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Medieval peaches and peach recipes.

 

NOTE: See also the files: fruits-msg, apples-msg, berries-msg, grapes-msg, plums-msg, strawberries-msg, cherries-msg, figs-msg, fruit-pears-msg, fruit-quinces-msg.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

    Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                          Stefan at florilegium.org

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From: Gretchen M Beck <grm+ at andrew.cmu.edu>

Date: Fri,  6 Jun 1997 10:35:45 -0400 (EDT)

Subject: Re: SC - Period Recipes

 

Excerpts from internet.listserv.sca-cooks: 5-Jun-97 Re: SC - Period

Recipes by rebecca tants at servtech.c

> Just a thought - I can't imagine there not being something like this

> somewhere in all of period cooking.  Aluminum foil is out, but what

> else might have been used.  (My mind went straight to mexican and

> american indian cooking in corn husks and mediterranian cooking in

> grape leaves, btu I'm at a consulting job in another state and won't

> see my cookbooks again until at LEAST Sunday...)

 

In the Fruit, Herbs and Vegetables of Italy, Castelvetro mentions

roasting peaches in the coals wrapped in damp paper--"Some people eat

peaches cooked, wrapped in damp paper, and roasted in the ashes--These

really are very nice".

 

toodles, margaret

 

 

Date: Fri, 12 Dec 1997 08:55:07 -0600

From: "Decker, Terry D." <TerryD at Health.State.OK.US>

Subject: RE: SC - A bit bland...

 

Peaches (Prunis persica) were being cultivated in China before 500 B.C.

They were traded into the Middle East after Jang Qian's diplomatic

mission (to find allies against the Huns) into Central Asia in 140 B.C.

In 65 B.C., Pompey had peaches transplanted to Rome from Persia.

Apparently, peaches spread with the Roman advance to everywhere they

could be grown in Europe.

 

In 1513 C.E., the Spanish planted peaches in Florida and in 1618 C.E.,

English gardeners were warned not to prune peaches in England's cold

climate.

 

So, I would say peaches were available and eaten in much of Europe

during period.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Sun, 10 May 1998 22:24:04 +1000

From: "Glenda Robinson" <glendar at compassnet.com.au>

Subject: SC - Roman world - Apricots or Peaches

 

Niccolo wrote:

> I'm not aware of any sources I have of peaches, but Apicius has

> apricots in the ancient Roman cuisine.  That should mean they came up

> north at some point thereafter, at least in dried form.  No certianty,

> but those Romans shared their cultures with so many others that you

> never can tell which way stuff went.  Then there is the Hansiatic

> trade league shooting all over the north European trade ways......they

> proliferated many foodstuffs as well.  Apricots would be a great taste

> idea to go with a semi dry mead of final gravity around 1.035-1.040.

 

The way my version of Apicius reads is that they had peaches in ancient Rome

and not apricots (checked the latin recipe name with the dictionary -

there's no mistranslation).

 

There is also an extant fresco from Pompeii with peaches (p 104 - Still Life

with Peaches - Pompeii - Lessing/Varone 1996 ISBN 2-87939-007-9) this book

also has a lot of mosaics with fruit. Some of these fruits are easily

identifiable, and others aren't. Some could possibly be apricots, but are

not clear enough to positively identify. These yellow fruits are also much

bigger (by comparison with other fruits in the same fresco) than the

apricots we now get, so are unlikely to be them.

 

That's not to say that this proves the Romans didn't have Apricots, but does

prove they did have peaches.

 

Glenda.

 

 

Date: Sun, 10 May 1998 09:23:16 -0500

From: "Decker, Terry D." <TerryD at Health.State.OK.US>

Subject: RE: SC - Roman world - Apricots or Peaches

 

> The way my version of Apicius reads is that they had peaches in ancient Rome

> and not apricots (checked the latin recipe name with the dictionary -

> there's no mistranslation).

> Glenda Robinson

 

According to Trager's The Food Chronology, about 140 B.C. apricots and

peaches were brought out of China into the Near East.  About 65 B.C., Pompey

introduced apricots, peaches and plums into the Roman orchards.

 

The source is a questionable, but it gives a starting point for finding

meatier information.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Mon, 11 May 1998 11:59:44 -0700

From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

Subject: SC - Peaches in Northen Europe

 

Brokk asked about peaches in Scandinavia or northern Europe.

