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fried-breads-msg – 3/14/14

 

Period fried breads. Funnel Cakes, Donuts.

 

NOTE: See also the files: pastries-msg, French-Toast-msg, bread-msg, flour-msg, pretzels-msg, breadmaking-msg, wafers-msg, yeasts-msg, cooking-oils-msg, desserts-msg.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

   Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                         Stefan at florilegium.org

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Date: Tue, 12 May 1998 22:36:01 -0700

From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Frittours

 

At 8:50 AM -0400 5/12/98, LrdRas wrote:

>Be that as it may, funnel cakes are frittour-

>like and, SFAIK, period documentable. These tasties are sprinkled with

>powdered sugar and are tasty warm or room temperature. :-)

 

Yes. Mincebek (from mis-en-bec = put in funnel) is a funnel cake recipe

from the Anglo-Norman cookbook; it has a sugar syrup on it rather than

powdered sugar.

 

Mincebek [or, funnel cakes]

Anglo-Norman no. 4 p. 863

 

(Elizabeth's translation, guided by theirs)

 

And another dish, which has the name mincebek.  Take amydon [wheat starch]

and grind it in a mortar, and if you do not have this, take fine white

flour; and take almond milk or tepid water, and put in it a little yeast or

a little sourdough; and then temper it; and take a bowl and make a hole in

the middle, and pour the mincebek through the hole into oil or into grease;

and then take sugar and make a syrup to boil; and dip[?] the mincebek in

it, and put some on top [or, put salt on it]; and then serve them. [end of

original]

 

1 c white flour

1 c whole wheat flour

2 c water for dough

1/4 c sourdough

1/2 c water for syrup

2 c sugar

oil for frying

 

Mix sourdough and water, stir into the mixed flour, stirring until pretty

smooth. Let rise about 7 hours. Heat oil in frying pan. For syrup, bring

water to a boil, add sugar and cover. When the sugar is dissolved and the

syrup again clear, it is ready. Pour some of batter into a funnel and

dribble around into oil at a medium heat, then fry until brown, turning at

least once. Each mincebek comes out of the oil onto a paper towel to drain

briefly, then is dipped (tongs are useful) into the syrup, then onto the

plate to serve.

 

Elizabeth/Betty Cook

 

 

Date: Wed, 13 May 1998 15:39:26 -0400

From: Ceridwen <ceridwen at commnections.com>

Subject: SC - Funnel cakes (cryspes)

 

The funnel cakes mentioned here are the forerunners of those

lovelies that we get at the fairs. Funnel cake mix is available at most

groceries, for those wanting to try them without redacting an original.

 

I made them for breakfast at Trimaris' Tenth Year Anniversary, in an

outdoor kitchen (two gas burners) for about 100 people. Fun... but I

won't do it again unless I have a way to regulate the temperature of the

oil better.... the breeze sucked the heat out of the burners, and I had

far more waste than I would have liked. Doing them again in June at St

Jerome's Study (for 50).Ceridwen

 

From Le Menagier de Paris (janet Hinson trans)

Crepes in Tournay Style

 

First, you must have the use of a brass skillet holding a quart, of

which the top is no wider than the bottom, even by a very little, and

the edges should be 3 or 4 fingers tall and half a finger thick.

Item: you need to have salted butter, melted, skimmed, and cleaned, and

then turned into another skillet, and leave all the salt and fresh oil

as clean in one as in the other. Then take eggs and fry (?) them and

take the whites out of half of them, and the remains of these are beaten

with all the whites and yolks, then take a third or a fourth of warm

white wine and mix it all together, then take the best wheat flour you

can get, and then beat together enough at a time, for one or two people,

and your batter should be neither clear nor thick, but such that it will

flow though a hole as big as your little finger:

 

Then put your butter and your oil on the fire, as much of one as the

other, until it boils, then take your batter and fill a bowl or a lerge

pierced wooden spoon, and pour it inot your grese, first into the middle

of the skillet, then circling until your skillet is full: and keep

beating your batterwithout stopping to make more crepes. And this crepe

which is in the pan should be lifted with a fork or a skewer, and turned

over to cook, then take it out, put it on a plate, and start another,

and keep stirring and beating the batter without stopping.

