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camelne-sauce-msg - 7/25/11

 

Period sauces having cinnamon as a major component. Recipes.

 

NOTE: See also the files: cinnamon-msg, fruits-msg, broths-msg, sauces-msg, dairy-prod-msg, almond-milk-msg, vinegar-msg, verjuice-msg, garum-msg, mustard-msg, Mustard-art.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I  have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I  have done  a limited amount  of  editing. Messages having to do  with separate topics  were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the  message IDs  were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make  no claims  as  to the accuracy  of  the information  given  by the individual authors.

 

Please  respect the time  and  efforts of  those who have written  these messages. The  copyright status  of these messages  is unclear  at this time. If  information  is  published  from  these  messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

    Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                          Stefan at florilegium.org

************************************************************************

 

From: "James L. Matterer" <jmattere at weir.net>

Date: Tue, 29 Apr 1997 21:45:42 -0700

Subject: SC - Cameline Meat Brewet

 

Greetings,

   In response to Derdriu's & Willem's request for a posting of A

Cameline Meat Brewet, here it is.

 

   Looking over the recipe, I think it might be fun to substitute red

wine for the water in the Cameline Sauce. I've never tried it, but I

think I'll have to now that I've thought of it. If anyone makes this

dish, please let me know what you think!

 

Master Ian

 

<snip of brewet recipe>

 

Cameline Sauce

"Pound ginger, plenty of cinnamon, cardamon, mace, long pepper if you

wish, then squeeze out bread soaked in vinegar and strain it all

together and salt it just right." -  Le Viandier de Taillevent, from

Food in History, p. 219.

 

Unlike many sauces, this one is unboiled as per the description in Le

Viandier de Taillevent, p. 219: "Cameline sauce has cinnamon as its

predominant ingredient and is unboiled." Le Viandier also advises us

that not all sauces contained binding agents (p. 23-24). Bearing that in

mind, the bread crumbs have been left out of this version of the recipe.

 

1 c. each cider vinegar and water

1/2 tsp. cinnamon

1/4 tsp. each of ginger, cloves, mace, cardamon, pepper, and salt

Combine liquids, add spices and mix thoroughly with a wire whisk. Taste

for seasonings and adjust accordingly. Use immediately or refrigerate

for later use.

 

 

From: Stephen Bloch <sbloch at adl15.adelphi.edu>

Date: Thu, 8 May 1997 21:45:26 -0400 (EDT)

Subject: Re: SC - Cameline Meat Brewet

 

Ian writes:

> Unlike many sauces, this one is unboiled as per the description in Le

> Viandier de Taillevent, p. 219: "Cameline sauce has cinnamon as its

> predominant ingredient and is unboiled." Le Viandier also advises us

> that not all sauces contained binding agents (p. 23-24). Bearing that in

> mind, the bread crumbs have been left out of this version of the recipe.

 

Perhaps in Viandier, but for the Catalan feast we served three months

ago we used a cooked, breadcrumb-thickened "salsa camelina" based on a

mixture of beef broth and pomegranate juice!  It was deliciously

different.

                                      mar-Joshua ibn-Eleazar ha-Shalib

                                                 Stephen Bloch

                                           sbloch at panther.adelphi.edu

                                      http://www.adelphi.edu/~sbloch/

                                        Math/CS Dept, Adelphi University

 

 

From: Stephen Bloch <sbloch at adl15.adelphi.edu>

Date: Fri, 9 May 1997 19:43:13 -0400 (EDT)

Subject: Re: SC - Cameline Sauce

 

Lasairfhiona writes:

> Could I possibly beg that recipe from you? I have a couple quarts of

> pomegranate juice, and no idea what to make of it (aside from wine, but that

> would be too easy...)

 

The recipe is #109 in _Libre del Coch_.  Here's our translation:

 

109 Cameline Sauce

Take two or three pomegranates and strain them all through a piece of

clean linen.  And when they are strained, press them well in such

manner that the juice [hisca] well.  And afterwards take a bit of

toasted bread and soak it in the aforementioned juice.  And afterwards

take a good quantity of ground cinnamon and put it with the bread.  And

afterwards grind it well in a morter.  And when it is ground up, temper

it up with good broth and the juice of the aforementioned pomegranates

and vinegar which isn't too strong .  And after that it goes on the

fire to boil, stirring all the time, until it is thick, but put in the

pot before it boils a lump of fine sugar.  And it's done.

 

Our first redaction turned into Cameline Glue; the following has fewer

breadcrumbs, and works well in both flavor and texture.