 

C. Anne Wilson, in Food and Drink in Britain, mentions peaches being

planted in the royal gardens at Westminster in the 13th c.  It sounds from

the context as if they might have been somewhat unusual in England at that

time. By the end of our period (actually, 1629) someone in England listed

22 varieties of peaches.  I don't have any information for Scandinavia,

though.

 

Elizabeth/Betty Cook

 

 

Date: Sun, 4 Feb 2001 10:59:02 -0500

From: rcmann4 at earthlink.net

Subject: Re: SC - peaches

 

And it came to pass on 4 Feb 01, , that Stefan li Rous wrote:

> But I'm getting the feeling that peaches were not used that often

> in period cooking. Perhaps it is just the recipes I've been reading,

> but I thought I remembered one of the books saying this.

 

Peaches were introduced into Europe from Persia by the Arabs.

Karen Hess says that there were some planted in the royal garden

at Westminister during the 13th century.

 

Humourally, they are cold and moist, and are best served at the

end of the meal.  Platina suggests serving them dried, or cooked in

honey.

 

Enrique de Villena (1423) gives instruction in his carving manual for

cutting and serving peaches -- peel them, remove the pit and the

bitter parts, and cut them into slices.  Then they are put on a plate,

if they are not being served in wine.

 

There are 14th century Catalan recipes for preserving peaches in

honey or sugar.  

 

Nola has one recipe for a peach pottage, which appears to be

meant as a accompaniment to roasts: peaches cooked in broth-

based almond milk, seasoned with sugar, ginger, and drippings

from the spit.

 

Granado (1599) has various recipes for peaches, including 5

different preserves and confections.  He also has 2 recipes for

peach pie.  One is sort of a cheescake, whose filling is a mixture of

peach puree, various cheeses, sugar, and eggs.  The other pie

(possibly one of the Italian recipes he plagiarized from Scappi) has

slices of peach with spices, sugar and butter.

 

I'll let one of the gardeners on the list answer questions about

growing them.  Presumably, they require mild weather, since they

flourish in places like Georgia.

 

Lady Brighid ni Chiarain

Settmour Swamp, East (NJ)

 

 

Date: Sun, 4 Feb 2001 21:26:29 -0500

From: rcmann4 at earthlink.net

Subject: Re: SC - peaches

 

Sue Clemenger wrote:

> OH MAN....I'm drooling all the way over here in Montana....recipes

> please?

 

> --Maire (trying to sound pathetic but not whiney)

 

I was afaid that might happen.  The recipe from Nola is the only one I

have translated.  Since I don't want to be a spoon-tease, here it is.

 

Source: Rouperto de Nola, _Libro de Guisados_ (Spanish, 1529)

Translation: Lady Brighid ni Chiarain (Robin Carroll-Mann)

 

POTAJE LLAMADO PERSICATE

 

Pottage called Peach-Dish

 

You will take the peeled peaches, and cut them into slices, and cook them

in good fat broth; and when they are cooked, take a few blanched

almonds and grind them; and when they are well-ground, strain them

rather thick with that broth.  And then cook this sauce with sugar and a

little ginger, and when it is cooked, cast in enough pot-broth or that

which falls from the roasting-spit.  And let it stew well for a little; and

then prepare dishes, and upon each one cast sugar; and in this same way

you can make the sauce of quinces in the same manner; but the quinces

need to be strained with [the] almonds, and they should not be sour, and

likewise the peaches.

 

footnote: "Durazno" is the Spanish for "peach", but "Persico" ("Persian") is

the word for the peach tree.  The Latin name, "prunus persica", means

Persian plum, because the fruit was introduced to Europe from Persia.

 

Lady Brighid ni Chiarain

Settmour Swamp, East (NJ)

 

 

Date: Mon, 05 Feb 2001 03:33:16 +0100

From: TG <gloning at Mailer.Uni-Marburg.DE>

Subject: Re: SC - peaches

 

From "The good Huswifes Handmaide for the Kitchin" (ca. 1594):

 

"To bake Peaches.

Take Peaches, pare them, and cut them in two peeces, +

take out the stones as cleane as you can for breaching of

the Peach: then make your pie three square to bake fowre

in a pie, let your paste be verie fine, then make your

dredge with fine Sugar, Synamon and Ginger: and first lay

a little dredge in the bottome of your pies: Then put in

Peaches, and fill up your coffins with your Dredge, and

put into every coffin three spoonfuls of Rosewater. Let

not your Oven be too hot. +c."

 

There are German recipes, too: Philippine Welser's (ca. 1545) recipe for

a peach tart [*] or a recipe for peach salad in the F¸rtrefflichs

Kochbuoch 1559/60.

