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Period stuffed pasta dishes. Raviolis, Manicotti, Cannoli.

 

NOTE: See also the files: fd-Italy-msg, pasta-msg, pasta-gnocchi-msg, flour-msg, dumplings-msg, cheese-msg, cheesemaking-msg, rissoles-msg, pierogies-msg.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I  have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I  have done  a limited amount  of  editing. Messages having to do  with separate topics  were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the  message IDs  were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make  no claims  as  to the accuracy  of  the information  given  by the individual authors.

 

Please  respect the time  and  efforts of  those who have written  these messages. The  copyright status  of these messages  is unclear  at this time. If  information  is  published  from  these  messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

    Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                          Stefan at florilegium.org

************************************************************************

 

From: Andrew Tye <atye at efn.org>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Pasta in 16th Century

Date: Mon, 15 Sep 1997 16:23:24 -0700

Organization: Oregon Public Networking

 

I'm getting in to this topic a little late, but a while back I was trying

to document spaetzle to the 15th C.  In the course of doing so I came

across a recipe for ravioli from _Das Kochbuch der Sabina Welserin_,

Augsburg, 1553.  Here it is in my translation:

 

#31.  Rabiolin zu machen - (To make ravioli)

 

Take spinach and scald it as if you were making cooked spinach and chop it

fine.  Take approximately a handfull after it is chopped, and cheese or

roast chicken or capon that has been boiled or roasted.  Then take twice

as much cheese as spinach and meat the same amount, and beat 2 or 3 eggs

thereinto and make a fine dough.  Put salt and pepper thereinto and make a

dough with wheat flour as if you were going to make a cake.  When you have

rolled it out, then put a little lump of filling at the edge of the dough

and form it into a dumpling.  And squeeze it together around the edges and

place it in a meat broth and leave it there approximately as long as it

takes to soft boil an egg.  The meat should be chopped fine and the cheese

finely grated.

 

I hope this is of some interest.

 

Ivar Hakonarson

Adiantum, An Tir.

 

 

Date: Fri, 13 Mar 1998 12:26:47 -0500 (EST)

From: Gretchen M Beck <grm+ at andrew.cmu.edu>

Subject: Re: SC - Raviolis, tortellini and fritters

 

Excerpts from internet.listserv.sca-cooks: 13-Mar-98 SC - Raviolis,

tortellini a.. by Christi Redeker at digital.

> The original recipe has a title of ravioli or tortellini, but in my

> limited knowledge of Italian (derived from being able to read and dechiper a

> little bit of Spanish) I don't see anywhere in the original for wrapping in

> pasta.  In the author's notes, she says that ravioli, tortelini and fritters

> were used interchangeably until the custom of wrapping a filling in pasta

> became wide spread and known as ravioli and tortelini.

 

There is a recipe in the British Libraryh: Additional 32085, an

Anglo-Norman collection dating to the late 13th century.  It is a recipe

for  ravioli -- and (apparently) of the wrapped pasta sort.  My source

is Constance Hieatt and Robin Jones' article, Two Anglo-Norman Culinary

Collections Edited from the British Library Manuscripts Additional 32085

and Royal 12.C.xii, published in Speculum 61/4, 1986.  Here's the

transcription and the translation:

 

8. Ravieles. E une autre manere de viaunde, ke ad a noun ravieles.

Pernez bel flur e sucre, e festes un past; e pernez bon formage e bure,

e braez ensemble; e puys pernez p'ersil e sauge e eschalouns, e mincez

les menu, e jettez les dedenz la fassure, e puys pernez formage mye/ e

metez desus e desuz; e puys metez au furn.

 

8. Ravioli.  Here is another kind of dish, which is called ravioli.

Take fine flour and sugar and make pasta dough; take good cheese and

butter and cream them together, then take parsley, sage, and shallots,

chop them finely, and put them in the filling (i.e. the cheese and

butter); put the boiled ravioli on a bed of grated cheese and cover them

with more grated cheese, and then reheat them (?)

 

toodles, margaret

 

 

Date: Tue, 24 Mar 1998 18:19:55 -0800

From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Raviolis, tortellini and fritters

 

At 9:38 AM -0500 3/13/98, Christi Redeker wrote:

>Upon reading The Original Mediterranean Cuisine last night and redacting the

>Ham Fritters recipe I came across something that struck me as strange.  (My

>Mistress is trying to get me to question anything and ask questions, so here

>I go!)  The original recipe has a title of ravioli or tortellini, but in my

>limited knowledge of Italian (derived from being able to read and dechiper a

>little bit of Spanish) I don't see anywhere in the original for wrapping in

>pasta.  In the author's notes, she says that ravioli, tortelini and fritters

>were used interchangeably until the custom of wrapping a filling in pasta

>became wide spread and known as ravioli and tortelini.  Could this be a

>mistake in the translation.  Could it have been assumed that you would put

>this in pasta?  It is a fried dish, and pasta isn't often fried before being

>boiled.

