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mustard-msg – 7/24/11

 

Mustard seed in period. sauces. recipes.

 

NOTE: See also the files: Mustard-Making-art, Mustard-art, Balled-Mustrd-art, sauces-msg, herbs-msg, ham-msg, sausages-msg, pretzels-msg, meat-pies-msg, spices-msg, murri-msg.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

    Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                          Stefan at florilegium.org

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From: dpeters at panix.com (D. Peters)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Mustard/Condiment Question

Date: 17 Apr 1996 19:59:35 -0400

 

>"I have been looking for ways to make my campsite more

>authentic.  I know from my research that "they" often used mustard

>as a condiment.  What I haven't been able to track down is whether

>that was powdered, as a sauce, a chutney or relish, or what.  Does

>anyone have any suggested sources that I might have overlooked?"

 

What my researches in medieval cookery have turned up is:  Mustard was

served as a sauce for meat in England and France from roughly the

13th-15th centuries (I haven't pursued later sources because I'm more

interested in earlier sources); mustard recipes generally call for

a mixture of mustard seed, vinegar, variable spices, and (occasionally)

honey; culinary writings from the above period state that mustard is to

be served as a condiment for salted (preserved) meats (in menus, it is

also mentioned with brawn).

 

A redaction of _Le Menagier's_ mustard sauce appears in Cariadoc and

Elizabeth's _Miscellany_; I worked out a redaction of a honey mustard

sauce in a collection of 13th century N. European recipes (e-mail me if

you'd like to see it).  Other Rialto regulars (or lurkers) probably have

other ones.  Have fun....

 

De Gustibus,

D.Peters

 

 

From: sbloch at adl15.adelphi.edu (Stephen Bloch)

Newsgroups: rec.food.historic,rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: history of mustard

Date: 4 Jan 1997 16:06:54 GMT

Organization: Adelphi University, Garden City, NY

 

<bagabne at ix.netcom.com> wrote:

>does anybody know if wet mustard is period?

 

Yes, definitely.  It wasn't exactly like modern mustard, but "mustard

sauces" go back to at least the 13th century.

 

The 14th-c. Catalan _Llibre de Sent Sovi_ gives a recipe "to make

mustard our way", with finely ground mustard seed, broth, and honey or

sugar, pointing out that "the French style" is tempered with vinegar

rather than broth.

 

The 13th-c. Arabo-Andalusian _Manuscrito anonimo_ gives the following

recipe for "Sinab":

Clean good mustard and wash it with water several times, then dry it

and pound it until it is like antimony [?].  Sift it with a sifter of

hair, and then pound shelled almonds and put them with the mustard and

stir them together.  Then press out their oil and mash them with

breadcrumbs little by little, not putting in the breadcrumbs all at

once but only little by little.  Then pour strong vinegar and eggs over

this dough for the dish, having dissolved sufficient salt in the

vinegar.  Then dissolve it well to the desired point, and clarify it

thoroughly with a clean cloth; and there are those who after it is

clarified add a little honey to lessen its heat. Either way it is

good.

 

If I recall correctly, a 13th-c. Anglo-Norman source also describes a

mustard sauce and specifies its particular affinity for pork.

--

                                                 Stephen Bloch

                                           sbloch at panther.adelphi.edu

                                         http://www.adelphi.edu/~sbloch/

                                        Math/CS Dept, Adelphi University

 

 

From: dpeters at panix.com (D. Peters)

Newsgroups: rec.food.historic,rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: history of mustard

Date: 4 Jan 1997 13:07:06 -0500

 

Stephen Bloch <sbloch at adl15.adelphi.edu> wrote:

>If I recall correctly, a 13th-c. Anglo-Norman source also describes a

>mustard sauce and specifies its particular affinity for pork.

 

No, I believe that the _Enseignements_ specifies mustard as a condiment

for meats that have been salted.  (Gee, Steve, the Anglo-Norman sources

are in one of the filing cabinets at home.  You *could* have checked :-))

 

Getting back to work,

D.Peters

 

 

Newsgroups: rec.food.historic,rec.org.sca

From: wp823 at freenet.victoria.bc.ca (Jo Beverley)

Subject: Re: history of mustard

Organization: Victoria Freenet Association

Date: Thu, 9 Jan 1997 21:12:38 GMT

 

As a lurker here (I confess, I just skim through looking for anything

that might be relevant to one of my romance novels) I'll contribute the

fact that mustard seed was known and used in Anglo-Saxon times.

 

If anyone here is interested in research of that period, a UK company

called Anglo Saxon Books puts out some detailed works, such a two-volume

set on food. I use them because my novels are late 11th, early 12th

century and most books favor the later period.

 

Jo Beverley

 

 

From: jfideli at newshost.li.net (Fideli)

Newsgroups: rec.food.historic,rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: history of mustard

Date: 13 Jan 1997 04:21:26 GMT

Organization: LI Net (Long Island Network)

 

Greetings...don't know how I passed over this post. being a food researcher

more than anything else.....here goes...just a quick find....from my

notes....

 

" {Prepared mustard} (gerenodne senep) was apparently used as a flavouring

with bread or other food (op cit.) . A mixture is to have 'the forum in

which mustard is tempered for flavouring' (pa onlicnesse geworht pe senop

bid getemprod to inwisam), and we learn that this could be spooned up, and

so had the pasty consistency that made mustard has today. Cumin is also

mentioned as an ingredient in a sauce, and both mustard and cumin were

found in the Oseberg ship burial in Norway."

 

from Hagen, Ann; A handbook of Anglo-saxon food Processing and

Consumption; Anglo-Saxon Books. Chippenham, Wiltshire, England. 1994.

<covering a period from the 5th cent. through 1100 ADE.>

This quote is sub-quoted from Foote, P.G. & D.M. Wilson; The Viking

Achievement. Sidgwick & Jackson. 1970.

 

     Lord Xaviar the Eccentric    

 

 

From: "Timothy.Moss" <Timothy.Moss at ncl.ac.uk>

Newsgroups: rec.food.historic,rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: history of mustard

Date: 15 Jan 1997 10:51:30 GMT

Organization: University of Newcastle upon Tyne

 

As far as my knowledge goes, Anglo-Saxons (and presumably any other

civilisation which had mustard) ate the mustard leaves raw before eating

the seeds. We tend not to these days, even though the modern mustard bush

is a wimp compared to the medieval thick stalked shrub, almost the size

of a sapling.

 

Tim.

 

 

From: L Herr-Gelatt and J R Gelatt <liontamr at postoffice.ptd.net>

Date: Wed, 23 Apr 1997 09:47:43 -0500 (CDT)

Subject: SC - THE SOAP-BOX +  Horseradish Recipe

 

<snip>

 

OK. To the inevitable questions:

 

1 cup heavy cream

1 small Jar Prepared Horseradish

     OR 1/2 cup grated fresh horseradish and 1/4 cup malt vinegar

1/2 tsp dry mustard powder

sugar to taste if desired (I don't)

Salt if desired

 

Whip the cream to stiff consistency. Fold in remaining ingredients to taste.

Chill. Serve cold with roasted meats. I have, upon occaision, doubled the

horseradish with good result.

 

No, I have no documentation. It's traditional English. They are all

documentable ingredients, and that's as close as I have bothered to get.

 

 

From: "Philip W. Troy" <troy at asan.com>

Date: Wed, 23 Apr 1997 11:53:24 -0400

Subject: Re: SC - THE SOAP-BOX +  Horseradish Recipe

 

L Herr-Gelatt and J R Gelatt wrote:

> No, I have no documentation. It's traditional English. They are all

> documentable ingredients, and that's as close as I have bothered to get.

 

Lovely stuff, Aoife!

 

I like sour cream in mine, which takes it away from the English

repertoire and into something more like Eastern European.

 

There's a recipe for horseradish sauce in Digby, if I remember

correctly, which omits the cream and includes a bit of sugar. A bit like

bottled horsradish with additional seasonings.

Hard to go wrong.

 

Adamantius

 

 

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Date: Sun, 29 Jun 1997 11:53:39 -0400

Subject: Re: SC - mustard history

 

linneah at erols.com wrote:

> Any comments on the recent article by Edythe Preet ( LA Times syndicate) that

> said:

>

> "In the Middle Ages, mustard was a fixture on every table.  It disguised the

> rank taste of spoiled food and camouflaged the immense amount of salt used to

> preserve meat.  The small seeds, crushed into powder, were mixed with the

> leavings of wine - grape must.  Hence the name for this mixture is much the

> same in most European languages...  When made by those who did not have

> access to wine, mustard powder was mixed with vinegar.  Honey was often added

> to minimize its sharpness."

 

We've been through this pretty exhaustively before on this list. Not a

comment on the above poster, just a comment on the claim about

disguising "the rank taste of spoiled food" and camouflaging "the

immense amount if salt used to preserve meat", which is one I've never

heard before ;  ). It does seem to be true that mustard was fairly

ubiquitous across medieval Northern Europe; it i s one of the relatively

few spices that is native to much of Europe, and therefore comparatively

inexpensive. It is also true that mustard seems to be commonly used in

combination with cured or salted meats, just as it is used today.

However, I find it hard to accept the implication that such meat was

eaten without soaking and otherwise desalting it. Recipes generally are

pretty detailed about this process, and in an environment where salt

meats were eaten pretty frequently it would have been common knowledge

how to get around this.  

> I like mustard but I don't often see it at feasts.  Was it really as

> ubiquitous as the above makes it sound?

 

As with many things, it depends on when and where you are. Taillevent

refers to it several times, and gives at least one recipe, IIRC. Le

Menagier either gives a recipe or says to buy it from the sauce merchant

in different references, or both. Both The Forme of Cury and Das Buoch

Von Guter Speiss include recipes for a mustard sauce for preserving

fruits and vegetables: a similar recipe is in Le Menagier de Paris, but

I believe offhand that the mustard element is toned down in comparison

to the other recipes I mention.

 

Adamantius

 

 

From: gfrose at cotton.vislab.olemiss.edu (Terry Nutter)

Date: Sun, 29 Jun 1997 12:51:09 -0500

Subject: Re:  SC - mustard history

 

Hi, Katerine here.  Linneah writes:

 

>Any comments on the recent article by Edythe Preet ( LA Times syndicate) that

>said:

>

>"In the Middle Ages, mustard was a fixture on every table.  It disguised the

>rank taste of spoiled food and camouflaged the immense amount of salt used to

>preserve meat.  The small seeds, crushed into powder, were mixed with the

>leavings of wine - grape must.  Hence the name for this mixture is much the

>same in most European languages...  When made by those who did not have

>access to wine, mustard powder was mixed with vinegar.  Honey was often added

>to minimize its sharpness."

 

Most of this is complete garbage.  They didn't eat spoiled food; and they

had several techniques to leech the salt out of preserved meat (and fish).

Must is not "the leavings of wine".  It is reduced grape juice.  You see

it at some processes of vintning; but it was also made directly from grapes,

with no fermentation, as a sauce.  Mustard was not made with must; the name

is the name of the plant.  Mustards could be made with either wine or

vinegar or both; or for that matter, with neither.  But people with no

access to wine were unlikely to have access to vinegar either.

 

What is true: mustard sauces were common and popular.  They were generally

made with a wine or vinegar base, and often sweetened (though in the recipes

I am familiar with, sugar and sweet spices are more common than honey).

 

>I like mustard but I don't often see it at feasts.  Was it really as ubiquitous

>as the above makes it sound?

 

It was a common sauce.  There are surviving recipes for it, and lots of

mentions of it.

 

Cheers,

- -- Katerine/Terry

 

 

From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

Date: Mon, 30 Jun 1997 21:49:28 -0700 (PDT)

Subject: Re: SC - mustard history

 

Linneah quotes an article on mustard  and asks:

>I like mustard but I don't often see it at feasts.  Was it really as

>ubiquitous as the above makes it sound?

 

_Food and Drink in Britain_ (C. Anne Wilson) quotes figures for a

fifteenth-century English household which  in a given year used 3/4 lb

saffron, 5 lb pepper, 2 1/2 lb ginger, 3 lb cinnamon, 1 1/4 lb each of

cloves and mace, and 84 lb mustard seed. Mustard, after all, was locally

grown and was a whole lot cheaper than spices which had to be imported from

the Orient.

 

Elizabeth/Betty Cook

 

 

Date: Wed, 30 Jul 1997 16:04:00 -0500

From: gfrose at cotton.vislab.olemiss.edu (Terry Nutter)

Subject: RE: SC - The siege cook challenge.

 

Hi, Katerine here.  Juana Teresa asks:

 

>I have a question about a recipe in something called Harleian MS. #4016:

>the dish is "Ffesaunte rosted" ... it all seemed so simple and straight-

>forward until I got to the phrase "his sauce is Sugur and Mustard."

>GOOD GRIEF!!  Is that the same "French's mustard & brown sugar" affair

>that I was terrorized by on Aunt Olive's Christmas ham throughout my

>innocent childhood???

 

Not precisely.  Mustard sauces were a staple (so much so that they are often

referred to, but there are few recipes for them). But they weren't like

French's.  (What is?)  I would take this to mean either that you use

a mustard -- but a medieval one -- and sprinkle on sugar, or (more

likely) that you use mustard, but in making it, go a little heavy on the

sugar.

 

Here's a mustard sauce from the Menagier that I use a lot:

 

(Translated) Original:

 

If you would make provision of mustard to keep for a long time, make it in the

harvest season and of soft pods.  And some say that the pods should be boiled.

Item, if you would make mustard in the country in haste, bray mustardseed in a

mortar and moisten it with vinegar and run it through the strainer and if you

would prepare it at once, set it in a pot before the fire.  Item, if you would

make good mustard and at leisure, set the mustardseed to soak for a night in

good vinegar, then grind it in a mill and then moisten it little by little with

vinegar; and if you have any spices left over from jelly, clarry, hippocras or

sauces, let them be ground with it and afterwards prepare it.

 

Amounts as I make it:

3 tsp + dash ground mustard      scant 1/8 tsp black pepper

2 1/2 T white wine vinegar       scant 1/2 tsp sugar

1 1/2 T water                      1/8 tsp + mace

1/8 tsp coriander          1/8 tsp + cloves

1/8 tsp + ginger

 

Step-by-step:

1.     Mix all ingredients thoroughly.

2.     Simmer, stirring gently, until it begins to thicken.  It will not get

very thick while it is hot.

3.     Take it off the heat, and let it cool.

 

Notes:

This makes a wonderful mustard.  You can use commercial ground mustard seed for

it, but it is much better if you get whole mustard seeds and grind them.  It

thickens when it gets cold.

 

Good with beef or pork, or for that matter chicken, or mutton, or anything

you'd consider putting mustard with.

 

Cheers,

- -- Katerine/Terry

 

 

Date: Wed, 30 Jul 1997 17:20:41 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - The siege cook challenge.

 

Terry Nutter wrote:

<mustard recipes snipped>

 

> This makes a wonderful mustard.  You can use commercial ground mustard seed

> for it, but it is much better if you get whole mustard seeds and grind them.

 

I second the motion! I usually use a combination of whole black mustard

seeds, ground freshly in a mortar, with Coleman's, which is commercially

ground white mustard. This gives it a nice texture and an interesting

speckled appearance, while still being a little easier than grinding it

all yourself.

> Good with beef or pork, or for that matter chicken, or mutton, or anything

> you'd consider putting mustard with.

 

Essential for salt meats of all kinds. Yes, including corned beef, which

is a close relative of several forms of salted beef found in period

Europe. Also salt fish, according to some period sources, although

perhaps the sugar should be omitted in that case. Also: don't forget to

save some for hot dogs, if you do that sort of thing.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Tue, 26 Aug 1997 20:27:45 -0700 (PDT)

From: rousseau at scn.org (Anne-Marie Rousseau)

Subject: Re: SC - capers

 

>Oooh. Sounds delicicous! Redaction please, and original recipe(s) if

>you have them.

 

okeydokey!

This is from _French Food in the Renaissance_ by me, which will hopefully

be part of a CA soon (I've had MY part done for a year now! :)). This

mailer won't take footnotes, so I've put in the citations in the text.

 

Please don't use in any publication with checking with me. I'll likely

give permission, I just like knowing where my stuff goes.

 

[Included in these Florilegium files with permission of the author -ed]

 

SAUCE ROBERT

This rich, creamy, slightly tangy sauce appears in many of the French

sources. There is some variation, for example _le Cuisinier francois_ (la

Varenne, 1651) updates his with capers, but all use verjuice and mustard

and butter. What its' served on seems to vary as well, with _le Menagier_

(Cariadoc et al 1991) putting it on poached sole (M30), _le Viandier de

Taillevent_ (Prescott, 1989) on poached or baked John Dory (a North

Atlantic flat fish) (T115, T207), and _le Cuisinier_ on Poor John

(another fish, perhaps a regional name for a John Dory) (V80), goose

(V33, p41), pork loin (V56, p48), or wild boar (V39, p67). We've enjoyed

this sauce on bork, fish, lamb and even veggies although there's no

documentation for the last two. Heck, ti's even good on bits of bread.

 

POOR JOHN WITH A SAUCE ROBERT (la Varenne, V80)

You may put it with butter, a drop of verjuice, and some mustard, you may

alsso mixe with it some capers and chibols [chives or green onions].

 

BARBE ROBERT [SAUCE] (Taillevent, T207)

Take small onions fried in lard (or butter according to the day),

verjuice, vinegar, mustard, small spices and salt. Boil everything

together. (A 1583 cookbook quoted by Pichon et al., p109)

 

(M30, le Menagier de Paris)

"POLE" and SOLE are the same thing, and the "pole" are speckled on the

back. They should be scalded and gutted like plaice, washed and put in

the pan, with salt on them and water, then put on to cook, and when

nearly done, add parsley; then cook again in the same liquid, then eat

with green sauce, or with butter with some of the hot cooking liquid, or

in a sauce of old verjuice, mustard, and butter heated together.

 

My version:

1 tsp rinsed and minced capers

2 tsp minced green onion, just the white part

2 tsp fine ground prepared mustard

1/2 stick butter (4T)

1 tsp cider vinegar or verjuice, if you can find verjuice

 

Mix all the ingredients over low heat until the butter is melted and

everything is blended. If it separates, whisk briskly until it reblends.

Makes 1/2 cup sauce. Serve on poached white fish, roast pork or goose.

 

Enjoy!

- --Anne-Marie d'Ailleurs

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Anne-Marie Rousseau

rousseau at scn.org

Seattle, Washington

 

 

Date: Thu, 02 Oct 1997 20:56:01 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Noemi's recipe challenge

 

Varju at aol.com wrote:

> Out of curiousity, Adamantius, why did you decide to use prepared mustard

> rather than mustard powder?

 

I suppose it was that a dollop of prepared mustard turns up frequently

in sauces, while powdered mustard is generally used to make prepared

mustard. Also, dishes that have powdered mustard in them are often a bit

harsh, as it is hard to tell at first just how powerful the mustard will

turn out to be when it is fully macerated with the other ingredients.

Prepared mustard gives you a little more control in this regard, at

least. And, I didn't think the vinegar in the mustard would be

especially out of place here.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Mon, 20 Oct 1997 11:15:51 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - mustard and hiney saulce

 

Robert Beaulieu wrote:

> Does any one have a period recipe for a honey and mustard sauce to go

> with a roasted faisan?

 

While I don't have a period recipe for honey mustard, I can tell you a

couple of things that may interest you. The first is that Taillevent

recommends serving roast pheasant with fine salt only, and the second is

that the addition of honey to mustard in the Middle Ages was a signature

of Lombardy. Lombardy mustard appears to have been fairly coarse, almost

like whole grain mustard, and slightly sweet from the added honey.

 

I suspect that the coarse variety of Grey Poupon, with a little honey

added to taste, and some white wine and/or white wine vinegar added to

thin it down to a sauce, rather than a spreadable consistency, would be

a good approximation of Lombard mustard sauce.

 

You could, of course, make your own in more or less the same way.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Sat, 25 Oct 1997 15:42:47 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Mustard soup

 

James and/or Nancy Gilly wrote:

> I can't find either of my copies of Baron Salaamallah's mustard soup recipe

> (one from the *Nocking Point* a few years back, one from the A&S issue of

> the *Pikestaff* around the same time).  Do any of you folks from the

> Eastrealm have it?  (Margali?  Ras? Adamantius?)  And does anyone know what

> documentation His Excellency has for it?

 

I regret that I've never tasted His Excellency Salaamallah's mustard

soup, but it does appear to have quite a wide reputation. The only

mustard soup I can think of, offhand, from a primary source, is in le

Viandier de Taillevent. He's got a recipe for egg sops, with a similar

recipe for mustard sops, as a sort of partner to it. I don't recall if

the mustard sops is a variation on the egg sops, or if it is intended

that they be served together.

 

Are poached eggs, or, for that matter, eggs in any form, involved in the

mustard soup you know? This might provide a clue as to whether this soup

has some basis in the Viandier's recipe.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Mon, 27 Oct 1997 17:18:39 -0500

From: waks at world.std.com (Jane Waks)

Subject: SC - Fo: Mustard soup recipe

 

Forwarded from the East list.  Since I didn't transcribe it myself,

I can't comment on whether there was source info in the A&S article.

- --Caitlin

 

 

ORIGINALLY From sca-east-approval at world.std.com  Mon Oct 27 15:28:01 1997

Date: Mon, 27 Oct 1997 15:28:01 +0000

From: "Dr. Memory" <JVINCENT at wesleyan.edu>

To: sca-east at world.std.com

Subject: Re: [EK] Seeking a Salaamallah recipe...

 

From Pikestaff A&S '95...

 

Mustard Soup

 

A) Feast Size:

 

Ingredients:

- ------------

2 lbs butter (unsalted if possible)

2 lbs flour

20-50 oz cans of chicken broth

4 dozen eggs

120 oz of Gulden's spicy brown mustard

2 gallons milk

8 pints whipping cream

3 lbs frozen peas

 

Heat the chicken broth and milk together until it is hot but not

boiling (takes about 1 hour on fairly high heat)

Make a roux by melting the butter in the bottom of a large pot,=20

gradually adding the flour while stirring constantly until you have a thick

paste.

Add the chicken broth/milk mix to the roux, stirring CONSTANTLY so

it does not lump.

Beat the egss in a seperate bowl. Add the mustard and mix well. Add

the cream to that mixture and mix well.

Mix a little of the hot broth into the egg/mustard/cream mix to warm

it so the egss don't curdle. Then add the entire mixture to the large pot

of broth.

 

NOTE: The soup is usually made in 2 large pots, so adjust this procedure

accordingly.

 

Rinse the peas in colander with enough water to melt any ice, but

not cook them. Serve the peas in seperate bowls as a garnish for the soup.