 

In addition, there are several medical and dietetical remarks about how

and when peaches should be eaten.

 

Castelvetro, looking back to 16th century Italy, says peach is a

"delicatissimo frutto, e ordinariamente crudo si mangia", but he

mentions other preparations, too.

 

Thomas

* "pfirsych dordten zu machenn

so nim die pfirsych vnnd schel sy dau dan die keren

her auser vnd mach zway dayl aus ainer kitten

vnd las syeden daus dan jn die phrsych vnd nim

zucker zimet vnnd ain frischen buder daus dar

ein vnnd las ain fyerdel stundt bachen nim

dan syesen wein vnd butter dus jn ain pfendlin

vnnd la? an ain ander syeden vnd nim die

brye vnnd geus auff den dorttenn"

(Phil. Welser, ed. Hayer 69)

 

 

Date: Mon, 5 Feb 2001 22:41:36 -0500

From: rcmann4 at earthlink.net

Subject: SC - Peach tart recipe (in Spanish)

 

Here's the first peach recipe from Granado.  It's a melon tart, and

making it with peaches is one of the variations.

 

Source: Diego Granado, _Libro del arte de cozina_ (Spanish 1599)

 

Torta de melones

 

Tomase el melon limpio de la corteza y de la semilla, y que no

este muy maduro, y cortese a bocadillos, y haganse freyr poco a

poco con manteca mezclandolo con la cuchara de contino,

saquese y dexese enfriar, y passese por el colador, y a cada dos

libros de melon frito an~adansele seys onzas de queso de

Tronchon or Parmesano y seys onzas de requeson, or queso

fresco bien majado, seys onzas de queso de Pinto mantecoso una

onza de canela, media onza de pimienta, seys onzas de azucar,

diez hiemas de hueuos frescos, o a lo menos seys con las claras,

y tengasa la cazuela tortera vntada con manteca, con vn ojaldre de

pasta algo gordo hecho de la flor de la harina, agua rosada, hiemas

de hueuos, manteca de vacas, y sal, y su tortillon ojaldrado

alrededor, y pongase dentro la composicion, y hagase cozer en el

horno con manteca derretida por encima, y en estando casi cozida

hagase la corteza de azucar, y canela, y en estando cozida

siruase caliente.  Desta manera se puede hazer de los duraznos y

aluaricoques, y ciruelas mal maduras.

 

 

So, who'd like to tackle this one?  There are some good

dictionaries online at:

http://www.diccionarios.com/

and the 1726 and 1992 RAE dictionaries are at:

http://www.rae.es/NIVEL1/buscon/AUTORIDAD2.HTM

 

I'll post another one tomorrow.  I have been shovelling a foot of

heavy, wet snow for an hour, and my back is aching.

 

Lady Brighid ni Chiarain

Settmour Swamp, East (NJ)

 

 

Date: Tue, 6 Feb 2001 07:51:32 -0600

From: "Decker, Terry D." <TerryD at Health.State.OK.US>

Subject: RE: SC - peaches

 

Since Pliny mentions peaches, they arrived in Europe long before the Islamic

expansion. One of Charlemagne's capitulares notes peach trees on the royal

estates, which, while he could have gotten them from the Moors, is highly

unlikely.

 

BTW, peaches are of Chinese origin and are believed to have be brought into

Persia around 140 BCE during Jang Qian's mission to find allies to fight the

Hsiung Nu (Huns).

 

Bear

 

> Peaches were introduced into Europe from Persia by the Arabs.

> Karen Hess says that there were some planted in the royal garden

> at Westminister during the 13th century.

>

> Lady Brighid ni Chiarain

 

 

Date: Mon, 26 Mar 2001 00:40:13 -0500

From: "Christine Seelye-King" <kingstaste at mindspring.com>

Subject: SC - Pottage called Peach-Dish

 

This weekend, I tried the following recipe translated and posted by Lady

Brighid. It was absolutely yummy, and was declared a winner among period

recipes. Below is the original, and my experiment last night.

