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green-sauces-msg – 2/5/12

 

Period green sauces. Sauces of green herbs.

 

NOTE: See also the files: sauces-msg, broths-msg, eggs-msg, camelne-sauce-msg, garlic-sauces-msg, vinegar-msg, verjuice-msg, garum-msg, mustard-msg, Mustard-art.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I  have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done  a limited amount  of  editing. Messages having to do  with separate topics  were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the  message IDs  were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make  no claims  as  to the accuracy  of  the information  given  by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time  and  efforts of  those who have written  these messages. The copyright status  of these messages  is  unclear  at this time. If information  is  published  from  these  messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

   Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                         Stefan at florilegium.org

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Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000 20:59:11 -0400

From: Elaine Koogler <ekoogler at chesapeake.net>

Subject: Re: SC - Food Attitude

 

There is a recipe in Scully's Early French Cookery for a Green Sage sauce that

is marvelous with chicken.  I'll try to find and and post it tomorrow.  I served

it last fall with chicken chunks for a luncheon and folks were spreading it on

bread/eating it with their fingers when the chicken was gone!

 

Kiri

 

 

Date: Wed, 04 Oct 2000 10:43:38 -0500

From: "Michael F. Gunter" <michael.gunter at fnc.fujitsu.com>

Subject: non-member submission - Re: SC - Period pesto recipe- Roman Moretaria-  LONG

 

> To get back to the original topic of discussion, there's a lot of

> evidence to suggest pesto is very old indeed.

 

Speaking of Pesto...

We tried to make a green sauce from _The Medieval Kitchen_ which is cited

as beign from Tractatus de modo preparandi et condiendi omnia cibaria:

"Here is how to make green sauce: take ginger, cinnamon, pepper, nutmeg,

cloves, parslety, and sage. First, grind the spices, then the herbs and

add a third of the sage and parsley and if you wish, two or three cloves

of garlic. Moisten with vinegar or verjuice. Note that to ever sauce and

condiment salt is added, and crumb of bread to thicken it."

 

What we got was a sort of thick pesto. The more vinegar we added, the less

we could taste the other ingredients. Redon, when redacting it, included

water, which we ended up trying, and we also tried adding olive oil. (I

know, I know, olive oil is farther from the intention than the water...)

 

But it was VERY thick, and adding more vinegar seemed not to be an option.

Suggestions?

 

 

Date: Wed, 4 Oct 2000 09:14:31 -0700

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

Subject: Re: non-member submission - Re: SC - Period pesto recipe- Roman Moretaria-   LONG

 

Not sure who sent this, as it was unsigned:

>Speaking of Pesto...

>We tried to make a green sauce from _The Medieval Kitchen_ which is cited

>as being from Tractatus de modo preparandi et condiendi omnia cibaria:

>"Here is how to make green sauce: take ginger, cinnamon, pepper, nutmeg,

>cloves, parslety, and sage. First, grind the spices, then the herbs and

>add a third of the sage and parsley and if you wish, two or three cloves

>of garlic. Moisten with vinegar or verjuice. Note that to ever sauce and

>condiment salt is added, and crumb of bread to thicken it."

>What we got was a sort of thick pesto. The more vinegar we added, the less

>we could taste the other ingredients. Redon, when redacting it, included

>water, which we ended up trying, and we also tried adding olive oil. (I

>know, I know, olive oil is farther from the intention than the water...)

>But it was VERY thick, and adding more vinegar seemed not to be an

>option.

>Suggestions?

 

Eat it thick, like modern mustard.

 

This is a sauce that was made at The Boar Hunt Feast last year and

served with Roast Chicken. It was very, very thick, almost, if you'll

excuse this analogy, like a dip. But, omuhgawd, it was delicious.

There was a lot leftover, so i took home a huge baggie full and

dipped anything i could think of into it, like tofu and cheese.

 

The cook hadn't used too much vinegar, so although it was tart and

tangy, it didn't have "pucker power", and the flavor of the herbs was

very clear.

 

While green and thick, I didn't even think of pesto when i was eating

it, although I can see why someone might.

 

Anahita al-shazhiyya

 

 

Date: Wed, 02 May 2001 11:49:25 -0400

From: Elaine Koogler <ekoogler at chesapeake.net>

Subject: Re: SC - What would you do?  or 2 months to freak out

 

OK...here 'tis:

 

Froide sauge--Cold Sage Sauce

Du fait de cuisine, #49,from Early French Cookery.

 

Et pour vous donner a  entendre comme vous feres la froide sauge si faictes que vous haies grant foison de percy, grant foison de salvy, et quiíilz soient bien deliez et laves et esgoutes et broyes tresbien, et si en broyes tant grant quantite quíelle soit bien verd; et quant ell