 

 

B) "Initmate" size (ie serves 1-6)

 

Ingredients:

- -----------

2 Tbs butter

2 Tbs Flour

2.5 cups chicken stock

2 eggs

0.5 tsp salt

dash of pepper

1 tsp of onion juice

3 Tbs Dijon Mustard (or a spicy brown)

1.25 cups milk

0.5 cup heavy cream

10 oz package of frozen peas

 

Except for the addition of the salt, pepper, and onion to the

egg/mustard/cream mix, this is made just like the feast version.

 

 

Date: Sun, 3 May 1998 10:09:17 EDT

From: Kallyr <Kallyr at aol.com>

Subject: Re: SC - homemade mustard

 

<< Does someone on the list have a recipe for homemade msutard?   >>

 

>From Le Menagier de Paris, (1390's)

MUSTARD.  If you want to provide for keeping mustard a long time do it at

wine-harvest in sweet must.  And some say that the must should be boiled.

Item, if you want to make must hastily in a village, grind some mustard-seed

in a mortar and soak in vinegar, and strain; and if you want to make it ready

the sooner, put it in a pot in front of the fire. Item, and if you wish to

make it properly and at leisure, put the mustard-seed to soak overnight in

good vinegar, then have it ground fine in a mill, and then little by little

moisten it with vinegar; and if you have some spices left over from making

jelly, broth, hypocras or sauces, they say it may be ground up with it, and

then leave until it is ready.

 

Properly made Mustard from Le Menagier De Paris

redaction by Minna Gantz

 

1 cup whole mustard seed

1-2 tsp Powder Fort*

16 oz. red wine vinegar (may not use all)

 

1)  Mix the seeds and spices in a non-metal bowl

(A glass jar works great, leave about a cup headroom though.)

 

2)  Cover the seeds  with about 1 1/4 cup of the vinegar and soak overnight.

 

3)  Grind in a mortar or food processor to desired fineness.

 

4)  Add more vinegar to get to consistency you want, use up all left from

soaking first.

 

*Powder Fort:  I have used 3 parts each of Cinnamon & Ginger, 2 parts each of

Black Pepper and Galengal, and 1 part each of Cubebs, Grain of Paradise, and

Cloves.

 

I have found it easier to make batches of Powder Fort blend as was the period

practice, than to try calculating fractions of spoons for a given recipe.

 

For people wanting to try mustard making, it's easy & wonderful.  If you don't

have all the Powder Fort spices, use those you do-- the source recipe was not

all that specific, though Powder Fort is the spice of the era.

 

~~Minna Gantz <KALLYR at aol.com>

 

 

Date: Mon, 4 May 1998 00:42:04 -0400

From: mermayde at juno.com (Christine A Seelye-King)

Subject: Re: SC - homemade mustard

 

>Does someone on the list have a recipe for homemade msutard?

>Phillipa Seton

 

This is not a period recipie, (although, having read the post

that listed one, this is not far from it), but rather one from a (I

shudder to mention this) Sunset Book - Gifts From Your Kitchen.  I made

this for Christmas this year, and I am sold!  It is so easy to do, and

the results are just great.

 

French Old-Fashioned Mustard

 

Soak 1/2 cup White Mustard Seeds and

1 Tbsp. Dry Mustard in

1/2 cup cold water for 3 hours.

        In a 1 - 2 quart noncorrodible pan,

combine 1/2 cup each:white wine vinegar and dry white wine;

1 small onion, chopped, (or 1/2 cup chopped shallots);

2 cloves garlic, pressed or minced;

1 tsp. each salt and sugar;

1/2 tsp. dry tarragon;

1 bay leaf;

1/8 tsp. each ground allspice and ground turmeric.

        Simmer, uncovered over medium heat until reduced by half, (10 -

15 min.)  Pour liquid through a wire strainer into mustard seed mixture;

whirl in a blender until coarsely ground.  Cook in the top of a double

boiler over simmering water, stirring occasionaly, until thickened (8 -

12 minutes).  Let cool, pack into a jar or crock, and cover tightly.

Store in a refrigerator for at least 3 days or up to 2 years.  Makes

about 1 cup.

 

Other spiced recipies include Dijon-style -use 1/2 cup water and 1 cup

dry mustard.   For Honey-Dijon, add dark corn syrup and honey.

Green peppercorn - as above with 2 tbsp. minced green peppercorns.

Spiced German - use cider vinegar, brown sugar, cinnamon, allspice, dill

seeds, tarragon and turmeric.

I actually used Hot Chinese Mustard Seeds in the Old-Fashioned recipie,

and it is very good, with just a hint of bite when you bite into a seed.

I don't like hot stuff, and this isn't hot, just a little piquant.  Yum.

 

Mistress Christianna MacGrain, OP, Meridies

 

 

Date: Mon, 4 May 1998 06:27:48 -0500From: vjarmstrong at aristotle.net (Valoise Armstrong)Subject: Re: SC - homemade mustard>Does someone on the list have a recipe for homemade msutard?>Phillipa SetonDas Kochbuch der Sabina Welserin has a sweet mustard recipe. I haven'ttried it, but it looks simple to do.34 To make the mustard for dried codTake mustard powder, stir in good wine and pear preserves and put sugarinto it, as much as you feel is right, as make it as thick as you prefer to eat it, then it is good mustard.Valoise

 

Subject: [Fwd: SC - re:period recipes and sources/mustards]

Date: Fri, 08 May 1998 17:56:54 -0400

From: Ceridwen <ceridwen at commnections.com>

To: stefan at texas.net

 

   ---------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: SC - re:period recipes and sources/mustards

Date: Tue, 05 May 1998 10:32:42 -0400

From: Ceridwen <ceridwen at commnections.com>

To: Seton1355 at aol.com

 

From An Old Icelandic Medical Miscellany ( supposed to be 15th C., from

a lost manuscript of the 13 th C.)

 

One shall take mustard (seed) and add a fourth part of honey and grind

all together with good vinegar. This is good for forty days.

 

One shall take mustard (seed) and a third of honey and a tenth part of

anise and two such of cinnamon. Grind this all with strong vinegar and

put it in a cask. This is good for three months.

 

Delights for Ladies - Cookerie and Huswifery, Hugh Plat, 1609

 

Mustard Meale

It is usuall in Venice to sell the meal of Mustard in their markets as

we doe flower and meale in England: this meale, by the addition of

vinegar, in two or three daies becommeth exceeding good mustard: but it

would be much stronger and finer, if the husks or huls were first

divided by searce or boulter: which may easily be done, if you dry your

seeds against the fire before you grinde them. The Dutch iron hand-mills

or an ordinarie pepper-mill may serve for this purpose.

 

The Closet Oened (sir Kenelme Digbie, KT) 1669

 

To Make Mustard

 

The best way fo making mustard is this: Take of the best mustard seed

(which is black) for example a quart. Dry it gently in an oven, and beat

it to subtle powder, and serse it. Then mingle well strong wine-vinegar

with it, so mush that it be pretty liquid, for it will dry with keeping.

Put to this a little pepper, beaten small (white is the best) at

discretion as about a good pugil (quantity?? how much is a pugil

anyone?) and put a good spoonful of sugar to it (which is not to make it

taste sweet, but rather, quick, and to help the fermentation) Lay a good

onion in the bottom, quartered if you will, and a race (root) of ginger

scraped and bruised, and stir it often with a Horseradish root cleansed,

which let always lie in the pot till it hath lost its vertue, then take

a new one. This will keep long, and grow better for a while. It is not

good till after a month, that it have fermented a while.

    Some think it will be the quicker if the seed be ground with fair

water, instead of vinegar, putting store of onions in it.

My Lady Holmsby make her quick fine mustard thus: Choose true mustard

seed; dry it in an oven, after the bread is out. Beat and searce it to a

most subtle powder. Mingle Sherry-Sack with it (stirring a long time

very well, so much as to have it of a fit consistency for mustard) Then

put a good quantity of fine sugar to it, as five or six spoonfuls, or

more, to a pint of mustard. Stir and incorporate well together. This

will keep good a long time. Some do like to put to it a little (but a

little) of very sharp wine vinegar.

 

Ceridwen

 

 

Date: Mon, 28 Dec 1998 05:47:08 -0500

From: Melanie Wilson <MelanieWilson at compuserve.com>

To: "INTERNET:sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu" <sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu>

Subject: Mustard

 

>Does anybody know when mustard - as the creamy, spreadable condiment we use

>today - was first used in Europe?  I know mustard SEEDS were known way the

>heck back, from a New Testament quote regarding faith the size of a mustard

>seed.

 

Creamy spreadable stuff? Mustard?  Well there are many types in Europe

even now, I prefer the type that has seeds in it but...

 

English Mustard (yellow & Smooth) was first recorded in 1730 in Durham

 

There are refs to Medieval mustard as a creaminy white sauce. White Mustard

was introduced in Britain by the Romans. The grains were pounded, blanced

with water, and cooking soda, mixed with sharpe white vinegar. It was

thickened with almonds and pine kernals for the table. Other recipes

include honey, oil & vinegar with powdered mustard !

 

French mustard is pounded & spices added

 

Lombard pounded & mixed with thick honey, wine & vinegar.

 

By Edward I there were proffesional sauce makers making mustard.

 

Mel

 

 

Date: Wed, 30 Dec 1998 05:23:50 -0500

From: Melanie Wilson <MelanieWilson at compuserve.com>

To: "INTERNET:sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu" <sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu>

Subject: Mustard Roman

 

>I didn't know the Romans had "cooking soda."  Can you please tell us where

>this information came from, and perhaps a little bit about the source or

>makeup of cooking soda?

 

From Food & Drink in Britain, C Anne Wilson, it is I think mentioned in

Apicius for enhancing the green of vegetables as well.

 

Mel

 

 

Date: Mon, 28 Dec 1998 15:42:41 -0500 (EST)

From: Jenne Heise <jenne at tulgey.browser.net>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Mustard

 

Sarah Garland, in _The Complete Book of Herbs and Spices_ says "The way to

reduce mustard seed to fine flour was only discovered in the mind-18th

century; before that the seed was pounded as needed in a mustard quern,or

the pounded seed was mixed with honey, vinegar and spices and formed into

balls that could be stored until needed. John Evelyn's instructions in the

_Discourse of Sallets_ written in 1699, are: 'Take the mustard seed, and

grind one and half pints of it with honey and Spanish oil and make it into

a liquid sauce with vinegar.'"

 

From my reading, I'd gathered the impression that pounding up mustard seed

and mixing it with oil & vinegar was a way of using it as a condiment that

was fairly common in period. However, their mustard would have been quite

different in flavor from most of our mustards, simply because it was made

right before consumption, while ours is ready made; most people say most

of the essential oil of mustard deteriorates within a day of mixing.

 

Jadwiga Zajaczkowa (Shire of Eisental; HERMS Cyclonus), mka Jennifer Heise

jenne at tulgey.browser.net

 

 

Date: Fri, 1 Jan 1999 17:33:26 -0500

From: Melanie Wilson <MelanieWilson at compuserve.com>

To: LIST SCA arts <sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu>

Subject: Mustard

 

According to Richard Mabey, mustard of medieval times was more like a salad

dressing that the yellow stuff we think of today.. He cites a recipe from

John Evelyn(later 1699 so not quite sure why he cites than but here goes):

 

Take the mustard seed, and grind one and a half pints of it with honey, and

Spanish oil, and make it into a liquid with vinegar......

 

To make mustard for the pot, slice some horse-radish, and lay it to soak in

vinegar, squeezing it well, and add a lump of sugar and an onion chopt. Use

vinegar from this mixture to mix the mustard.

 

Mel

 

 

Date: Sun, 17 Jan 1999 12:47:17 -0500

From: snowfire at mail.snet.net

Subject: Re: SC - Venison sausage-update

 

Here's a Welsh Horseradish based sauce.  This "unusual" sauce apparently

should be served with veal.  It was in a book of traditional Welsh recipes.

I don't know how old it is.

 

Suryn Cyffaith Poeth

 

6 lemons, 2 oz horseradish, 1 lb salt, 6 cloves of garlic, 1/4 oz cloves,

1/4 oz mace, 1/4 oz nutmeg, 1/4 oz cayenne, 2 oz mustard, 2 quarts malt

vinegar

 

Cut the lemons into eighths and cover with salt. Cut the horseradish very

finely, then place with the rest of the ingredients in a big jar that has a

lid.  Place the jar in a boiler of water (with the water coming to within 2

inches from the rim of the jar).  Bring to the boil and boil for 15 minutes.

Stir the mixture every day for six weeks, and keep the lid on.  At the end of

six weeks strain the mixture into small bottles and cork tightly.  This will

keep for years, a little will go far.

 

Elysant

 

 

Date: Mon, 18 Jan 1999 16:02:08 -0500

From: Melanie Wilson <MelanieWilson at compuserve.com>

To: LIST SCA arts <sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu>

Subject: Mustard & Soughdough Books

 

Two titles on the History of ....

 

A Dash of Mustard Katie Holder & Jane Newdick History of mustard from

Roman times to modern, 50 recipes etc

 

World of sourdoughs from antiquety  ed Wood 1996

 

All these interesting books ...so little time...so unfair !

Mel

 

 

Date: Wed, 20 Jan 1999 22:45:17 EST

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - mustard sauce

 

stefan at texas.net writes:

<< Take the mustard seed, and grind one and a half pints of it with honey, and

> Spanish oil, and make it into a liquid with vinegar......

>

> To make mustard for the pot, slice some horse-radish, and lay it to soak in

> vinegar, squeezing it well, and add a lump of sugar and an onion chopt. Use

> vinegar from this mixture to mix the mustard.

>

> Mel >>

 

I was speaking tongue in cheek but since you brought up the subject. The first

recipe sounds pretty straightforward to me as does the second. There were many

ways to make mustard. Al-Andalus contains a recipe with almonds added to the

ground mustard seed that has been soaked in water to remove the bitterness.

al-Baghdadi has a similar recipe where the mustard seed is soaked, drained,

crushed and mixed with vinegar and sweetener.

 

Barring the French's garbage all of the mustard making experiments I have done

turned out to be almost indistinguishable from certain modern products available

in the supermarket. Look for coarse ground mustards and brown mustards as well

as honey mustards. The difference is so minimal that it is really not worth

the bother of making your own.

 

Not all so-called modern foods differ in any significant way from it's

medieval counterpart. For instance modern canned tunafish packed in oil is

almost virtually the same as the Roman recipe for the fish which was cooked

and packed in oil. Anchovies are another example.

 

Admittedly the addition of ale to thin it down may or may not have been period

but it certainly was the best alternative considering I didn't bring any

vinegar with me. :-)

 

I never said it was a period sauce. I merely indicated that it was close in my

estimation to something that could have been period.. BTW, if you're looking

for actual redacted recipes from me at small affairs like our Shire 12th Night

which is exclusively held for shire members and their guests or our shire

picnic you will be sorely disappointed as I use those get togethers to

practice BEING a  pewriod -like cook rather than parroting other cooks

recipes. They are a time for playing in the kitchen. :-)

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Fri, 22 Jan 1999 06:17:15 PST

From: "Tipperith" <tipperith at excite.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Mustard & Soughdough Books

 

I have "A Dash of Mustard" and I really like it as a secondary source. There

are no period recipies, but the history portion of the book is reliable.

 

Tipperith

 

 

Date: Fri, 22 Jan 1999 09:27:54 EST

From: WOLFMOMSCA at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - Mustard & Soughdough Books

 

In a message dated 99-01-22 02:32:10 EST, Stefan wrote:

<< A Dash of Mustard Katie Holder & Jane Newdick  History of mustard from

> Roman times to modern, 50 recipes etc >>

 

I bought this one a few months back.  Wonderful coffee table book.  Great

pictures.   Historical information provided, but no bibliography, so you

pretty much have to take their word for it. Earliest (in their words) mustard

recipe given from De Re Rustica by Columella. There are some cool historical

pictures, though, including an artist's rendering of the Ancient Kitchen at

Windsor Castle, done in 1816, which shows a nifty scene of activity in this

huge cavern of a room.  I don't know whether the kitchen at Windsor was

pre-1600 construction, but I'm willing to bet it was.

 

The rest of the recipes in the book are marvelous concoctions, with pretty

pictures.  No historicity.  Modern recipes from modern kitchens and cooks.

Valid as a spiffy 20th-century cookbook.  The onion & rosemary focaccia

w/black mustard seed in the bread is just scrumptious.

 

The authors are Katy Holder (she wrote the recipes), a home economist and

writer, and Jane Newdick, a freelance journalist & writer specializing in

interiors & gardens, flowers and foods.  Has a book called Period Flowers to

her credit (no, I haven't got it, so I don't know what period it discusses,

but if it's like Period Houses, it includes a lotta centuries).

 

My prime beef (with or without mustard) is the lack of a bibliography.  To her

credit, the writer of the non-recipe material has, in some cases, given you

the source in the actual writing but, hey, I've got this thing about

knowing where ALL the info came from.

 

Great cookbook, especially for mustard lovers. Tells you how to grow and make

your own mustard.  And the recipes are quite yummy.  From this cookbook

collector, a general thumbs up.

 

Wolfmother

 

 

Date: Fri, 22 Jan 1999 22:50:18 -0500

From: "Robin Carroll-Mann" <harper at idt.net>

Subject: Re: SC - mustard sauce

 

I know of three late period "Spanish" recipes for mustard.  (I use

quotation marks, because two of them, though appearing in a

Spanish cookbook, are referred to as French mustard.)  All of them

call for the mustard to be ground in a mortar. One specifies that

the mustard should be well ground up, and it describes the result

as "polvo" -- powder.  The same recipe calls for honey to be added,

and lists "a little vinegar" as an optional ingredient, so I guess that

makes honey mustard period.

 

Brighid, who wishes she could still eat honey mustard.

 

Lady Brighid ni Chiarain

Settmour Swamp, East (NJ)

 

 

Date: Sat, 23 Jan 1999 11:16:00 -0500

From: "Robin Carroll-Mann" <harper at idt.net>

Subject: Re: SC - mustard sauce

 

And it came to pass on 23 Jan 99,, that Stefan li Rous wrote:

> Lady Brighid ni Chiarain said:

> > I know of three late period "Spanish" recipes for mustard.

 

> Could you please post these recipes and translations? Or at least give a

> better idea where these can be found?

 

They are in the "Libro de Guisados" (1529)  I have no finished

translation (nor any redaction) that I can post immediately.

 

Lady Brighid ni Chiarain

Settmour Swamp, East (NJ)

 

 

Date: Sat, 23 Jan 1999 10:36:17 -0500

From: "Daniel Phelps" <phelpsd at gate.net>

Subject: Re: SC - mustard sauce

 

"The Medieval Kitchen; Recipes from France and Italy" 1998) Odile Redon,

Francoise Sabban and Silvano Serventi translated by Edward Schneider, The

University of Chicago Press ISBN: 0-226-70684-2 pages 177 through 178 has a

mustard recipe from "Le Menagier de Paris".  The recipe is the the soul of

simplicity and consists of soaking 1.5 cups of white mustard seeds (250g) in

about 1.75 cups of excellent quality white wine vinegar (40cl).  You cover

the mustard seeds with 1/4 inch of vinegar until the mustard seeds swell and

are soft enough to crush with your fingers, they say over night but I let it

soak longer.   Drain the mustard seeds and grind to a thick paste gradually

adding the reserved vinegar until you get the consistency you want.  Salt to

taste and one teaspoon of from the following prepared spice mixture from

page 222 item c: Strong Black Spice Mixture.  1/4 cup freshly ground black

pepper(30g) 1/4 cup ground long pepper (or additional black pepper) (30g)

3/4 teaspoon ground cloves 1 whole nutmeg, grated. The spice mixture is from

.  Ludovico ;Frati, editor Libro di cucina del secolo XI, Livorno, 1899;

reprinted Bologna, Forni, 1970 ("Test Antichi di Gastronomia," 7)  Le

Menagier's recipe as translated calls for using left over spices from making

aspics, clare', hypocras, or sauces.

 

I entered this mustard in a recent Art/Sci serving it with sliced beef as

called for in Shakespeare's "Taming of the Shrew" along with some beer bread

so that people could make little sandwiches.  It did quite well.   If any

one wants a copy of the full documentation as writen up I will attach it to

a separate E-Mail privately.

 

 

Date: Sat, 23 Jan 1999 14:50:58 -0500

From: renfrow at skylands.net (Cindy Renfrow)

Subject: Re: SC - mustard sauce

 

Hello!  There are 3 mustard recipes in Le Menagier, but this is the one you

are referring to (from Power's Goodman of Paris, p. 286):

 

"Item, if you would make good mustard and at leisure, set the mustardseed

to soak for a night in good vinegar, then grind it in a mill and then

moisten it little by little with vinegar; and if you have any spices left

over from jelly, clarry, hippocras or sauces, let them be ground with it

and afterwards prepare it."

 

His recipes for hippocras (p. 299) call for either

 

"a quarter of very fine cinnamon*..., and half a quarter of fine flour of

cinnamon, an ounce of selected string ginger (gingembre de mesche), fine

and white, and an ounce of graine [of Paradise,] a sixth of nutmegs and

galingale together... two quarters of sugar..."

[*spelled canelle in both instances in Pichon's edition]

or

 

"five drams of fine cinnamon, selected and peeled; white ginger selected

and pared 3 drams; of cloves, cardamom, mace, galingale, nutmegs, nard*,

altogether a dram and a quarter, most of the first and less of each of the

others in order... a pound and a half a quarter (by the heavy weight) of

lump sugar..."

[*Pichon notes this is spikenard.]

 

His recipe for meat jelly (p. 279) calls for the following spices:

"a quarter of an ounce of saffron... ten or twelve heads of white ginger,

or five or six heads of galingale, half an ounce of grain of Paradise, two

or three pieces of mace leaf, two silver penniworths [10d.] of zedoary;

cubebs and nard three silver penniworths [15s.]; bay leaves and six

nutmegs..."

 

There is no salt listed in the original mustard recipe. He does not give a

recipe for clarry (a spiced wine drink). I am confused as to where this

spice mixture you give fits in to the original recipe.

 

Cindy Renfrow/Sincgiefu

renfrow at skylands.net

 

 

Date: Sat, 23 Jan 1999 17:11:16 -0500

From: "Daniel Phelps" <phelpsd at gate.net>

Subject: Re: SC - mustard sauce

 

Yes my lady your are correct regarding the source of the recipe I provided.

You are also correct regarding the spice mixture added, it is clearly from a

different quite possibly a non-period source. The salt to be added is not

specifically mentioned in the orginial recipe either.    In truth I did not

add salt to the mustard I made.   Regarding the orginal recipe as redacted,

sans the spices, what would be your take on the composition and volume of

the spice mixture to be added?