 

Forme of Cury:

Cryspes

 

Take flour of pandemayn and medle it with white greece over the fire

on achawfor and do the batter thereto quentlych through thy fingers, or

through a skymour and let it  little quayle a little so that it be hool

therein. And if thou wilt colour it with alkanet ysondyt. Take them up

and cast therein sugar, and serve them forth.

 

Ancient Cookery (contained in form of Cury)

For to make cryppys

 

Nym flour and wytys of eyren sugar other honey and sweyng togeder, and

make a batour. Nym white greece and do it in a posnet and cast the

batour thereyn and stury to thou have many, and take them up and messe

hem with the frutours ans serve forthe.

 

Two Fifteenth Century Cookery Books

Cryspes

 

Take white of eyron, milke, and fyne floure, and bete hit togidre

and drawe hit thorgh a streynour, so that hit be rennyng and noght to

stiff: and caste there-to sugur and salt. And then take a chauffur ful

of fresh greece boiling: and then put thy honde in the batur and lete

the batur ren thorgh thi fingers into the chaffur:

And when it is runtogidre in the chaffre, and is ynow, take a skymour and take hit outw ofthe chauffer and putte oute al the greece and let ren: And putte hit ina faire dissh and cast sugur thereon ynow and serve it forth.

 

 

Date: Thu, 14 May 1998 21:33:59 -0400

From: "marilyn traber" <mtraber at email.msn.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Frittours

 

Why not do an above the salt with the more elaborate fruit fritters and

below the salts get funnel cakes? I have made them for parties at home, and

my lord worked in a funnel cake booth one northern California renn faire,

and we both concur that at 30-60 seconds per funnel cake, with 2 skillets

running and an assistant sugarer{?} they could be turned out with relative

speed for even 300 people. Northern Equipment sells a very nice cast iron 2

burner that hooks up to propane and can be set up on a table just outside

the kitchen door[if it isn't raining..] very reasonably[in the vicinity of

$40. Then all you need is a nice pair of 10" cast iron skillets, some

well-fry, a 1/2 gal pitcher, a skimmer, a draining grill, a large shaker for

the sugar, a cake pan to sugar in and a whole stack of paper plates. The

whole shebang, if you had to buy everything rather than dog-rob would be

somewhere in the vicinity of $75 plus the cost of the ingredients for the

batter.

 

margali

 

 

Date: Thu, 07 Oct 1999 09:16:51 -0400

From: "Nick Sasso" <njs at mccalla.com>

Subject: SC - Funnel Cakes (was [TY] cooking query)

 

For thoise looking for the medieval funnel cake recipe, you will find it titled something like "Cryspes".  They are made with a thickish batter that is put into a bowl with a hole in the bottom and drizzeled over heated grease. When done, you scatter ground sugar on them.  It is used as a spice in this dish, not so much a sweetener.  Hooray for medieval Faire Foods!!

 

Might have to make these at an event some afternoon.

 

niccolo difrancesco

 

 

Date: Thu, 07 Oct 1999 09:58:21 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Funnel Cakes (was [TY] cooking query)

 

Nick Sasso wrote:

> For thoise looking for the medieval funnel cake recipe, you will find it tiled

> something like "Cryspes".  They are made with a thickish batter that is put

> into a bowl with a hole in the bottom and drizzeled over heated grease.  When

> done, you scatter ground sugar on them.  It is used as a spice in this dish,

> not so much a sweetener.  Hooray for medieval Faire Foods!!