Christianna

 

Source: Rouperto de Nola, _Libro de Guisados_ (Spanish, 1529)

Translation: Lady Brighid ni Chiarain (Robin Carroll-Mann)

 

POTAJE LLAMADO PERSICATE

Pottage called Peach-Dish

 

You will take the peeled peaches, and cut them into slices, and cook them in

good fat broth; and when they are cooked, take a few blanched almonds and

grind them; and when they are well-ground, strain them rather thick with

that broth. And then cook this sauce with sugar and a little ginger, and

when it is cooked, cast in enough pot-broth or that which falls from the

roasting-spit. And let it stew well for a little; and then prepare dishes,

and upon each one cast sugar; and in this same way you can make the sauce of

quinces in the same manner; but the quinces need to be strained with [the]

almonds, and they should not be sour, and likewise the peaches.

 

footnote: Durazno is the Spanish for ‘peach’, but Persico (‘Persian’) is the

word for the peach tree. The Latin name, prunus persica, means Persian plum,

because the fruit was introduced to Europe from Persia.

 

 

I took a pork roast and sprinkled ginger, pepper, and kosher salt on it.  I

had a can of white Chinese peach halves in light syrup, and I poured a small

amount of the syrup over the roast.  I cooked the roast in a medium oven for

an hour or so.  Meanwhile, I sliced the peach halves.  This was a can of

fruit that I had bought at a Chinese market some time back.  The fruit was

white, firm, almost the consistancy of a pear without the grit, and not as

sweet as a cling peach.  I think it made a big difference, I don't think it

would be as good with cling peaches, but firm, light colored plums would be

about the same texture and amount of sweetness.  I suppose quinces would be

good as well, just a very different flavor.

        I placed the peach slices, the rest of the syrup, ginger, a tablespoon or

two of white sugar, and almond milk in a sauce pan and let it cook down

while the roast was in the oven.  When the roast was done, I added a bit of

water to the pan to deglaze it a bit, and added the juices to the saucepan,

and cooked it for about 20 minutes longer.  After letting the roast rest, I

sliced it and put it back in it's pan, pouring the sauce and peach slices

over the meat.  It was just wonderful.  It was not too sweet, but I did find

that the sauce needed the small amount of sugar to bring out the flavors,

but not enough to make it overly sweet.  The ginger was a nice compliment to

the roast and sauce.  I think it might also be good if the fruit were pureed

into the sauce.  I will cook this again for our purposes, and would

certainly consider adding it to a feast menu.

Thanks for the recipe, Brighid!

 

 

Date: Mon, 26 Mar 2001 20:57:18 -0500

From: rcmann4 at earthlink.net

Subject: Re: SC - Pottage called Peach-Dish

 

And it came to pass on 26 Mar 01, , that Christine Seelye-King wrote:

> This weekend, I tried the following recipe translated and posted by Lady

> Brighid.  It was absolutely yummy, and was declared a winner among period

> recipes.  Below is the original, and my experiment last night.

> Christianna

 

I redacted this once.  I found it tasty, but too caloric for my

personal use.  I used frozen peach slices, fresh peaches not being

in season.  You, as I recall, can get them cheaply in season.

 

If you were serving this sauce at a feast, it might be amusing to

serve peach pits as well.  You could explain to the feasters that

you were being very thrifty, and not wasting any part of the

peach.... :-)

 

[In this case, Lady Brighid is talking about the peach pit sotelties

discussed a while back on this list, not real peach pits. See sotelties-msg

or illusion-fds-msg files for more details - Stefan]

 

Lady Brighid ni Chiarain

Settmour Swamp, East (NJ)

 

 

Date: Fri, 13 Apr 2001 19:48:07 -0500

From: "Michael Newton" <melcnewt at netins.net>

Subject: SC - coring fruit

 

> Speaking of glop, I encountered a dish of pears in syrup made for a

competition recently. The original recipe does not call for cutting, coring, or peeling the pears at all (in fact, none of the pears in syrup type recipes I've seen call for coring the pear, which is odd). The redactor had cored, peeled and cut the pears into small pieces and cooked it for some time-- the amount of wine in her redaction was minimal. Someone else pointed out that this recipe is usually done with pears peeled, cored and sliced in half, then cooked quickly.

 

It occured to me that that is the way modern pears in syrup are served, and so we may be being overly influenced by 'tradition'. What do others think?

(The redaction was delicious but obviously somewhat similar to really chunky applesauce.)

> --

> Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, mka Jennifer Heise       jenne at mail.browser.net

 

They may have not cored the pear at all; the Czech vet at work always eats

his apple/pear, core and all. I also remember reading in _Pinniccio_,(the

book not the Disney version) that Gepedo warns his "son" to eat all of the

pear, including the core, since he might not have anything else to eat. Was

this a common thought during the Medieval ages? I don't know. But it could

be why their recipes don't call for coring the fruit. A waste not, want not

attitude.

