce by simmering. Heat 1 cup of liquid to boiling,

dissolve gelatin, and add to broth. Season to taste (seasoning should be

pronounced, since cold temperature masks flavors). Add lemon juice. Pour

1 inch gelatin mixture in a glass or enamel platter and chill. When set,

arrange eel and cooked carrots and cover with remaining broth.

Refrigerate overnight or until aspic is set. Serve in portions garnished

with lemon and parsley.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

        Eel in Herb Sauce "Conger in Sauce" - England, 1378

        The Forme of Cury, 1378 Updated and compiled in Seven Centuries

of English Cooking by Maxime de la Falaise. Grove Press, 1992 Posted by

Jeff Pruett.

        "Take the conger & scald him and cut him in pieces & seeth him;

take parsley, mint, pelletour, rosemary & a little sage, bread & salt,

powder fort & a little garlic, & a few cloves, take & grind it well, draw

it up with vinegar thro' a cloth, cast the fish in a vessel and make it

boil on & serve it forth."

        1 Eel, skinned

        2 1/2 c Fish stock

        4 TB Parsley

        2 TB Mint

        1 tsp. Rosemary

        1/2 tsp. Sage

        2 cl Garlic, crushed

        1/2 c Breadcrumbs

        1/2 tsp. Salt

        Powderfort (2 tbs. chives-chopped with 1/2 tsp.-powdered mace)

        4 Cloves, crushed

        4 TB Vinegar

        Skin the eel, cut it into slices and simmer in the fish stock,

using the skin for flavor, until tender. Chop together the fresh parsley,

mint, rosemary, and sage. Put in a blender with the crushed garlic, the

breadcrumbs, salt, powderfort, and crushed cloves. Add a little vinegar

and blend well. Rub through a sieve, using a little more vinegar to wash

the mixture through. Arrange the eel slices in a fireproof dish, pour the

sauce over them, and reheat, spooning the sauce over the fish from time

to time so that it can absorb the flavor. Simmer for 10 to 15 minutes and

serve.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

Korrin S. DaArdain

Kingdom of An Tir in the Society for Creative Anachronism.

Korrin.DaArdain at Juno.com

 

 

Date: Thu, 4 Nov 1999 10:12:23 EST

From: CONNECT at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - eel

 

A Gentle wrote asking for Eel receipe info.

 

The Medieval Kitchen has a receipe for San Vincenzo's Day Grilled Eel. I

planned to make this for the St. Bacchus Day tournament event hosted by my

Barony, but my fishmonger was not able to come up with 10-15 lbs of fresh

eel, and I had to do a last minute substitution.

 

Your humble servant,

Rosalyn MacGregor

(Pattie Rayl)

 

 

Date: Fri, 21 Apr 2000 12:18:15 -0500

From: "catwho at bellsouth.net" <catwho at bellsouth.net>

Subject: SC - The Right Kind of Eel

 

"The right kind of eel has a small head; skin that is fine, lustrous,

wavy, and sparling; a large body; and a white belly.  The other kind

has a large head, a brownish yellow belly, and thick brown skin."

 

A Medieval Home Companion: Housekeeping in the Fourteenth Century

Page 114

 

Melbrigda

 

 

Date: Fri, 21 Apr 2000 12:18:15 -0500

From: "catwho at bellsouth.net" <catwho at bellsouth.net>

Subject: SC - The Right Kind of Eel

 

"The right kind of eel has a small head; skin that is fine, lustrous,

wavy, and sparling; a large body; and a white belly.  The other kind

has a large head, a brownish yellow belly, and thick brown skin."