 

See also Le Menagier's Crepe recipe; he even speaks of using the

funnel/bowl arrangement to make various shapes, such as buckles. Then

there are the English (and other) recipes for nysbeke, mincebek, etc.,

which are somewhere in between funnel cakes and zeppoles, being raised

with yeast. There are also similarly named dishes calling for a fruit

stuffing wrapped up like a cus...uh, you know. That thing.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Thu, 7 Oct 1999 19:34:37 -0400

From: "Andy Oppenheim" <Laguz at mediaone.net>

Subject: RE: SC - Funnel Cakes (was [TY] cooking query)

 

There is also a recipe in Take A Thousand Eggs Or More.

andy

 

 

Date: Thu, 7 Oct 1999 16:59:51 -0700

From: varmstro at zipcon.net (Valoise Armstrong)

Subject: Re:  SC - Funnel Cakes (was [TY] cooking query)

 

Here are several Strauben and other funnel cake-like recipes from Sabina

Welserin. She must have really been fond of them to include this many

recipes. I thought I saw a Strauben recipe in Anna Weckerin that included

chopped apple in the dough. I'll look laer this evening to see if I can

find it and give it a quick translation.

 

Valoise

 

**********

82 Spritzgebackenes

 

     Then take one third quart of milk and let it boil and take wheat flour,

as if you were making steamed buns, and take six or eight eggs and beat them

in one after the other until the dough becomes very soft and put through a

pastry bag and fry it slowly.

 

86 If you would bake good fried Strauben

 

       Then bring water to a boil and pour it on the flour, stir it together

well, beat eggs into it and salt it, take a small Strauben funnel, which

should have a hole as wide as a finger, and let the batter run through and

fry the Strauben. The batter should be warm.

 

99 To bake white Lautensternchen

 

       Take flour and pour cold water thereon and salt and make the dough thick

and thin it with pure egg whites, until it becomes thin enough. After that

take a small Strauben funnel, which should have a very small hole, and take

a small pan, and it should run through so that it looks like

Lautensternchen and fry them therein.

 

141   To bake Strauben for a meal

 

       Take six eggs and a little milk with water, salt it, beat it together well and put the flour into it. Do not make it thick, then it is right.

 

161   To bake white Strauben

 

       Take egg whites, well beaten, and some wheat flour, make a thin batter out of it, and let it run through a skimming ladle. Turn the Strauben at once

in the fat. Wind them around a rolling pin, then they become curved.

 

162   To bake Spritzgebackenes

 

       Take one quart of water or milk for a meal and put it into a pan. Bring it to a boil, stir good flour into it, so that the dough becomes fairly dry,

take it out of the pan, roll it out well, but with additional flour, put it

into a mortar, blend it well with eggs, until it becomes good and sticky,

put it in a pastry bag, bake them slowly.

 

185   If you would fry white Strauben

 

       Take an egg white and a spoonful of water and of flour and stir it

together well until the batter becomes smooth. Put sugar in the batter and

make it thinner than other batters. Make eight or ten small holes in a

small pot [let the batter run through] and fry it through that. And make

nice long strips, as long as the pan. They are not as thick as other

Strauben. Make a round stick three fingers wide, so that the pastry can be

wrapped over it, and twist it around with the stick and take it out, and

when you have taken it out, then take hold of the pastry and curve it over

the stick so that it goes together like a Hohlhippe. And set them on a

board, one after the other, and always set two close against each other.

This is pretty around a tart.

 

 

Date: Thu, 7 Oct 1999 18:43:11 -0700 (PDT)

From: Huette von Ahrens <ahrenshav at yahoo.com>

Subject: Re:  SC - Funnel Cakes (was [TY] cooking query)

 

- --- Valoise Armstrong <varmstro at zipcon.net> wrote:

> Here are several Strauben and other funnel cake-like

> recipes from Sabina Welserin.

 

Have you [or anyone else] found any correlation

between funnel cakes and baumkuche?  Baumkuche is a

cake batter that is piped or drizzled onto a spit and

cooked over a fire.  I have always wondered if there

was a correlation.

 

Huette

 

 

Date: Tue, 12 Oct 1999 13:49:24 -0700 (PDT)

From: Huette von Ahrens <ahrenshav at yahoo.com>

Subject: Re:  SC - Funnel Cakes (was [TY] cooking query)

 

- --- Valoise Armstrong <varmstro at zipcon.net> wrote:

> Huette wrote:

> >Have you [or anyone else] found any correlation

> >between funnel cakes and baumkuchen?  Baumkuchen is

 

> >cake batter that is piped or drizzled onto a spit

> >and cooked over a fire.  I have always wondered if

> >there was a correlation.