 

I can't answer for Italian.  In England, ravieles (in this or another

spelling) turn up in the late 13th-c. Anglo-Norman (which someone has

already quoted) and Form of Cury (14th c.) meaning boiled cheese ravioli;

the latter recipe says to make your filling, make your dough, and "close

hem therin as turteletes".  Tartlettes out of the same cookbook are boiled

ravioli with a pork, eggs, currents, and spices filling. There are also

"Tourteletes in Fryture", which are fig filling closed in dough and fried.

The word tartlettes also gets used to mean small tarts.  You also find

14th/15th recipes for things similar to tarts--chewettes or risshews,

filling enclosed in dough--either baked or fried. It looks rather as if

once you have enclosed something in dough, baked, boiled, and fried

versions may be thought of as different version of the same basic idea

rather than completely separate things.

 

Fritters seems always to mean something fried--apples dipped in batter,

some filling wrapped in dough, a mush of cheese and eggs...

 

Hieatt and Butler say in their notes in _Curye on Inglysch_ that there are

recipes for "ravioli" in _Il Libro della Cucina_ which are not modern

ravioli but instead fritters of various sorts; this may be where your

recipe originally comes from.

 

Elizabeth

 

 

Date: Fri, 19 Jun 1998 21:31:25 -0500

From: allilyn at juno.com (LYN M PARKINSON)

Subject: SC - Re: frozen ravioli/maultaschen

 

Anne Marie,

 

>>--ravioles are perfect! you can even make them ahad of time and freeze

them. Put them in the boiling broth on site, and voila!<<

 

This may take some care.  The worst feast disaster I've ever had involved

some maultaschen--that's German for a ravioli like thing--meat filling in

dough.  The people who were helping me wrapped the raw maultaschen in

waxed paper and then froze them.  The ice crystals made the dough soft,

sticky and totally yucky when they thawed, everything stuck to the waxed

paper, and we had to throw out well over half of the resultant mess.

I've played with them at home, and if I cook them *before* I freeze them,

and freeze them on cookie trays, then dump them into freezer bags, they

freeze well.  Open up the freezer bags, let thaw on cookie trays or oiled

foil covered cardboard from boxes--insta-trays!-and then slip back into

the simmering broth.  The first cooking I did in plain water.  Of course,

they're best prepared fresh and cooked in the meat broth, but sometimes

that's impractical.  It was the first time I hadn't done them fresh.  How

do you prepare your ravioli when you freeze it?

 

Allison

 

 

Date: Sun, 21 Jun 1998 01:21:50 -0700

From: "Anne-Marie Rousseau" <acrouss at gte.net>

Subject: Re: SC - Re: frozen ravioli/maultaschen

 

Hi all from Anne-Marie

Allison asks about our ravioles and how we did them.

 

I believe much would depend on the dough you use, as well as the method of

freezing (as you noted).

We used fresh pasta sheets (containing flour, water, egg and salt). Placed

dollops of filling (cheese and herb, as per Barbara Santiches new book on

The Original Mediterranean Cuisine), seal with a fork. The pasta was fairly

well floured, so when we threw them in the ziplock bag and then into the

freezer, they didn’t stick to each other at all. The air was evacuated

(using a straw or a good puckerer) before freezing. They were frozen for

several weeks before use, and thawed in the bag with no problems. Ice

crystal formation can be avoided by limiting the water in the bag, (wax

paper wouldn’t do this), and by being sure that the raviolies are totally

dry. If you use water to seal them and then don’t let them dry??

 

thanks for the warning though, I'd hate to blaze in all confident and then

have it flop.

- --AM

 

 

Date: Sat, 20 Jun 1998 11:10:25 -0500

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Re: frozen ravioli/maultaschen

 

Anne-Marie Rousseau wrote:

> I believe much would depend on the dough you use, as well as the method of

> freezing (as you noted).

> We used fresh pasta sheets (containing flour, water, egg and salt). Placed

> dollops of filling (cheese and herb, as per Barbara Santiches new book on

> The Original Mediterranean Cuisine), seal with a fork. The pasta was fairly

> well floured, so when we threw them in the ziplock bag and then into the

> freezer, they didnt stick to each other at all. The air was evacuated

> (using a straw or a good puckerer) before freezing. They were frozen for

> several weeks before use, and thawed in the bag with no problems. Ice

> crystal formation can be avoided by limiting the water in the bag, (wax

> paper wouldnt do this), and by being sure that the raviolies are totally

> dry. If you use water to seal them and then dont let them dry??

 

Another possibility is to freeze them on oiled cookie sheets with a

sprinkling of flour or starch, or perhaps lined with parchment paper,

then remove them, bag them, and return them to the freezer. Obviously

this takes up more room in the freezer, but if one has access to a big

freezer, or more than one freezer, the method is pretty foolproof, and

takes up no additional room once the job is done.

 

As for the problem of thawing in or out of the bag, and the problems

inherent to either method, I wonder why they are being thawed at all,

unless they're stuck together, which doesn't happen using the above

method. Just drop the frozen mawpockets right into your boiling cooking

liquid. It may take an additional minute or two to bring the liquid back

to the boil, but the end result is pretty much identical.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: 22 Jun 1998 09:11:55 -0700

From: "Marisa Herzog" <marisa_herzog at macmail.ucsc.edu>

Subject: SC - Re- frozen ravioli/maultasc

 

My experience with pastas and raviolis is: if they are frozen, DON'T THAW them

before you cook them.  Just throw them in the boiling water.  If you thaw them

they get gummy.