 

1/4 cup breadcrumbs (from toasted whole wheat bread)

3/4 cup pomegranate juice

1/4 cup beef broth

2 T wine vinegar

1 T cinnamon

1 tsp white sugar

 

As I recall, we did this redaction, scaled up by a factor of ten or

so, alongside the roast beef in the feast.  We also served a "salsa

allipebrada", or garlic-and-pepper sauce, which actually I think had

been redacted years earlier from a French recipe entitled "sauce

aliper".

                                      mar-Joshua ibn-Eleazar ha-Shalib

                                                 Stephen Bloch

                                           sbloch at panther.adelphi.edu

                                      http://www.adelphi.edu/~sbloch/

                                        Math/CS Dept, Adelphi University

 

 

Date: Mon, 4 Aug 1997 13:55:11 -0400 (EDT)

From: Stephen Bloch <sbloch at adl15.adelphi.edu>

Subject: Re: SC - Re: Sauces and Humors

 

Lionardo Acquistapace wrote:

> ... I must say that a

> Camaline Sauce can be fairly varied in flavor based on the type of

> wine, verjuice, vinegar, etc. and the amounts of spices and such you

> use.

 

We were quite excited to find a cooked cameline sauce in one of the

medieval Catalan cookbooks that's based on pomegranate juice.  So I

walked around the corner to the kosher grocery, picked up a quart bottle

of pomegranate juice....  We served this with roast beef in a feast last

February, quite successfully.

 

                                      mar-Joshua ibn-Eleazar ha-Shalib

                                                 Stephen Bloch

                                           sbloch at panther.adelphi.edu

 

 

Date: Thu, 07 Oct 1999 21:31:39 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Sauce recipe for lamb shanks

 

"Artemis of St. Malachy" wrote:

> Thank you all for the recipe suggestions. If someone would like to post the

> recipe for the cameline sauce that would be great.

 

This is a nice version; it's the only one that seems to contain fruit;

the others are all, to some extent, like prepared mustard made with

cinnamon instead of mustard seed. For this reason, in spite of the fact

that this source (The Forme of Cury, ~1390 C.E.) is somewhat later than

the dates you specified, I thought this would be the best for your needs.

 

"149. Sawse camelyne. Take raysons of coraunce & kyrnels of notys &

crustes  of brede & powdour of gynger, clowes, flour of canel; bray it

wel togyder and do (th)erto salt. Temper it vp with vyneger, and serue

it forth."

 

Or, in other words,

 

Sauce cameline: Take dried currants and shelled nuts [probably walnuts,

maybe hazelnuts], crusts of bread, powdered ginger, powdered cloves, and

ground cinnamon, and pulverize it all together [in a mortar] and add

salt. Mix it til smooth with vinegar and serve.

 

I don't have a worked-out recipe with quantities and such, but I figure

approximately equal quantities of currants and nutmeats would be about

right, with about half as much of the heel of, say, a whole wheat loaf,

as of either the nuts or the currants. Cinnamon should definitely

predominate among the spices, with just touches of ginger and clove, and

a mild vinegar like malt, sherry or white wine vinegar to your own taste

and preferred consistency. Salt to taste. I wouldn't serve this

immediately, in spite of the recipe. I'd give it an hour or two at least

to sit before serving, and mix it well at the last minute before dishing

it up.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Fri, 08 Oct 1999 00:16:06 EDT

From: Korrin S DaArdain <korrin.daardain at juno.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Sauce recipe for lamb shanks

 

"Artemis of St. Malachy" <lek01 at uow.edu.au> writes:

>Thank you all for the recipe suggestions. If someone would like to

>post the recipe for the cameline sauce that would be great.

 

Enjoy

 

Korrin S. DaArdain

Kingdom of An Tir in the Society for Creative Anachronism.

Korrin.DaArdain at Juno.com

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

        Cameline Sauce (French, 14th c.)

        Goodman p. 286/25

        From Cariadoc's Miscellany, Copyright © by David Friedman, 1988,

1990, 1992.

        Note that at Tourney to make cameline they bray ginger, cinnamon

and saffron and half a nutmeg moistened with wine, then take it out of

the mortar; then have white bread crumbs, not toasted but moistened in

cold water and brayed in the mortar, moisten them with wine and strain

them, then boil all together and put in brown sugar last of all; and that

is winter cameline. And in summer they do the same but it is not boiled.

