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Food of medieval Wales. Recipes.

 

NOTE: See also the files: Wales-msg, languages-msg, fd-Celts-msg, books-food-msg, England-msg, Roman-Wales-bib, Wales-lnks, lamb-mutton-msg, cl-Wales-msg.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

    Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                          Stefan at florilegium.org

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From: branwen at cerebus.ccc.amdahl.com (Karen Williams)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Welsh recipes

Date: 2 Apr 93 21:35:17 GMT

Organization: Amdahl Corporation, Sunnyvale CA

 

greg at silver.lcs.mit.edu (Hossein Ali Qomi (mka Gregory F. Rose)) writes:

>>his home. One time he held a Welsh bardic feast, where all the food was

>>made using Welsh recipes, and each guest was asked to bring a poem, song,

>>or story to share.

 

>Where, oh where did he get the Welsh recipes? Please?????

 

You'd have to ask him (John? oh, John?), but what I do when I want

Welsh recipes is use the Welsh mini-cookbook he brought me from Wales

(it's called something like "Recipes from the Bards," and is made up

of recipes of foods mentioned by Medieval Welsh bards), or, if none

of those are feasible for the moment, I use "The Little Book of Welsh

Recipes" (or whatever it's called; there's a whole series of "The Little

Book of ____ Recipes" out now) which has "traditional" Welsh recipes in

it.

 

Branwen ferch Emrys

The Mists, the West

 

 

From: nweders at mail.utexas.edu (ND Wederstrandt)

Date: Tue, 8 Jul 1997 08:34:09 -0500 (CDT)

Subject: SC - period welsh food

 

Concerning Welsh food (celtic)

 

This is from a little booklet I have called, "Food of the Bards" by Enid

Roberts,D.Brown & Sons,IMAGE Publishers, Cardiff, 1982.  This is actually

an overview of food in Welsh Poetry from 1350 - 1650.  The translations of

the Welsh poems are verly reliable and they have listed sections of poems

containing descriptions of foods and what was served. Since poets tended to

flatter people that could pay them, these are descriptions of upper middle

and nobility.

        They list venison from deer and roebuck, brawn (muscle meat from

boars and pigs), Bream ( a fish).  They ate(as of the 16th century) rabbits

(a lot), birds, bitterns, herons, swans, curlews (only nobles could eat

these) geese and fish.

Non meat items included white bread, frumenty, vegetables, oranges, apples,

walnuts, pears, pomegranites, wafers and sugar.  Drinks were mead and wine.

I included a few of the verses.

        "Fish, birds baked in bread,

        Pasties and well-mellowed wine.

                        Lewys Glyn Cothi, 15th cent.

"A sauce made of measures of gushing vinegar,

Strong chives, Pretty Nancy, parlsey, thyme,

Sorrel and dittany and raspberry leaves."

                        Ieuan ap Rhydderch, mid 15th cent

"Dishes of many vegetables,

Courses of many dishes, and white sugar."

                        Lewys Glyn Cothi, mid 15th cent

 

Clare

 

 

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 1997 08:24:11 -0800 (PST)

From: Russell Gilman-Hunt <conchobar at rocketmail.com>

Subject: SC - "first catch your peacock

 

Courtesy of Amazon.com:

Bobby Freeman has also wrote "Good Food From Wales",

and I presume it's not full of senseless blubbering.

 

Good Food from Wales

by Bobby Freeman

List: $24.95

Our Price: (this is not a commercial)

Availability: This title usually ships within 2-3 days.

Please note: we cannot guarantee delivery of this item by

December 24. Visit the Gift Center for books with 24-hour

availability.

 

Hardcover, 332 pages

Published by Hippocrene Books

Publication date: May 1, 1997

ISBN: 0781805279

 

 

Synopsis:

With over 260 recipes, this book is the definitive guide to Welsh food

and customs through the centuries. Introductory chapters trace the

evolution of important Welsh foodstuffs: cereals, cheese and butter,

poultry and eggs, meat, fish, and fruits, flowers, and vegetables.

Later chapters include recipes for traditional favorites like

Blackberry Bread Pudding, Welsh Salt Duck, and Trout with Bacon.