> I don't recall seeing a recipe for anything like

> baumkuchen in a period

> cookbook, but I wasn't looking for it, so I can't

> say when it might have

> originated. Obviously the cooking methods vary,

> Strauben is fried in fat

> and baumkuchen baked on a spit, are batters similar?

> Valoise

 

Sort of.  It is hard to tell.  There are similarities

and there are some differences.  I have only looked at

Sabrina Welserin.

 

The first recipe #161 To bake white Strauben, uses

bake in the title, but is unclear in recipe.  #185 If

you would fry white Strauben, is clearly fried, but it

is also twisted around a stick or rolling pin.

 

161 To bake white Strauben

 

Take egg whites, well beaten, and some wheat flour,

make a thin batter out of it, and let it run through a

skimming ladle. Turn the Strauben at once in the fat.

Wind them around a rolling pin, then they become

curved.

 

185 If you would fry white Strauben

 

Take an egg white and a spoonful of water and of flour

and stir it together well until the batter becomes

smooth. Put sugar in the batter and make it thinner

than other batters. Make eight or ten small holes in a

small pot [let the batter run through] and fry it

through that. And make nice long strips, as long as

the pan. They are not as thick as other Strauben. Make

a round stick three fingers wide, so that the pastry

can be wrapped over it, and twist it around with the

stick and take it out, and when you have taken it out, then

take hold of the pastry and curve it over the stick so

that it goes together like a Hohlhippe. And set them

on a board, one after the other, and always set two

close against each other. This is pretty around a

tart.

 

So if the first recipe really meant baked and if you

took the wrapping around the stick from the second

recipe, you would have something similar to

Baumkuchen.

 

The batters from Welserin specify egg whites, whereas

the modern recipe uses whole eggs but separates four

eggs and asks that the whites be beaten until stiff.

It also asks for lemon peel, almonds and cardemom.

However, I have found a Swedish version of this

called, "Spettekaka", which does not ask for any

flavorings or butter.  The German recipe comes from

Stettin in Pomerania, and the Swedish recipe comes

from the southern province of Skåne.

 

The modern recipe:

 

1 1/2 cups + 1 tbsp butter, softened

3 cups sugar

14 eggs, 4 separated

1 3/4 cups flour

grated peel of 1/2 lemon

1 heaping tbsp crushed almonds

generous pinch of cardamom

 

Combine the butter and sugar and beat until frothy.

Add eggs one at a time (10 whole eggs + 4 egg yolks).

Stir in flour and seasonings until you have a smooth

mixture. Beat 4 egg whites until stiff and fold into

batter. If the batter is still too stiff, beat in

whole eggs until correct.  Take a hard wood spit, 2 to

3 inches in diameter.  Wrap it with waxed paper.

Place spit over a low flame fire, approx. 12 inches

above. Drip batter over spit as it is slowly

rotating. When first layer is slightly brown, add

next layer, and continue adding layers on top of

browned layers until you have used up all the batter.

Remove cake from spit and sprinkle with sugar.  Serve

warm. The Swedish recipe decorates the cake with

flowers.

 

Anyway, in my eyes, there is some correlation, but I

think that there might be a "missing link" somewhere

that should link these early recipes with the modern

recipes. Or one of the other German cook book authors

might have something closer, but all I have access to

in English is Welserin and "Guter Speise".

 

Huette

 

 

Date: Tue, 12 Oct 1999 17:13:26 -0700

From: varmstro at zipcon.net (Valoise Armstrong)

Subject: Re:  SC - Funnel Cakes (was [TY] cooking query)

 

Huette von Ahrens wrote (regarding baumkuchen/strauben):

>Sort of.  It is hard to tell.  There are similarities

>and there are some differences.  I have only looked at

>Sabrina Welserin.

 

>The first recipe #161 To bake white Strauben, uses

>bake in the title, but is unclear in recipe.

 

Actually, the same word can be translated either bake or fry and needs to

be translated in the context of the recipe. In this case, I really did mean

to go back and change it to fry because:

 

>161 To bake white Strauben

>Take egg whites, well beaten, and some wheat flour,

>make a thin batter out of it, and let it run through a

>skimming ladle. Turn the Strauben at once in the fat.