- -brid (who has had some interesting meals of pastoid "lumps" while teaching

husband how to cook!)

 

 

Date: Mon, 21 Sep 1998 22:13:24 -0800

From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Feast Menu-Everyman's Challenge

 

At 8:37 PM -0400 9/21/98, LrdRas at aol.com wrote:

>Here is the menu from Everyman's Challenge held in the Shire of Eisental,

>Sept. 19, 1998. Kitchen Steward-Lady Ellesbeth Donofrey. This is being posted

>with her permission.

>The following abbreviations are used>

>P=Period

>PL=Period-like

>T-Traditional

>E=Ethnic

 

>Cannoli (E)

 

And for a period Cannoli (from the Miscellany, 8th edn):

 

Stuffed Qanânît, Fried Cannoli

Andalusian p. A-70

 

Pound almond and walnut, pine nuts and pistachio very small. Knead fine

white flour with oil and make thin breads with it and fry them in oil.

Pound [sugar] fine and mix with the almond, the walnut and the rest. Add to

the paste pepper, cinnamon, Chinese cinnamon and spikenard. Knead with the

necessary amount of skimmed honey and put in the dough whole pine nuts, cut

pistachio and almond. Mix it all and then stuff the qananit that you have

made of clean wheat flour.

 

Its Preparation: Knead the dough well with oil and a little saffron and

roll it into thin flatbreads. Stretch them over the tubes (qananit) of

cane, and you cut them [the cane sections] how you want them, little or

big. And throw them [into a frying pan full of oil], after decorating them

in the reed. Take them out from the reed and stuff them with the stuffing

and put in their ends whole pistachios and pine nuts, one at each end, and

lay it aside. He who wants his stuffing with sugar or chopped almond, it

will be better, if God wishes.

 

Translator's note: The scribe is dropping things again. The general

discussion in the beginning, which is the only place where the stuffing is

described, must have dropped the word sugar, as the recipe section omitted

the instruction to fry the tubes. "Qanânît" is the plural of "qanut"-canes

or cylinders. (Charles Perry)

 

1/2 c almonds, ground fine      1 t pepper     1/2 c oil

1/2 c walnuts, ground fine      3/4 c honey     1/2 c water

1/2 c pine nuts, ground fine    1/4 c whole pine nuts   oil for frying

1/2 c pistachios, ground fine   1/4 c chopped almonds   a few whole

pistachios and pine nuts

1/4 c sugar     1/4 c chopped pistachios

2 T cinnamon    3 c flour

 

Mix ground nuts, spices, sugar, and honey and knead together. Add chopped

nuts. Knead flour, oil and water together and refrigerate 20 minutes. Form

dough into cylinders ~2" long on 3/4" wooden dowel and deep-fry in hot oil

while on the dowel. (They had to be fried on the dowel, as they would not

remain as cylinders otherwise.) Remove from dowel; stuff with filling; stop

one end with a whole pistachio, the other with a whole pine nut.

 

Note: Too much pepper for Elizabeth, fine for Cariadoc.

 

David Friedman

 

 

Date: Thu, 9 Mar 2000 20:37:55 -0600

From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Re: 12th C Anglo Norman ravioli

 

At 4:57 PM +0000 3/9/00, Christina Nevin wrote:

>Hauviette wrote

><< Well, I know there's a 12th century Anglo-Norman recipe which is cheese

>ravioli with shallots.  Quite tasty.  There's also the cuskynoles, but >>

 

>      Would you be so kind as to post the source and possibly the original

>recipe.<snip>

>The source is:

>HIEATT, Constance B. & JONES, Robin F.

>"Two Anglo-Norman Culinary Collections Edited from British Library

>Manuscripts Additional 32085 and Royal 12.C.xii"

>Speculum Issue 61/4 1986

 

Unless I am mistaken, this source is late thirteenth century, not 12th century.

 

David/Cariadoc

http://www.best.com/~ddfr/

 

 

Date: Thu, 9 Mar 2000 16:32:38 EST

From: Bronwynmgn at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - Re: 12th C Anglo Norman ravioli

 

ChannonM at aol.com writes:

<< Would you be so kind as to post the source and possibly the original recipe.

I'm working with 12th C right now and this is intriguing. Although I have my

menu set for the feast on Mar 25, I might be able to incorporate it into head

tables dishes. >>

 

Actually, I got the recipe off this list, and I was incorrect, it's 13th

century.  But here is the info that appeared on the list, and the modern

version done by myself, my husband, and another shire member.

 

<<Excerpts from internet.listserv.sca-cooks: 13-Mar-98 SC - Raviolis,

tortellini a.. by Christi Redeker at digital.

> The original recipe has a title of ravioli or tortellini, but in my

> limited knowledge of Italian (derived from being able to read and dechiper a

> little bit of Spanish) I don't see anywhere in the original for wrapping in

> pasta.  In the author's notes, she says that ravioli, tortelini and fritters

> were used interchangeably until the custom of wrapping a filling in pasta

> became wide spread and known as ravioli and tortelini.