 

 

Date: Wed, 17 Mar 1999 19:20:47 -0500

From: snowfire at mail.snet.net

Subject: Re: SC - St. David's Day food

 

>Elysant, could I please have recipes for the Lamb Stew with leeks and

>Welshcakes?  Thanks, Leanna of Sparrowhaven

 

Certainly!  And thank you for asking!

 

The recipe for the Lamb stew is similar to the one I posted a few weeks ago

(for those list members who have that). That recipe was from a cookbook,

whereas the following recipe is how I was taught to make it. I've included

some common variations on serving the dish at the end.

 

                Cawl Cennin Cymraeg - Welsh Lamb Stew with Leeks

Ingredients

1 1/2 lbs neck of lamb

2 - 3 carrots, peeled and sliced

1/3 - 1/2 swede peeled and diced

2 - 3 parsnips peeled and diced

3 - potatoes, peeled and cut up into 1" by 1" pieces

2 leeks chopped into 1/2 inch slices

fresh parsley

salt and white pepper to taste

Tablespoon of butter to saute vegetables in

 

Note: Usually these days potatoes and swedes are added, which would make the

stew OOP.  Also, the ingredient amounts are estimated, as you go by your own

taste and judgement as to how much of everything you want to put in it.

 

Method

Put the neck of lamb pieces into a large pot of salted water.  Bring to the

boil and skim off the scum from the surface.  Saute the prepared swedes,

carrots, and parsnips in the butter in a saute pan, then add them to the pot.

Twenty minutes later add the potatoes.  Cook over a moderate heat until all

vegetables are tender.  Add more water if the level is going down. (The longer

you cook this the better it tastes - especially if you re-heat the left overs

for another meal later). :-)

 

10 minutes or so before the end of the cooking time, add the leeks. Add

seasoning to taste.  When the stew is done, remove the all the lamb and bones

from the pot, and while keeping the stew on a low heat, cut up the meat, and

discard the bones.

 

You can then either return the meat to the pot to serve, or you can keep it

to serve alongside the stew on a seperate plate (some people do that).

 

Just before you serve the stew, add some fresh parsley to the pot.

 

Some families also boil a few potatoes and serve the stew by first putting a

potato in the bottom of the dish, cutting it up, then pouring the stew over

the potato to serve.  This way is also common in Iceland.

 

Garnish the stew with more fresh parsley to serve.

 

Some families and high end restaurants add a swirl of cream to the pot with

the parsley, or to the dish before garnishing it with the parsley.

 

Here's the recipe for Welshcakes that I've been using of late.  I have 2 other

versions, one more fancy, but this is the most authentic.

 

                                Welsh Cakes

 

These quantities will make about 2 dozen Welshcakes.  If kept in an airtight

container, they can last for several weeks.

 

Ingredients

1/2 lb. self-raising flour

1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

1/4 lb margarine

1 egg

3 oz sugar

2 -3 oz sultanas (raisins)

 

Method

Rub margarine into flour.  Add sugar, mixed spice and sultanas.  Add beaten

eggs.  Combine to form a soft dough.  Roll out on a floured board to 1/4 inch

thickness and use 2 - 2 1/2 inch round pastry cutter. Cook cakes on greased

griddle-stone (griddle) until light golden brown on both sides.

 

Sprinkle with sugar to serve.

 

Understand that usually Welshcakes are more of a tea time or snack type food

than a dessert.  I think they're best with a hot cup of tea (with milk and

sugar in of course). :-)

 

Elysant

 

 

Date: Wed, 31 Mar 1999 20:55:23 -0500

From: snowfire at mail.snet.net

Subject: Re: SC - Recipes for "Teisen Lap"

 

Here are three recipes for the Welsh cake "Teisen Lap"  (not sure of English).

This is a traditional Welsh cake.

 

The three recipes are for the same cake, and although all are "rubbing in"

method dishes with similar ingredient lists, each version seems to vary somewhat

in the cooking method.

 

I wonder - are there other dishes that can be cooked by different methods and

yet be called the same thing like this?