 

A Medieval Home Companion: Housekeeping in the Fourteenth Century

Page 114

 

Melbrigda

 

 

Date: Mon, 11 Sep 2000 00:29:56 -0400

From: "Robin Carroll-Mann" <harper at idt.net>

Subject: SC - Moray eels, yet again

 

Someone on rec.food.historic responded to my inquiry with a quote from

_Mediterranean Seafood_ (I really need to look at that book).  It was:

 

> Moray eel

> Muraena helena (Linnaeus)

> FAO 67

 

> REMARKS. Maximum length 150 cm. Of varying colours, but always

> distinctively mottled (e.g. off-white on dark brown). They have a

> dangerous bite and are both cunning and greedy. According to Euziere

> some fishermen believe that the moray likes to live near an octopus, of

> which when other food fails he will eat a tentacle, knowing that it will

> grow again. The skin of the moray can be cured and used, e.g. for

> bookbinding, although this is not done commercially.

 

> CUISINE. Opinions vary. Professor Bini, in correspondence, has told

> me that in his view the flesh of the moray is perhaps the finest of all

> Mediterranean fish. Others would expect to use it only in bouillabaisse.

> The Romans seem to have grilled the moray or boiled it, and Apicius

> gives sauces for both dishes. Avoid the bony tail-end.

 

This last sentence explains a lot.  I think that this, plus Vincent's

suggestion that "espinas" refers to fish bones, solves the mystery.  You

flog the moray so that the bones descend into the tail, which is then

discarded.  (I don't know if this actually happens, or if it is a folk belief).

If you want to fool/deceive a friend, give him the tail piece, which will

look nice and plump, but has very little on it that is edible.

 

Here's the relevant bit of recipe again:

"Scald the moray eel just like the conger eel; and if it is alive flog it vigorously because all the fish bones will descend to the tail, and if you want to deceive your companion give him the tail to eat; and then remove the head..."

 

Lady Brighid ni Chiarain

Settmour Swamp, East (NJ)

 

 

Date: Mon, 09 Oct 2000 20:12:00 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: SC - Attn: Brighid -- Sea-dwelling eels and their bones

 

I was just glancing through the Austin edition of Two Fifteenth-Century

Cookery-Books, the section devoted to Ms. Harl. 279, and spotted the

following that made me think of your questions on Moray eels and tail bones:

 

".xliii. Mortrewes of Fysshe. -- Take Gornard or Congere, a-fore (th)e

navel wyth (th)e grece, for be-hynde (th)e navel he is hery of bonys, or

Codlyng, (th)e lyuer an (th)e Spaune, an sethe it y-now in fayre Water,

an pyke owt (th)e bonys, and grynde (th)e fysshe in a Morter, an temper

it vp wyth Almaunde Mylke, an cast (th)erto gratyd brede; (th)an take it

vp; an put it on a faure potte, an let boyle; (th)an caste (th)erto

Sugre and Salt, an serue it forth as other Mortrewys. And loke (th)at

(th)ou cast Gyngere y-now aboue."

 

Admittedly a conger isn't a Moray, but it _is_ an eel variant that is

being commented on as having an inconvenient tail bone structure.

 

Adamantius, trying to think of a musical couplet that can go before the

phrase, "That's a Moray..."

 

"When your Mortrewes is stale,

All those bones in the tail,

That's etc..."  

 

 

Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2003 10:48:59 -0400

From: Alex Clark <alexbclark at pennswoods.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Galyntyne

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

At 12:30 PM 9/11/2003 -0400, Christianna quoted from _Curye on

Inglysch_:

> . . . and note that III 24

> FRESCH LAUMPREY is to be served cold but the 'galentyn' hot. . . .

 

Hieatt & Butler were mistaken about this. The first part of III 24 is a

recipe for fresh lamprey, but the part where the galantine is heated by

itself is really a different recipe: ". . . & if the laumprey be salt,

. .

. he schal be serued cold & the galentyn hot kendlich."

 

Henry of Maldon

 

 

Date: Sun, 13 Feb 2005 22:12:44 -0600

From: "Terry Decker" <t.d.decker at worldnet.att.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] eels

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

There are both freshwater and saltwater eels.  The freshwater eels are

generally the ones of commercial importance.  Freshwater eels spawn at sea,

but live and grow in rivers until the migrate out to sea to spawn.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Mon, 14 Feb 2005 05:12:11 -0500

From: Bill Fisher <liamfisher at gmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] eels

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

On Mon, 14 Feb 2005 00:55:55 -0600, Stefan li Rous

<StefanliRous at austin.rr.com> wrote:

> Now that you mention it, I do remember that there are both freshwater

> and saltwater eels. I hadn't realized though that the freshwater eels

> needed to spawn at sea. This means you can't just indefinitely raise

> them in a pond as you can catfish. The pond simply becomes a holding

> area which you must replenish with new eels from the sea. Do eels

> swim up stream seasonally similar to salmon?