                Sweet   spicy   Sweet & spicy

        ginger  1 t     1 t     1 t

        cinnamon        1 t     1 t     1 t

        saffron medium pinch for all 3

        nutmeg  1 whole 1/2 whl 1/2 whle

        wine    2 T     1/2 c   1/2 c

        bread crumbs    3 T     2 T     2 T

        brown sugar     2 T     1 t     1 T

        cold water      2 c     1 c     1 c

        Grind smoothly until well ground, add bread crumbs, grind smooth,

add water and wine, bring it to a boil, simmer until thickened and add

the brown sugar.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

        Cameline Meat Brewet & Sauce

        From The Goodman of Paris. Posted by Master Huen / James L.

Matterer (jmattere at weir.net)

        This cold meat dish comes from a reference in The Goodman of

Paris, which lists a Parisian feast of 1393 where there was served "a

cameline meat brewet - pieces of meat in a thin cinnamon sauce." Although

it is not known exactly how this particular dish was prepared, this

recipe is an approximation of how such a meat brewet may have been

created. Curye on Inglish describes two cold brewets, one without meat

(p. 128) and one with (p. 129).

        2 lbs. beef, sliced into thin strips

        1 tsp. butter

        1 tsp. salt

        1/8 tsp. pepper

        Meat butter in pan, add meat and seasonings and saute until done.

Drain well and let cool. Place meat in a sealable container and add

Cameline Sauce to cover. Refrigerate for several days, agitating

container once a day. Remone from marinade and serve cold or at room

temperature. Serves 4 - 8.

        ------------------------------

        Cameline Sauce

        "Pound ginger, plenty of cinnamon, cardamon, mace, long pepper if

you wish, then squeeze out bread soaked in vinegar and strain it all

together and salt it just right." - Le Viandier de Taillevent, from Food

in History, p. 219.

        Unlike many sauces, this one is unboiled as per the description

in Le Viandier de Taillevent, p. 219: "Cameline sauce has cinnamon as its

predominant ingredient and is unboiled." Le Viandier also advises us that

not all sauces contained binding agents (p. 23-24). Bearing that in mind,

the bread crumbs have been left out of this version of the recipe.

        1 c. each cider vinegar and water

        1/2 tsp. cinnamon

        1/4 tsp. each of ginger, cloves, mace, cardamon, pepper, and salt

        Combine liquids, add spices and mix thoroughly with a wire whisk.

Taste for seasonings and adjust accordingly. Use immediately or

refrigerate for later use.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

 

Date: Fri, 8 Oct 1999 17:54:33 EDT

From: ChannonM at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - Sauce recipe for lamb shanks

 

I thought I'd peek my head in and offer a recipe from Le Menagier.

 

Cameline Sauce

 

In addition to mustard, cameline sauce is a common  recipe found in “Le

Viander de Taillevent”(1380), “Le Menagier de Paris”(1393), “The Forme of

Cury, A Roll of Ancient English Cookery (1390). This condiment is  used to

accompany  cooked meats and poultry and has a poignant taste reminiscent of

modern day “steak sauce”. The following is an exerp from “Le Menagier de

Taillevent”;

 

Note that at Tournay to make cameline they bray ginger, cinnamon and saffron

and half a nutmeg moistened with wine, then take it out of the mortar, then

have white breadcrumbs, not toasted but moistened them with wine strain them,

then boil all together and put brown sugar last of all and that  is winter

cameline. And in summer they do the same, but it is not boiled.

And in truth, to my taste, the winter sort is good but in (summer) that which

followeth is far better, bray a little ginger and a great deal of cinnamon,

then take it out and have toasted bread moistened, or  plenty of bread

raspings in vinegar, brayed and strained.

 

I have taken some liberty in combining two aspects of the above recipe.

Firstly, I have used the boiling method and use of wine of the first recipe,

and secondly I utilized the spice content of the latter recipe. I have also

canned the end product using modern methods, with excellent results.

 

In practice

1tsp ground ginger      2 tbsp verjuice or lemon juice

3tsp ground cinnamon        1 tbsp cider vinegar

1/3 cup white wine      1/4 cup white bread crumbs

3 tbsp brown sugar(packed)

 

Mix all ingredients. Strain the mixture through a fine seive, pressing down

with a spoon to extract as much of the liquid as possible. Boil the liquid

about 5 minutes. You can now can the sauce or use it immediately

 

Hauviette

 

 

Date: Sat, 9 Oct 1999 14:56:52 EDT

From: Elysant at aol.com

Subject: SC - Cameline Sauce

 

Several people have asked that I put the recipe for the Cameline Sauce that I

made at Pennsic on the list.  So here it is. :-) Sorry to be a "spoon tease"

;-).

 

The recipe was from Le Viandier de Taillevant, translation by Elizabeth Bennett.

It is to be found in Cariadoc's second volume of Medieval and Rennaissance

Cookbooks (Seventh Edition).