 

Elysant

 

Teisen Lap (1)

 

1 lb flour

4 oz lard

4 oz margarine

2 heaped teaspoons baking powder

7 oz sugar

8 oz currants

3 eggs

a little nutmeg

 

Rub the fat into the flour and add the dry ingredients. Add the well-beaten

eggs and enough milk to have a soft mixture.  Bake in a moderate oven, using a

shallow tin (my mother cooks it on a greased ovenproof plate).  The cake is cut

into wedges when cool.

 

Teisen Lap (2)

1 lb flour

4 oz fat

4 oz brown sugar

4 oz mixed fruit

1/2 teaspoon of spice

1/2 teaspoon of bicarbonate of soda dissolved in milk)

1 egg

1/2 pint of buttermilk or sour milk

 

Rub fat into flour, add sugar, fruit, spice; mix well together,  Add the beaten

egg and the milk and beat to a soft dough.  Divide the dough and roll out to an

inch in thickness; bake on a bakestone or hotplate; time about 15 minutes, when

nicely brown one side, turn it over.

 

Teisen Lap (3)

 

This cake should be baked in  Dutch oven before an open fire to make it in the

traditional Welsh way but the results are just as good if you bake it in a well

greased oblong tine (spread the mixture thinly) in a moderate oven for about 35

- - 40 minutes.

 

1 lb flour

1 teaspoonful baking powder

Pinch of salt

a little grated nutmeg

4 oz butter

4 oz sugar

4 oz dried fruit (sultanas and currants)

3 eggs

1/2 pint milk (sour milk is delicious)

 

Sieve flour, baking-powder, salt and nutmeg.  Rub in lightly butter, add sugar

and fruit, whisk the eggs, and add to mixture.  Gradually add the milk, mixing

all with a wooden spoon.  The consistency should be soft enough for the batter

to drop from the spoon.

 

 

Date: Sat, 03 Apr 1999 14:04:50 -0500

From: snowfire at mail.snet.net

Subject: Re: SC - Recipes for "Teisen Lap"

 

>> Here are three recipes for the Welsh cake "Teisen Lap" (not sure of English).

>> This is a traditional Welsh cake.

 

>> The three recipes are for the same cake, and although all are "rubbing in"

>> method dishes with similar ingredient lists, each version seems to vary

>> somewhat in the cooking method.

 

>> I wonder - are there other dishes that can be cooked by different methods and

>> yet be called the same thing like this?

 

>Sure. Look at the variations in all the different dishes known as

>haggis, or steak and kidney pie, or any of a bazillion others.

 

OK...

 

>> Teisen Lap (2)

 

>Okay, so we have a basic soda-and-acid (sour milk or buttermilk)

>reaction, such as is used for real Irish soda bread. Cooking on a

>griddle is probably closer to the proto-Ur-original dish, as is the use

>of soda instead of baking powder with its own built-in acid (originally

>it probably had no leavening of any kind, other than the shortening

>power of the fat in the dough, and what Scots to this day mysteriously

>call "light fingers" to keep it from cracking your teeth). Muffins as

>Americans know them probably evolved from the British dish so named,

>which also were originally a dish cooked on a  griddle of some kind.

 

So this would seem to be the oldest method of the three Teisen Lap recipes?

Hmmm...  Recipe evolution makes the variation in these recipes suddenly make sense!

Duh!

 

BTW A lot of the Welsh cake recipes are the "fat, flour, eggs and dried fruit"

combo, and many of the old favourites are cooked on a griddle.  e.g. Welsh Cakes,

Crempog (pancakes), Pancws Llaeth Sur, (sour milk pancakes), Slapan, Teisen Gri,

Cacen Gri, Teisen Planc (plank pastry), Bara Ceirch (Oatcakes), and Teisen Lap.

 

Most are simple little dishes, basically similar, and many use the sour or

buttermilk/soda combo also - which must also speak to their older origins then.

 

>It's a bit like wondering how you'd find Eohippus, Mesohippus, and Equus all

>together in the same field: the answer is that you wouldn't. All were "the

>official horse" at one time, but not at the same time.

 

Great analogy. :-)

 

Elysant

 

 

Date: Tue, 18 May 1999 13:33:55 -0400

From: snowfire at mail.snet.net

Subject: SC - Re: Welsh Seaweed Recipes

 

Although we've spoken about seaweed being eaten by various cultures, I thought

I'd share the Welsh way with you all.