 

There is a recipe in the British Libraryh: Additional 32085, an

Anglo-Norman collection dating to the late 13th century.  It is a recipe

for  ravioli -- and (apparently) of the wrapped pasta sort.  My source

is Constance Hieatt and Robin Jones' article, Two Anglo-Norman Culinary

Collections Edited from the British Library Manuscripts Additional 32085

and Royal 12.C.xii, published in Speculum 61/4, 1986.  Here's the

transcription and the translation:

 

8. Ravieles. E une autre manere de viaunde, ke ad a noun ravieles.

Pernez bel flur e sucre, e festes un past; e pernez bon formage e bure,

e braez ensemble; e puys pernez p'ersil e sauge e eschalouns, e mincez

les menu, e jettez les dedenz la fassure, e puys pernez formage mye/ e

metez desus e desuz; e puys metez au furn.

 

8. Ravioli.  Here is another kind of dish, which is called ravioli.

Take fine flour and sugar and make pasta dough; take good cheese and

butter and cream them together, then take parsley, sage, and shallots,

chop them finely, and put them in the filling (i.e. the cheese and

butter); put the boiled ravioli on a bed of grated cheese and cover them

with more grated cheese, and then reheat them (?)

 

toodles, margaret >>

 

Modern version by Duncan McBain, Angus Campbell, Brangwayna Morgan

 

For 25 ravioli:

4 cups flour

1/2 cup sugar

1 1/2 cup water

 

Mix together for pasta dough.

 

Filling:

1/2 lb ricotta

1/4 lb butter

1 shallot, finely chopped

1/8 tsp ground sage

flowers of 5 sprigs of parsley, finely chopped

 

Mix filling ingredients together, drop into cut wrappers and seal, then drop

individually into boiling water for about 5 minutes.  When the dough is sealed, drain, lay on bed of grated mozzarella, top with more mozzarella, and reheat in oven to melt cheese.

 

It was quite wonderful. with a subtle, rich flavor.

 

Brangwayna

 

 

Date: Thu, 09 Mar 2000 01:43:35 +0100

From: Thomas Gloning <gloning at Mailer.Uni-Marburg.DE>

Subject: SC - Origin of Ravioli

 

<< ... I am looking for historical information about Ravioli (Where it

came from,  when it was introduced in Italy,... >>

 

The _Dizionario etimologico della lingua italiana_ (4, 1036b) says that

the Italian word is first attested in Boccaccio and the _Libro della

cucina_, both 14th century. In addition, they mention the Latin

chronicle of Salimbene (ca. 1285). -- Micoli, in his edition of Maestro

Martino, mentions earlier uses of "rabiola" or "rabiÚle" (1243 and

before 1223).

 

There is some dispute about the etymology of the word ...

 

Looking up the text of the Salimbene chronicle (ed. Scalia 797.13), I

find:

  "De gulositate modernorum ...

   Item millesimo supraposito, in festo sancte Clare, comedi primo

   raviolos sine crusta de pasta. Et hoc ideo dico, ad demonstrandum

   quantum subtiliata est humana gulositas ...".

If I understand this quotation correctly, he critizises "gulositas"

(gluttony) by stating that there were people eating ravioli without the

pasta surrounding the filling ...

 

In a note, the editor points to the work of Messedaglia (p. 385) for a

comment on this passage.

 

Searching for ravioli in the _Libro di cucina_ (ed. Frati, viz. in the

Anonimo Veneziano's 'Libro per cuoco' of Faccioli's edition), I find

that ravioli are mentioned in three ways: (a) recipes for ravioli, (b)

ravioli as an ingredient, (c) ravioli in a comparison (_salsizie longi

come rafioli_). The recipe numbers of the Faccioli edition are: XLV,

LXII, LXIII, LX (_Quinquinelli zoe rafioli boni molti_; seems to be

another term), LXIV, LXXVII, XCIV, CXII, CXIV.

 

There is also a ravioli recipe in the Anonimo Meridionale (Bostrˆm's

Libro B, Nr. LXXXV) and ravioli are mentioned four times in Maestro

Martino, as an ingredient (doubtful), for a recipe, and twice in a

comparison, see the Faccioli-edition page 134 (doubtful), 145 (_Ravioli

in tempo di carne_), 178 (_Frictelle in forma di raffioli_), 183 (_Ova

in forma de raffioli_).

 

Alas, this does not answer the question...

 

Thomas

 

- -- Bostrˆm, I. (Hg.): Anonimo Meridionale, Due libri di cucina.

Stockholm 1985 (Acta Universitatis Stockholmensis, Romanica 11).

- -- Cortelazzo, M./ Zolli, P.: Dizionario etimologico della lingua

italiana. F¸nf B‰nde. Bologna 1979-88.

- -- Faccioli, E.: Arte della cucina. Libri di ricette, testi sopra lo

scalco, il trinciante e i vini dal XIV al XIX secolo. Zwei B‰nde.

Mailand 1966.

- -- Frati, L. (Hg.): Libro di cucina del secolo XIV. Livorno 1899.

Nachdruck Sala Bolognese 1979.