 

Daniel Raoul

 

 

Date: Sat, 23 Jan 1999 18:17:31 -0500

From: renfrow at skylands.net (Cindy Renfrow)

Subject: Re: SC - mustard sauce

 

Well, it's clear from Le Menagier that the spices to be used for the

mustard are leftovers from making the hippocras, jelly, etc.  So, I suppose

I'd start by making the hippocras (since it's the easiest), & straining out

& reserving the spices. (The recipes for hippocras are each to make a quart

of spiced wine; the recipe for meat jelly also calls for a pig, 4 calves'

feet, 2 chickens, 2 young rabbits, 3 quarts white wine or clarry, 1 pint

vinegar, and 1/2 pint verjuice. While the spices serve to season these

mixtures, the spices in turn are flavored by the other ingredients.)  Next,

I'd grind the spices to paste, & add them to my mustard mixture a bit at a

time, until it was seasoned to my liking.

 

Cindy Renfrow/Sincgiefu

renfrow at skylands.net

 

 

Date: Sat, 23 Jan 1999 20:30:27 -0600

From: "Decker, Terry D." <TerryD at Health.State.OK.US>

Subject: RE: SC - mustard sauce

 

The spice mixtures referred to in the Medieval Kitchen are from Ludovico

Frati's Libro di cucina del secolo XI and are quite period.  While the

authors are not precisely following Menagier, they are being true to his

instructions by using leftover spice mixes from their kitchen.

 

The one thing that really doesn't fit in is the salt.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Sat, 23 Jan 1999 23:32:49 -0500

From: "Robin Carroll-Mann" <harper at idt.net>

Subject: SC - Mustard Recipe #1

 

This is from 'Libro de Guisados" (Spanish, 1529).  The translation

is mine.

 

MUSTARD

 

You must take granular mustard; and clean it of the dust and the

earth and the stones and grind it well in a mortar, and when it is

ground, pass it through a cloth strainer: and then take the mustard

powder and put it in a mortar with a piece of bread crumb* soaked

in meat broth; and crush it all together; and when it is well crushed,

dissolve it with a little bit of lean broth without fat which is well

salted and when it is gradually dissolved so that it should not be

too thin, take honey which is good; and melted on the fire, and

cast it in the mortar and stir it well until it is well mixed and prepare

dishes.  Some cast a little vinegar in the broth, you can add peeled

crushed almonds with the mustard, toasted.

 

*note: the word here is "migajon" which means a chunk of the

inside part of the loaf, ie., not the crust.

 

Somebody want to play around with this one?  I'd be tempted,

because it's nice and simple, but as a diabetic, I don't have much

use for honey mustard these days.

 

Brighid

 

Lady Brighid ni Chiarain

Settmour Swamp, East (NJ)

 

 

Date: Fri, 5 Feb 1999 22:05:12 -0500

From: "Robin Carroll-Mann" <harper at idt.net>

Subject: Re: SC - mustard sauce

 

The other mustard translations I promised.

 

Mustard recipe # 2

 

>From "Libro de Guisados" (Spanish, 1529)

my translation -- permission to reproduce in SCA publications if

credit is given

 

"French Mustard"

 

You must take a "cantaro" [a wine-vessel and/or unit of

measurement for wine] of the must of wine, either red or white; and

grind a dishful of mustard that is select and very good; and grind

with it, if you wish, after passing it through a cloth strainer or a hair

sieve, a little cinnamon and cloves and ginger and cast it all, very

well mixed, into the mortar, into the cantaro or jar of wine; and with

a cane stir it around a long while, so that it mixes with the must;

and each day you must stir it with the cane seven or eight times;

and you will boil the wine with this mustard and when the wine has

finished boiling, you can eat this mustard; and when you want to

take it out to cast it in the dish to eat, first stir it with the cane a

little, and this is very good mustard and it will keep all year.

 

Mustard Recipe # 3 (same source):

 

"Another Very Good French Mustard Which Lasts All Year"

 

Take a caldron which will hold two cantaros, and fill it with red

grapes and set it to cook upon the fire until it is reduced by half

and there remains half a caldron which is one cantaro; and when

the grapes are cooked remove the scum with a stick of wood; and

stir it now and then with a stick; and strain this must through a

clean cloth and cast it into a cantaro [used here in the sense of

wine-vessel]; and then cast in the mustard, which will be a dishful

well ground up, stirring it with a stick, and each day you should stir

with it, four or five times a day and if you wish you can grind with

the mustard cinnamon three parts, cloves two parts, and ginger

one part; this French mustard is very good and lasts all year and is

mulberry-colored.

 

Brighid

Lady Brighid ni Chiarain

Settmour Swamp, East (NJ)

 

 

Date: Thu, 15 Apr 1999 23:55:47 EDT

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - mustard sauces

 

him at gte.net writes:

<< I see that some of the mustard recipes calls for a wine must.  How do I

make or fake that?   Any help would be greatly appreciated.

 

Helen >>

 

Wine must is unfiltered grape juice before it ferments. Grape juice would be

a substitute.

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Tue, 20 Apr 1999 10:39:28 -0400

From: renfrow at skylands.net (Cindy Renfrow)

Subject: SC - mustard balls - was - First Feast

 

>Cindy Renfrow/Sincgiefu mentioned:

>>  There's a recipe around here somewhere for dry balls of mustard,

>> that can be mixed with vinegar? when needed.

>Is this a period recipe? Or just a modern expedient? Either way I'd

>like to hear more details if anyone has more info on this.

>--

>Lord Stefan li Rous    Barony of Bryn Gwlad   Kingdom of Ansteorra

 

Hi!  I found it.  It's from Epulario (1598), p. 32:

 

To make mustard which may be carried in Bals.

Beat the mustard seed as aforesaid*, then take grapes well stamped, adding

thereto Sinamon and Cloves, then make what fashion bals you will round or

square, and set them on a table to dry, and being dry, you may carry them

whether you will.  And when you will use them, temper them with a little

veriuice, vinegar, sodden wine, or Bastard wine."

 

*"Take mustard seed & let it soke for the space of two daies, and change

the water often, that it may be the whiter..."

 

Cindy Renfrow/Sincgiefu

renfrow at skylands.net

 

 

Date: Fri, 23 Apr 1999 06:54:21 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - mustard balls - was - First Feast

 

Stefan li Rous wrote:

> 1) What does it mean by "grapes well stamped"? The grape outside after

> most of the juice has been squeezed out? Or the juice? I would guess

> the former.

 

Yeah, one might think so, since this is supposed to end up a dryish sort

of product. On the other hand, with respect, Lord, it's possible to, um,

think too much...;  ) . If you get my drift. Take some grapes, and

pulverize them in a mortar, or however they're crushed for making wine,

I guess. Take the result, which is unfiltered must, and use it to make

mustard, which is why it's called mustard, apparently.

 

> 2) Any idea what "sodden wine" or "Bastard wine" is? The former sounds

> like old wine or wine that has been in contact with the air for awhile.

> The latter sounds like just "low grade" wine.

 

Sodden wine is presumably wine that has been sodden, or seethed, or

boiled. Bastard implies a mixture, but not necessarily low grade:

consider you might some day have to discuss your views with William the

Conqueror and Leonardo da Vinci, both bastards. Mixing various wines,

beers, and ales has a long history before the birth of Half-and-half

(half mild, half bitters?) in British pubs.

 

> "round or square bals". Ok. :-)

 

Hey, now there's an interesting point. I'm not gonna run to the

dictionary just this second, but I wonder if we have, over time,

developed a habit of putting the cart before the horse in the matter of

round balls. In other words, does the word mean round, or some kind of

projectile not characterized by its roundness, but by its

projectile-ness, if you know what I'm saying? If so, square balls would

be a perfectly sensible term. And if not, well, we seem to have figured

it out anyway... .

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Wed, 12 May 1999 21:45:04 -0400

From: "Daniel Phelps" <phelpsd at gate.net>

Subject: SC - Re: OOP Neat Book

 

I recently picked up "The Mustard Book" by Jan Roberts-Dominguez, Macmillian

Publishing Co., NY 1993 ISBN 0-02-603641-X.  Its a great little special

topic cook book with a short chapter on the history of mustard and chapters

on European, Eastern and American mustards.  All in all a lot of fun to read

and use.

 

Daniel  Raoul

 

 

Date: Sat, 2 Oct 1999 19:16:43 EDT

From: RuddR at aol.com

Subject: SC - Re: Need Help with Compost

 

Kerri Canepa asks:

<Anyone want to take a guess on Greek wine and Lombard mustard?

 

I have adapted this the easy way; instead of grinding my own mustard seed,

etc., I start with commercial mustard already made with wine and vinegar, and

thin it with honey and wine:

 

LUMBARD MUSTARD

 

Take mustard seed and waisshe it, & drye it in an ovene.  Grynde it drye;

sarse it thurgh a sarse.  Clarifie hony with wyne & vyneger & stere it wel

togedre and make it thikke ynow\; & whan (th)ou wilt spende (th)erof make it

thynne with wyne.

Forme of Cury

 

1 C brown mustard made with white wine

1/2 C honey

1/4 C dry white wine

1.  In a bowl, stir together mustard and honey.

2.  Stir in wine until sauce reaches a desirable consistency.

 

Yields one and three-quarters cups of sauce.

 

Rudd Rayfield

 

 

Date: Sat, 02 Oct 1999 20:51:29 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Re: Need Help with Compost

 

RuddR at aol.com wrote:

> Kerri Canepa asks:

> <Anyone want to take a guess on Greek wine and Lombard mustard?

> I have adapted this the easy way; instead of grinding my own mustard seed,

> etc., I start with commercial mustard already made with wine and vinegar, and

> thin it with honey and wine:

 

Grey poupon makes a whole-grain Dijon mustard that's excellent for this

sort of thing. So does a company called Plochman's, whose product comes

in a distinctive "stoneware" pot.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Mon, 04 Oct 1999 09:53:26 -0400

From: "Nick Sasso" <njs at mccalla.com>

Subject: Mustard (was Re: SC - Re: Need Help with Compost)

 

>troy at asan.com writes:

><<  So does a company called Plochman's, whose product comes

> in a distinctive "stoneware" pot. >>

 

>This is the brand i use because it is the closest to anything i have tried to

>make myself from period recipes. :-)

>Ras

 

Is the Plochman's made with white mustard seed? My understanding from a spice/herbal source is that white (yellow) seed was more common in Western European Middle Ages than the black.

 

I have been overjoyed with my success at making mustards from seed and from Coleman's Dry Mustard.  I started with the Coleman's and the Menagier recipe, and loved it truly.  It aged gracefully and was a delight after about 2 months.  Lots of the sharp edges mellowed into a smooth, hot mustard.

 

The Forme of Cury (Lombard Mustard) recipe method is much simpler because of the dry seeds.  When I try to soak the seeds before running through a mill or even a food processor, it gets a bit sticky and awkward to handle.  The dry seeds went much better.   Either is just delightful with Menagier's sausages and German soft pretzels.

 

 

Date: Mon, 04 Oct 1999 16:53:51 GMT

From: "Liam Fisher" <macdairi at hotmail.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Re: Need Help with Compost

 

>I have adapted this the easy way; instead of grinding my own mustard seed,

>etc., I start with commercial mustard already made with wine and vinegar,

>and thin it with honey and wine:

 

Dunno, I think the only tedious part would be to grind the mustard.  I'd

think you could use pre-ground mustard, but it would loose some of the oils

being pre-ground.  I think this is something you could make well in advance.

  Also, you can adjust it if you use the original.

 

But then again, people think I'm weird too..

 

Cadoc

- -*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-

Cadoc MacDairi, Mountain Confederation, ACG

 

 

Date: Tue, 05 Oct 1999 11:26:31 CEST

From: "Christina van Tets" <cjvt at hotmail.com>

Subject: SC - mustard

 

There is actually no need to use a food processor to grind mustard seeds:

to my mind the mortar does a nicer job, as I like the variation in size

which it gives.  The only extra work is picking up all the seeds which fall

out onto the floor, because I invariably forget to put a bowl under the

mortar first, and the little blighters bounce. Is there a difference in

flavour between the various seeds?  I only ask because I can't seem to

duplicate the flavour of my favourite mustard (stoneware jars labelled

Pommery) which has _brownish_ seeds, which I've never seen in shops (I've

only found black and yelow).

 

Cairistiona

 

 

Date: Tue, 05 Oct 1999 13:18:56 -0400

From: "Nick Sasso" <njs at mccalla.com>

Subject: Grinding mustard (was Re: SC - Re: Need Help with Compost)

 

>macdairi at hotmail.com writes:

><< Dunno, I think the only tedious part would be to grind the mustard. >>

>Even this is not tedious. Food processor immediately comes to mind.

>Ras

 

I often use my Black & Decker 'Handy Chopper": a 2 cup capacity food processor.  It works sufficiently well, especially for smaller quantities.  The big processors would make lighter work of it, though when you get over a cup or so.

 

One thing to keep in mind is that if you grind with too much liquid, you'll get air incorporated and yield a moussey texture. I found that a rather annoying side effect the first time.  grind dry or with scant liquid to make a paste to avoid that problem.

 

niccolo difrancesco

 

 

Date: Sun, 14 Nov 1999 15:45:12 -0600

From: Magdalena <magdlena at earthlink.net>

Subject: Re: SC - Platina mustard

 

Stephanie Dale Ross wrote:

Does anyone have the original of Sinapidum Rubeum (reddish mustard) from Platina's De honesta voluptate with a decent translation? I have a redaction I picked up at an A&S University, but the translation says to use white corn meal, and the redaction uses 2 c. of burgundy wine in place of "a little must". I'd like to see how well done the redaction is in the recipe i have.

 

I won't swear as to how good the translation is...

 

Platina: On Right Pleasure and Good Health

trans.  Mary Ella Milham

 

8.14  Red Mustard Sauce

 

Grind in mortar or mill, either separately or all together, mustard, raisins, dates, toasted bits of bread, and a little cinnamon.  When it is ground, soak with verjuice or vinegar and a bit of must, and pass through a sieve into serving dishes.  This heats less than the one above (8.13 Prepared Mustard/ Sinapidum) and stimulates thirst but does not nourish badly.

 

Magdalena

 

 

Date: Fri, 3 Dec 1999 08:54:39 -0000

From: "=?iso-8859-1?Q?Nanna_R=F6gnvaldard=F3ttir?=" <nannar at isholf.is>

Subject: Re: SC - mustard recipes

 

>hi all from Anne-Marie

>does anyone have a favorite homemade mustard recipe they'd care to share?

>I'm especially interested in period ones, ie one like le Menagier, or

>Epilarios, and ones that don’t contain eggs.

 

Here is one from the Harpestreng-manuscript, Icelandic version, late 15th

century:

 

"Item sem salsa mustar

Taka skal mustard ok lata til ?ridiung af hunangi. ok tíunda hlut af afsi.

enn tvo slik af kanele. mala ?etta. alltt saman med stercktt edik. lata

sidan j legil. ?at dugir um ?ria manadi."

 

Another mustard sauce

Take mustard and add a third as much of honey, and a tenth of aniseed, and

twice as much cinnamon (as aniseed). Grind this all together with a strong

vinegar, then put in a cask. It will keep for three months.

 

The other versions of this recipe I have are very similar.

 

This is a hot mustard, very good for lamb or well-flavored ham. I do use a

bit less aniseed, though.

 

Nanna

 

 

Date: Fri, 3 Dec 1999 19:08:36 -0000

From: "=?iso-8859-1?Q?Nanna_R=F6gnvaldard=F3ttir?=" <nannar at isholf.is>

Subject: Re: SC - mustard recipes

 

><< I do use a bit less aniseed, though. >>

 

Ras asked:

>How much less?

 

Weeell - let´s see. To each 300 ml of mustard seed maybe 100 ml honey, 4

tbsps cinnamon and 1-1 1/2 tbsp aniseed (should be 2 tbsps according to the

recipe). Come to think of it, I probably use a bit less cinnamon too - maybe

2 1/2-3 tbsps. Mixed with some vinegar and sometimes thinned with a bit of

water.

 

There is another, milder, mustard recipe in the 1616 Danish Koge Bog, with

mustard, roasted almonds, wine and sugar or honey.

 

Nanna

 

 

Date: Fri, 03 Dec 1999 07:46:57 -0500

From: grizly at mindspring.com

Subject: Re: Re: SC - mustard recipes

 

My redaction of the Le Menagier follows:

 

Mustard (Le Menagier De Paris, ca. 1393 (Powers)

MUSTARD. If you wish to provide for keeping mustard a long time do it at wine-harvest in sweet must. And some say that the must should be boiled. Item, if you want to make mustard hastily in a village, grind some mustard-seed in a mortar and soak in vinegar, and strain; and if you want to make it ready the sooner, put it in a pot in front of the fire. Item, and if you wish to make it properly and at leisure, put the mustard-seed to soak overnight in good vinegar, then have it ground fine in a mill, and then little by little moisten it with vinegar: and if you have some spices left over from making jelly, broth, hypocras or sauces, they may be ground up with it, and then leave it until it is ready.

 

2 tablespoons ground yellow mustard seed

2 tablespoons vinegar

pinch black spices

 

Mix the mustard and vinegar together into a smooth paste.  Add spice mix and let stand to meld and/or mellow for a week or more. The  mustard I entered in Kingdom A&S was nine days old, and aged gracefully for another two weeks (it was gone by then).  The black spice powder is adapted from "The Medieval Kitchen": equal parts black pepper and long pepper (1/4 cup each) to 1/2 tsp ground cloves and a whole grated nutmeg. You only use a pinch in the small recipe above, so it lasts a long time.  The black spices are also great on a pan roasted beef steak!

 

simple recipe with delightful outcome.  Pungent taste followed 3-5 seconds later by an intense heat.  Marvelous on lamb and pork.

 

niccolo difrancesco

 

 

Date: Fri, 03 Dec 1999 18:33:12 -0800

From: Valoise <varmstro at zipcon.net>

Subject: Re: SC - mustard recipes

 

Sabina Welserin has a sweet mustard recipe:

 

34 To make the mustard for dried cod

 

Take mustard powder, stir into it good wine and pear preserves and put sugar

into it, as much as you feel is good, and make it as thick as you prefer to

eat it, then it is a good mustard.

 

I noticed that this calls for mustard powder. Does a coffee grinder

get mustard seeds that finely ground?

 

Valoise

 

 

Date: Fri, 3 Dec 1999 23:03:34 EST

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - mustard recipes

 

varmstro at zipcon.net writes:

<< Does a coffee grinder get mustard seeds that finely ground?

 

Valoise >>

 

I grind in the coffee grinder and then sift, returning the large bits to the

grinder and repeat until it is all finely ground. I do this with all my whole

spices that need to be ground.

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Sat, 04 Dec 1999 00:24:52 -0800

From: Anne-Marie Rousseau <acrouss at gte.net>

Subject: Re: SC - mustard recipes

 

hey all from Anne-Marie

Valoise sez :At 06:33 PM 12/3/99 -0800, you wrote:

>Sabina Welserin has a sweet mustard recipe:

>34 To make the mustard for dried cod

>Take mustard powder, stir into it good wine and pear preserves and put sugar

>into it, as much as you feel is good, and make it as thick as you

>prefer to eat it, then it is a good mustard.

>I noticed that this calls for mustard powder. Does a coffee grinder

>get mustard seeds that finely ground?

 

do you have access to the original German? is it positive that they mean

mustard powder, and not "mustard powdered", ie ground seeds (which could be

a bit chunky)?

I know that there's some English recipes that call for grinding things like

meat to "dust" and we take that to mean "grind really well", not literally

to dust (which would be very tricky with fresh meat :)).

 

this is gonna be fun! I like the idea of mustard with pear preserves added...

 

- --AM

 

 

Date: Sat, 04 Dec 1999 14:35:13 -0800

From: Valoise <varmstro at zipcon.net>

Subject: Re: SC - mustard recipes

 

>Anne-Marie Rousseau  asked:

> do you have access to the original German? is it positive that they mean

> mustard powder, and not "mustard powdered", ie ground seeds (which could be

> a bit chunky)?

 

The recipe calls for senffmel which would literally be mustard flour.

Powder is one of the alternate uses for the modern word Mehl or flour.

 

Valoise

 

 

Date: Fri, 3 Mar 2000 14:49:35 -0500

From: Christine A Seelye-King <mermayde at juno.com>

Subject: SC - Digby's Horseradish Mustard

 

> Digby has a Ginger horseradish mustard sauce: can someone get that

> for me?

> Caointiarn

 

Here you go -

 

From Sir Kenelme Digby's Closet Opened

 

"To Make Mustard

        The best way of making Mustard is this: Take of the best Mustard-seed

(which is black) for example a quart.  Dry it gently in an oven, and beat

it to subtle powder, and searse it.  Then mingle well strong Wine-vinegar

with it, so much that it be pretty liquid, for it will dry with keeping.

Put to this a little Pepper beaten small (white is best) at discretion,

as about a good pugil, and put a good spoonful of Sugar to it (which is

not to make it taste sweet, but rather quick, and to help the

fermentation) lay a good Onion in the bottom, quartered if you will, and

a Race of Ginger scraped and bruised; and stir it often with a

Horse-radish root cleansed, which let always lie in the pot, till it have

lost it's vertue, then take a new one.  This will keep long, and grow

better for a while.  It is not good till after a month, that it have

fermemted a while.         Some think it will be the quicker, if the seed be

ground with fair water, in stead of vinegar, putting store of Onions in

it.

        My Lady Holmeby makes her quick fine Mustard thus: Choose true

Mustard-seed; dry it in an oven, after the bread is out.  Beat and searse

it to a most subtle powder.  Mingle Sherry-sack with it (stirring it a

long time very well, so much as to have it of a fit consistence for

Mustard.  Then put a good quantity of fine Sugar to it, as five or six

spoonfuls, or more, to a pint of Mustard.  Stir and incorporate all well

together.  This will keep a good long time.  Some do like to put to it a

little (but a little) of very sharp Wine-vinegar."

 

        And here is another plain horseradish sauce.  

 

<snip - see sauces-msg>

 

        Christianna

 

 

Date: Fri, 03 Mar 2000 22:39:43 -0500

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Digby's Horseradish Mustard

 

Seton1355 at aol.com wrote:

> mermayde at juno.com writes:

> << > Digby has a Ginger horseradish mustard sauce: can someone get that

>  > for me?

>  >

>  > Caointiarn

>

>  Here you go -

>

>  From Sir Kenelme Digby's Closet Opened

>

> What does "searse" mean?

 

verb, to sift or sieve

> "as about a good pugil,

> What is a pugil?

 

>From the context, probably a fistful [of pepper]. Pugilism is boxing.

> How much is a race  (of ginger)?

 

A race is a rhizome or root. That doesn't tell you much, I suspect. A

piece of ginger. Some ; ) .