 

Elysant

 

In Wales Seaweed is called "Laverbread" in English, and "Bara Lawr" in Welsh.

Laver (Lawr) is a kind of edible seaweed found on the south and western shores

of Wales and England.  (I don't know where else it grows, or what the Latin

name is - sorry).  Bara Lawr has a distinctive sea-salt taste.  Once tried,

re-sampling it is usually first on the list of "must do's" for visitors

returning to the area.

 

To prepare and cook Bara Lawr you gather and wash the seaweed well to remove

all sand.  Boil it for hours,  Mix it with fine oatmeal and form it into small

cakes.  These are fried, preferably in bacon fat, and are excellent for

breakfast.

 

They can be offered with bacon for breakfast or with mixed grills (bacon,

sausage, mushrooms, kidney)

 

Ways with Laverbread

 

(It is a tradition not to use an iron pan or metal spoon. Use wooden spoons

or silver fork or spoon, and an aluminium saucepan).

 

1.  Heat a tablespoonful of butter in pan, put in Laverbread and a squeeze of

    lemon juice, and serve on hot buttered toast.

 

2.  Mix a small quantity of Laverbread with a squeeze of lemon-juice, add a

  few drops of olive oil, pepper and salt and spread on fingers of toast,

crackers or crisp-bread for a savoury or hors d'oeuvre.

 

3.  Thick slices of bread fried in bacon fat spread with hot Laverbread,

topped with chopped ham or bacon, pepper and salt, and if liked, a few

drops of onion juice.

 

4.  Serve piping hot Laverbread mixed with a squeeze or two of Seville orange

    juice as a vegetable accompaniment to Welsh mutton.

 

5.  Coat flat cakes of Laverbread with oatmeal and fry win bacon fat.

 

6.  Mix Laverbread with fine oatmeal, then coat with oatmeal and fry in bacon

    fat.

 

7.  Eat Laverbread cold with vinegar, as is the custom in Cornwall.

 

 

Date: Wed, 26 May 1999 18:23:17 -0400

From: "Stephen and Stephanie Dale" <sdale at mx00.us.hsanet.net>

Subject: SC - Re: Chicken and Leek pie

 

<< Since someone mentioned a leek loaf, there is also a recipe for Chicken and

Leek pie in this book which is apparently very popular in Wales. No mention

of the periodness of it however. Anyone want it posted?

 

Aislinn

  >>

 

Elysant responded privately that she'd like the recipe posted, so here goes:

 

Welsh Chicken and Leek Pie

 

4 lb stewing hen

1 lg onion, peeled and quartered

1 sm celery stalk, including leaves

a bunch of parsley tied together with one bay leaf

1/4 tsp thyme

1 tbsp salt

10 med leeks, split lengthwise including 1" of the green part, then cut into

1" pieces

1/4 lb smoked beef tongue, cut into 1/8" slices

1 tbsp finely chopped parsley

rough puff pastry

1 egg yolk combined with 1 tbsp heavy cream

1/4 c heavy cream

 

In a 6 to 8 qt pot, combine the chicken, onion, celery stalk, parsley and

bay leaf, thyme and salt. Add enough water to cover and bring to the boil,

skimming the foam off the surface. Reduce heat to low and simmer partially

covered until tender, about 1 hour.

Tranfer chicken to a plate. Strain the chicken stock, pressing down on the

herbs and celery hard with a spoon before discarding them. Pour 2 cups of

the stock into a saucepan and skim the fat off the surface. Add leeks and

bring to the boil. Simmer on low 15 minutes, until leeks are tender.

Debone the chicken, discarding the skin and bones. Cut the meat into 1"

pieces, and place evenly in a 1 1/2 qt casserole or baking dish. Pour the

leeks and stock over the chicken. Arrange the slices of tongue over the

chicken, but leave a 1" square place in the center. Sprinkle with the

parsley.

Preheat the oven to 400. Roll out the pastry on a lighly floured surface

into a rough rectangle 1/4" thick. then cut two strips, about 12" long and

1/2 " wide from the ends. Place the strips around the inside edge of the

pan, pressing firmly into place. Moisten them with cold water.