> Stefan

 

http://www.cnr.vt.edu/efish/families/anguillidae.html

 

That site explains the mating process of the american variety of freshwater

eels.  It also explains the tanking and farming process. somewhat.

 

Eels return to the sea once in their life to mate and die.  Males live 15

years females can live close to 20.

 

When I was a kid, we would catch the rare eel in the Susquehanna, in PA if they

left the faberdam in Shamokin Dam deflated for the summer.  Now they are putting

in fish bypasses for the dams and the eels should soon be there again.

 

I remember eating eel cooked right after it was caught.  Because it would die

on the stringer and my Mom would toss it and claim it was bad because the skin

would come off of it after it was out of the water.  So we would build a campfire where we were fishing and clean/cook the eel right there.

 

Now imaging looking at this and saying : yum

 

http://www.fiskbasen.se/images/petromyzon_marinus.jpg

 

That's right, the dreaded lamprey.......imagine them having these guys in the tank at the fish market?

 

Cadoc

 

 

Date: Fri, 06 Jun 2008 19:48:03 +1200

From: Antonia Calvo <ladyadele at paradise.net.nz>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Recipe Deal Breakers

To: Susan Fox <selene at earthlink.net>,      Cooks within the SCA

        <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Susan Fox wrote:

<<< Kidneys, since high school biology class and realized what they were for.  I have not tried some of the other "awful offals" but I'd probably try brains or sweetbreads if they were put before me, well prepared.  

 

I developed a taste for eel mainly at the sushi bars, before I knew what "unagi" meant.  Good stuff!  I bet it smokes well too. >>>

 

It smokes wonderfully. http://www.aoteamoana.co.nz/howto/eel.htm

I usually get it like this, though.

http://www.seasmoke.co.nz/index.php/pi_pageid/6

--

Antonia di Benedetto Calvo

 

 

Date: Fri, 19 Feb 2010 21:40:02 -0500

From: <jimandandi at cox.net>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] smoked eel

 

Strangely enough, I found it here:

 

World Food Store

125 NW 23rd Ave, Ste 16

Gainesville, FL 32609

(352) 379-6167

 

Mostly Russian and Eastern European imported food, but he also has a lovely "deli" counter with vacuum-sealed smoked fish, sausages, and cheeses. We found this place when I was planning my Russian feast, and now shop there regularly. Sour cherry pelmeni... mmmm!

 

Madhavi

 

 

Date: Thu, 03 Mar 2011 22:08:43 +1300

From: Antonia di B C <dama.antonia at gmail.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] eels again

 

On 3/03/2011 7:09 PM, Ian Kusz wrote:

<<< http://www.travelchannel.com/TV_Shows/Anthony_Bourdain/Video/A_locals_obsession_with_smoked_eel

 

okay, so what species of eel are we talking, here, and where can I get some? >>>

 

If I understand correctly, those are Anguilla rostrata from the Delaware

River, but other eels are good smoked, too.  Around here it's Anguilla

dieffenbachii and Anguilla australis, in Japan Anguilla japonica, in

Europe Anguilla anguilla, etc. They are all very good eating.  Smoked

eel is a real treat.

--

Antonia di Benedetto Calvo

 

 

Date: Thu, 3 Mar 2011 20:09:08 -0600

From: "Terry Decker" <t.d.decker at att.net>

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] eels again

 

If you want to try to chase down eels (or any other seafood for that

matter), you might try some of the sources in this directory:

 

http://www.trade-seafood.com/directory/seafood/eel-freshwater.htm

 

Bear

 

<the end>



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