 

When I actually made the sauce, I was working straight from the text itself,

and did not have time to write anything down, so the amounts quoted in the

recipe below are as I remember them.  Also, please know that I was making an

amount of sauce for a small side dish, which perhaps would have been

sufficient for about 4 people in my estimation.

 

Elysant

 

"UNBOILED SAUCES AND HOW ONE MAKES THEM.

 

TO MAKE CAMELINE SAUCE.  Take ginger, cinnamon, and a lot of cloves, grains

of paradise, mastic, long pepper if you like; then soak bread in vinegar, and

take it out, and salt to taste."

 

Recipe

 

1/4 teaspoon ginger

1/4 teaspoon cinnamon

3/4 teaspoon cloves (whole)

1/2 teaspoon grains of paradise

1/4 teaspoon mastic

2 medium long peppers

1/4 cup fine breadcrumbs

1 cup red wine vinegar

salt to taste

 

Grind all spices with a mortar and pestle.  Empty the spices into a bowl, and

add the breadcrumbs and vinegar.  Stir.  Let the sauce mixture sit for about

5 minutes, then pour it  through a sieve into a second bowl, working the

bread/spice mixture as much as possible through the sieve with the back of a

spoon in a firm stroking motion (be sure to add the sieved mixture from the

underside of the sieve to the sauce in the bowl). To finish the recipe,

taste the sauce, and add salt as needed.

 

Notes:   - The fine breadcrumbs were prepared from a dried white bread loaf.

         - The finished sauce was added to Ras's recipe for diced Lamb's

               Testicles just before the dish was served.

 

 

Date: Tue, 12 Oct 1999 00:50:03 +0100

From: Thomas Gloning <Thomas.Gloning at germanistik.uni-giessen.de>

Subject: SC - Cameline sauce from the 'Vivendier'

 

Here is another recipe for cameline sauce from Terence Scully's edition

of the 'Vivendier', a 15th century French cookery text, edited from a

manuscript now in the Gesamthochschul-Bibliothek Kassel (publ. with

Prospect books, 1997; not the same as the 'Viandier'!).

 

"Pour faire une saulse cameline: prenez pain blancq harlé sur le greil,

sy le mettez temprer en vin rouge et vin aigre, passé parmy l'estamine,

canelle assez, et gingembre, clou, graine, macis, poivre long et saffren

un poy et sel; faictez boullir ou non boullir comme vouldrez; aucun y

mettent du chucquere." (Scully, Vivendier, 1997, p. 35).

 

'To make a Cameline Sauce. Get white bread toasted on the grill, set it

to temper in red wine and vinegar, and strain it, along with a good deal

of cinnamon, and ginger, cloves, grains of paradise, mace, long pepper

and a little saffron. Finish it off either boiled or not as you like.

Some people put sugar in it." (Translation T. Scully p. 35; follow some

comments).

 

If you need a 'redaction', look at Flandrin & Lambert, Fêtes gourmandes

au Moyen Âge, p. 94.

 

Thomas

 

 

Date: Mon, 11 Oct 1999 21:11:56 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Cameline sauce from the 'Vivendier'

 

Thomas Gloning wrote:

> "Pour faire une saulse cameline: prenez pain blancq harlé sur le greil,

> sy le mettez temprer en vin rouge et vin aigre, passé parmy l'estamine,

> canelle assez, et gingembre, clou, graine, macis, poivre long et saffren

> un poy et sel; faictez boullir ou non boullir comme vouldrez; aucun y

> mettent du chucquere." (Scully, Vivendier, 1997, p. 35).

> 'To make a Cameline Sauce. Get white bread toasted on the grill, set it

> to temper in red wine and vinegar, and strain it, along with a good deal

> of cinnamon, and ginger, cloves, grains of paradise, mace, long pepper

> and a little saffron. Finish it off either boiled or not as you like.

> Some people put sugar in it." (Translation T. Scully p. 35; follow some

> comments).

 

This recipe is actually fairly similar to the one in the earlier

Viandier, as previously posted. It's worth noting, however, that Scully,

in _his_ translation of le Viandier, notes the reference to mastic in

one of the manuscripts, and the several references to mace in the same

recipe in other manuscripts, and concludes, rightly or wrongly, that a

scribe misspelled or misread "macis" as "mastic". I'm not prepared to

say, "This is definitely how it is," but it seems fairly plausible that

mace is intended, rather than mastic.  Maybe the scribe was just really

a man, or lady, of taste, and decided that mastic would be better.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Tue, 12 Oct 1999 16:40:50 -0500

From: "Michael F. Gunter" <michael.gunter at fnc.fujitsu.com>

Subject: SC - Cameline Sauce from the Vivendier

 