Place the remaining pastry over the dish. Trim the excess and crimp the

edges together. Cut the remaining pastry into leaf and flower shapes and

attach to the top of the pastry with the egg-and-cream mixture. Brush the

entire surface also. Cut a 1" round hole in the center.

Bake for 1 hour, until golden brown. Just before serving, heat the cup of

cream to lukewarm and pour it through the hole in the crust.

 

Rough Puff Pastry

 

2 c. flour

1/4 tsp salt

1 stick sweet butter, chilled and cut into 1/4" bits

1/4 lb lard, prepared as the butter

4 to 6 tbsp ice water

 

Sift together the flour and salt. Drop in the butter and lard, blending

until the consistency of coarse meal. Pour 4 tbsp of ice water in all at

once, and gather into a ball. If dough crumbles, add ice water a tbsp at a

time until it adheres together. Dust lightly with flour, wrap in waxed

paper, and chill for 30 minutes.

Place pastry on lightly floured board, and press into a rectangle about 1"

thick. Dust it with flour again, and roll it out into a strip about 21" long

and 6" wide. Fold the strip into thirds, and roll out to the same dimensions

again. Repeat this process three more times, ending with the pastry folded.

Wrap the pastry tightly in plastic wrap or a baggie, and refrigerate it for

at least an hour. The pastry will keep for 3 or 4 days.

 

Regards,

Aislinn

 

 

Date: Thu, 5 Aug 1999 18:24:17 -0400

From: "Nancy Santella" <annaoftderturm at pathway.net>

Subject: SC - Welsh Cooking

 

My dear Elysant, and anyone on the list,

 

            I am preparing a celtic feast in Oct. and am looking for

recipies of welsh origan. I was wondering if you could help me.

 

These are the books I was able to borrow:

 

            1. "First Catch Your Peacock   A Book Of Welsh Food"

                        by Bobby Freeman

 

            2. "Lamb, Leeks and Laverbread"

                        by Gilli Davies

 

            3. "Celtic Cookbook"

                        by Helen Smith-Twiddy

 

            4. "The British Museum Cookbook"

                        by Michelle Berriedale-Johnson

 

Anna OftderTurm

 

 

Date: Thu, 05 Aug 1999 21:55:16 -0400

From: snowfire at mail.snet.net

Subject: SC - Re: Welsh Cooking

 

>            I am preparing a celtic feast in Oct. and am looking for

>recipies of welsh origan. I was wondering if you could help me.

 

Do you have any dishes already in mind that you need thing to work with

or accompany?  And are you looking for main course dishes, dessert....?

 

Laver Bread, Cockles, Welsh Cakes, Cawl Cennin with it's period way of

serving the meat, Bara Brith (Speckled bread)... these are very old

dishes, although I'm still searching for documentation as to how old!

 

A lot of the traditional Welsh dishes use lamb.  Also bacon is featured

quite a bit. Now and again you'll see beef or veal used, or even chicken

- - although chickens in the past were usually only eaten at Christmas.  I

have various recipes here for stews, pies, faggots (made with pig's

liver).  For fish you'll usually see salmon and trout (and sometimes

herring), and for seafood we traditionally have cockles (like miniature

clams).  We love melted cheese, and there's also the Laver Bread

(seaweed) or as we call it "Bara Lawr".

 

As a side dish, two vegetables mashed together is very traditional

(these days the most usual version of that is "Potch Erfyn" which is

swedes and potates mashed together.  But there are other combinations

Stwns pys - potatoes and peas, or swede/turnip and peas, and Stwns Ffa -

potato or swede/turnip and broad beans.  Also sometimes we'll just eat

the peas or beans (or both together) in the water from the saucepan and

butter melted into it in the dish.  That is a traditional Sunday brunch

dish (Faggots and Peas without the Faggots).

 

For dessert, Teisen Lap and Welshcakes are the most usual traditionally,

with Bara Brith also popular. (The recipes are all from the

flour/sugar/egg/dried fruit/spices group of dishes seen around the

British Isles.  Also we have pancakes.  All of these cakes are also very

good alone with just a good cup of tea.