- -- Maestro Martino: Libro de arte coquinaria. In: Faccioli, E. (Hg.):

Arte della cucina. Band 1. Mailand 1966, 115-204.

- -- Martino da Como: Maestro Martino da Como, ªLibro de Arte Coquinaria´.

A cura di E. Montorfano e con introduzione di E. Travi. Mailand 1990.

[Faksimile und Transkription der Handschrift `Washington, Library of

Congress, De Ricci 153'.]

- -- Martino da Como: Libro de arte coquinaria. Premessa e commenti di P.

Micoli. Udine (Societ‡ Filologica Friulana/ Arti Grafiche Friulane)

1994. [Text nach der Ausgabe Faccioli 1966.]

- -- Messedaglia, L.: Leggendo la Cronica di frate Salimbene da Parma.

Note per la storia della vita economica e del costume nel secolo XIII.

In: Atti dell'Istituto veneto di scienze, lettere ed arti, Anno

accademico 1943/44, Tomo CIII/2, Classe di Szienze morali e lettere,

352-426 & Indice.

- -- Salimbene de Adam: Cronica. Nuova edizione critica a cura di G.

Scalia. Zwei B‰nde. Bari 1966.

 

 

Date: Sat, 11 Mar 2000 09:24:28 EST

From: Bronwynmgn at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - Re: 12th C Anglo Norman ravioli

 

stefan at texas.net writes:

<< But what is this last ingredient? Parsley flowers? Where would you get

this? Or is this some other kind of flowers combined with chopped parsley? >>

 

"Flowers" of parsley is what Duncan calls the leafy end bits of parsley.  He

basically means leaves, no stems.  I can't think what they might otherwise be

called, other than something like "Leaves only of five sprigs of parsley" .  

 

Brangwayna Morgan

 

 

Date: Fri, 10 Mar 2000 15:00:25 EST

From: allilyn at juno.com

Subject: Re: SC - Fw: Origin of Ravioli

 

My new copy of Dr. Thomas Scully's  mid 15th C. 'The Neapolitan Recipe

Collection' arrived today--Thanks, Devra!--and there are ravioli recipes

in it.  NOT Chef Boyardee, in case you are new to medieval cooking,

Nicholas.

 

This collection is 'Cuoco Napoletano', MS Bu:ler 19, Pierpont Morgan

Library, New York.  Book citation: The University of Michigan Press, Ann

Arbor, 2000.  ISBN 0-472-10972-3.  Contains the original recipes, as well

as criticism, and commentary on the recipes. Scully says it has clear,

primary connection to Martino.

 

Recipe #10 is a fairly standard, if elaborate, version that we've seen in

a number of collections, calling for ground meat- pork belly, loin of

veal,and  capon breast; spices-fragrant herbs, pepper, cloves, ginger,

and saffron; old cheese and a little new, creamy cheese.  All of these

are to be well ground, enclosed in a thin dough in nut-sized amounts, and

cooked in capon broth or other meat broth, garnished with a mix of grated

cheese and good spices.

 

Recipe #11 is different.  It calls for buffalo cheese well ground

(Scully's comment on the buffalo cheese calls it 'probatura' and says the

taste and texture resemble mozzarella, but it is exported from Italy)

butter, ginger and cinnamon; for one cheese add 3 well beaten egg whites

and a decent amount of sugar; mix well; shape it into ravioli the length

and thickness of a finger and coat with flour; note that these are made

without dough; boil gently so they don't fall apart, when they begin to

boil, remove and set out with sugar and cinnamon; can make it yellow with

saffron.

 

In the two, cheese, sugar and spices, and flour are all they have in

common except for the simmering method of cooking.  Were they called

ravioli because of this?  About a year ago, I posted some comments about

German versions which were fried, some baked. Probably in the

Florilegium by now.  Stefan, what did you call the file "little

individual stuffed dough thingies"?  Scully lists some other collections

for #10--Forme of Curye, etc., but  #11 is Southern Italy and seems to

have no counterpart.

 

Anybody know of other ravioli that are fried, baked, or similar to #11?

It almost seems dessert type, doesn't it? Depending on what they

considered a 'decent' amount of sugar for this.

 

Notes on ravioli as feast food:  very popular in a number of versions,

but very labor intensive.  Making them the morning of the feast is the

least practical way, unless you are overflowing with experienced, willing

cooks.  One of the most practical ways were some that Margaret and I did

ahead of time, she making and cutting the dough, I filling, pressing, and

partially cooking the stuffed ones in boiling water--just so they

wouldn't stick together.  These were frozen on cookie sheets, the frozen

ones stored in freezer bags, then cooked in broth at the event.  Do Not

wrap and freeze raw dough in waxed paper!  When thawed, you will have one

gigantic lump of garbage.

 

Regards,

Allison,     allilyn at juno.com

 

 

Date: Fri, 23 Feb 2001 09:49:19 -0500

From: Elaine Koogler <ekoogler at chesapeake.net>

Subject: Re: SC - In a pasta making mood

 

I don't have the recipe right at hand...it's on my desktop computer, which is in

the shop being redone into a bigger/better/faster machine (she says hopefully!),

but the rauiolles (??sp.) from "Curye on Inglysch" is out of this world!  I

didn't make my own pasta as I was serving it to 250 people.  I used wonton

wrappers instead.  The filling is 3 different cheeses.  I had a hard time

getting the dish away from my kitchen staff and out to the hall.  I have had

more requests for that recipe than any other I've ever done!