Adamantius wrote:

<<< This recipe is actually fairly similar to the one in the earlier

Viandier, as previously posted. >>>

 

Thanks for pointing to this recipe. I missed that. The recipe, given in

the earlier post, seems to be a translation of #155 in the VAT- or the

BN-Version (the manuscripts now in the Biblioth_$BoR_(Jue Nationale and

the Vatican): 'Cameline Sauce. Pound ginger, plenty of cinnamon, cardamon,

mace [=BN], long pepper if you wish, then squeeze out bread soaked in

vinegar and strain it [=VAT] all together and salt it just right. (Le

Viandier de Taillevent, from Food in History, p. 219).'

 

<<< It's worth noting, however, that Scully, in _his_ translation of le

Viandier, notes the reference to mastic in one of the manuscripts, and

the several references to mace in the same recipe in other manuscripts,

>>> 

 

In case we are both speaking about #155: four of the five manuscripts

only have the passage with _macis/mastic_: three of them have _mastic_,

only one of them has _macis_: the manuscript in the BN. In the oldest

version, the Valais manuscript, this part of the recipe lacks.

 

<<< and concludes, rightly or wrongly, that a scribe misspelled or

misread "macis" as "mastic". >>>

 

The evidence indicating an error (and not the work of a gourmand), he

mentions, is, that the dictionaries show only medical uses of mastic,

that mastic is "extremely rare in mediaeval European cooking" (p. 220 n.

3), and that an error was easily possible because of many variant

spellings. Thus: "Its presence [i.e. of mastic] in the _Viandier_

remains doubtful". "Doubtful", this is a cautious conclusion. Anyway,

the translation has "mace".

 

Scully's notes point to several other recipes for a cameline sauce (e.g.

Harpestraeng, (J Magninus, Libre del coch). It is a

pleasure to work with such a rich edition!

 

Cheers,

Thomas

 

 

Date: Wed, 13 Oct 1999 07:19:36 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Cameline sauce from the 'Vivendier'

 

Stefan li Rous wrote:

> Adamantius notes:

> > Maybe the scribe was just really

> > a man, or lady, of taste, and decided that mastic would be better.

> Does this mean that you have tried the recipe both ways, with mastic,

> and with mace instead of mastic, and decided that you prefer the

> version with mastic?

 

No, I haven't tried it with mastic. I've tried it with mace, though,

I've eaten mastic in other foods, and suspect I'd prefer the version

with mace. I was joking, somewhat, and acknowledging that the sauce made

with mastic might be perfectly good. We have seen good evidence that it was.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Mon, 13 Nov 2000 15:20:10 -0500 (EST)

From: Jenne Heise <jenne at mail.browser.net>

Subject: Re: SC - Sauces

 

> >Any other sauces that anyone would recommend with pork? We'll be

> >roasting it with garlic and not much else - it was scrumptious last

> >year under a different Kitchen Steward, who's now out of the country.

 

When we ran the taste-test  for the sauces we used in the dayboard I just

did, we found that all the sauces were good with pork. However, the ones

we liked best with it were the green sauce, the Tournai cameline, the

black (pepper) sauce, and the black grape sauce (best of all! it has that

sweet/sour thing going).

 

Recipes and redactions follow.

- -------

Black Sauce: (3x)

<snip - See the file sauces-msg. - Stefan>

- -----

Black-Grape Sauce

<snip - See the file sauces-msg. - Stefan>

 

- ----

Tournai-style Cameline sauce (3x)

Original: "Cameline. Note that at Tournai, to make cameline they pound

ginger, cinnamon, saffron, and half a nutmeg, moistened with wine then

removed from the mortar, then take crumb of white bread, without grilling

it, soaked in cold water and pounded in the mortar, moisten with wine and

strain; then boil everything, and finish with brown sugar; this is a

winter cameline. (Le Menagier de Paris 230, translated in The Medieval

Kitchen, Redon et al.)"

    3 slice bread

    1 nutmeg

    24 threads saffron

    3 tsp ground ginger

    4 1/2 tsp cinnamon

    3 3/4 c. white wine

    3/4 c brown (turbinado) sugar

Grate your nutmeg into the mortar. Add cinnamon and saffron and grind

together with  ginger. Add the white wine. Strain, then bring to a boil

and add sugar. Cook until thin sauce consistency.

    

- ---

Tournai-style Cameline sauce (3x)

Original: "Cameline. Note that at Tournai, to make cameline they pound

ginger, cinnamon, saffron, and half a nutmeg, moistened with wine then

removed from the mortar, then take crumb of white bread, without grilling

it, soaked in cold water and pounded in the mortar, moisten with wine and

strain; then boil everything, and finish with brown sugar; this is a

winter cameline. (Le Menagier de Paris 230, translated in The Medieval

Kitchen, Redon et al.)"