 

These would comprise the range of dishes we have really. Our food is

bland for the most part.  If you could give me a little more focusas to

what type of dish you're interested in, I certainly would post some

recipes for you. Again, know that the recipes are not documentable (to

my knowledge) as period - as old as I know they must be! ;-)

 

I'd be extremely curious to read what the books you have say in

comparison with this post.  I do not have any of them, but the "Peacock"

book is on my "to get" list!  I know it discusses Welsh cookery from the

12th century onward if I'm not mistaken?

 

Elysant

 

 

Date: Sat, 07 Aug 1999 15:07:31 -0400From: snowfire at mail.snet.netSubject: Re: Northern Foods was Re: SV: SC - Introducing Myself>> They use "thin metal plates", he says, no longer flat stones.>>I suspect that would be the Norwegian griddle, I believe called a>"takke". My friend has an electric one specifically for lefse, of all things.In Wales we also used the bakestone.  The recipe for Welshcakes, for examplesays to cook them on a bakestone.  This progressed over time to our using alarge round iron plate instead of a stone - called in Welsh "maen" which means"stone".  Welshcakes in Welsh are called "Pice ar y Maen".Meini (pl) come in various sizes, and the bigger they are, the thicker theyare.  The big ones were used on the fire. The one my mother has is smaller (14"diameter x3/4" thick), and was made for use on a modern stove top.Elysant

 

Date: Sat, 07 Aug 1999 16:10:46 -0400From: snowfire at mail.snet.netSubject: Re: Northern Foods was Re: SV: SC - Introducing Myself>Is your recipe for Welshcakes available online anywhere? (snip)>-- HarrietHere is is!Elysant                                   Welsh CakesIngredients1/2 lb. self-raising flour                      1/2 teaspoon cinnamon1/4 lb margarine                                1 egg3 oz sugar                                      2 -3 oz sultanas (raisins)MethodRub margarine into flour.  Add sugar, mixed spice and sultanas.  Add beateneggs.  Combine to form a soft dough.  Roll out on a floured board to 1/4 inchthickness and use 2 - 2 1/2 inch round pastry cutter.  Cook cakes on greasedbakestone (griddle) until golden brown on both sides.Sprinkle with sugar.In a sealed tin they last for weeks.

 

 

Date: Tue, 10 Aug 1999 09:16:02 -0500

From: "Paul Shore" <shore at dcainc.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Re: Welsh Cooking

 

> I'd be extremely curious to read what the books you have say in

> comparison with this post.  I do not have any of them, but the "Peacock"

> book is on my "to get" list!  I know it discusses Welsh cookery from the

> 12th century onward if I'm not mistaken?

>

> YIS

> Elysant

 

This book was republished as "Traditional Food from Wales" (ISBN

0781805279) in 1997 by Hippocrene Books. Amazon.com lists it for $17.47.

 

Arglwydd Aeddan ap Trahaearn

Shire of Mooneschadowe

Kingdom of Ansteorra

 

 

Date: Sun, 19 Sep 1999 00:55:18 EDT

From: Elysant at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - SC REC Bara Brith (Welsh)

 

Henry of Maldon says:

>  I don't know if the Welsh documentation goes back that far, but something

>  much like this was known in later Renaissance England as Great Cakes, Spice

>  Cakes, Banbury Cakes, or simply Cakes.

 

"Bara Brith" isn't a cake it's a bread.  Bara being the Welsh word for bread.

The consistency of "Bara Brith" is like that of a nut bread with raisins in

it, and it's sliced and buttered like a loaf.

 

"Teisen Lap", which is a cake (Teisen) baked on a plate or a bakestone, is

probably the most prevelant traditional cake recipe we have in Wales.  It

uses bicarbonate of soda or baking powder rather than ale barm.  I had posted

the recipe previously, but will willingly post the recipe again if people

wish me to.  :-)

 

Elysant

 

 

Date: Sun, 19 Sep 1999 13:45:49 EDT

From: Elysant at aol.com

Subject: SC - SC: REC Teisen Lap

 

Here are three recipes for Teisen Lap.  

 

The first is baked in a shallow tin, the second is cooked on a bakestone, and the third is baked either in a Dutch oven before an open fire, or in an oblong tin.  In our area of Wales(Southern Powys)  we always bake the cake in the oven on a large plate.