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Thu, 08 Jun 2000 23:18:21 -0400

From: grizly at mindspring.com

Subject: Re: Re: SC - Poppa's mustard

 

<<<<Thanks!  I'll drag Markham out. I'm going to make the red mustard from Platina,

a German one, and the one in Digby that uses horseradish, onions, ginger etc,

but I reallly liked the one I tried at KC.>>>>

 

 

Foy your information, Platina's mustard ROCKS!! I'll give you what I came up with.  I ground the mustard flour myself (a real chore in a Corona mill!).  It is the hit of several events around these parts so far.  Very complex and interesting flavor.

 

 

Red Mustard

 

(On Good Health and Right Pleasure -- Platina translated by Milham)

 

Liber ovtavus, <14> :  Sinapeum Rubeum:       Sinapum, passalas, sandalos, buccellas, pinas tostas, cinnami parum, seorsum autsimul conterito, vel molito.  Trita cum acresta aut aceto cum-que modico sapae dissolvito, in patinasque per setaceum transagito.  Hoc minus praedicto concalefacit, ac sitim movet, nec incommode nutrit.

 

Book Eight, <14>  Red Mustard sauce:   Grind in mortar or mill, either separately or all together, mustard, raisins, dates, toasted bread, and a little cinnamon.  When it is ground, soak with verjuice or  vinegar and a bit of must, and pass through a sieve into serving dishes.  This heats less than the one above and stimulates the thirst but does not nourish badly.

 

niccolo's Red Mustard (Makes about 1 ? cups prepared mustard sauce.)

 

1/2 cup mustard flour (yellow)          4 large pitted dates

3/4 c. cider/wine vinegar        1 slice toasted bread

1/4 c. white grape juice          1/4 tsp cinnamon

2 Tbl zante raisins               1/4 tsp salt (to taste)

 

Combine the two liquids and stir; set aside. Moisten toasted bread in liquid to cover for two hours, then drain.  In mortar or food processor grind mustard flour, bread, raisins, dates and cinnamon until fine.  You may need to add a little of the liquid to loosen it.  When ground, turn out into the mustard in large mixing bowl and add salt and add 3/4 of the liquid.  Stir with a spoon or whisk until smooth.  Pass this mixture entirely through a fine mesh sieve or food mill.  This will make a very smooth paste and remove fibrous material left from raisins and dates.  Let stand covered overnight.  Stir in more vinegar/juice liquid to desired consistency.  The complex sweetness surpasses any honey mustards I've made to date.

 

 

Date: Mon, 12 Jun 2000 08:09:34 -0400

From: Elaine Koogler <ekoogler at chesapeake.net>

Subject: Re: SC - Poppa's mustard

 

Sure.  No problem.  I'm including the original translation and my redaction...with notes.

 

                            Sinapidum rubeum--Reddish Mustard

 

                                Platina--De honesta voluptate

Original:

 

"Grind up mustard, raisins, white corn meal and toasted bread crumbs and a little cinnamon, either separately or all together; when they are ground up, dissolve them in verjuice or vinegar and a little must. And pass this into dishes through a strainer. This is less warming than the [mustard recipe] above and stimulates the thirst and is agreeably nourishing."

 

Redaction:

 

1      cup mustard seed    3   teaspoons cinnamon

1/3   cup balsamic vinegar    1/4   cup bread crumbs

1   cup white cider vinegar    2   cups burgundy wine

1   cup raisins

 

1. Place mustard seeds in a blender with vinegars and wine. Liquefy.

2. Add cinnamon and raisins, and reduce this to liquid.

3. Add bread crumbs, enough to thicken the mustard enough so that a wooden spoon or spatula will almost stand in it.

4. Let cure for several weeks in a crock with a cloth cover.

 

Notes:

 

The translation called for "white corn meal". Because I am unaware of the existence of corn meal in 16th century Italy, I believe that this is a mistake in translation, but do not know enough classical Latin as it was used in the Renaissance to do my own translation. Therefore I simply omitted it. Possibly the original referred to "meal", which might have been oats or spelt, according to information found in "A Taste of Ancient Rome" and "The Original Mediterranean Cuisine".

 

Also, as must is not generally available, I have substituted burgundy wine, as it seemed to be a reasonable substitute.

 

Finally, this translation is from the edition published by Falconwood Press, and, as it did not include the name of the translator, I'm not sure who it was.

 

Kiri

 

 

Date: Thu, 15 Jun 2000 02:13:49 EDTFrom: CBlackwill at aol.comSubject: Re: SC - Re: SC poppa's Mustard ringofkings at mindspring.com writes:> To my knowledge, "must" is the unfiltered grape juice that you get>  with crushed grapes with all the pulp and bits still in it but the skins>   and seeds strained out.  It is your basic beginning point of making>  wine from sratch rather from concentrates.  As it has lots of natural>  yeasts in it, it will begin to ferment unless kept cool, so putting it in>  sealed bottles in the bottom of a pond makes sense. That's correct.  'Must'  is, essentially, the same as 'wort' in beer brewing. The raw, unfermented building blocks for remarkably tasty beverages...Balthazar of Blackmoor

 

Date: Thu, 15 Jun 2000 08:22:31 -0500

From: Magdalena <magdlena at earthlink.net>

Subject: Re: SC - Re: SC poppa's Mustard

 

RANDALL DIAMOND wrote:

> As it has lots of natural yeasts in it, it will begin to ferment unless kept

> cool, so putting it in sealed bottles in the bottom of a pond makes sense.

 

I use a combination of partially concentrated grape juice and a touch of red

wine to simulate must.  The real question, though, is whether the Latin word

"sapae" (I think that's the word) means "must" in a modern sense.

 

Trita cum acresta aut aceto cum-que

modico sapae dissolvito, in patinasque per setaceum transagito.

 

aceto=vinegar; acresta~verjuice

 

- -Magdalena

 

 

Date: Thu, 15 Jun 2000 10:04:07 -0400 (EDT)

From: Jenne Heise <jenne at tulgey.browser.net>

Subject: Re: SC - Poppa's mustard (recipe #1 - Platina red)

 

> A key phrase is ". . . and have it ground".  Not begging any questions

> since I, too, ground my first couple of mustard flours, but it is quite

> apropos to get pre ground mustard flour to use as ingredient since the

> spicers in much of medieval Europe would have been doing the grinding

> for us.  

 

Can I ask for further elaboration?  

 

Because I've been wondering about that very subject. Sarah Garland, in

_The Complete Book of Herbs and Spices_ says "The way to reduce mustard

seed to fine flour was only discovered in the mind-18th century; before

that the seed was pounded as needed in a mustard quern,or the pounded seed

was mixed with honey, vinegar and spices and formed into balls that could

be stored until needed." On the other hand, Plat says, "It is usuall in

Venice to sell the meal of Mustard in their markets as we doe flower and

meale in England," but he then says, "but it would be much stronger and

finer, if the husks or huls were first divided by searce or boulter: which

may easily be done, if you dry your seeds against the fire before you

grinde them. " Which is a bit confusing. My theory is that the smooth

ground mustard powder that is available from modern merchants is probably

not accurate: what you get when you grind it yourself (in mortar or coffee

grinder, at least) is of a much rougher texture.

 

If you have more information to justify the use of modern mustard 'flour',

I'd feel a lot more comfortable (because I admit to using half-and-half

handground and commercial mustard powder in my mustard).

 

Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, mka Jennifer Heise       jenne at tulgey.browser.net

 

 

Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 12:22:56 -0400

From: Nick Sasso <grizly at mindspring.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Poppa's mustard (recipe #1 - Platina red)

 

My belief is built on the directions in the recipe to 'have it ground'

and references in Scully's "Art of Cookery" (IIRC) that travelling

spicers would bring spices for the manors, and that spicers in

marketplaces would also do so.  I also belief from reading and

experience that one can get a VERY fine grind with a mortar and pestle

given patience and muscle.  Bolting will serve to give an even finer

product based on the weave of the bolting cloth. Consider the fine

flour needed for breads.  It starts as a rather large, husked seed, and

can come out very fine in a grist mill.  Le Menagier also talks of

buying whole spices rather than pre ground, but commends the wife to buy

prepared mustard, so that is a wash.

 

Given time and effort, I have gotten a fairly fine grind on the mustard

seed.  I don't have an enormous mortar as a large kitchen must certainly

have had (compared to my 8 ounce jobber), but I can get .5 to one cup of

fine mustard over several hours of work with mortar and FINE sieve.  I

end up regrinding a lot.  Does that help?  I can get page and source

reference next week if desired.

 

Also know that oxygen will react with compounds in the mustard to make

it hotter.  That is one reason, I suspect, that aging smoothes the

taste.  the oxygenated compounds degrade and resemble the more natural

ones in the mustard.

 

niccolo

 

Jenne Heise wrote:

> > A key phrase is ". . . and have it ground".  Not begging any questions

> > since I, too, ground my first couple of mustard flours, but it is quite

> > apropos to get pre ground mustard flour to use as ingredient since the

> > spicers in much of medieval Europe would have been doing the grinding

> > for us.

>

> Can I ask for further elaboration?

>

> Because I've been wondering about that very subject. Sarah Garland, in

> _The Complete Book of Herbs and Spices_ says "The way to reduce mustard

> seed to fine flour was only discovered in the mind-18th century; before

> that the seed was pounded as needed in a mustard quern,or the pounded seed

> was mixed with honey, vinegar and spices and formed into balls that could

> be stored until needed." On the other hand, Plat says, "It is usuall in

> Venice to sell the meal of Mustard in their markets as we doe flower and

> meale in England," but he then says, "but it would be much stronger and

> finer, if the husks or huls were first divided by searce or boulter: which

> may easily be done, if you dry your seeds against the fire before you

> grinde them. " Which is a bit confusing. My theory is that the smooth

> ground mustard powder that is available from modern merchants is probably

> not accurate: what you get when you grind it yourself (in mortar or coffee

> grinder, at least) is of a much rougher texture.

>

> If you have more information to justify the use of modern mustard 'flour',

> I'd feel a lot more comfortable (because I admit to using half-and-half

> handground and commercial mustard powder in my mustard).

>

> Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, mka Jennifer Heise       jenne at tulgey.browser.net

 

 

Date: Mon, 19 Jun 2000 13:16:32 -0400 (EDT)

From: Jenne Heise <jenne at tulgey.browser.net>

Subject: Re: SC - Poppa's mustard (recipe #1 - Platina red)

 

> If you soak the mustard seed first, it would be easier to grind.  

 

Um, er... I've tried it both ways, using wet mustard seed and dry mustard

seed, and in my experience, the dry is easier to grind in a mortar &

pestle, because when it is wet, the friction is reduced. I also find that

grinding seeds, etc. is much easier in a mortar with a rough inner

surface. (Somehow I ended up with FIVE mortar & pestle sets:

 

One regular pottery with a not-completely-smooth glaze and a shaped wooden

pestle (which has been demoted to pomander making since I can't get the

frankincense completely off the pestle)

One white ceramic with a roughened surface inside and on the pestle

(excellent for everything but lavender and roses)

One brass, smooth inside, with a smooth brass pestle (seems to work for

dried herb leaves but not seeds)

One marble set which I can't find!

One semi-conical mortar with a ridged interior (and cylindrical wooden

pestle) which is good on lavender flowers, roses, etc.-- I think this came

from a Japanese grocery)

I also have a cheap electric coffee grinder for large amounts of seeds...

 

(What's an herbalist without a M&P anyway?)

 

Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, mka Jennifer Heise       jenne at tulgey.browser.net

 

 

Date: Fri, 11 May 2001 22:29:19 -0700 (PDT)

From: Terri Spencer <taracook at yahoo.com>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Mustard question

 

I'm preparing some mustard and noticed a small discrepancy in recipes.

My edition of The Goodman of Paris (Powers, 1928) lists on page 286:

 

Mustard.  If you would make provision of mustard to keep for a long

time, make it in the harvest season and of soft pods.  And some say

that the pods should be boiled

 

The recipe as posted by several list members reads:

 

Mustard. If you wish to provide for keeping mustard a long time do it

at wine-harvest in sweet must. And some say that the must should be

boiled.

 

Must at harvest time makes sense to me, but I don't want to contradict

a source without further evidence.  Anyone out there with a copy of the

recipe in the original French?  Other translations? Educated opinions?

 

Tara

 

 

Date: Sat, 12 May 2001 14:37:59 +0200

From: tgl at mailer.uni-marburg.de

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Mustard question

 

"269. Moustarde. Se vous voulez faire provision de moustarde

pour garder longuement, faictes la en vendenges de moulx doulx.

Et aucuns dient que le moulx [moust_ms. B] soit bouly."

 

Source: Brereton, G.E./ Ferrier, J.M. (eds.): Le Menagier de Paris.

Oxford 1981, p. 258 #269. The text in Pichon/Vicaire edition is

essentially the same, only "faites-la" instead of "faictes la" and

"moust" instead of the second use of "moulx".

 

Thomas

 

 

From: "Siegfried Heydrich" <baronsig at peganet.com>

To: <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

Date: Sun, 22 Jul 2001 00:00:54 -0400

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Col. Mustard did it in the kitchen

 

    I ran across this in my wanderings . . .

 

    Sieggy

 

For the Love of Mustard

 

If you're fascinated by mustard - and who isn't? - you may want to plan a

trip to Mount Horeb, Wis. soon, in order to pay a visit to the Mount Horeb

Mustard Museum, home to over 3,000 varieties of everyone's favorite yellow

condiment. Founded in 1986 by curator Barry Levenson, the museum also

features "an extensive collection of mustard memorabilia and antique mustard

pots". If that sort of thing gets your heart racing, you'll probably need a

pacemaker after visiting the museum's official site, where you can buy

assorted mustard paraphernalia - a "mustard herbal bath" anyone? - or enroll

at the mock mustard college "Poupon U." where you can take courses in such

fascinating subjects as "Brown Spicy Mustard in Etruscan Literature". Um,

could someone pass the ketchup please?

 

http://www.mustardweb.com/

 

 

From: "Patricia Collum" <pjc2 at cox.net>

To: <SCAFoodandFeasts at yahoogroups.com>, <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

Date: Sun, 1 Jun 2003 09:20:03 -0700

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Sabrina Welserin Mustard Sauce

 

Yesterday was our A&S competition. I decided at the last minute (6:30am

that day) that I would bring this mustard sauce and make it right then. I

had made Sir Digby's mustard several monthe before, and the contrast between the two was really nice. My Kingdom MoAS suggested that I only enter one at Kingdom A&S, and Sabrina's won the most positive comments. I did not win the category with the mustard yesterday, because their were no other

cooking-condiments entries to compete against. This may also happen at Kingdom.

But the crowd's reaction was wonderful.

Original recipe (translated in english from Das Kuchbuch der Sabrina

Welser=

in (1553): To make the mustard for dried cod:

 

Take mustard powder, stir into it good wine and pear preserves and put

suga=

r into it, as much as you feel is good, and make it as thick as you

prefer =

to eat it, then it is a good mustard.

 

I decided to use canned pears instead of pear preserves like the

redaction that I read in 'Making Medieval-Style Mustards' by Jadwiga

Zajaczkowa/Jenne Heise.(Thank you for a wonderful article!)

 

my redaction: 1 cup freshly ground mustard seed (starting with about 1

Tbsp of brown mustard seed to 3 Tbsp yellow)

 

2 small cans (8 1/2 oz.) pears in heavy syrup, drained well

1/2 cup sugar

1/2 cup red wine vinegar

1/4 cup cooking sherry

 

dump all contents into a blender and whirl until smooth.

 

 

Date: Fri, 11 Jul 2003 22:43:30 -0400 (EDT)

From: <jenne at fiedlerfamily.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Mustard

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

>>> 

Besides the seeds, are other parts of the plant also edible? Roots, for example?

<<< 

 

The leaves and sprouts of white mustard are edible; they are eaten as

mustard greens.

 

-- Pani Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika   jenne at fiedlerfamily.net

 

 

Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2003 09:48:56 -0400 (EDT)

From: jenne at fiedlerfamily.net

To: sca-east at indra.com

Subject: [EK] sauces/spreads from war camp

 

A couple people asked me for the recipes for this stuff, so here they are.

 

Dilled cream cheese:

<see spreads-msg –Stefan>

 

Sauce for Pigeons (the salsa stuff):

Original:

Sauce for Peiouns.  Take percely, oynouns, garleke, and salt, and mynce

smal the percely and the oynouns, and grynde the garleke, and temper it

with vynegre y-now; and mynce the rostid peiouns and cast the sauce

ther-on a-boute, and serve it forth.

(Ashmole M.S. 1479, quoted in Take a Thousand Eggs by Cindy Renfrow)

 

    * Snip parsley leaves from 3 large bunches off stems (I used a mixture

of curly and flat parsley).

    * Grind about 3 cups of leaves in a food processor until seriously

minced; remove from food processor.

    * Cut up about 4 medium onions into chunks and mince in food

processor.

    * Add a handful of peeled garlic cloves.

    * Remove and mix with minced parsley.

    * Add red wine vinegar (about a cup) and mix so that the result is

moist with vinegar and salsa-like in texture.

(Can be made the night before and refrigerated. Should be let stand at

least 1/2 hour before serving in any case.)

 

Brown Mustard from Rumpolt:

Original: Brown mustard made up with clear vinegar/ is also good.

Grind brown mustard seeds. Add white wine vinegar to make a thin paste.

Let sit 2 days. Does not need refrigeration.

 

Cinnamon Mustard:

From The Viandier of Taillevent (13th century), translated by Terence

Scully [Cameline Mustard Sauce]: "Take mustard, red wine, cinnamon powder

and enough sugar, and let everything steep together. It should be thick like

cinnamon. It is good for any roast."

 

1 part chinese cinnamon powder

4 parts ground yellow mustard seed

Add burgundy wine to make a thin paste

Sweeten to taste with sugar.

 

Tournai-Style Cameline:

 

Spicy Green Sauce (the pesto-like stuff):

 

Prune Sauce:

<see the sauces-msg file for these sauces –Stefan>

 

n  Pani Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika

 

 

Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2003 09:50:23 -0400 (EDT)

From: <jenne at fiedlerfamily.net>

Subject: RE: [Sca-cooks] Mustards

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

>>> 

I'd like to try some other fruit mustards.  Does anyone have any recipes or

thoughts before I go wildly experimenting on:

 

Fig Mustard

Plum Mustard (or maybe prune mustard would be better)

Cherry Mustard

An Orange Marmelade sort of mustard

Olive mustard

<<< 

 

Hm... I would try prunes and dried cherries rather than fresh plums and

cherries, they work really well. What about combining mustard with the

prune sauce that we already have from period?

 

Some fruit mustards:

 

with grapes:

De Nola:

155. Another Very Good French Mustard Which Lasts All Year-- OTRA

MOSTAZA FRANCESA MUY BUENA Y DURA TODO EL AÑO

 

Take a caldron which will hold two cantaros, and fill it with red grapes

and set it to cook upon the fire until it is reduced by half and there

remains half a caldron  which is one cantaro; and when the grapes are

cooked, remove the scum with a wooden   spoon; and stir it now and then

with a stick; and strain this must through a clean cloth and cast it into

a cantaro; and then cast in the mustard, which should be up to a dishful

well-ground, little by little, stirring it with the stick. And each day

you should stir with it, four or five times a day; and if you wish, you

can  grind with the mustard three parts cinnamon, two parts cloves, and

one part ginger. This French mustard is very good and lasts all year and

is mulberry-colored.

 

 

Two mustards with dried fruit from Platina:

 

Red Mustard sauce: Grind in mortar or mill, either separately or all

together, mustard, raisins, dates, toasted bread, and a little cinnamon.

When it is ground, soak with verjuice or vinegar and a bit of must, and

pass through a sieve into serving dishes. This heats less than the one

above and stimulates the thirst but does not nourish badly.

 

Mustard sauce in bits: Mix mustard and well-pounded raisins, a little

cinnamon and cloves, and make little balls or bits from this mixture. When

they have dried on a board, carry them with you wherever you want. When

there is a need, soak in verjuice or vinegar or must. This differs little

in nature from those above.

 

-- Pani Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika jenne at fiedlerfamily.net

 

 

Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2003 06:58:42 -0700 (PDT)

From: Louise Smithson <helewyse at yahoo.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re: Mustards

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

Jadwiga wrote:

>What's your favorite mustard recipe?

 

I made this sweet mustard from Scappi about a year

ago.  In the absence of quinces I used apples.

 

From Scappi Cap CCLXXVI, folio 95, 2nd book.

Sweet Mustard

Take a pound of sauce of grapes, and an other of

quinces cooked in wine and sugar, four ounces of

"appie" apples cooked in wine and sugar, three ounces

of candied peel of eggplant, two ounces of candied

lemon peel, and half an ounce of candied sour orange

peel, and paste all the candies together with the

apples and quinces in a mortar.  When everything is

ground pass it through a sieve together with the grape

sauce, add to the said material three ounces of

cleaned mustard seed, more or less depending on how

strong you want it. And when it is passed (mixed) put

in a little salt and sugar finely ground, half an

ounce of cinnamon, and a quarter (of an ounce) of

cloves, and if you don't want to make a paste of the

candies then chop them minutely.  If you don't have

sauce of grapes one can make it without, take more

quinces and apples cooked in the above said manner.

 

From Scappi Cap CCLXXIIII folio 95, 2nd book

To make sauce of black grapes

Take black grapes, that are firm, those that are

called "gropello", that is "cesenese", that have a red

skin, break them and put to boil in a casserole on a

low fire for an hour.  After take the juice that they

have made and strain through a sieve.  And for every

pound of juice take eight ounces of fine sugar and put

it to reboil in a casserole, scum it well and to this

add at the end a little salt and whole cinnamon and

let it boil on a slow fire until it takes the cooking

(the implication here is that the sauce reduces and

becomes syrupy) and when it is cooked conserve it in a

glass or glazed pottery vessel.

 

Mustardo amabile - sweet mustard

For the grape sauce:

1 lb red or black grapes

4 oz sugar

1 " stick cinnamon

For the apples cooked in wine and sugar (note for

feast apples were cooked in water only):

3 apples

1/2 cup wine

1/2 cup water

1/3 cup sugar

For the mustard sauce:

1 oz candied lemon peel

1 small pinch ground nutmeg

1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1 pinch cloves

1 oz mustard seed ground

pinch salt

Take the grapes, break the skins and place in a

covered pot on a low heat for one hour.  Strain the

grapes through a sieve and then strain the resultant

pulpy juice through a jelly bag or cheesecloth.  This

should yield 8 oz of grape juice.  Add the sugar,

return to the pan and bring to a boil.  As it boils

remove any scum that rises to the surface.  Simmer for

about 20 minutes until the sauce reaches a consistency

that is tacky and thick and is before the jelly stage.

 

Core the apples, chop roughly and place in a pan with

the wine and sugar, simmer until tender.  Remove the

apples from the liquid and press through a sieve or

other strainer, to remove skin and mash apples.