    3 slice bread

    1 nutmeg

    24 threads saffron

    3 tsp ground ginger

    4 1/2 tsp cinnamon

    3 3/4 c. white wine

    3/4 c brown (turbinado) sugar

Grate your nutmeg into the mortar. Add cinnamon and saffron and grind

together with  ginger. Add the white wine. Strain, then bring to a boil

and add sugar. Cook until thin sauce consistency.

--

Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, mka Jennifer Heise       jenne at tulgey.browser.net

 

 

Date: Tue, 17 Apr 2001 19:22:07 -0400

From: "Robin Carroll-Mann" <rcmann4 at earthlink.net>

Subject: Re: Dansk kogebog A: haerrae salsae (was: SC - On topic)

 

On 17 Apr 01,, UlfR wrote:

> I recently got my hands on a (borrowed) copy of Veirups "Til taffel hos Kong

> Valdemar" (Systime A/S, Viborg, Denmark, 1994). This is supposedly the

> oldest surviving European cookbook (dated to 1300). Any comments?

>

> In particular I'm looking at the camelina recipie (though it calles it

> "hÊrrÊ salsÊ" -- "lords sauce" -- it is to my mind pretty clearly a

> camelina). Apart from the usual camelina spices (cloves, nutmeg, pepper,

> cinnamon, and ginger) it also has cardamons. Has anyone seen that in any

> other camelina recipie?

 

The Catalan "Libre de Sent Sovi" has a recipe, not for cameline sauce, but for "Polvora de Duch".  It contains 1/2 oz. cinnamon, 3/4 oz. ginger, and 1/4 oz. total of cloves, nutmeg, galingale, and cardamon.  This is mixed with a pound of sugar.  It is the only mention of cardamon in that cookbook.

 

Lady Brighid ni Chiarain

Settmour Swamp, East (NJ)

 

 

Date: Sun, 15 May 2011 12:26:41 -0700

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Saucy Thoughts

 

Because of questions on other SCA cooking lists, i began collecting

recipes for Cameline Sauces  and Green / Verte Sauces. So far i have

15 Cameline sauces and 15 Green/Verde/Vert sauces (a real favorite of

mine) plus 1 basil sauce and 2 sorrel sauces. The recipes are from

three centuries (14-16) and in English, French, Italian, Spanish...

and German green sauce.

 

However, i have not found a Cameline sauce in the German language,

perhaps only because of my bad German. Since cinnamon is used in

German language recipes, i thought there ought to be one, or at least

a Cameline analog.

 

Does anyone know of such a cinnamon based meat sauce in medieval German?

--

Urtatim [that's err-tah-TEEM]

the persona formerly known as Anahita

 

 

Date: Sun, 15 May 2011 13:27:10 -0700

From: "Daniel Myers" <dmyers at medievalcookery.com>

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Saucy Thoughts

 

-------- Original Message --------

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

Date: Sun, May 15, 2011 3:26 pm

 

However, i have not found a Cameline sauce in the German language,

perhaps only because of my bad German. Since cinnamon is used in

German language recipes, i thought there ought to be one, or at least

a Cameline analog.

 

Does anyone know of such a cinnamon based meat sauce in medieval German?

----------

 

I didn't find anything in the books I have access to.  Mind you, for

Germanic languages I need to rely on the translations of others.

 

The closest one I found was this Danish recipe:

 

XCII - A good sauce for steak (roast). Take finely chopped almond. Give

thereto grated simle and grate it fine and small together. Make it up

with wine and give to it ground cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg. Make it sweet

or sour as it suits yourself, and put it out with the roast.  [Koge Bog

(Denmark, 1616)]

 

- Doc

 

 

Date: Sun, 15 May 2011 18:06:21 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae at mac.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Saucy Thoughts

 

I suspect there are more English. We had 8 each in the Concordance.

Hieatt listed another each in her volume A Gathering. That would make 9

apiece.

 

Add in the 16th century and there's bound to be a maybe a few more.