 

Beatrix of Tanet

 

 

Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2009 09:38:48 -0500

From: Jennifer Carlson <talana1 at hotmail.com>

To: Cooks list <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Preserving peaches

 

Some weeks back, someone mentioned the Martha Washington's cookbook's recipe for preserving peaches in wine and, as the Oklahoma peach crop was coming in just then, I gave it a whirl.  I got a half-bushel of Porter peaches (a variety of freestones - Augustas, I think) and, deciding to go on an all-Ansteorra theme, a bottle of a Texas moscato (Ste. Genevieve), and got to work.

 

The result was beautiful and absolutely delicious.  The wine and peach juice made a lovely, rosy syrup with some of the richest flavor I've ever gotten putting up peaches.  The moscato added a light honey tone to the taste.

 

This first attempt was a complete success.  I'm having to ration how much I let the husband put on his ice cream/pound cake/oatmeal so we'll have some to enjoy this winter.  

 

If I were to try using ingredients closer to those of the time period of the recipe, what varieties of peaches and what wines would be appropriate equivalents?

 

In servicio et humilitate,

 

Talana

 

 

Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2009 21:27:29 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae at mac.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Preserving peaches

 

I took a look at the 1633 edition of The herball or Generall historie of plantes. Gathered by Iohn Gerarde of London.

It's the one online so it's easy to use. He lists in Chapter 94 the

following kinds:

 

"THere are diuers sorts of Peaches besides the foure here set forth by

our Author, but the trees do not much differ in shape, but the

difference chiefely consists in the fruit, whereof I will giue you the

names of the choice ones, and such as are to be had from my friend M^r .

Millen in Old-street, which are these; two sorts of Nutmeg Peaches; The

Queenes Peach; The Newington Peach; The grand Carnation Peach; The

Carnation Peach; The Blacke Peach; the Melocotone; the White; The

Romane; The Alberza; The Island Peach; Peach du Troy. These are all good

ones. He hath also of that kinde of Peach which some call Nucipersica or

Nectorins, these following kindes; the Roman red, the best of fruits;

the bastard Red; the little dainty green; yellow; the white; the russet,

which is not so good as the rest. Those that would see any fuller

discourse of these may haue recourse to the late worke of M^r . Iohn

Perkinson, where they may finde more varieties, and more largely

handled, and therefore not necessarie for me in this place to insist

vpon them."

 

He mentions a red peach, the Persica praecocia, or the d'auant Peach, a

white peach, and a Persica lutea, or the yellow Peach.

 

Hope this helps,

 

Johnnae

 

Jennifer Carlson wrote:

snipped

<<< If I were to try using ingredients closer to those of the time period of the recipe, what varieties of peaches and what wines would be appropriate equivalents?

 

Talana >>>

 

 

Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2009 18:49:56 -0700

From: David Walddon <david at vastrepast.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Preserving peaches

 

For an earlier take there is always De Honesta.

These two "recipes" come from the first five books so are not included in

Martino, etc.

 

BK2 #12 De Persico Preserved Fresh Peaches. To keep fresh peaches bringe

them overnight, remove them from the brine, place in a jar with salt,

vinegar and savory.

 

BK2 #12 De Persico Peaches in Wine. Cut them in pieces and cook, or soften

them in wine. Serve as a final course following roasted meat.

 

Eduardo

 

 

Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2009 22:05:35 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae at mac.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Preserving peaches

 

<<< If I were to try using ingredients closer to those of the time period of the

recipe, what varieties of peaches and what wines would be appropriate

equivalents?

 

Talana >>>

 

Of course the Herball could be looked up and used in this edition

/The herball or Generall historie of plantes. Gathered by Iohn Gerarde

of London Master in Chirurgerie/, Imprinted at London : by [Edm.

Bollifant for [Bonham Norton and] Iohn Norton, 1597.

but it's late and it's much easier to just look up, cut and paste from

the 1633 when it's this late.

 

Since I am still online with the university, I just took a look under

"peach" and "cookery" and came up with

this one recipe from Dawson's 1587 The good husvvifes ievvell.

 

To make all maner of fruit Tartes.

 

You must boile your fruite, whether it be apple, cherie, peach, damson,

peare, Mulberie, or codling, in faire water, and when they be boyled

inough, put them into a bowle, and bruse them with a ladle, and when

they be cold, straine them, and put in red wine or claret wine, and so

season it with suger, sinamom and ginger.