Blend 8 oz grape sauce with 8 oz of apple mush in a

blender with the lemon peel and remaining spices

including the mustard.  Blend until smooth.  This is a

sweet, tangy, fruity mustard, in every way friendly

(which is the literal translation of amabile).  Makes

enough to fill a 16 oz canning jar, serves 30 for

feast.

 

 

Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2003 11:22:53 -0400 (EDT)

From: <jenne at fiedlerfamily.net>

Subject: RE: [Sca-cooks] Mustards

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

>>> 

I think the dried fruit would be good too, as it would concentrate the

sweetness and keep the mustard from being watery.

<<< 

 

Someone used dried cranberries in her mustard and liked it very much.

 

>>> 

Combining a prune sauce and a mustard sounds like a good combo.  I looked in

the Florilegium for prune sauce, but didn't turn it up.  And I tried a few

other google searches as well.  Is it under an old language spelling?

<<< 

 

It's in The Medieval Kitchen by Redon et al. Googling Dried Plum Sauce

found it in someone's list of redactions-- here's the original:

 

"Translation: Take prunes and put them to soak in red wine, and remove the

pits; pound them very well with a few unskinned almonds and a little

roasted or grilled bread soaked in the wine where the prunes had been. And

pound all these things together with a little verjuice and the above

mentioned wine and a little boiled grape must, or sugar, which would be

much better; mix and strain, adding good spices, especially cinnamon. "

 

>>> 

Those grape and raisin ones sound tasty.  Do you find that white or red

wine/verjuice is best from those ones in Platina.  The spice-raisin balls

seem like a good food for travelers or campers as it would be easy to just

get out the number of little spice balls that you needed from your container

and would require minimal preparation at that point.  It occurred to me that

this preparation is like jerky-for-spices.

<<< 

 

I like red wine and white verjuice, the white wine mustards I've made seem

to turn pickle-ish over time.

 

BTW, my research indicates verjuice or must would be used in summer,

vinegar in fall and spring, and wine in winter because of the theory of

humors, but I think that info is from Scully's Medium Aevum article.

 

>>> 

Did you teach your mustard class again this year at Pennsic?  If so what

were people's favorites?

<<< 

 

Well, mostly I give them a bunch of things to try mixing together. Many of

them make lombard mustards but a bunch of them made the cinnamon mustard

from the Viander, as that is one of the ones I had available for them to

try. (I used 3 parts mustard to one part chinese cinnamon)

 

-- Pani Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika jenne at fiedlerfamily.net

 

 

Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2003 14:27:26 -0400

From: "Phlip" <phlip at 99main.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Mustards/Responses to Phlip's, Jadwiga's,      and

      Helewyse's posts

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

>>> 

Phlip,

is your pear mustard posted somewhere I could find it and try it out?  I

have experienced some of the mustards that were very sweet--- on the order

of mustard flavored honey.  But I think a lot of people like this version

too as they seem to sell well modernly.

 

Your thoughts did lead me to think though about other things that would add

sweetness and flavor without being overly sweet.  One thing that occurred to

me would be beets.  I haven't looked though to see whether white and yellow

beets are period as well as red.  And while I think beet mustard flavor

could be really good, I am not sure how the color would come out with red

ones--beet red or a funny color of orangey yellow.  A red one might or might

not be visually appetizing in combination with meat (or it might make for

one of those heart stopping soltilties).

<<< 

 

This is from Valoise' translation of Sabina Welserin:

 

34 To make the mustard for dried cod

 

Take mustard powder, stir into it good wine and pear preserves and put sugar

into it, as much as you feel is good, and make it as thick as you prefer to

eat it, then it is a good mustard.

 

As I was unable to find pear preserves, and knowing that preserves are

cooked, I substituted fresh pears, which I had cored and lightly parboiled-

just to tenderness. I left the peels on, for a bit of added texture (never

mind it was late and I was tired ;-) and we ran them through the food

processor, with a bit of wine- semi-dry white- with the mustard powder. We

did add a bit of sugar, but very little, because these pears were

wonderfully sweet in their own right.

 

The consistancy was rather similar to a fairly firm applesauce, with a

lovely bite of mustard. It does mellow, given a couple of days, but is still

good in 24 hours.

 

Proportions were about 6 pears to one can (4 3/4 oz?) mustard. We served it

with roast pork loin, as one of 3 sauces, camelline and pevorade (sp?

Grape/black pepper combo) being the other two.

 

If I were to do it again, I'd likely make pear preserves, since they're so

hard to find, and do them in either thin slices, or small chunks, and work

from there. Regardless, it was very tasty as it was, and if I get a taste

for it in a hurry, I'll duplicate my actions.

 

This enough?

 

In the meantime, Jadwiga, while I have thought about doing the mustards with

dried fruits, I've been in a bit of a quandry about what to do to liquify

them, to a softer consistancy. I'm thinking about rehydrating them in a

light wine, but haven't come to any firm decision. Any suggestions?

 

Saint Phlip,

CoD

 

 

Date: Wed, 3 Dec 2003 11:44:59 -0500

From: "Barbara Benson" <vox8 at mindspring.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] On Topic, Welserin's Pear Mustard (long)

To: "Cooks List" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

I am working on an A&S entry for this weekend, long story short, starting at

one spot ended up with me making a variety of mustards, one of them being

Welserin's Pear. There are many different redactions on the web, and even

several that were posted here I hope what I have done will add at least a

little interesting to the corpus. The following is the second Appendix to my

research that discusses the Pear Preserves I used to make the Mustard, I

have just copied and pasted so it is in "documentation" speak.

 

Appendix B

The Welserin recipe calls for pear preserves. I did not want to purchase

ready made preserves (assuming they could be found), but neither Welserin

nor her contemporary Rumpolt saw fit to provide us with a recipe for pear

preserves. Instead of moving to a parallel source from another region of

Europe I decided to look back in time to earlier German manuscripts, hoping

to keep the continuity of the region.

 

Luckily the Teutonic cookbook provides us with a sort of pear preserve.

18. Wilthu ein grune? von Huzellen machenn:

so wasche die Huzell gar schone und stos sie clein und streich sie durch

mytt Wein und seidt sye dann woll und thu dan darein guett Hoengk und wurz

genuck und wer es zu din, so reib Prott darein und thu es in ein Haffenn so

bleybett es dir 4 ader 6 wochen guett. das magst kallt ader warm gebenn und

stre(u) Zucker daruff und Zimettrindenn.

18. If you want to make a green (dish) of pears

Wash the pears nicely and pound them finely. Pass them through a sieve with

wine, boil them well and add good honey and enough spices. If it is too

thin, add ground breadcrumbs. If you put it into a crock, it will last

for 4 to 6 weeks. It can be served cold or hot. Sprinkle it with sugar and

cinnamon.

In keeping with the theme of this line of research I chose to update the

recipe to coincide with what I have found by comparing the texts, namely

that the use of honey had been all but phased out by the 16th century in

most things. So, to this end I substituted sugar for honey in the recipe and

I utilized the same Reisling wine that I chose for the end sauce.

 

To determine what spices to use I reviewed the Welserin manuscript and

identified five recipes that were for dishes in which pears were the main

ingredient. The break down of the seasoning was: two with cinnamon only; two

with cinnamon and cloves; and one with cinnamon, ginger and cloves. The

original recipe calls for cinnamon at the end, so I chose to go with

cinnamon and cloves to fulfill the mandate of "enough" spices.

Lastly, the issue of pears, I went to the market and looked at all of the

pears available to me. Of all on display the ones that were labeled

"Forelle" looked the best in quality, so those are what I bought. Upon

returning home I decided to see what I could find on the pear, fully

expecting it to be a modern variety, but hopefully better than a Bosc. What

I was able to find was fortuitous:

     "Forelles are a very old variety, and are thought to have originated

sometime in the 1600's in northern Saxony, Germany. The name Forelle

translates to mean "trout" in the German language. It is believed that the

variety earned this name because of the similarity between the pear's

brilliant red lenticles and  the colors of a Rainbow trout.."

          Pear Bureau Northwest. Forelle Pears - History.

http://www.usapears.com/

http://www.usapears.com/varieties_forelle.php#history

With no further research to substantiate this claim, I would not hold it as

fact. But possibly luck was with me that day.

Ingredients:

     6 small Forelle Pears

     3/4 C Reisling Wine

     1 1/2 C Sugar

     1 t Cinnamon

     pinch Cloves

Peel pears and cut in half, remove seeds and chop coarsely. Place in food

processor with wine and process until smooth. Force mixture through a sieve

into non-reactive cooking pot. Add spices and sugar, stir to combine. Bring

to a boil and hold at a low boil for 30 minutes. Stir frequently to avoid

scorching. Refrigerate or can using sanitary methods.

 

There have been plenty of redactions of the mustard itself posted, so unless

someone wants it I will not make this any longer. One point that I was a bit

confused on tho, in most of the redactions by SCA'ers that I have seen they

have added vinegar. In the Welserin it calls for wine. I was wondering why

people added the vinegar.

 

Glad Tidings,

Serena da Riva

 

 

Date: Fri, 26 Mar 2004 10:05:52 -0500 (EST)

From: <jenne at fiedlerfamily.net>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re: [sig] Re: Period Mustard Recipes

To: Slavic Interest Group <sig at yahoogroups.com>

Cc: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org, EKCooksGuild at yahoogroups.com

 

> I'm confused; a recently acquired source on Polish

> herbs and plants lists references to black mustard and

> white mustard, one firm source being in the 1500's,

> but no mention of Brown Mustard, yet someone here said

> that brown mustard is more appropriate?  I'm not

> contesting them, since this is just one source, but

> asking for clarification.

> Eluned

 

Join the club of confused people. Black mustard and brown mustard are both

terms used for Brassica nigra, but if Gernot Katzer's spice pages can be

believed:

 

"Botanically different, though of equal use in the kitchen, are the

Sarepta mustard or Romanian Brown Mustard (Br. juncea) from Eastern Europe

and the Indian Brown Mustard (Br. integrifolia or Br. juncea, a fertile

hybride from Br. nigra and Br. campestris) from India and Central Asia.  

Of all three species, the latter is probably most commonly sold in the  

West.

 

Although the pungency of black mustard is slightly stronger than that of

brown mustard, black mustard is hardly planted in Europe anymore, and

brown mustard is the dominating quality on the European market. The reason

is that brown mustard, unlike black mustard, can be harvested by machines

which make production much cheaper in countries where working force is

expensive. "

 

I should re-write my pages to explain that. If you can get real black

mustard, by all means use it-- otherwise, brown mustard is a decent

approximation of black, and is the preferred approximation.

 

 

Date: Fri, 30 Apr 2004 12:03:44 -0400

From: "Phlip" <phlip at 99main.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Pear Mustard?

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

>> If anyone has it, PLEASE e-mail me privately, as i get the Digest of

>> this list and i probably won't see your response until Sunday night

>> when i get back from Beltane.

> I think this is it... From Sabina Welserin, via Cariadoc's website...

> 34 To make the mustard for dried cod

>   Take mustard powder, stir into it good wine and pear preserves and

> put sugar into it, as much as you feel is good, and make it as thick

> as you prefer to eat it, then it is a good mustard.

> Adamantius

 

If my redaction will help (and you can't find pear preserves, which I

haven't found yet), quarter and core 4-5 pears, parboil them to just tender,

then throw them in the blender with a dab of cinnamon and the white wine.

and an entire (small, supermarket size, not a honking great food services

size) can/jar of mustard. It really should sit in the fridge about a week,

to mellow the flavors, although it's OK in a day or two- just a bit

harsh.

 

I added the cinnamon because all the recipes found for pear preserves had

cinnamon in them, and it really did do a nice job of brightening up the

flavor, and I never added sugar because the pears I had were so sweet. If I

were to add sugar, though, I think I'd do it as a syrup, to thicken the

texture just a bit and make it a bit more like normal preserves.

 

Saint Phlip,

CoDoLDS

 

 

 

Date: Thu, 24 Jun 2004 15:43:38-0400

From: Elaine Koogler <ekoogler1 at comcast.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] long pepper?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

OK...here'tis.  The original says to eat it right away, but I have

found that letting it age for about 6 weeks makes it really delicious.

Otherwise, IMHO, it's a little too sharp.

 

Red Mustard Sauce – Platina, p. 357 (Mary Ella Milham edition)

 

Grind in a mortar or mill, either separately or all together, mustard,

raisins, dates, bits of bread, and a little cinnamon.  When it is

ground,  with verjuice or vinegar and a bit of must, and pass thorugh a

sieve into serving dishes.  This heats less than the one above ad

stimulates thirst but does not nourish badly.

 

2 cups mustard seed

2 cups must

4 tsp. Cinnamon

3/4  cups raisins

3/4 cups dates

1 1/2 cups white wine vinegar  (or verjuice)

1/2 cup balsamic vinegar

1 cup bread crumbs

 

Place mustard in a blendr with vinegars and must.  Liquify.  Add

cinnamon, raisins and dates and reduce this to a liquid.  Add enough

bread crumbs to thicken the mustard so that a wooden spoon or spatula

will almost stand in it.  Let cure in a crock with a cloth cover for

several weeks.

 

Kiri

 

 

Date: Thu, 26 Aug 2004 10:21:19 -0700

From: Ruth Frey <ruthf at uidaho.edu>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Commercial Mustard ingredients.

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

> Still hashing this about.  My hope was if 9 out of 10 of your

> ingredients and 90% by volume of your ingredients must be

> documented to period, this may well disqualify many commercial

> sauces or limit their percentages in final sauces.

> All commercial mustards would still fall within your guidelines.

> Unaltered.

 

      What about the tumeric?  I believe that's what give some of the

commercial mustards that screaming-yellow color, and I don't recall

tumeric on any Period European spice lists . . . That would at least

take out *some* of the commercial mustards.

 

      Just to chime in with a mustard kids might like (if they have a

tolerance for hot stuff), I've come up with a slightly-faked version of

Sabina Welserin's pear mustard ("For Stockfish," though it goes

wonderfully with beef, too).  The faking comes in with the pear

preserves; I haven't been able to find any pre-made, and when I don't

have time to make my own, I substitute pear "nectar" (juice) for flavor

and a little applesauce for texture. Also, she calls for wine in the

recipe, but I've substituted a little vinegar to avoid uncooked-alcohol

issues (especially important when serving to kids!).  If you're serving

to adults only, however, a little white wine would probably be

excellent.  The recipe goes as follows:

 

4 parts ground yellow mustard seed

2 parts pear juice

1 part apple cider vinegar

2 parts unrefined cane sugar

plus a little "dab" of applesauce

 

Mix, let stand for about 10-15 minutes, stir again to dissolve all the

sugar, and you're ready to go.

 

Sweet, hot, and popular with all my "tasters."  :)

 

                  -- Ruth

 

 

Date: Thu, 26 Aug 2004 13:37:35 -0400

From: Jadwiga Zajaczkowa / Jenne Heise <jenne at fiedlerfamily.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Commercial Mustard ingredients.

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

>      What about the tumeric?  I believe that's what give some of the

> commercial mustards that screaming-yellow color, and I don't recall

> tumeric on any Period European spice lists . . . That would at least

> take out *some* of the commercial mustards.

 

Well, actually, tumeric was imported to Europe at the end of period, and

it, and preservatives, probably don't add up to 10% of any given

commercial mustard.

 

The brown mustards mostly don't have tumeric in them.

 

By the way, should I start bringing Pear butter and "pear sweets"

(boiled pear juice) to events and handing them out? Everyone seems to

love Welserin's Pear mustard but says they can't get pear preserves.

 

-- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika

 

 

Date: Thu, 26 Aug 2004 14:53:44 -0400

From: Jadwiga Zajaczkowa / Jenne Heise <jenne at fiedlerfamily.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Commercial Mustard ingredients.

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> So the "pear sweets (boiled pear juice)"  ... boiled how long?  To a

> syrup stage?

 

Yes, definitely a syrup. I picked it up at the Amish health food store

in the next county. I thought, hm... we know that the Teutonic knights

stored boiled down berry juices to add to drinks and we are pretty sure

same are mentioned in the Domostroi... so boiling down pear juice in

Germany to get the 'pear preserves' is a good guess.

 

According to Wax Orchard's online store, it is concentrated pear juice

with unsweetened pineapple and peach juices. But it definitely tastes of

pear juice specifically.

 

Anyway, I did try a version of the Welserin mustard with pear butter and

someone else tried it with pear sweet-- it was good but I wasn't really

paying attention to what I was doing, as it was filling a slow space in

a small class I was teaching. I need to do it again.

 

-- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika jenne at fiedlerfamily.net

 

 

Date: Thu, 26 Aug 2004 16:43:38 -0400

From: Avraham haRofeh <avrahamharofeh at herald.sca.org>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Pear Mustard (was Re:  Commercial Mustard

        ingredients)

To: <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> Anyway, I did try a version of the Welserin mustard with pear butter and

> someone else tried it with pear sweet-- it was good but I wasn't really

> paying attention to what I was doing, as it was filling a slow space in a

> small class I was teaching. I need to do it again.

 

When Phlip and I did the Northpass Tavern feast two years ago (gee, is it

really that long?), due to a misreading of Petru's recipe, we made the pear

mustard with fresh pears. It was nummy. :-)

 

****************

Reb Avraham haRofeh

      (mka Randy Goldberg MD)

 

 

Date: Thu, 26 Aug 2004 19:01:00 -0400

From: "Phlip" <phlip at 99main.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Pear Mustard (was Re: Commercial Mustard

        ingredients)

To: "Cooks withn the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

>> Anyway, I did try a version of the Welserin mustard with pear butter and

>> someone else tried it with pear sweet-- it was good but I wasn't really

>> paying attention to what I was doing, as it was filling a slow space in a

>> small class I was teaching. I need to do it again.

> When Phlip and I did the Northpass Tavern east two years ago (gee, is it

> really that long?), due to a misreading of Petru's recipe, we made the pear

> mustard with fresh pears. It was nummy. :-)

> ****************

> Reb Avraham haRofeh

 

No we didn't, Avraham, we did that deliberately, since I was totally unable

to find any pear preserves anywhere. Still looking, still haven't found any.

What I did was to reverse engineer preserves, and include the ingredients

that would normally be put into pear preserves, including cooking the pears

(remember the parboiling) and work from there. Sugar was adjusted to my

taste- since the pears I got were already so wonderfully sweet, I didn't add

any. In later versions, I have added a bit of cinnamon, since later research

(by others on this List) indicted that almost every pear preserve recipe

they had found had a bit of cinnamon in it (like I ever need an excuse to

add cinnamon to anything ;-).

 

Saint Phlip,

CoDoLDS

 

 

Date: Thu, 26 Aug 2004 17:03:47 -0700

From: lilinah at earthlik.net

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Commercial Mustard ingredients.

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

Sabina Welserin's Pear Mustard... i used baby food pears and some

sugar (since - hurrah! - baby food doesn't have sugar in it anymore)

for the pear preserves, when i couldn't find any.

 

Anahita

 

 

Date: Thu, 26 Aug 2004 21:46:27 -0400

From: "Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius"

        <adamantius.magister at verizon.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Commercial Mustard ingredients.

To: mooncat at in-tch.com, Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Also sprach Sue Clemenger:

> Okay, I was actually wondering this, recently, anyways, but:

> What exactly makes a mustard a "dijon" mustard? I thought maybe

> consistency, but I've seen it for sale as both smooth, and chunkier

> (still showing evidence of the seeds, almost a whole-grain mustard).

> I was a bit disgruntled, having to actually buy some of the stuff

> (for a modern recipe) when I could so easily have made my own (in

> the broad middle of a mustard project for A&S Competition).

 

I believe Dijon mustard is a style characterized today by the

addition of salt, vinegar and white wine to the ground mustard.

 

The Larousse Gastronomique sez:

"In 1390 the manufacture of mustard was governed by regulations: it

had to be made from 'good seed and suitable vinegar', without any

other binder. The corporation of vinegar and mustard manufacturers

was founded at the end of the 16th century at Orleans and in about

1630 at Dijon. In the 18th century, a Dijon manufacturer called

Naigeon fixed the recipe for 'strong' or 'white' mustard, the

production of which was synchronized with the wine harvest, as the

black and brown seeds were mixed with verjuice. Today, Dijon mustard

is prepared with verjuice and white wine, Orleans mustard with white

vinegar, and Bordeaux mustard, which is milder and brown in color,

with grape must (the French word for mustard is derived from moute

ardent, i.e. 'piquant must'). Meaux mustard, which owes its flavor

and color to coarsely crushed seeds of various colors, is made with

vinegar, particularly at Lagny."

 

I'd bet there's a Grey Poupon web site with a little more historical

information. Some of it might even be accurate, but in general when a

place name is attached to a wine, a cheese, etc., there are some kind

of standards for determining style, outside of which it is illegal

(somewhere) to use that name...

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Wed, 24 Nov 2004 20:43:44 -0700

From: Sue Clemenger <mooncat at in-tch.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Period Gifts in Jars

To: jenne at fiedlerfamily.net, Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Jadwiga Zajaczkowa / Jenne Heise wrote:

>> A period Mustard (such as that from Le Menagier de Paris)

> Lots of period mustards. Anyone ever try canning any of these? Some

> people don't feel comfortable distributing them without safety seals.

 

Yes.  Me, at least.  I do it a LOT (contributions for royalty gift

baskets, most frequently).  I waterbath the jars (4 oz or 8 oz) for

10-15 minutes, and check seals after they cool.  Works just fine, and

then there are no safety concerns, or leakage issues.

--maire

 

 

Date: Fri, 10 Dec 2004 10:17:48 -0500

From: Jadwiga Zajaczkowa / Jenne Heise <jenne at fiedlerfamily.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] mustards

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> Didn't I read somewhere that beer was used in some mustards?

 

Hm... I have not found any recipes from pre-1650, let alone pre-17th c.

that specify beer, but that doesn't mean that nobody did it, just that

nobody wrote it down. :)

--

-- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika jenne at fiedlerfamily.net

 

 

Date: Tue, 18 Jan 2005 02:52:51 -0500

From: "Phlip" <phlip at 99main.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Fw: [mk-cooks] Periodness and a query....

To: "SCA-Cooks" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Was discussing corned beef with a fairly new person on MK Cooks, and Huen

chimed in with the following story. Not only did it lead me into a bit of

online research, which brought me toan interesting website, but the story

itself is great, not only for Jadwiga and her many mustards, but for the

gentle asking about Scottish foods.

 

> Do you know what powdered beef is? I've seen references to it in early

> 17th c manuscripts.

 

> My former mistress once told me that she thought it was related to

> corned beef, but she wasn't sure.

 

(Website is http://www.pepysdiary.com/p/381.php- putting it here for you

guys will now make sense).

 

> Here's a funny story bout powdered beef - it's from Taylor's Feast,

> 1638.