 

Johnnae

 

On May 15, 2011, at 3:26 PM, lilinah at earthlink.net wrote:

<<< Because of questions on other SCA cooking lists, i began collecting  

recipes for Cameline Sauces  and Green / Verte Sauces. So far i have  

15 Cameline sauces and 15 Green/Verde/Vert sauces (a real favorite  

of mine) plus 1 basil sauce and 2 sorrel sauces. The recipes are  

from three centuries (14-16) and in English, French, Italian,  

Spanish... and German green sauce. >>>

 

 

Date: Sun, 15 May 2011 17:12:37 -0500

From: "Terry Decker" <t.d.decker at att.net>

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Saucy Thoughts

 

To my knowledge, which is not comprehensive, German sauce recipes tend to

use cinnamon and ginger in combination, thus not producing sauces that can

be clearly labeled cameline or jance.  If not used with ginger, cinnamon is

usually mixed with some combination of sugar, nutmeg, mace, cloves, or

cardamom.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Sun, 15 May 2011 20:12:55 -0700 (PDT)

From: Euriol of Lothian <euriol at yahoo.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Saucy Thoughts

 

This recipe comes from the Northern Cookery Book (which I believe one of the manuscripts was written in German)

 

Original Recipe:

Recip VI

Quomodo temperetur salsum

dominorum et quamdiu durat.

Man skal tak? g?rf?rs naghl?, oc

Muscat, cardemomum, pip?r, cinamomum th?t ?r kani?l, oc ingif?r, all? i?fn

w?ghn?, tho swa at kani?l ?r ?m myk?t sum all? hin? andr?; oc slyk tu stekt

br?th sum all? hin? andr?, oc st?t? them all? sam?, oc mal? m?th st?k ?dyk? oc

lat? I en l?gh?l. Th?t ?r h?rr? sals?, oc ?r goth et halft aar.

 

English Translation:

Recipe VI

How to prepare a sauce for the

lords and how long it lasts.

One takes cloves and nutmeg,

cardamon, pepper, cinnamon "that is canel" and ginger, all in equal amounts,

except that there should be as much canel as all the other spices; and add

twice as much toasted bread as of everything else, and grind them all together,

and blend with strong vinegar, and place it in a cask. This is a lordly sauce,

and it is good for half a year.

 

Grewe, Rudolf &

Constance B. Hieatt ed. trans. 2001. Libellus

de arte coquinaria: An Early Northern Cookery Book. Tempe, Arizona.

Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies.

 

Euriol

 

 

Date: Mon, 16 May 2011 15:17:12 -0700

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Saucy Thoughts

 

Euriol wrote:

<<< This recipe comes from the Northern Cookery Book (which I believe

one of the manuscripts was written in German)

 

Original Recipe:

Recip VI. Quomodo temperetur salsum dominorum et quamdiu durat. Man

skal tak? g?rf?rs naghl?, oc Muscat, cardemomum, pip?r, cinamomum

th?t ?r kani?l, oc ingif?r, all? i?fn w?ghn?, tho swa at kani?l ?r

?m myk?t sum all? hin? andr?; oc slyk tu stekt br?th sum all? hin?

andr?, oc st?t? them all? sam?, oc mal? m?th st?k ?dyk? oc lat? I en

l?gh?l. Th?t ?r h?rr? sals?, oc ?r goth et halft aar.

 

English Translation:

Recipe VI. How to prepare a sauce for the lords and how long it

lasts. One takes cloves and nutmeg, cardamon, pepper, cinnamon ?

that is canel ? and ginger, all in equal amounts, except that there

should be as much canel as all the other spices; and add twice as

much toasted bread as of everything else, and grind them all

together, and blend with strong vinegar, and place it in a cask.

This is a lordly sauce, and it is good for half a year.

 

Grewe, Rudolf & Constance B. Hieatt ed. trans. 2001. Libellus de

arte coquinaria: An Early Northern Cookery Book. Tempe, Arizona.

Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies. >>>

 

Thank you for this! I don't own this cookbook. Armed with recipe's

beginning, I found the original on Doc's site.

 

Since there are many special characters in the original, which did

not come through in the Digest, here is the recipe with the (?)

replaced with variations on the characters. I replaced the letter

"ash", which is ae joined, with a&e; and I used /o to replace o with

a slash through it, the letter "oo".

 

Recipe VI [K6]. Quomodo temperetur salsum dominorum et quamdiu durat.

Man skal takae g/orfaers naghlae, oc muscat, cardemomum, pipaer,

cinamomum thaet aer kaniael, oc ingifaer, allae iaefn waeghnae, tho

swa at kaniael aer ae, mykaet sum allae hinae andrae; oc slyk to

stekt br/oth sum allae hinae andrae, oc st/otae them allae samae, oc

malae maeth staerk aedykae oc latae i en laeghael. Thaet aer haerrae

salsae, oc aer goth et halft aar.

--

Urtatim [that's err-tah-TEEM]

the persona formerly known as Anahita

 

 

Date: Mon, 16 May 2011 15:34:18 -0700

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Saucy Thoughts

 

Eduardo wrote:

<<< If you post the list we might all be able to add to your list.