 

Recipe 1 is closest to the way my mother makes it.

 

Elysant

 

Teisen Lap - recipe 1

 

1 lb flour

4 oz lard

4 oz margarine

2 heaped tablespoonsfuls baking powder

7 oz sugar

8 oz currants

3 eggs

A little nutmeg

 

Rub the fat into the flour and add the dry ingredients. Add the well beaten

eggs and enough milk to have a soft mixture.  Bake in a moderate oven, using

a shallow tin.

 

Teisen Lap Recipe 2 - [baked using  a bakestone]

 

1 lb flour

4 oz fat

4 oz brown sugar

4 oz mixed fruit

1/2 teaspoon spice

1/2 teaspoonful of bicarbonate of soda (dissolved in milk)

1 egg

1/2 pint of buttermilk or sour milk

 

Rub the fat into the flour, add sugar, fruit, spice; mix well together.  Add

the beaten egg and the milk and beat to a soft dough. Divide the dough and

roll out to an inch in thickness; bake on a bakestone or hotplate; time about

15 minutes, when nicely brown one side, turn them over.

 

Teisen Lap - recipe 3

 

This cake should be baked in a Dutch oven before an open fire to make it in

the traditional Welsh way but the results are just as good if you bake it in

a well greased oblong tin (spread the mixture thinly) in a moderate oven for

about 35 - 40 minutes.

 

1 lb flour

1 teaspoonful baking powder

Pinch of Salt

A little grated nutmeg

4 oz butter

4 oz sugar

4 oz dried fruit (sultanas and currants)

3 eggs

1/2 pint milk (sour milk is delicious)

 

Sieve flour, baking-powder, salt and nutmeg,  Rub in lightly butter, add

sugar and fruit, whisk the eggs, and add to mixture. Gradually add the milk,

mixing all with a wooden spoon.  The consistency should be soft enough for

the batter to drop from the spoon.

 

 

From: branwen at cerebus.ccc.amdahl.com (Karen Williams)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Welsh recipes

Date: 2 Apr 93 21:35:17 GMT

Organization: Amdahl Corporation, Sunnyvale CA

 

greg at silver.lcs.mit.edu (Hossein Ali Qomi (mka Gregory F. Rose)) writes:

>>his home. One time he held a Welsh bardic feast, where all the food was

>>made using Welsh recipes, and each guest was asked to bring a poem, song,

>>or story to share.

 

>Where, oh where did he get the Welsh recipes? Please?????

 

You'd have to ask him (John? oh, John?), but what I do when I want

Welsh recipes is use the Welsh mini-cookbook he brought me from Wales

(it's called something like "Recipes from the Bards," and is made up

of recipes of foods mentioned by Medieval Welsh bards), or, if none

of those are feasible for the moment, I use "The Little Book of Welsh

Recipes" (or whatever it's called; there's a whole series of "The Little

Book of ____ Recipes" out now) which has "traditional" Welsh recipes in

it.

 

Branwen ferch Emrys

The Mists, the West

 

 

From: Laurie Brandt <brandtfamily at sprintmail.com>

Date: December 4, 2006 9:22:49 PM CST

To: "Harris Mark S. Stefan li Rous" <StefanliRous at austin.rr.com>

Subject: Welsh cookbooks

 

Here is the Bibliographic references to what I currently have. I thought these books had dates in them but looking them over tonight I see that they did not so more detective work will be needed.

Pegasus

 

Author: Fitzgibbon, Theodora

Year: 1983

Title: A Tast of Wales in Food and in PIctures

Series Title: A Tast of

City: London

Publisher: Pan/ J. M. Dent and Sons

ISBN: 0-330-23624-5

 

Author: Llewellyn, Sian

Year: 1982

Title: The Love Spoon A selection of Recipes from Wales

City: Swansea, England

Publisher: Celtic Educational Services Ltd

 

Author: Twiddy, E. Smith

Year: 1990

Title: A little Welsh cookbook

City: Belfast

San Francisco, CA

Publisher: Appletree Press ;

Chronicle Books

ISBN: 0877018588 (Chronicle Books)

 

<the end>



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