 

There are a few more indexed under peach at medievalcookery.com

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Sat, 27 Feb 2010 08:31:06 -0600

From: "Terry Decker" <t.d.decker at att.net>

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Peaches was Theatre food in Elizabethan England

 

<<< http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20100129/od_nm/us_shakespeare_snacks

 

*****************************************

"...imported food like peaches..."??

Peaches grow in the UK don't they? I was given to understand they had been

grown in England for most of the mediaeval period.

 

Angharad >>>

 

According to Davidson, the common wisdom has been that peaches were

introduced into England into the 16th Century; however, a reference to

peaches in Chaucer, two peach trees were at the Tower of London in 1275 and

peach pits excavated from a 2nd Century fishmarket in Billingsgate, suggest

that the common wisdom is in error.  The current thinking appears to be

peach cultivation ceased for a time and was reintroduced from France in the

16th Century

 

I haven't chased down the Tower of London reference, but several sources

suggest that it is an account entry for two trees delivered to the Tower in

1275.  The Chaucer reference appears to be from his (probable) translation

of Romance of the Rose, which, being of French origin, doesn't place peach

trees in England.

 

We know that Pliny wrote of the peach trees in Gaul and I have no problem

with the idea that the Romans introduced peach cultivation into England.

There is also some evidence that Charlemagne tried to expand peach

cultivation in France more or less unsuccessfully.  Which leads me to the

question of yield.  If the yields were low, then the peach could have been a

rare and expensive fruit even if grown locally.  Espaliering fruit trees,

pruning them to open them up and increase yields, occurred in Europe in the

late 14th Century.  It may be that peaches were in England, but were of

limited utility due to low yields until growers adopted the new techniques

of arboriculture.  It's an interesting question.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Wed, 11 Aug 2010 12:10:21 -0400

From: Sharon Palmer <ranvaig at columbus.rr.com>

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Peaches

 

I brought home two pecks (about 2 gallons each) of peaches yesterday.

 

I want to try the Rumpolt recipe for dried peaches.  Rather than

putting them in the sun (its raining hard right now) or using a

dehydrator, I thought of turning my oven to warm for awhile, then

turning it off and putting in the peaches, on a rack over a sheet pan

Does that seem like it would work?

 

And Peach Latweg (also from Rumpolt)

Make peach preserve also therefore/ and press the peaches/ like this

you are going to press a good juice from it/ boil it quickly away/

and take not much sugar/ like this it is also a beautiful preserve/

becomes beautiful clear juice/ good and well tasting.

 

Ranvaig

 

 

Date: Wed, 11 Aug 2010 16:46:14 -0700 (PDT)

From: wheezul at canby.com

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Peaches - more German

 

Peaches are so nom!

 

Rontzier's Peach Torte:

One peels and lays them in the torte /

give thereon grated bread / sugar / coriander

and egg yolks beaten with wine as well as

butter / etc.

 

Wecker has a lot to say about peaches being bad for the ill as they

decompose in the stomach and are forbidden to the sick above other fruits.

 

But she gives some recipes (this is somewhat down and dirty just for the

ideation):

 

Good dry peaches / as are normally the yellow / are good

peeled / in fine flour coated like the apples / and thus

in fat fried / as well as with sugar bestrewed. / half or whole / as

it pleases you / but whole are easiest / also you may uncoated

brown them in fat / then with Malmsey / cinnamon/

ginger/ and sugar make a brew thereover / and only [just]

allow them to boil / if you want raisin and such things /

bestrew it in a good proportion / or rather make in in a pastry

shell.  You may all kinds of mushes all mixed as one finds

apples / prepare [this] from it. However when you would rather tortes

or pastry make / so peel these into the pastry / chop a piece

off / that you can take out the kernel.  If you want / the crush shelled

almonds therein / or whole boiled dates / lay an hour or

tow in Malmsey or such strong wine / then prepare in the

shell with sugar and ginger / it will need goodly suger.  When the

shell hardenes / pour the wine also into it / you may also a bit of

fat prepare it with / it will be very tasty and good.

Cut the torte as a apple-mush / also lay it in

wine / prepare it in a shell (or pot) like an apple torte . Put raisins

in between / they [the peaches] also allow for preparation to keep in

various ways.  One bakes them also whole or half / and they are

then as cooked less bad [for you] than the raw.

 

The new Stengler Cookbook has a preserve done in clarified sugar (probably

the syrup form we've been discussing).

 

Katherine

 

<the end>



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