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fd-Japan-msg - 11/17/13

 

Food of medieval Japan.

 

NOTE: See also the files: Kumihimo-art, silk-msg, Silk-Reeling-art.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This article was submitted to me by the author for inclusion in this set of files, called Stefan's Florilegium.

 

These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

Copyright to the contents of this file remains with the author or translator.

 

While the author will likely give permission for this work to be reprinted in SCA type publications, please check with the author first or check for any permissions granted at the end of this file.

 

Thank you,

Mark S. Harris...AKA:..Stefan li Rous

stefan at florilegium.org

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Date: Fri, 29 Oct 2010 19:57:12 -0400

From: devra at aol.com

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] New book on historical Japanese Food -

        commercial   plug

 

I've just received copies of one of the two new titles coming out this fall/winter on the history of Japanese food.  This one is entitled JAPANESE FOODWAYS, PAST AND PRESENT, and is edited by Eric C Rath and Stephanie Assmann. It's a trade paperback, perfect-bound, 13 b/w illus and photos, 290pp, index. Bibliographies follow each of the essays. The section on historical food is about 129 pages, and consists of the following:

 

Honzen Dining: The Poetry of Formal Meals in Late Medieval and Early Modern Japan (Eric C Rath), "How to Eat the Ten Thousand Things,": Table Manners in the Edo Period (Michael Kinski), "Stones for the Belly": Kaiseki Cuisine for Tea during the Early Edo Period (Gary Soka Cadwallader & Joseph  B Justice), Meat-Eating in the Kojimachi District of Edo (Akira Shimizu), Wine-Drinking Culture in Seventeenth-century Japan: The Role of Dutch Merchants (Joji Nozawa).

 

The remaining two-thirds of the book consider various topics in Modern Japan and Contemporary Japan.

 

The cost is $28, plus $3 postage.

 

Devra the Baker

Poison Pen Press

 

 

Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2011 09:47:52 -0500

From: Elaine Koogler <kiridono at gmail.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] MisRepresenting the Outlands

 

<<< Is there a period Japanese source available at this point in English

translation? Or are we stuck with recreating from literary mentions and the

like?

--

David/Cariadoc

www.daviddfriedman.com >>>

 

There does not appear, at least at this point, to be a period Japanese

source.  However there is one that dates to about 1640.  A friend of mine

has translated it and we are currently pursuing a means to publish it.  Part

of the problem is that the version we acquired came from the V&A, and

getting permission to publish our translation of the book, along with some

redactions/interpretations of some of the recipes and a

historical/commentary section is proving to be very difficult.  Several of

us involved in the project have shared some of the recipes at symposia,

etc., but we have not published the entire work anywhere.

 

Beyond that, there are a couple of books about Japanese culinary history

that have proved to be very helpful, the best of which is Ishige Naomichi.

The History and Culture of Japanese Food.  Using this book, I have been able

to find listings of period foods. What I have done is to locate modern

recipes (from Japanese cookbooks that are traditional in nature, like Tsuji

Shizuo's *Japanese Cooking:  A Simple Art.  *I know this isn't the best way

to do a period feast but in the absence of period texts, this is as good as

it gets.  Also, there are many dishes that were served in period that have

survived in the cuisine to this day.

 

Kiri

 

<the end>



Formatting copyright © Mark S. Harris (THLord Stefan li Rous).
All other copyrights are property of the original article and message authors.

Comments to the Editor: stefan at florilegium.org