 

If you're interested, I can send it out as soon as I get my desktop computer

back, probably today or tomorrow.

 

Kiri

 

 

Date: Fri, 23 Feb 2001 12:41:28 -0500

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - In a pasta making mood

 

>The filling is 3 different cheeses.  I had a hard time

>getting the dish away from my kitchen staff and out

>to the hall.

 

Kiri, is this it?

 

"Forme of Cury, #94:

 

Rauioles. Take [s]wete chese and grynde hit smal, & medle hit wyt eyren

and saffron and a god quantite of buttur. Make a (th)in foile of dowe &

close hem (th)erin as turteletes, & cast hem in boylyng watur, & sethe

hem (th)erin. Take hote buttur meltede & chese ygratede, & ley (th)i

ravioles in dissches; & ley (th) hote buttur wyt gratede chese bine(th)e

& aboue, & cast (th)ereon powdur douce."

 

I think the last time I made ravioli, it was filled with odds and ends

from the kitchen: I think it consisted of ground beef, cooked and

pressed frozen spinach, some crumbled, cooked sweet Italian sausage,

Parmagianno cheese, and an egg to bind it... I believe we used wonton

wrappers also, and just made little turnovers like agnolotti.

 

Adamantius, thinking spinach & ricotta gnocchi

 

 

Date: Fri, 23 Feb 2001 23:02:02 -0500

From: LYN M PARKINSON <allilyn at juno.com>

Subject: Re: SC - In a pasta making mood

 

We make ravioles a lot up here in AEthelmearc, often with different

fillings.  Very popular luncheon food, if we don't serve it in the dishes

with butter and grated cheese, as you can pick up the tiny turnovers

between fighting/arching/class etc.  One of the favorites was a

suggestion of Margaret's: chopped cooked chicken with minced apple and

some spices.

 

Here's a sample from my working notes:

Recipes

RaviolesóTurnovers.  Margaret baked them, using a sourdough, got good

results.  Use large size forms; figure 3 per person.   Some Swiss,

Gruyere, and brick cheese for the veggies.  Chop and mix with egg to hold

together.  Chop cooked chicken, mix with [mushrooms, celery, onionsÖ]  

Bind with almond milk thickened with rice flour

==============================================================

 

Forme of Cury

 

194.  Chewetes on fyssh day.  Take turbot, haddock, codling and hake, and

cook it.  grind the cooked fish and add ground dates, raisins, pine nuts,

good powders and salt.  Make a small pie shell as above; close the filing

inside and fry it in oil, or stew it in sugar and wine, or bake it, and

serve it forth.

 

193.  Chewetes on flesshe day. Meat Pot Pies.  [ëchouxí :  means

individual small, round pastries.].  Mince pork and chicken, and fry

together, make a small pie shell and put the meat in.  On top, put

hard-boiled egg yolks, ground ginger and salt. Cover with a top crust

and fry in grease, or bake it until brown, and serve forth.             

      

 

1. Cut circles of strong pie dough to fit large muffin cups.

2. Use frozen pot pie tins.  

3. Use large turnover forms.

3/4 C.  minced pork              

3/4 C.  minced chicken

2 hard-boiled egg yolks, crumbled             

good pinch ground ginger

shake of salt

 

Fry meat together, drain.  Place in shell. Crumble yolks over meat,

sprinkle the ginger and salt on top.  Could cook ginger and salt with

meat.  Place in pastry container.  For first 2, cover with top crust,

crimp edges.  For turnovers, close mold.  Brush with butter or milk, or

lightly beaten egg.  Bake 450* until dough is done, about 20 min.  Or,

deep fat fry.

 

Note 1: this is going to be dry.  When bitten, the filling will crumble

out.  Try: separate the yolks from the egg white. Boil the egg yolks in

gently simmering water.  Use the raw egg whites as a binder, mixing in

with the cooked meat and spices.  Then, crumble the egg yolks over, or

mash yolks lightly with any broken egg yolk pieces, and sprinkle over the

top.

Note 2: To prepare ahead for feast or lunch, use turnover form, cook 5

min. in boiling water, remove with slotted spoon, lay on cookie sheets 5

min in freezer, package in freezer bags.

 

194.  Chewetes on fyssh day.  Take turbot, haddock, codling and hake, and

cook it.  Grind the cooked fish and add ground dates, raisins, pine nuts,

good powders and salt.  Make a small pie shell as above; close the filing

inside and fry it in oil, or stew it in sugar and wine, or bake it, and

serve it forth.

1/2 C. cooked, flaked fish                      1/4 C. mixed ground fruit

and nuts

pinch powder douce                 salt to taste

 

I'd forgotten Margaret's sourdough versions--very good, can't remember

that filling.  There are enough versions of these things that almost any

filling--if reasonable by other period recipe standards--can be used.