 

> Three Gentlemen of the ancient race of Redshanks, (now called

> Highland-men, because they inhabite in the Mountaynous parts of the

> North of Scotland) these three having occasion to come into Engand,

> being at their Inne, had to their Dinner a peece of powderd Beefe and

> Mustard: now neither of them had never seene Mustard before,

> wherefore one of them demanded what Deele it was? the Host

> answered, that it was good sawce for their meate; Sace said the

> other? it hath an ill looke, I pray let me see you eat some first, then the

> Host took a bit of Beefe, and dipt it in the Mustard, & did eate it: the

> Highland-man presently tooke his meat and rowl'd it in the Mustard, and

> began tochaw, but it was so strong, that it was no sooner in his mouth,

> but it set him a snuffing and neesing, that he told his Friends, (Ducan

> and Donald) that hee was slaine with the grey Grewall in the wee-dish;

> he bid them draw their Whineards, and stice the false Lowne, (their

> host) hee pray'd them to remember his last love to his wife and Barnes,

> and withall to have a care to beware of the grey grewall, for the Deele

> was in't. But after the force of the Mustard was spent, the Gentleman lef

> neesing, all was pacified, mine Host was pardoned, and Mustard was

> good sawce for powderd Beefe.

 

> Huen

 

Saint Phlip,

CoD

 

 

Date: Sat, 22 Jan 2005 00:39:53 +0100

From: Fred Schwohl <wladislaus at mac.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cook] Period German Mustard Recipes (long)

To: "sca-cooks at ansteorra.org" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Am 21.01.2005 21:15 Uhr schrieb "Irmgart" unter <irmgart at gmail.cm>:

 

Hello from Germany

 

(being a native German speaker and interested in medieval cooking and

collecting all those fancy books comes quite handy here :o)  )

 

> And here are mustard recipes that *aren't* translated, at least

> anywhere I can find them, an my rather pathetic attempts to translate

> using online sources:

>> From Koch vnd Kellermeisterey 1566

> (http://staff-www.uni-marburg.de/~gloning/kochkell.htm)

> Senff zu machen.

> Süssen Senff mal mit der Würtz/ vnd wann er wol gemahlen ist/ so gib> jm ein wall in einer Pfannen auff einem Fewr/ rür jn wol mit wenig

> Saltz/ behalt jn/ vnd mehre jn mit deren Würtzen gesotten/ vermach jn

> gar wol. Wiltu den zu essen machen/ so seud einen guten Honigwein/ vnd

> temperier den darmit/ saltz jn/ vnd würz jn/ kom zu prüffen/ so ist

> er gute

> Sweet mustard time with the sausage/ and when it is well ground/ so

> give at a wall(bank/parapet/rampart?) in a pan from the fire/ [rür] in

> good with a little salt/ keep in/ and more in with their sausage hard> boiled/ to give in well cooked. You will then make to eat/ also [seud]

> a good Honeywine/ and temper the stomach/ salt in/ and sausage in/

> [kom] close testing/ so is it good.

 

To make a sweet mustard ground it with spices/broth ("Würtz" is derived from

"Würze" which means normally seasoning, or spices, in the given context it

has to be the liquid something is boiled in or a simple meatbroth, and it

has nothing at all to do with sausages, which would be "Würste". The Term

"wort" used in beer brewing is the english term for that.)/and when it is

well ground/so give him some heat ("Wall" from the German "wallen,

aufwallen, aufwellen" which means to cook until the liquid is agitated

through heat convection)/stir it well with a little salt/keep it/ and add

("mehre" = "vermehre" = add some other liquid) some more broth (see

above)/store in a well closed container ("vermache" is an old expression

related to "einmachen" which means storing, the raw mustard is first cooked

and only prepared for eating whe needed). If you want to prepare it for

eating/cook a good mead (or Honeywine, i'm not absolutely sure which of the

many recipes for mead is used here)/and temper it (the honeywine) with the

prepared mustard (this term "temperier" is related to the Humoal Theorie of

Galenius where every ingredient has its own temper and a meal or dish has to

be well balanced to be healthy)/and salt it/ and season it/ and taste it

("prüfen" is "to prove" the taste)/ so it is good

 

> Ein ander behende weiß.

> Temperie Honig wol mit Essig/ Wein oder Fleischbrüh/ vnd rür den Senff

> darein.

> One other agile white. (Another easy white?)

> Temper honey well with vinegar/ wine or meat both/ and [rür] the mustard

> therin.

 

Another fast way ("behende weis" means in modern German "Behende Weise,

behende Art" = a fast way to do things)/temper (see comment above on humoral

theorie) Honey with vinegar/wine or meatbroth/ and stir ("rür" means

"rühren" = to stir) the mustard in

 

> Rosin vnd Feigen gesotten mit Wein oder Wsser/ damit Senff temperiret

> ist/ oder Rosenwasser/ vnd gestossen Zimetrinden darein gethan/

> subtilen Leuten.

> Rasins and figs hardboiled with wine or water/ so that mustard is

> tempered/ or rosewater/ and hardboil [zimetrinden - something

> crust... possibly cinnamon? Zimt is cinnamon] therein [gethan -

> possibly getan (done)]/ subtle people.

 

Rasins and figs boiled in wine or water /this used to temper (see again

comment on Humoral theorie above) the mustard/ or rosewater (in exchange to

the fgs and raisins)/ and add ground (actually "gestossen" is referring to

the way cinnamon is ground in a mortar) cinnamon rind ("Zimmetrinden" is

rind of cinnamon)/... The "subtle people" makes no sense for me at all, I

can see it in the original Text on Tomas´page but it makes no sense in any

context for mustard or sauce. It is possible the the complete part should

read "das ist von subtilen Leuten" meaning this is something

Extraordinary, not for common usage (due to the cinnamon of course), but this

is sheer speculation.

 

> OK, so none of these really makes sense, I think Ruhr might mean

> stir... Ruhr means dysentary in modern German, so I don't think that's

> right. But stir would make sense in context.

> So, 1) can anyone help me make my translations less mangled?

 

One is glad to be of Service!

 

> 2) does anyone know of other period German mustards?

 

I have to check in my Book collection and there should be many others

available, as German cooks seemed to be a bit possessed about mustard,

nearly s possessed as French cooks and Courts with their strange titles

like "Monsieur le Maitré Moutardier de Roi du France" was a very well paid

title with the rank of a Baronet or even Duke at the french court in 14 & 15

century.

 

> I'm going to be fairly cosmopolitan and not get region/decade specific

> with this feast, even though I really kind of want to, just because

> I'm afraid I'll get *too* bogged down in it.

 

You might consider using some of the sweet varieties, exchange at least one

of them with the Cherry sauce ("weichselmuss") mentioned earlier and add

some more stringent or spicier mustards.

 

> -Irmgart

 

Best wishes

Fred

 

 

Date: Fri, 21 Jan 2005 21:25:34 -0500

From: "Phlip" <phlip at 99main.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Period German Mustard Recipes (long)

To: "Irmgart" <irmgart at gmail.com>,  "Cooks within the SCA"

        <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> I am planning a German feast for Atlantia's KASF on March 5 (eep!),

> and was looking at sauces for the meats.

> I think what I want to do is make a mustard for each course.

> This is my first feast "all by myself" so, in some ways I'm afraid I'm

> over reaching, but it should all come out right, I've got a lot of

> backup :)

 

If I may make a couple of suggestions...

 

First, if you want to use Sabina Welserin's Pear Mustard, start looking for

pear preserves now- they're very hard to find- I'm still looking. If you

can't find them, my solution was to parboil the pears, and add the mustard,

white wine, and a dash of cinnamon ( a fairly recent discussion on the List

indicated that all the period pear preserve recipes available used cinnamon

in them). I haven't added sugar so far because the pears I've used have been

so sweet, so taste before you add that ingredient. If I were doing it again,

for a feast, I think I'd cook it down a bit, to thicken it more- as it is,

it comes out rather like apple sauce.

 

One thing you might want to do is plan on preparing the various mustard

sauces ahead of feast. I know for sure on the pear mustard that it needs a

few says to age and mellow ( 2 days is OK, a week is about ideal) and having

sampled a number of Jadwiga's mustards, I think hers would be best aged a

bit as well. Otherwise, they tend to be pretty harsh. I can enjoy them like

that, but I think the average feaster would prefer a mellower flavor.

 

And, I agree with the poster who suggested that you might want to have

alternative sauces, in addition to the mustard sauces. I love mustard, but

I'd get tired of it, even with variations, if it were the ONLY sauce flavor

available.

 

BTW, guys, I finally found something that the pear mustard doesn't go well

with- maple syrup. Clashingest flavors I've tried for a while.

 

Saint Phlip,

CoD

 

 

Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2005 17:59:54 -0500

From: Jadwiga Zajaczkowa / Jenne Heise <jenne at fiedlerfamily.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Period German Mustard Recipes (long)

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> One thing you might want to do is plan on preparing the various mustard

> sauces ahead of feast. I know for sure on the pear mustard that it needs a

> few says to age and mellow ( 2 days is OK, a week is about ideal) and having

> sampled a number of Jadwiga's mustards, I think hers would be best aged a

> bit as well. Otherwise, they tend to be pretty harsh. I can enjoy them like

> that, but I think the average feaster would prefer a mellower flavor.

 

It's definitely a matter of taste. Some people love them fresh-made, and

the documentation suggests that they may have been made the same day.

However, I would generally give a mustard at least 3 or 4 hours before

serving, and 1-2 weeks mellows it quite a bit.

--

-- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika jenne at fiedlerfamily.net

 

 

Date: Sat, 16 Apr 2005 20:04:42 -0400

From: "Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius

        <adamantius.magister at verizon.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Mustard

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Also sprach Terry Decker:

>> While I don't disagree with you, you are making the assumption

>>> that the mustard would have been added to improve the taste rather

>>> than be left out because it would be humorally harmful or

>>> inappropriate in the dish.

>>> 

>>> As for the term authentic, I would point out that both dishes

>>> described are authentic, but yours is not historically accurate.

>>> 

>>> Bear

>> 

>> But, and I don't have a source with me, wasn't mustard often

>> on the table as a condiment? Sounds like such a case to me. "These

>> french fries are good, but better with some ketchup. Or, more

>> to my mind, I like mustard with corned beef but add it after the cooking

>> process instead of during. Now, the recipe doesn't state to add mustard

>> but neither do most modern recipes when discussing condiments

>> that can be used.

>> 

>> Just a thought.

>> 

>> Gunthar

> My understanding is the mustard was being added in the kitchen,

> which, in accordance to the recipe, would be historically inaccurate

> (unless of course there is an attribution to "scribal error").

> Condiments on the table are in the province of the diner not the

> cook, so they might or might not have been added to any individual's

> portion of anything.  Without actual reference to how they were

> used, we can only assume they were used in the same manner we use

> them.  Safe assumption, but not necessarily historically accurate.

> At the Protectorate feast where you presented me your Iris ribbon,

> I sent out fish with apple and wine sauce and chicken with orange

> sauce and there were mustard and marmalade on the table.  At the

> tables, the sauces, mustard and marmalade got added to dishes in

> strange and curious ways.  I hewed to the recipes and made the

> dishes as historically accurate as I could.  They were eaten as the

> diners chose to eat them. Authentic, yes.  Historically accurate,

> unproven.

> Bear

 

I don't know whether mustard would have been a discretionary table

condiment or not, except in certain cases. It may be as it often is

today, where you're more likely to find mustard on the table, or even

serve it, as an accompaniment to, say, corned beef or various smoked

sausages, but less likely when poached filet of sole is served.

 

Interestingly enough, one of the more fun aspects of the text of The

Enseignements, a short French cookery text (kind of a proto-Viandier

pre-Taillevent) is full of cases where it'll say things like:

 

Fresh pork is eaten roasted with fine salt and verjuice only, the

salted gets mustard.

 

Fresh herring are eten fried and then baked in a pasty, then removed

and served with green sauce made from parsley, garlic, and bread

crumbs moistened in verjuice. And the salted gets mustard.

 

Adamantius Bob says check it out:

http://staff-www.uni-marburg.de/~gloning/1300ns.htm

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Sat, 16 Apr 2005 21:59:26 -0400

From: Jadwiga Zajaczkowa / Jenne Heise <jenne at fiedlerfamly.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Mustard

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> I don't know whether mustard would have been a discretionary tale

> condiment or not, except in certain cases. It may be as it often is

> today, where you're more likely to find mustard on the table, or even

> serve it, as an accompaniment to, say, corned beef or various smoked

> sausages, but less likely when poache filet of sole is served.

 

My impression is that mustard was the default condiment for most things,

except perhaps chicken. But I may be wrong.

 

This is from my notes:

'Le Menagier de Paris suggests mustard sauce with wild boar, beef

tongue, and lots of dfferent fish, including eel, shad, loach,

lampreys, cod, stockfish, and whiting. Anne Wilson, in Food and Drink in

Britain, says, "Mustard was eaten with fresh and salt meat, brawn, fresh

fish and stockfish, and indeed was considered the best sauce for ay

dish."'

 

I shall have to dig through my notes further on this one.

--

-- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika jenne at fiedlerfamily.net

 

 

Date: Sun, 17 Apr 2005 00:21:10 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Mustard

To: jenne at fiedlerfamily.net, Cooks withi the SCA

        <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> My impression is that mustard was the default condiment for most

> things, except perhaps chicken. But I may be wrong.

 

There are various instructions given for what mustard goes

with in The Book of Carving. Brawn is mentioned; certain fish

are listed, etc. I'll try also and pull my print-out

of what Buttes says in his book on mustard later on today.

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2005 20:57:32 +0200

From: Volker Bach <carlton_bach at yahoo.de>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] light cream and also question on sauces

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Am Mittwoch, 22. Juni 2005 17:02 schrieb Alexa:

> I was thinking that also.  Know of any really tastey

> mustard recipes?

 

Based on German recipes, two of my favorites are:

 

10 parts ground mustardseed, 1 part ground aniseed, 3 parts ground cinnamon, 5

parts liquid honey, diluted with white wine vinegar to taste.  (Wolfenbüttel

MS, North German, c. 15th cent going back to the Harpestreng tradition)

 

10 parts ground mustardseed,  1 part ground cassia buds ('cinnamon flower'),

10 parts liquid honey, dilute with white wine to taste (Munich fragment,

south German, mirrored in several other manuscripts from the region, though

usually with caneel cinnamon rather than cassia flower)

 

Both are thick, creamy, of soft, slightly grainy texture, sweet and aromatic

at first contact, but with bite. I like them with all manner of white meat

and with salmon.

 

Giano

 

 

Date: Sun, 13 Nov 2005 13:19:50 -0500

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Mustards was Curye on Inglysch

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

mollirose at bellsouth.net wrote: snipped

> Mustard...I want to know more about mustard.

> <Runs off to read mustard-msg - 9/30/01- Mustard seed in period.  

> sauces.

> Molli Rose

 

Lest we forget--

 

   Making Medieval-Style Mustards

 

a class in the Society for Creative Anachronism by Jadwiga Zajaczkowa

http://gallowglass.org/jadwiga/herbs/Mustards.html

 

and

 

   Making Mustard The Medieval Way

 

An activity for youth by Jadwiga Zajaczkowa/Jennifer Heise

http://gallowglass.org/jadwiga/herbs/pagemustard.html

 

A number of Mistress Jadwiga's papers are up at:

http://gallowglass.org/jadwiga/herbs/herbs.html

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Sun, 30 Jul 2006 19:31:02 +0200

From: Volker Bach <carlton_bach at yahoo.de>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Cooking contest

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Am Sonntag, 30. Juli 2006 09:34 schrieb Stefan li Rous:

> Giano complained:

 

> <<< I entered an 'instant' mustard sauce and the

> translation of a German medieval cookbook with recipe redactions. The

> mustard

> sauce won the competition (it took a few hours to make and required no

> particular abilities). My feedback consisted of 'tasty', 'cool idea'

> and 'I didn't know they had instant food then'. >>>

> Oh? Interesting. This was the dried mustard balls which could be

> carried on travels and then added to liquid and mixed up and used?

> I'd be interested in your docs for the Florilegium or perhaps an

> article on this or other instant or travel foods.

 

I've been working on 'travel foods' since forever, but not getting  

Anywhere close enough to write anything. But this one I've got:

 

Instant Cassia Mustard

 

The Sources

 

?Czuo ainem gouten senff nem senffs?men und d?rr den suber und sto? inn denn

In ainem morser gar klain und czuich in denno durch ain enges tuoch [probable

lacuna] czinmit pluot und tu es under den senff und ruerr es mit honig under

ain anders, recht als der wachs bertt undu wenn du wilt, so niem des selben

enwenig und rib es mit win; so haustu gouten czarten senff?

 

?For good mustard take mustard seed and dry it clean. Grind it very finely in

a mortar and pass it through a fine cloth. [Grind?] cinnamon flower, add it

to the mustard and stir it together with honey, just like wax. And whenever

you want, take a little of this and rub it with wine; thus you have good

gentle mustard?

 

Cgm 384 I #12 (second half 15th cent.)

 

?Item zu guetem seniff Nym seniff samen, und seuber in und st?? in schon und

reib in durch ain tuoch das enng sey, und sto? zimen pl?e misch dar under und

den seniff zwier mit hoenig samen unnder einander recht als ein muoss, und

wenn du in wild machen, So nym ein wenig und twier in mit wein So hastu ainen

guotn seniff?

 

?Also for good mustard take mustard seed and clean and grind it well. Pass it

through a fine cloth. Grind cinnamon flower , mix it in and then mix the

mustard twice (with twice the amount?) with honey, like porridge.  When you

wish to make some,  take a little and mix it with with wine. Thus you will

have good mustard?

 

Meister Hans #12 (1460)

 

 

The Reichenauer Kochbuch #99 parallels this recipe, but adds instructions to

dry the result.

 

Redaction

 

This recipe is attested in the south German tradition of the 15th century, but

to my knowledge nowhere else. It is an interesting condiment for several

reasons. Firstly it would be fitting for most tables from royal court to

bourgeois fare and available through most of the year, making it a good

choice for many personas. Secondly, it has an interesting sweet-hot, richly

spicy flavor with east Asian overtones. Thirdly, and most importantly, it is

easily transported to events (little danger of spilling or staining),

quickly prepared at need, and exotic enough to lend ?period-cred? to many a

mundane lunch. ?Cinnamon flower? is actually the flower bud of cassia, not

cinnamon, and is (sometimes) available under the designations ?Zimtbl? te? (in

Germany, where it was in common use until about 1920), ?Cassia Buds? and

?Guiding? (in Chinese shops).

 

Take powdered yellow mustard seed (or grind your own, but it must be very

fine) and add ground cassia buds (a pinch per tablespoon). Mix well.  Then add

roughly one part liquid honey to one part powder and mix (the result should

be sticky and very hard to stir). It helps to use honey that has been

liquefied by warming. Allow to dry and harden a little (you can dry it in the

oven at a gentle heat, but be sure not to let it get browned). Store in a jar

until needed, then take out the desired amount with a spoon and mix it with

white wine to taste (I prefer a thick paste, but you can add more wine until

you have a thin, liquid sauce). Let stand for 20-40 minutes before serving to

allow the taste to develop.

 

Giano

 

 

Date: Tue, 11 Sep 2007 12:32:33 -0500

From: Anne-Marie Rousseau <dailleurs at liripipe.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Final thoughts from my Laurel's Prize Tourney

        entry

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>,   "Elaine

        Koogler" <kiridono at gmail.com>

 

I frequently make the le menagier mustard as well...its dang tasty!  

and I dont add much sugar at all, so its more a gentle spicing.

 

red wine vinegar

poudre forte

sugar

mix of yellow and black mustard seeds

 

let vinegar and seeds soak overnight (or longer). yo may need to top  

off the vinegar, keeping seeds

submerged but not floating

 

whiz in your cuisinart, add spices

 

I hot pack can mine and give it as gifts :) but be sure to keep some  

out for yourself. it keeps

forever on the shelf (if canned properly) or in the fridge (if opened)

 

--AM

 

On Tue Sep 11 11:49 , "Elaine Koogler" sent:

 

> How about sharing the recipe you came up with for this?  I have made the red

> mustard from Platina, but haven't tried this one and it sounds like another

> really great sweet mustard.  Do you think it might work with  

> Splenda rather than sugar?

> Kiri

> On 9/11/07, Michael Gunter countgunthar at hotmail.com> wrote:

>> I made mustard from Le Menaigier de Paris where the seeds

>> are soaked in red wine vinegar overnight and then ground and

>> strained. After that I added nutmeg, mace, cinnamon & sugar.

>> After sitting for nearly 3 weeks it was wonderful stuff.

 

 

Date: Tue, 11 Sep 2007 13:09:00 -0500

From: "Michael Gunter" <countgunthar at hotmail.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Mustard

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

 

> How about sharing the recipe you came up with for this?  I have made the

> red mustard from Platina, but haven't tried this one and it sounds like  

> another really great sweet mustard.  Do you think it might work with  

> Splenda rather than sugar?

> Kiri

 

It's actually very simple.

 

Item, if you would make mustard in the country in haste, bray mustard seed

in a mortar & moisten it with vinegar & run it through the strainer & if you

would prepare it at once, set it in a pot before the fire. Item, if you

would make good mustard & at leisure, set the mustard seed to soak for a

night in good vinegar, then grind it in a mill & then moisten it little by

little with vinegar; & if you have any spices left over from jelly, clarry,

hippocras or sauce, let them be ground with it & afterwards prepare it.

 

I just took some brown mustard seed and soaked it in red wine vinegar

overnight. The next day I ground the seeds (a mortar and coffee grinder produced

nearly identical results).  Vinegar was added until the correct consistency was

achieved. The result was a bit too lumpy for my taste so I scrapped the mass

through a strainer which removed the husks but still produced a fairly lumpy

mustard so it had a nice texture when bitten into. I checked out a recipe for

hippocras and looked in my cabinet for spices. Basically use what you have.

I used nutmeg, cinnamon, mace and sugar and then put it in a little earthenware

pot covered with wax paper and let it sit for almost three weeks.  Every once

in a while I'd give it a little stir but that is it.

 

I'm not sure if it would work with Splenda. But experimentation is what we

are all about.

 

Gunthar

 

 

Date: Tue, 11 Sep 2007 13:13:56 -0500

From: "Michael Gunter" <countgunthar at hotmail.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Mustard

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

 

> I frequently make the le menagier mustard as well...its dang tasty!  

> and I dont add much sugar at all, so its more a gentle spicing.

 

Several of the tasters liked that the first thing you got when

trying it was vinegar and then the heat of the mustard and

afterwards there was this glow of the spices.

 

> red wine vinegar

> poudre forte

> sugar

> mix of yellow and black mustard seeds

 

You know, I didn't even think of poudre fort!