What is the criteria for the sauces? Does it have to be in the

title? Does it have to have certain components?

Let everyone know so we can crowd source (cook) your sauces >>>

 

I confess my "standards" are low... I mean loose... I mean

open-minded, but not so open that my brain will fall out:

 

I started looking for sauces with variations on the name Green Sauce

and Cameline. As I read sauce recipes, I noticed a number that had

pretty much the same ingredients as those with the explicit names,

but with different names or no specific name, e.g. the sauce for

roasts in the anonymous Tuscan.

 

Here are the Green and Cameline sauces and variations I have found so

far... still hunting...

 

---------------------

 

20 GREEN SAUCES and Variations

 

Medieval green sauces seem to me to be less comparable to modern

pesto (which includes cheese and nuts) and more comparable to modern

Argentine chimichurri sauce - which is made with parsley -- and

sometimes cilantro or oregano or basil -- olive oil, wine vinegar,

garlic, salt, pepper... and smoked paprika or dried chili powder.

 

<snip - see green-sauces-msg  -Stefan>

---------------------

 

15 CAMELINE SAUCES and Variations

 

Is this name *really* based on "camel", as seems to be the general

assumption? I wonder if perhaps it derived from "Caneline", i.e.,

based on canel/cannel, a word for cinnamon, the primary spice in most

recipes for this sauce, with a shift from "n" to "m".

 

(1) Tractatus de modo preparandi et condiendi omnia cibaria #394 -

France, early 14th c. - 11. Salsa camelina

(2) Le Viandier de Taillevent, 1380 [France] - 152. Cameline [Uncooked]

(3) The Forme of Cury, 1390 [Middle English] - 149. Sawse camelyne

(4) Le Menagier de Paris, 1393 [Northern France] - [Winter - cooked]

(5) ibid - - - - - [Summer - uncooked]

(6) Anonymous Tuscan cookbook, late 14th-early 15th C. [Italy] - [93]

Cenamata - Cinnamon sauce [Cooked]

(7) Anonymous Venetian cookbook, late 14th-early 15th C. [Venetian

region],IX. Carmeline sauce for capon [Cooked]

(8) ibid - - - - - LXVII. Perfect strong sauce [Uncooked]

(9) ibid - - - - - XCI. The best carmeline sauce [Uncooked]

(10) Vivendier, France, 15th c. [Cooked -or- Uncooked] -  a cameline sauce

(11) Libro de Arte Coquinaria, Maestro Martino of Como, Italy, 1470 -

[Uncooked] Sapor camellino

(12) The Neapolitan recipe collection, Italy, 15th c. (T. Scully,

trans.) - [Uncooked] Cameline Sauce

(13) Libre del Coch, Maestre Robert, in Catalan in 1520, and Libro de

Cozina, Ruperto de Nola, in Spanish in 1525. (Translated by Brighid

ni Chiarain) - Cameline Sauce [Cooked] (with pomegranates)

(14) ibid - - - - - White Cameline Sauce [Cooked] (with almond milk)

(15) ibid - - - - - Bastard Cameline Sauce [Cooked]

 

---------------------

I confess that i (a) started out using Doc's Medieval Cookery site

and (b) haven't fully plumbed the depths of Stefan's Florilegium,

although i dipped into it. I am certain there are more related

recipes. There are several cookbooks i haven't looked into, such as

Martino and 16th c. (and very early 17th c.) English cookbooks. And i

don't own *every* published source. So i am most appreciative of

pointers to additional recipes.

--

Urtatim [that's err-tah-TEEM]

the persona formerly known as Anahita

 

 

Date: Mon, 16 May 2011 17:56:49 -0600

From: James Prescott <prescotj at telusplanet.net>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Saucy Thoughts

 

Ouverture, 1604, has ten specific sauces which include cinnamon.

 

- for roasted cow's udder.

- for a veal subtlety.

- for dogfish pasties.

- for roasted sturgeon.

- for roasted dogfish.

- for tuna.

- for leg of mutton subtlety.

- for roasted calf's liver.

- for a veal subtlety.

- for duck.

 

I have not analyzed how many of these might reasonably be considered

to be versions of Cameline.

 

I hadn't previously realized quite how much cinnamon Casteau must

have used.  In 194 recipes the word 'cinnamon' appears 102 times!

 

Thorvald

 

<the end>



Formatting copyright © Mark S. Harris (THLord Stefan li Rous).
All other copyrights are property of the original article and message authors.

Comments to the Editor: stefan at florilegium.org