Vary the cheese, the meat, the spices, any veggies that go in.

Regards,

 

Allison

 

 

Date: Mon, 26 Feb 2001 13:10:36 -0500

From: Elaine Koogler <ekoogler at chesapeake.net>

Subject: SC - Ravioli recipe

 

To those who wanted it, here follows the recipe/redaction for the

Rauioles that I did for a feast a year or so ago:

 

94.  Rauioles.  Take wete chese & grynde hit smal, & medle hit wyt eyren

& saffron and a god quantite of buttur.  Make a thin foile of dowe &

close hem therein as turteletes, & cast hem in boyling watur, & sethe

hem therein.  Take hote butter meltede & chese ygrated, & ley thi

ravioles in dissches; & ley thi hote buttur why grateded cheses binethe

& aboue, & cast thereon powdur douce.

 

94.  Rauioles (ravioli).  Take white cheese and grind it small, and mix

it with eggs and saffron and a good quantity of butter.  Make thin sheet

of dough and seal this within as with tartlettes and put them into

boiling water, and boil them.  Take hot melted butter and grated cheese

and lay the raviolis in a dish and lay the hot butter with grated cheese

beneath and above, and sprinkle with poudre douce. (Forme of Curye from

Curye on Inglysch)

 

Redaction:  8 servings = 1 table

 

33 Won Ton Wrappers

  Grated Parmesan Cheese

1 Egg

  Powdered Ginger

1 pinch Saffron

  Sugar (Caster)

2 Tbsp. Butter

  Cloves

1 cup mozzarella grated

  Cinnamon

1 cup provolone grated

  Mace

1 Egg white (to seal raviolis)

 

1.  Grate cheese, and mix with eggs, saffron and melted butter.

2.  Fill wrappers with mixture and seal with egg whites.

3.  Boil until tender (al dente)

4.  Place in a dish, sprinkle with ginger, sugar, cloves, cinnamon, mace

mixed together (poudre douce) and Parmesan cheese.

 

Notes:

1.  I used won ton wrappers for this feast for expediency's sake. they

are essentially an oriental version of this same pastry .

2.  I used egg whites to seal the raviolis so they would stay together

better.

3.  I didn't record any quantities for the contents of poudre douce.  I

suspect I did the old thing of putting them together until they

looked/tasted right.

 

It comes from "Forme of Curye" found in Curye on Inglysche.  Hope this

helps!

 

Kiri

 

 

Date: Tue, 15 Nov 2005 16:16:56 -0500 (GMT-05:00)

From: Christiane <christianetrue at earthlink.net>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Pasta dough questions ...

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

Well, Sunday is quickly looming for our "Persephone Goes to the  

Underworld" event, the dayboard for which is being prepared by my  

cooking partner in crime and me.

 

So Sunday, I was making the dough for our spinach and mint ravioli,  

doubling the recipe I had found on godecookery.com, and I found that  

the dough was not coming together. I drizzled some olive oil in, kept  

kneading, and then drizzled some more in until the dough suddenly  

came together into a smooth lump.

 

My question is, should I have added a beaten egg or two, instead of  

oil? The dough looked and handled great, but I was operating on pure  

panic and I had used all of my eggs.

 

On masochistic note, I rolled the dough out by hand and cut the  

sheets with a knife. Now I have a concept of why pasta was considered  

a luxury food in period. Heh.

 

Any thoughts on the olive oil amounts in the dough?

 

 

Date: Fri, 13 Jan 2006 17:22:42 -0600

From: "Terry Decker" <t.d.decker at worldnet.att.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Cream sauces

To: "Kerri Martinsen" <kerrimart at mindspring.com>,       "Cooks within the

        SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

I am assuming that Raviolis de Courge is what is first recorded in  

the 13th Century.

 

While I am certain butternut squash ravioli is delightful, it is most

definitely not a 13th Century French dish.  The butternut squash (Cucurbita

moschata) is a New World vegetable.  The raviolis de courge of the 13th

Century would have been made with some type of bottle gourd (Lagenaria

siceraria).  Also, the modern butternut squash was hybridized in the 18th

Century by Auguste Parmentier (IIRC).

 

That being said, there is quite a bit of confusion about whether squash or

gourds are being called for in the 16th and 17th Centuries, so the dish may

have been made with squash before 1600.

 

Bear

 

> I am serving Butternut Squash ravioli for a feast on the 28th.

> The dish: Raviolis de Courge - Is a traditional french mountain-village

> dish is squash ravioli with walnut sauce.

> (Castrum de Guillermo.  Guillaumes was founded in the 10th century by

> Guillaume II, Count of Provence.  Remains of Neolithic habitation were

> discovered in a grotto in the Vallon de Cantet, 3 km southwest.  There are

> other various signs of Gallo-Roman and barbarian occupation. First  

> written record, 13th century.)

> Vitha

 

 

Date: Fri, 13 Jan 2006 19:23:26 -0600

From: "Terry Decker" <t.d.decker at worldnet.att.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Cream sauces

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

The term courge appears in texts in relation to gourds and squash, so it has

been used as a general term for both.  I assume the source for Vitha's

recipe makes the connection between butternut squash and Raviolis de Courge.