 

> let vinegar and seeds soak overnight (or longer). yo may need to

> top off the vinegar, keeping seeds submerged but not floating

 

I just kept mine moistened with the vinegar.

 

> whiz in your cuisinart, add spices

 

> I hot pack can mine and give it as gifts :) but be sure to keep some out

> for yourself. it keeps forever on the shelf (if canned properly) or  

> in the fridge (if opened)

 

I just left mine in a crock and sealed with Cling & Seal and had

no problems with it going bad.

 

> --AM

 

Gunthar

 

 

Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2007 14:58:50 -0700

From: aeduin <aeduin at roadrunner.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] recipe write-up

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

I just updated my website with a write-up of the Balled Mustard for

Trips recipe in "The Neapolitan Collection" by Terrence Scully.  I

did it as a demo for Caid's Festival of the Rose (A&S event).

 

www.housemorien.org/cooking/mustardfortrips.htm is my step by step  

progression

 

http://www.housemorien.org/cooking/mustard%20writeup.html is the

write up with conclusions.

 

aeduin

 

 

Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2007 20:13:58 -0400

From: "Elaine Koogler" <kiridono at gmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] recipe write-up

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

It looks really great.  It also sounds a lot like the Reddish Mustard from

Platina that I've done several times...the sweet spices, raisins and the use

of verjuice and/or must.  The first time I made it, I didn't have either, so

substituted white wine mixed with a little white wine vinegar and, IIRC,

some red wine for the must.  The last couple of times, I've been able to

acquire both.  I found that if I served the mustard immediately, as the

recipe actually suggests, it is VERY sharp...almost unpleasant.  But if I

put it in a crock and allow it to age, it takes on a really wonderful,

smooth flavor.

 

Kiri

 

> I just updated my website with a write-up of the Balled Mustard for

> Trips recipe in "The Neapolitan Collection" by Terrence Scully.  I

> did it as a demo for Caid's Festival of the Rose (A&S event).

> www.housemorien.org/cooking/mustardfortrips.htm is my step by step

> progression

> http://www.housemorien.org/cooking/mustard%20writeup.html  is the

> write up with conclusions.

> aeduin

 

 

Date: Thu, 22 Nov 2007 13:49:39 -0600

From: Michael Gunter <countgunthar at hotmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] mustard

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

> If it's that good, make the 20 cups and mail the extras to me ;-)

 

From my LPT notes:

 

Mustard

Moustarde, Le Menaigier de Paris (1393)

Translation by Janet Hinson

 

Item, if you would make mustard in the country in haste, bray mustard  

seed in a mortar & moisten it with vinegar & run it through the  

strainer & if you would prepare it at once, set it in a pot before  

the fire. Item, if you would make good mustard & at leisure, set the  

mustard seed to soak for a night in good vinegar, then grind it in a  

mill & then moisten it little by little with vinegar; & if you have  

any spices left over from jelly, clarry, hippocras or sauce, let them  

be ground with it & afterwards prepare it.

 

This is a pretty straightforward recipe.  Since I had a few weeks  

before the mustard was to be served I decided to ?make good mustard  

at my leisure? and soaked the seeds in a good red wine vinegar  

overnight.

 

The next morning I took the seeds and ground them in my marble mortar  

and pestle.  This is rather hard work and slow going when using  

rather smallish mortar, so the other half I tossed into my electric  

coffee grinder and let spin.  Although it is a horrid mundanity, the  

grinder produced virtually identical results.  To add flavor, I took  

the advice of the recipe and added some sweet spices.  I ground whole  

nutmeg, whole mace, cinnamon and some sugar together since all of  

these are common in hippocras and sauce recipes of the time.  I  

ground the rest of the sodden mustard seeds with the spices to a  

thick paste.  More red wine vinegar was added until the correct  

consistency was achieved.

 

I didn't care for the husks of the seeds so I took the aromatic mass  

and placed it in a sieve above a bowl.  A spatula was used to force  

the mustard through the sieve and the result was a much smoother  

mustard in the bowl and a lot of mangled husks in the sieve. The  

final quantity was about half of the amount before the sieving but it  

was just enough to fill my ?mustard pot?.

 

The mustard was rather harsh with a bitter aftertaste but not as hot  

as I expected. It also isn't as vinegary as I thought it would be.  

After two weeks stored in an earthenware jar and covered with wax  

paper it had mellowed appreciably.  The mustard has a nice bite and  

also a complex flavor of the spices as well as a touch of sweetness.  

This is a perfect mustard to be served with the sausages.

 

 

Date: Thu, 22 Nov 2007 14:08:07 -0600

From: Michael Gunter <countgunthar at hotmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] mustard

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

> You ran soaked (damp) mustard seed through a coffee grinder? Does  

> that work?????????

 

It does, more or less. You can get a pretty good grind and it came out about

the same as using the mortar and pestle. But it was still pretty full of hulls

so I took the completed mustard and scraped it through a screen which produced

a very nice thick paste.

 

> Hand grinding just isn't my cup of tea,

 

Considering I don't have a proper Medieval, gallon-sized mortar I'll be using

my grinder but this time I will probably try a batch ground first and then soaked in vinegar. After an overnight soaking I'll add the other ingredients  

and then jar the results for a month of mellowing.

 

> and I haven't found a mechanical thingie yet that does an adequate  

> job.

 

The coffee grinder is great, but if you pre-soak the seeds make sure you give

the grinder frequent rests so you don't burn out the motor.> Maggie

 

Gunthar

 

 

Date: Thu, 22 Nov 2007 21:50:26 -0700

From: "S CLEMENGER" <sclemenger at msn.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] mustard

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

I use my food processor.  Works like a charm.

--Maire, frequent maker of quantities and mathoms of mustard

 

<<< You ran soaked (damp) mustard seed through a coffee grinder? Does  

that work?????????

 

   That whole grinding concept has been my stumbling block to trying

   more/better/fun combinations of mustard and other liquids. Hand grinding

   just isn't my cup of tea, and I haven't found a mechanical thingie yet that

   does an adequate job. >>>

 

 

Date: Thu, 22 Nov 2007 21:04:30 -0800

From: "Maggie MacD." <maggie5 at cox.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] mustard

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

At 08:50 PM 11/22/2007,S CLEMENGER said something like:

> I use my food processor.  Works like a charm.

> --Maire, frequent maker of quantities and mathoms of mustard

 

I tried using the food processor, it just didn't grind it enough. I got a

lot of bruised seeds, and lots of seeds that simply glared and refuse to

break. It was very frustrating.

 

Maggie

 

 

Date: Fri, 23 Nov 2007 03:31:26 -0500

From: ranvaig at columbus.rr.com

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] mustard

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

> At 08:50 PM 11/22/2007,S CLEMENGER said something like:

>> I use my food processor.  Works like a charm.

>> --Maire, frequent maker of quantities and mathoms of mustard

> I tried using the food processor, it just didn't grind it enough. I got a

> lot of bruised seeds, and lots of seeds that simply glared and refuse to

> break. It was very frustrating.

 

I use my food processor too, but I soak the seeds in vinegar  

overnight first.

 

Ranvaig

 

 

Date: Fri, 23 Nov 2007 07:50:02 -0500

From: "Elaine Koogler" <kiridono at gmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] mustard

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

I use my blender, but put a little of the liquid that I use in the

mustard in the blender with it.  But soaking the seeds overnight

should work as well.

 

Kiri

 

 

Date: Fri, 23 Nov 2007 19:08:40 -0500

From: "Cassandra Baldassano" <euriol at ptd.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Mustard - Can you cut it?

To: "'Cooks within the SCA'" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

I've been playing with three different mortar & pestles over the last couple

of years (marble, stone, unglazed porcelain). When I teach my sauces class,

I have a bit of mustard seed in each type. I find the best result is to

start grinding the mustard seed with the stone mortar & pestle, then finish

it off in the unglazed porcelain to provide the finer grind.

 

Euriol

 

Euriol of Lothian, OP

Minister of Arts & Sciences, Barony of Endless Hills

Clerk, Order of the Pelican, Kingdom of ?thelmearc

 

 

Date: Sat, 24 Nov 2007 13:30:06 -0500

From: "Elaine Koogler" <kiridono at gmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] mustard

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Well, that's actually what I use, though I usually just put a little

of the liquid I'll be using to make the mustard in with it rather than

soaking the seeds.  However, I do get a somewhat grainy

mustard...which I happen to like.  But if I soaked them (which I may

try this time), they might produce a less grainy mustard.

 

Kiri

 

On Nov 24, 2007 12:51 PM, Caointiarn <caointiarn1 at bresnan.net> wrote:

>  How about using a blender for wet seeds? says the Mistress  

> reading over my shoulder . . . .

> Then I guess one could run the stuff thru a sieve for a smoother paste

> Caointiarn

 

 

Date: Sat, 24 Nov 2007 11:20:34 -0800

From: "Maggie MacD." <maggie5 at cox.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] mustard

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

At 09:51 AM 11/24/2007,Caointiarn said something like:

 

>  How about using a blender for wet seeds? says the Mistress  

> reading over my shoulder . . . .

> Then I guess one could run the stuff thru a sieve for a smoother paste

> Caointiarn

 

I've tried a blender, and a stick blender. The mustard just bounced around

merrily laughing at me.  There was some amount of crushed seeds after quite

a long while (LONG while).

 

So, yeh.

 

Maggie

 

 

Date: Sun, 25 Nov 2007 19:19:57 -0600 (CST)

From: jenne at fiedlerfamily.net

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Mustard seeds merrily laughing

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Maggie MacD wrote:

> I've tried a blender, and a stick blender. The mustard just bounced

> around merrily laughing at me.

 

I use either a mortar and pestle (if you have kids around, you can get a

lot of grinding done for free) or an electric coffee/spice grinder. I find

that the consistency is close enough to the mortar and pestle method for

my purposes.

--

-- Jenne Heise / Jadwiga Zajaczkowa

 

 

Date: Sun, 25 Nov 2007 19:25:56 -0600 (CST)

From: jenne at fiedlerfamily.net

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Mustard - Can you cut it?

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

>     We are not after Durham mustard, later Coleman's which began to be

> developed in 1720 by a  Mrs. Clements of Durham, England who discovered

> how to grind the seed in a flour mill to obtain the more flavor.

> Suey

 

J.O. Swahn in his _Lore of Spices_ (title from memory) suggests that the

process that was invented at that time was not a grinding process, but one

of bolting the mustard powder, that is, passing it through successively

finer screens to remove the outer hull of the mustard seed. I can find

that quotation for you if you like. I have found that sieving ground

mustard seed does make the texture more like that of dried English  

ground mustard.

--

-- Jenne Heise / Jadwiga Zajaczkowa

 

 

Date: Fri, 30 Nov 2007 11:01:44 -0600

From: Michael Gunter <countgunthar at hotmail.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Mustard results

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

I've made the gallon and a half of mustard needed for my feast.

I used the blender and it worked just fine. The main thing to

remember is that you need enough liquid to bind it all.

The texture is smooth but with enough grain to make it a proper

period mustard. No sieving was necessary.

 

It took a bit of experimentation but I did get the stuff pureed

to the correct texture.

 

So, the blender works great!

 

Gunthar

 

 

Date: Fri, 4 Jul 2008 15:12:32 -0500 (CDT)

From: "Pixel, Goddess and Queen" <pixel at hundred-acre-wood.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] English Food

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

On Fri, 4 Jul 2008, Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius wrote:

<<< Mustard is always good, and you can make it up weeks in advance (in fact you should, usually) and store it for when you need it. I think my favorite

period version is a simple semi-wholegrain, semi-coarse ground Lombardy honey

mustard -- mustard seeds, vinegar, white wine, salt, and honey. Kinda like

that coarse Dijon with honey? >>>

 

The pear mustard from Welserin has been a *huge* hit around here whenever

I've served it. Mustard made from hypocras spices is also pretty tasty

(and gosh, you have to make hypocras, too, to have the leftover spices!)

as is the Welserin pear mustard with added horseradish.

 

Margaret FitzWilliam

 

 

Date: Wed, 15 Oct 2008 06:51:20 -0600

From: "S CLEMENGER" <sclemenger at msn.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Canning/Largesse

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

The vinegar probably does preserve the mustard, but I can mine anyways (at

our altitude, 15 mins in a boiling water bath). It helps ensure against bad

buggy-do's, and it also seals the lids against leakage if they're being

transported.

 

--Maire

 

----- Original Message -----

From: "Mark S. Harris" <marksharris at austin.rr.com>

 

Gunthar commented:

 

<<< That's a cool idea. I'd love to hand out batches of

canned food or jellies as largesse. I'd personally

like to make a huge batch of spiced mustard

to hand out as gifts. I've been told that people have

gotten addicted to my mustards. >>>

 

Do you really need to can mustards? I thought the vinegar would

preserve them.

 

 

Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2008 22:20:17 -0600 (CST)

From: "Pixel, Goddess and Queen" <pixel at hundred-acre-wood.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Another mustardy question.

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

There's this mustard recipe in Rumpolt:

 

Max Rumpolt, Ein New Kochbuch

 

10. Seudt Birn in ssem Most / thu sie auauff ein saubers Bret/ vnd lakalt

warden / laden Most weiter siden / bier dick wirt / lain darnach kalt

warden / streichs mit braunem Senff durch / thu alsdenn die desotten Birn

darein / so wirt es gut vnnd wolgeschmack. Wiltu aber ein guten Senff

haben / so stoAnivnnd Coriander durcheinander / streichs durch mit braunen

Senffmehl / vnd ssen gesottenem Wein / so wirt es gut vnnd wolgeschmack.

 

10. Cook Pears in sweet cider syrup/ then put it off onto a clean Board /

and let it become cold / let the cider syrup continue to boil / until it

becomes thick / let it also become cold / press it through a sieve with

brown Mustard / then also put in the Pears / so it will be good and well

tasting. When you would have a good Mustard / so pound Anise and Coriander

altogether / press it through a sieve with brown Mustard flour / and sweet

boiled wine / so it will be good and well tasting.

******

 

My question is whether this is one mustard recipe or two, because it could

in theory be either.

 

Margaret FitzWilliam

Nordskogen

Northshield

 

 

Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 00:34:05 -0400

From: ranvaig at columbus.rr.com

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Another mustardy question.

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

<<< My question is whether this is one mustard recipe or two, because it could in theory be either. >>>

 

I think it is two recipes.  When I made it for my feast last year, I took the first recipe as a pear mustard, but looking at it again, I wonder if it should be pears in mustard sauce.

 

You translated "Most" as cider syrup, while I translated it as grape juice.  The dictionary says unfermented fruit juice, must (for wine), and that "Apfelmost" is cider.   I'm not sure which is more correct.

 

Ranvaig

 

Zugeh?rung 10. Seudt Birne in s?ssem Most / thu sie au? auf ein saubers Bret / und la? kalt werden / la? den Most weiter sideden / bi? er dick wirt / la? jn darnach kalt werden / streichs mit braunem Senf durch / thu alsdenn die gesottenen Birne darein / so wirt es gut und wohl geschmack. Wiltu aber ein guten Senf haben / so sto? Ani? und Coriander durcheinander / streichs durch mit braunem Senfmehl / und s?ssen gesottenem Wein / so wirt es gut und wohl geschmack.

 

10. Seethe pears in sweet grape juice/ take them out on a clean board/ and let cool/ let the juice boil/ until it is thick/ let it also get cold/ press through with brown mustard/ and put the boiled pears in it/ like this it is good and well tasting/ if you wish instead to have a good mustard/ you can crush anise and coriander together/ strain through with brown mustard powder/ and sweet boiled wine/ like this it will be good and well tasting.

 

 

Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2008 23:59:54 -0600

From: "Terry Decker" <t.d.decker at att.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Another mustardy question.

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

<<< You translated "Most" as cider syrup, while I translated it as grape juice.  The dictionary says unfermented fruit juice, must (for wine), and that

"Apfelmost" is cider.   I'm not sure which is more correct. >>>

 

Ranvaig

_______________________________________________

 

Ranvaig, I think you are correct in saying it is two recipes, one for pears

in a mustard spice syrup and the other for mustard.  I also think you are

correct in saying it calls for grape juice rather than cider.  I also note

that the first recipe calls for brown mustard while the second calls for

powdered brown mustard.  It occurs to me that the second recipe may be what

is referred to as Mostrich or French mustard.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2008 16:41:21 -0600

From: "Terry Decker" <t.d.decker at att.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Another mustardy question.

To: <grizly at mindspring.com>, "Cooks within the SCA"

        <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Interestingly enough, I presented mustards from 5 texts (4 German

sources and Libellius de arte coquinaria) and Rumpoldt was the only

one that called for Brown mustard. > > > > >

 

Now this begs another set of questions that I don't have answers for: Brown

as opposed to what? Yellow? Specifying brown seems logically to imply

another type.

 

Is this 'brown' a different species, or a different preparation/handling? (I

know there are several modern species available) Where and when was this

"brown" available first for use?  What made the brown more appropos for this

as opposed ot other preparations?  Was the original mustard all genenrically

called 'mustard' this brown, or some other kind . . . which came first,

basically.

 

niccolo difrancesco

-----------

 

Brown mustard is Brassica juncea.  Yellow mustard is actually white mustard,

B. alba, to which tumeric is commonly added. Black mustard is B. nigra.

Each of these plants has slightly differing chemical characteristics

producing different flavors.  For reference, Dijon mustard is a brown

mustard.

 

All of these mustards are of Eurasian origin and have been available in

Europe since Antiquity.

 

For more info, try Gernot Katzer's Spice Pages:

 

http://www.uni-graz.at/~katzer/engl/Bras_nig.html

 

http://www.uni-graz.at/~katzer/engl/Sina_alb.html

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Sun, 06 Jun 2010 13:43:48 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae at mac.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Meats to go with mustard

 

If you search through Early English Meals and Manners: The Boke of  

Keruynge (Boke of Keruynge is 1508)

which is online at:

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/24790/24790-h/keruyng.html

 

you'll find the traditional meats and dishes that require mustard,  

such as:

 

Seruyce. 1. Brawn, &c.  Fyrste sette ye forthe mustarde and brawne,

and

 

Take your knyfe in your hande, and cut brawne in ye dysshe as it  

lyeth, & laye it on your soueraynes trenchour, & se there be mustarde.

 

Here endeth ye keruynge of flesshe. And begynneth sauces for all maner  

of fowles.

 

Mustarde Mustard for beef; Verjuice for boiled chickens; Cawdrons for  

swans; is good with brawne, befe, chyne, bacon, & motton. Vergius is  

good to boyled chekyns and capon / swanne with cawdrons / rybbes of  

beef. befe with garlycke, mustarde, peper, vergyus; gynger sauce to  

lambe, pygge, & fawne / mustarde & suger to fesande, partryche, and  

conye Mustarde is good for salte herynge.

 

There are several more mentions. Summer sausage might work well. It  

doesn't need refrigeration.

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Mon, 07 Jun 2010 19:36:29 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae at mac.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Meats to go with Mustard....

 

Another way to more or less quickly search this would be

to go to medievalcookery.com and search under mustard.

 

http://www.medievalcookery.com/cgi/search.pl?term=mustard&;file=all

 

Then look for the interesting dishes that appeal to you from the list.

For example

Enseignements qui enseingnent a apareillier toutes manieres de viandes

(France, ca. 1300 - D. Myers, trans.)

The original source can be found at MedievalCookery.com

 

Fresh whiting with garlic, bread and mixed with verjuice of grain.  

Salted with mustard.

 

This one is somewhat strange--

 

This is an excerpt from The Good Housewife's Jewell

(England, 1596)

The original source can be found at Chef Phains - Free Cookbooks

 

To make a close Tarte of Cherries. Take out the stones, and laye them  

as whole as you can in a Charger, and put Mustard in synamon and  

ginger to them, and laye them in a Tarte whole, and close them, and  

let them stand three quarters of an houre in the Oven, then take a  

sirrope of Muscadine, and damask water and suger, and serve it.

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2011 17:01:01 -0500

From: "Terry Decker" <t.d.decker at att.net>

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Dijon Mustard?

 

My understanding is "Dijon mustard" refers to a specific recipe created in

1856 by Jean Naigeon.  It is a mustard from brown or black mustard seed made

originally with verjuice (rather than vinegar) and having the seed coats

sieved out.  Spices may be used to enhance the flavor, but no dyes,

stabilizers or fillers are permitted in true dijon.  Dijon mustard made with

wine, vinegar or some other acidic liquid are technically "Dijon style."

Naigeon's Dijon mustard shows up just a few years after the first mechanical

method of processing mustard seed.  It makes me wonder if "Dijon mustard"

wasn't a marketing ploy for commercial mustard production in Dijon.  Maille

and Grey Poupon, as commercial entities, both predate this recipe.

 

Bear

 

============

<<< What do you mean by Dijon mustard?

Do you mean did they eat mustard in France in period?

Or is there a specific recipe you are trying to re-create?

Eduardo >>>

 

Is Dijon mustard period? I am reading conflicting theories on it.

 

Am thinking of trying a recipe out but want it to be a period recipe.

Have tons of non-period recipe for mustards!

 

Gwyneth

 

 

Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2011 22:29:21 +0000

From: yaini0625 at yahoo.com

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Dijon Mustard?

 

When I went gluten free eons ago mustards were on the forbidden list. I had to do some deep research and found that mustard seeds are often processed with wheat. I will have to re-read my book to find out if it was for filler or to reduce the spicy flavor. It was later confirmed by Frenches and Dijon that this was true. Now, gluten free mustards are processed differently and use gf vinegars or wines.

 

Aelina

 

 

Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2011 20:28:05 -0500

From: "Terry Decker" <t.d.decker at att.net>

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Dijon Mustard?

 

It is a modification of an existing recipe done in the 19th Century.

Commercial mustard production in Dijon began in the mid-18th Century.  I

would suspect that commercial recipes were made from earlier recipes.  To

quote Martino (15th Century), "French Mustard.  It is merely thinned with

bitter or soddeen wine.  This is French mustard--for what it is worth."

 

Bear

 

<<< I haven making my own mustard for 4 years now. But I mostly make stone

ground not smooth and light mustards and thought to try a Dijon. But was

uncertain if Dijon mustard was period or not  or even if the name was added

to a mustard from an earlier time. A number of times I have seen mustard

recipes for period mustards or dishes use the term Dijon mustard and this

has puzzled me as to whether it was a mustard created in the mid 1800's or

a variation on an earlier mustard.

 

Gwyneth >>>

 

 

Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2011 08:48:00 -0500

From: "Terry Decker" <t.d.decker at att.net>

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Dijon Mustard?

 

From: "Drucilla Meany-Herbert" <bookshop at charter.net>

<<< So, what I am reading is that Dijon was originally based on a mustard

called French Mustard? Am I right? Now to find the recipe for that. >>>

 

Not quite.  Consider "Dijon mustard" a brand name based on Naigeon's recipe

of 1856 that has since gone generic.  Dijon mustard did not exist before

1856.  There are many mustard recipes that pre-date 1856 and the original

Dijon recipe is a modification of one of those recipes, exchanging verjuice

for vinegar.