The confusion between the bottle gourds and the squashes shows in a number

of languages, because of their similarity and the fact the better-tasting

squashes simply assimulated the gourds position in the kitchen.  (Bloody New

World Borg.)

 

Lagenaria is a genus rather than a species, specifically bottle gourds.

Cucurbita is the genus for squashes.  Lagenaria and Cucurbita are both

members of the family, Cucurbitaceae, which also contains the genera,

Cucumis (cucumbers and possibly some melons), Citrullus (watermelon  

and some other melons), and Luffa (luffas).

 

Lagenaria are found in both the Pre-Columbian New and Old Worlds, but the

current opinion is the New World Lagenaria are accidental transplants from

Africa due to ocean drift or migrating birds.

 

Bear

 

> how do you make the link from courge to squash, and specifically to butternut squash?

> Courge resembles courgette, which is the current day french for

> zucchini. Afaik, European squash relatives are Cucurbitaceae

> Lagenaria, a species whose fruits are only edible young.

> Finne

 

 

Date: Fri, 21 Dec 2007 19:57:22 -0500

From: Gretchen Beck <grm at andrew.cmu.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Authentic Ravioli

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

--On Friday, December 21, 2007 7:34 PM -0300 Suey <lordhunt at gmail.com>

wrote:

> What is the origin of ravioli? This site it states that ravioli was

> first documented in Italy in the 12th C.:

> http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=16782122

> I have it that it came from Africa between the 11th and 14th C.  

> Nola is the first Spaniard to give a recipe for it I think but he is 15th-16th

> century.

 

I don't know about the origin, but the earliest recipe I've found is in the

late 13th C British Library 32085 (or Manuscript A from Constance Hieatt's

and Robin Jone's Two Anglo-Norman Culinary Collections, published in

Speculum 61/4 (1986))

 

Here's the translation and transcription

Ravioli. Here is another kind of dish, which is called ravioli. Take fine

flour and sugar and make pasta dough; take good cheese and butter and cream

them together; then take parsley, sage, and shallots, chop them finely, and

put them in the filling [i.e., the cheese and butter]. put the boiled

ravioli on a bed of grated cheese and cover them with more grated cheese,

and then rehat them (?)

 

Ravieles. E une autre manere de viaunde, ke ad a noun ravieles.  Pernez bel

flur e sucre, e festes un past e pernez bon formage e bure, e braez

ensemble; e puys pernez persil e sauge e eschalouns, e mincez les menu, e

jettez les dedenz la fassure e puys pernez formage mye e metez desus e

desuz e puys metez au furn.

 

toodles, margaret

 

 

Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2009 16:55:16 -0500

From: "Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius" <adamantius1 at verizon.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] al-Hafla breakdown ...

To: Christiane <christianetrue at earthlink.net>,   Cooks within the SCA

        <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

On Feb 12, 2009, at 3:50 PM, Christiane wrote:

<<< Things I would do differently: not freezing the manti (it was very  

difficult to get them out of the layers of waxed paper and several  

opened up when boiling, disgorging their meaty insides) >>>

 

For future reference...

 

Something I've learned over the years regarding filled dumplings of  

various kinds, including mantee: you can freeze them on parchment-

lined cookie sheets until they're completely, rock-hard frozen -- you  

may have to freeze them in several batches -- and then transfer them  

to ziplock bags to save space, and since they keep their shape and  

don't stick together to any appreciable extent, and those that do  

separate easily in the pot, they're pretty easy to handle.

 

In boiling them, I find that you can reduce the tendency to burst open  

by having _lots_ of boiling water; the more water, and the faster you  

can bring it back to a boil, the better; dropping 20 pounds of frozen  

dumplings into a 20-quart pot is a bad idea, tempting though it may be  

to get them all cooked at once.

 

Once the water comes back to a boil (after you've cooled it by adding  

frozen dumplings to it), you break with the traditional pasta wisdom  

and lower the heat to a simmer. Once the dumplings float, give them  

about five more minutes for the filling to cook through (an instant-

read thermometer is helpful here), they're done. Since they're just  

done, and not heated to the boiling point, there's no steam buildup  

inside, and no internal pressure, so little to no bursting.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2009 23:19:31 -0800 (GMT-08:00)

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Manti, was al-Hafla breakdown ...

To: SCA-Cooks <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Gianotta wrote:

<<< Things I would do differently: not freezing the manti (it was very

difficult to get them out of the layers of waxed paper and several

opened up when boiling, disgorging their meaty insides); >>>

 

I've made manti from a 15th c. recipe (on my website) more than once.

 

I froze them on cooking parchment lined cookie sheets. Once frozen, they could be *carefully* dumped into zip lock bags.

 

To keep them from opening, do not seal the wrappers too thoroughly. Yes, i found that when there was a little opening, they didn't "burst". But when they were completely and tightly sealed, quite a few split open, letting the meat out.

 

Also, i used purchased wonton wrappers. I found that the thinner, more flexible Chinese wrappers were far, far better than the thicker and stiffer Japanese wrappers.

--

Urtatim (that's urr-tah-TEEM)

the persona formerly known as Anahita

 

<the end>



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