 

Mustard comes in a variety of thicknesses.  Think of the difference between

a heavy stone ground mustard that must be spread and a thin yellow ballpark

mustard that can be poured.   According to Martino, French Mustard is a

thick mustard that has been thinned by adding poor quality wine creating an

inferior product that Martino apparently does not find worthy of the

name--mustard.  This is apparently a regional difference between France and

Italy in the 15th Century as to how they prepared mustard rather than any

specific recipe.

 

Under Nartino's definition, Dijon, or more correctly Dijon style, mustards

that are thinned with wine are "French mustard" rather than Dijon being

derivative from French Mustard.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2011 07:13:42 -0700

From: David Walddon <david at vastrepast.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Dijon Mustard?

 

> Eduardo do you have any favorite Italian mustard recipes you can recommend?

 

My favorite is the Basic Martino recipe.

The Mustard the color of Peacocks sounds fun and I have all the ingredients now (Saba and Sauders) but I have yet to try it.

 

I am working on a paper comparing the three mustards in all 7 Martino sources.

Will let you know when it is completed.

 

I am sure I will have something on my blog about the trials in the next week or two.

 

Eduardo

 

 

Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2011 07:26:25 -0700

From: "Anne-Marie Rousseau" <dailleurs at liripipe.com>

To: "'Cooks within the SCA'" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Dijon Mustard?

 

If the propaganda at the mustard museum in Dijon, France is to be believed,

they've been making mustard there for a thousand years. I would suggest that

the term dijon refers to a style, rather like champagne, or Buffalo wings ;)

refer to food items that started in one place and much later the term

started to be used to refer to a type rather than a specific terroire....

 

--Anne-Marie

 

 

Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2011 21:29:18 +0000

From: CHARLES POTTER <basiliusphocas at hotmail.com>

To: <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Dijon Mustard?

 

I have one from the Italian 1549 Banchetti/Libro Novo by Christoforo Messisbugo.  A sweet and spicy mustard, enjoy!

 

                                                 Master B

 

                               Mostarda

 

    Pigula a libra una di zuccaro chiarificato, di cannella pesta fina oncia una, di gengeuero oncia una, di garofani

oncia meza, di seneva pista oncia sei, et mescola insieme, e passa per lo setazzo, overo macina ogni cosa insieme

con macinella, e sera perfettissima, e non la volendo di zuccaro li porrai del mele.

 

   Take a pound (345g) of clear sugar water, a ounce (28.8g) of fine ground cinnamon (use true cinnamon not cassia), a ounce of ginger, half-ounce of cloves, six ounces of ground mustard, and mix together, and pass through a sieve, or grind everything together with a hand held grindstone, and it shall be perfect, and if you do not want it with sugar, you shall put honey.

 

 

Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2011 13:25:18 -0700

From: David Walddon <david at vastrepast.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Dijon Mustard?

 

<<< Eduardo, could you please send me a link to the recipe of Martino's for

mustard? If you have it. The Peacock sauce does sound interesting. >>>

 

I don't think there is an online version of Martino.

There might be of the 1598 Epulario which includes the three mustard recipes in Martino (Translated into English about 130 years after Martino's original).

 

Eduardo  

 

 

Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2011 19:36:39 -0700

From: David Walddon <david at vastrepast.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Dijon Mustard?

 

Has anyone made the below recipe?

I just tried it (with the honey not the zuccaro chiarificato).

The clove is OVERWHELMING all other spices (including the mustard).

The texture is pretty good (perhaps a bit thick) and the color is nice.

Master B is this your translation?

 

I have done a quick one of my own and there is not much room for interpretation.

The only thing I am still wondering about is the weight measurements.

I have Italian Weights and Measures (somewhere) I will head up and take a look.

As well as what is before and after this in terms of recipes as the mustard seed is not soaked (below) and I am wondering if it should be.

 

Eduardo

 

PS - I will put my redactions up on my blog (along with pictures) sometime tonight or tomorrow.

 

On Apr 29, 2011, at 2:29 PM, CHARLES POTTER wrote:

<<< I have one from the Italian 1549 Banchetti/Libro Novo by Christoforo Messisbugo.  A sweet and spicy mustard, enjoy!

 

                                               Master B

 

                                        Mostarda >>>

 

 

Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2011 21:59:30 -0500

From: "Terry Decker" <t.d.decker at att.net>

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Dijon Mustard?

 

Actually, you don't need to worry about the weights.  The recipe, by weight,

is 24 units sugar water, 2 units ground cinnamon, 2 units ginger, 1 unit

cloves, and 12 units ground mustard.  The gram weights shown suggest that

the translator is using the Roman pound of 12 ounces and are a hair off of

the actual weights.

 

Bear

 

<<< The only thing I am still wondering about is the weight measurements.

I have Italian Weights and Measures (somewhere) I will head up and take a

look.

 

Eduardo >>>

 

 

Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2011 20:37:47 -0700

From: David Walddon <david at vastrepast.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Messisbugo Mustard - Was Dijon Mustard

 

I found the Mustard recipe in my copy of Messisbugo (FYI it is not included in the Messisbugo selections in Arte Della Cucina where I looked first!)

 

There are no Mustard recipes before this one but there are instructions for Mostarda d'altra sorte (Mustard of other sorts) following the original recipe for Mostarda.

 

Also Master B it seems there is at least one (insignificant) transcription error in the below. It should be Piglia libra not Piglia a libra.

 

Eduardo

 

 

Date: Sun, 1 May 2011 20:45:35 +0930

From: "Claire Clarke" <angharad at adam.com.au>

To: <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: [Sca-cooks]  Messisbugo Mustard - Was Dijon Mustard

 

I am fine with that interpretation as long as the ounce to pound ratio is 12

to 1 at that time and place in Italy.

I used the 12/1 ratio for the redaction I just made up.

It is however REALLY clove dominate.

This might change with a bit of age (the mustard is likely to come out) or

maybe the sugar water (instead of honey) might release more mustard flavor.

 

Another question - Anyone know what why sugar water was chosen instead of

clarified sugar or clear sugar (see below Florio translations)?

Could it be melted sugar?

 

Any thoughts on this? I would translate it as "clarified sugar" if I was

translating it.

 

Eduardo

****************************************

I thought the same things as you looking at this recipe. That is, I would

translate it as 'clarified sugar' and the ratio of 50% clove to ginger made

my eyes water just to think of it. When I make gingerbread I usually use

maybe half a teaspoon of cloves to four or five teaspoons of ginger (if not

more) so no more than 10% cloves to ginger. I wonder if there is a

transcription error, or if period cloves had a very weak flavour?

 

Angharad

 

 

Date: Sun, 1 May 2011 18:29:30 +0000

From: CHARLES POTTER <basiliusphocas at hotmail.com>

To: <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Dijon Mustard?

 

<<< I have one from the Italian 1549 Banchetti/Libro Novo by Christoforo Messisbugo.

 

                                               Master B >>>

 

Are the pounds and ounces you are using from Italian Weights and measures?

What is clear sugar water? Or what do you suspect it is?

 

I am going to try this with the honey. Sounds delicious.

 

Eduardo

====================

 

I used Italian Weights And Measures From The Middle Ages To The Nineteenth Century by Ronald Edward Zupko and the weights I give are for Ferrara Italy in period.  I think the sugar water is say one cup of sugar to one cup of water which with modern sugar you just mix till it is clear, but in period they would have boiled the sugar and water and skimmed the scum from the top and when it was clear it was done.  For the recipe you would then use 345g of clear sugar water mixed with the spices.

 

                                               Master B

 

Date: Sun, 1 May 2011 18:53:13 +0000

From: CHARLES POTTER <basiliusphocas at hotmail.com>

To: <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Dijon Mustard?

 

Yes this my translation and I have made this in the past.  I do think that over time the mustard will come out more too fight back with the clove but I do admit that a half-ounce of cloves sounds too high and maybe Christoforo meant to say a quarter-ounce instead.  This would be much more consistant with other recipes in the Banchetti/Libro Novo.

 

                          Master B

 

<<< Has anyone made the below recipe?

I just tried it (with the honey not the zuccaro chiarificato).

The clove is OVERWHELMING all other spices (including the mustard).

The texture is pretty good (perhaps a bit thick) and the color is nice.

 

Master B is this your translation?

 

I have done a quick one of my own and there is not much room for interpretation.

The only thing I am still wondering about is the weight measurements.

I have Italian Weights and Measures (somewhere) I will head up and take a look.

As well as what is before and after this in terms of recipes as the mustard seed is not soaked (below) and I am wondering if it should be.

 

Eduardo >>>

 

 

Date: Sun, 1 May 2011 23:16:47 -0700

From: David Walddon <david at vastrepast.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Messisbugo Mustard Re: Dijon Mustard?

 

Thanks for the confirmation on the weights.

Have you looked at other editions or versions of Messisbugo?

I only have access to the Arte Della Cucina transcription (mustard not included) and the Forni edition. There seems to be several other editions and it would be good to check the clove level in the other editions.

When you say that a quarter ounce is much more consistent with other recipes do you mean in relation to other spices in other sauces? It would be interesting to do an analysis of those recipes that have weights and cloves in them to make this determination.

The large amount of cloves is actually quite interesting. Almost red pepper like with the mustard and ginger.

I am interested in seeing how it ages.

 

Eduardo

 

On May 1, 2011, at 11:53 AM, CHARLES POTTER wrote:

<<< Yes this my translation and I have made this in the past.  I do think that over time the mustard will come out more too fight back with the clove but I do admit that a half-ounce of cloves sounds too high and maybe Christoforo meant to say a quarter-ounce instead. This would be much more consistant with other recipes in the Banchetti/Libro Novo.

 

                                                    Master B >>>

 

Date: Mon, 2 May 2011 12:32:39 -0700 (PDT)

From: wheezul at canby.com

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Dijon Mustard?

 

<<< Is this period? I am reading conflicting theories on it.

 

Am thinking of trying a recipe out but want it to be a period recipe. Have

tons of non-period recipe for mustards!

 

Gwyneth >>>

 

I thought to take a look at La Maison Rustique (1572) and the 1604 English

translation of it in The Countrie Farm.  There are references to mustards

from Dijon - although I don't know if it will answer your specific

questions.  I'll quote the English translation, but I will place in

brackets the additional information that is not in the French 1572

version.  I'm also modernizing the u/v's.  It seems from these entries

that the mustard of the Dijon region already had a reputation for quality.

 

For to make mustard, you must picke and cleanse your seed very well,

searce it, wash it in colde water, and after leave it a whole night in the

water, then take it out, and when you have wrung it or pressed it (as

neere as you can) dry with your hand, then put it in a new or verie cleane

mortar, and bray it with a peestle with strong vineger, and then after

that straine it.  [Some make a very pleasant mustard in this maner.  

Take two ounces of the see of Senme, halfe an ounce of cinamome, poune

them very small, and with hony and vineger make a paste, and of the paste

little loaves, which you shall dry in the sunne or oven : and when you

would use it, dissolve one or some of one of your loaves in verjuice or

vineger, or some other liquor.]

 

Some to take away the great sharpnesse that is in it, doe steepe the seed

in new wine, during vintage time, and them make it as we have sayd

already, after they put it in little barrels, such a mustard of Aniou is

woont to be put in.  The people of Dijon make it in small loaves, and when

they will use it they dissolve it in vineger. The mustard of Dijon hath

woon the praise from all other, either because of the seed growing there,

which is better than that of other countries, or by reason of the making

thereof, which the inhanbitants there doe perform more carefully than in

other places.

 

Katherine

 

 

Date: Tue, 03 May 2011 08:39:07 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae at mac.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Dijon Mustard?

 

Here are some dscriptions from EEBO.

 

The 1616 Maison rustique, or The countrey farme? says:

 

For to make Mustard, you must picke and cleanse your seed verie well,  

pearce it, wash it in cold water, and after leaue it a whole night in  

the water: then take it out, and when you haue wrung it or pressed it  

(as neere as you can) drie with your hand, then put it in a new or  

verie cleane Mortar, and bray it with a pestle with strong vine?ger,  

and then after that straine it. But the most ordinarie way for the  

making of your Mustard, is, onely to wash the seed verie cleane, then  

put it into your Mustard Quernes, and grind it either with strong  

vineger (which is the best) or with good Beere or Ale, or with Butter-

milke; onely the Beere will make it eat a little bitter whilest it is  

new, and the Butter-milke will die soone.

 

Some make a verie pleasant Mustard in this manner: Take two ounces of  

the seed of Senuie, halfe an ounce of Cinnamon, powne them verie  

small, and with honey and vineger make a paste, and of the paste  

little loaues, which you shall drie in the Sunne, or Ouen: and when  

you would vse it, dissolue one, or some of one, of your loaues in  

Veriuice or Vineger, or some other liquor. Some, to take away the  

great sharpnesse that is in it, doe steepe the seed in new Wine during  

Vintage time, and then make it as we haue said alreadie: after they  

put it in little Barrels, such as Mustard of Anion is wont to be put  

in. The people of Dijon make it in small loaues, and when they will  

vse it, they dissolue it in vineger. The Mustard of Dijon hath woon  

the praise from all other, either because of the seed growing there,  

which is better than that of other Countries, or by reason of the  

making thereof, which the inhabitants there doe performe more  

carefully than in other places.

-------

 

An itinerary vvritten by Fynes Moryson Gent. from 1617

mentions Moutarde (Mustard) de Dijon,

 

---------

The French gardiner instructing how to cultivate all sorts of fruit-

trees and herbs for the garden : together with directions to dry and  

conserve them in their natural from 1658 by

R. D. C. D. W. B. D. N., Evelyn, John, 1655-1699., Philocepos.

 

To make Mustard a la mode de Dijon, you shalf only take of this  

Codiniack and put to it store of Seneve or Mustard-seed well bruised  

in a mor?tar with water, & finely searced, and when it is exquisitely  

mixed toge?ther, quench therein some live coles, to extract all the  

bitternesse from the seed, then either barrel or pot it up, well  

closed, and reserved for use.

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Thu, 5 May 2011 18:15:07 -0700 (PDT)

From: wheezul at canby.com

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Dijon Mustard?

 

Thought I was done but found one more thing in Petit Traite' Contenant La

Maniere de faire toute confitures dated 1589 on how to make mustard of

Dijon:

 

Pour fair moutarde de Dijon.

 

Prenez pour un sols de moutarde

commune , & trois ou quatre petites

cueillieres d'argent de la raisin?e qui se

fait de raisins noirs en temps de vendan-

ges, ou bien du moust qui est du vin cuit ,

qui se fait aussi en mesme temps que

vous d?layerez bien avec vostredite

moutard , y adjo?tant un peu de pou-

dre de canelle battu? dans un mortier de

marbre avec un grain de bon musc.

 

Rough translation:

 

To make mustard of Dijon

 

Take for a grinding of common

mustard and three or four small

silver spoons of raisins that are made

of black grapes in grape harvest

time, or as well the must that comes from cooked wine,

and at the same time as you will dilute the said

mustard, therein add a little powder

of cinnamon beaten in a mortar of

marble with a grain of good musk.

 

There are probably further nuances to 'vin cuit' that I don't have time to

investigate at the moment, but thought at least add this to the

discussion.

 

It sounds awful good to me, but definitely not gray poupon-like somehow,

venturing an uneducated opinion.

 

Katherine

 

 

Date: Fri, 6 May 2011 06:27:26 +0000

From: yaini0625 at yahoo.com

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Gluten Free Dijon Mustard

 

Before there was gluten free mustard I made mine own. It was based on this recipe I found in Sarah Garland's Complete Book of Herbs and Spices An Illustrated Guide to Growing and using culinary, aromatic, cosmic and medicinal plants.

 

It is in this book I found the description for the use of flour in the preparation of English mustard, "dry English mustard is a combination of ground black and white mustard seed and a little wheat flour colored with turmeric. Mix it to a paste with cold water or vinegar 5 minutes before needed.".

 

Further on it talks about how French mustards, Dijon and Bordeaux and German mustards were mixed with vinegars. White vinegar is an area of caution for many who are on gluten free diets.

 

I did play around with these mixtures in the past substituting the vinegars with gf vinegars or wine.

 

The one that has been popular in my house comes from John Evelyn's Discource of Sallets written in 1699 (I think this is later period for many of us)

"Take the mustard seed and grind one and half pints of it with honey and Spanish oil (I used olive oil) and make it into a liquid sauce with vinegar" (I used cider vinegar or verjuice). I have served this with roast beast or with salmon.

I am not a huge tarragon fan but I didn't have dill one year for my salmon so I substituted tarragon. It was pretty good.

 

Aelina

 

 

Date: Sat, 7 May 2011 17:54:19 +0000

From: yaini0625 at yahoo.com

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Gluten Free Dijon Mustard

 

To answer Stefan's question to the tarragon. My apologies for the confusion. I made homemade mustard based on the recipe stated and added dill. I served it with smoked salmon. I had run out of dill for a second dish so I used tarragon instead. It was not part of the original recipe but a combination of two recipes for one dish.

 

As to use of turmic in the mustard I am not sure how old that use is in mustard. I know it has been uses as a clothing dye for centuries.

 

Aelina Vesterlundr aka the Saami

 

 

Date: Mon, 23 May 2011 12:58:23 -0700

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Fruit Mustard of Cremona

 

I am still looking through de Casteau, Ouverture

de la Cuisine - written circa 1585, published

1604 - for Cameline-like sauce - i have found one

so far. And i saw this. Perhaps this has been

posted to the list already, if so i don't recall.

It sure sounds delicious!

 

Pour faire moustarde de Cremone.

<<066>>

Prennez demye libure de pelleures

d'orenge confites en succre, demye libure

de poires de coing confites en succre

ou marmelade, & le tout haschez

bien ensemble bien menu: puis prennez

demye pinte de moustarde bien

espes, puis prennez succre fondu auec

eau de rose, & mettez dedans du tornesol,

& faites boullir auec pour donner

couleur bien rouge, & le laissez boullir

comme cirope, & meslez dedans ce que

vous auez hasch?, & meslez la moustarde

auec, mettez de la cirope assez, &

seruez dans des petits plats trois ou

quatre cueilliers pour mettre a table

auec le rosty.

 

To make mustard of Cremona.

Take half pound of orange

peels preserved in sugar, half pound

of quinces preserved in sugar

or marmelade*, & chop it all

[*Note: marmelade was generally of quinces at this time]

well together very fine: then take

half pint of quite thick

mustard, then take sugar melted with

rose water, & put in some <tornesol>**

[**Note: scholars are not quite certain what

turnsol is, but clearly it makes food reddish]

& boil with [it] to give

a very red color, & let it boil

like syrup, & mix therein that which

you have minced, & mix the mustard

with (it), put enough of the syrup, &

serve in some little dishes three or

four spoonfuls to put on the table

with the roast.

 

This is my initial rough translation, but i think it is clear enough.

 

Sure sounds delicious to me!

--

Urtatim [that's err-tah-TEEM]

the persona formerly known as Anahita

 

 

Date: Mon, 23 May 2011 13:44:18 -0700 (PDT)

From: Honour Horne-Jaruk <jarukcomp at yahoo.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Fruit Mustard of Cremona

 

-- On Mon, 5/23/11, lilinah at earthlink.net <lilinah at earthlink.net> wrote:

<<< I am still looking through de Casteau, Ouverture de la Cuisine - written

circa 1585, published 1604 - for Cameline-like sauce - i have found one

so far. And i saw this. Perhaps this has been posted to the list

already, if so i don't recall. It sure sounds delicious!

(much snipped)

?then take sugar melted with

rose water, & put in some <tornesol>**

[**Note: scholars are not quite certain what turnsol is, but clearly it makes food reddish] >>>

 

About turnesol:

According to

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turnsole

it was a common dyestuff, also used in food; you got blue, purple or red depending on acid/alkaline balance.

 

(Friend) Honour Horne-Jaruk, R.S.F.

Alizaundre de Brebeuf, C.O.L. S.C.A.- AKA Una the wisewoman, or That Pict

 

 

Date: Mon, 23 May 2011 16:39:03 -0500

From: "Terry Decker" <t.d.decker at att.net>

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Turnsole was Fruit Mustard of Cremona

 

Turnsole is a general reference to plants that turn to face the sun as it

progresses across the sky.  It also specifically refers to the dye extracted

from those plants.  The source of Medieval turnsole is most likely the juice

of  Crozophora tinctoria AKA dyer's crook carrier or dyer's litmus.  It is

also produced from the sap of Heliotorpium europaeum, but this plant is

poisonous.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2011 14:26:12 -0700

From: K C Francis <katiracook at hotmail.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Wine from Navarro

 

I like the verjus from Navarro.   It comes in wine bottles like their wine grape juices and it makes a very nice cold beverage when served with lots of ice.  I've tasted the mustard, nice, but nothing special.  OT, I am partial to the Barney Flats Oatmeal Stout Mustard ($8 last time I bought some) from Anderson Valley Brewing, which is located in Booneville just down the road from Philo and the Navarro Winery.  Recently made a trip to stock up at both places.  Just lucky they are in the neighborhood!

 

Katira

 

From: StefanliRous at austin.rr.com:

================================

Alys K. said:

<<< Should any of you be aficionados of Edelzwicker wine or

Pinot Grigio, Navarro Vineyards has a one-cent ground shipping "sale"

going on right now until July 31 or sold out. Details at

http://www.navarrowine.com/casespecials/ . Got some verjus that way and

it was thoroughly packed! >>>

 

Unfortunately, it looks like that 1 cent shipping sale is only good on

'cases' of wine or verjuice.

 

I thought I might want to try their verjuice and maybe their mustard,

but the shipping on a single bottle of verjuice is more than the cost

of the verjuice! And I don't think I could use a case of verjuice,

even if the special included the verjuice, which I'm not sure it does.

 

They say this about the mustard. Is this correct? I don't remember

any medieval recipes using verjuice, but I may not be remembering

correctly. It does sound like an interesting item to try. I can go

through a lot of mustard, though. $17 per jar could get expensive,

though. :-(

 

<<< The name mustard derives from the Latin words mustum (unfermented

grape juice) and ardens (burning or fiery). Navarro's Medieval mustard

is made in the ancient manner by mixing the hot seeds with the green

must of Verjus. Mustard seeds and green grapes for Verjus are both

harvested in late summer and have been blended for centuries. This is

a coarse, savory mustard that will mind you of the origins of the more

modern versions.

Contains: Mustard seed, Navarro Verjus (contains sulfites), water,

salt, spice.

 

$12.00. 8.5 oz. >>>

 

Stefan

 

<the end>



Formatting copyright © Mark S. Harris (THLord Stefan li Rous).
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