>Wind them around a rolling pin, then they become

>curved.

 

Welser indicates that the strauben should be turned once in the fat -

sounds like frying to me. I'm going to keep my eye open for anything that

looks like baumkuche. Besides #185 (the white strauben that is shaped to

resemble Hohlippen) there are is the recipe for holliplen (or Hohlhippen)

that is shaped like a tube around a metal form.

 

190   To fry small holliplen

 

       Take good flour, the best that you can get, as much as you would like to

make, and put some water, sugar and pepper thereon. Also melt a little

butter in a small pan and pour it also therein, but it should not be hot,

but just as it is about to harden up again, then the holliplen will be more

easily released from the iron mold. And make the batter about the same

thickness as Strauben batter. You should also pour rose water into it. And

fry them on a cast iron mold. Grease the iron also with butter.

 

Valoise

 

 

Date: Thu, 08 Sep 2005 12:27:16 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Still Life with Sweets and Pottery, 1627

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>,

        SCA_Subtleties at yahoogroups.com

 

I was doing an image search today and came

across this one

http://www.nga.gov/cgi-bin/pinfo?Object=45891+0+none

 

It's too good to pass up and it's easy to get to since it's in the

National Gallery of Art. There are a number of detail images too.

 

Still Life with Sweets and Pottery, 1627 by Juan van der Hamen

 

Doughnuts anyone?

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Sat, 5 Nov 2005 08:56:21 -0800

From: David Friedman <ddfr at daviddfriedman.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] rice crispie (tm) treat analog--period

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> I recently made some variation on rice crispie

> treats... i hate marshmallows and eschew corn

> syrup, unless absolutely necessary. And being a

> cosmic organic sort i bought

 

(From the Miscellany)

 

Barad

al-Baghdadi 211/13

 

Take best white flour, made into a dough, and

leave to rise. Put a basin on the fire, with some

sesame-oil. When boiling, take in a reticulated

ladle some of the dough, and shake it into the

oil, so that as each drop of the dough falls in,

it sets. As each piece is cooked, remove with

another ladle to drain off the oil. Take honey as

required, mix with rose water, and put over the

fire to boil to a consistency: then take off, and

while still in the basin, whip until white. Throw

in the barad, and place out on a soft-oiled

surface, pressing in the shape of the mould. Then

cut into pieces, and serve.

 

1/2 c white flour   1/2 t dried yeast + 2 t water    1/2 c honey

1/2 c water       or 1/4 c sourdough   1 T rose water

        about 1 1/4 c sesame oil

 

Make the flour and water into a smooth batter.

Mix yeast and water, wait about 10 minutes, then

add to the flour-water mixture.  Let stand 2-3

hours (12-18 hours if your are using sourdough

instead of the yeast/water mixture). Heat 1 c of

the sesame oil to about 300° in a large frying

pan. Pour the batter through a ladle or skimmer

with small holes in it, so as to form small balls

in the hot oil. Cook to a pale brown (1-3

minutes), take out, drain on paper towel. Add

more sesame oil when it gets low.

 

Mix rose water and honey, cook to 250°. Pay close

attention-you want it almost but not quite

boiling over. As it cools, whip it; it eventually

takes a sort of whipped butter consistency, with

a light color. Mix it with the fried dough, press

down on an oiled plate, press down from above

with another plate or a spatula. Chill before

serving.

 

It has some tendency to come out a bit oily; you

may want to use paper towels during the pressing

to absorb as much of the surplus oil as possible.

----

The first time we made these my squire Dain, part

way through the process, told us that he knew

what they were--rice krispie treats.

--

David/Cariadoc

www.daviddfriedman.com

 

 

Date: Tue, 13 Mar 2007 09:57:04 -0500 (CDT)

From: "Pixel, Goddess and Queen" <pixel at hundred-acre-wood.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Sugar Waffles?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

On Tue, 13 Mar 2007, Jadwiga Zajaczkowa / Jenne Heise wrote:

 

> A friend mentioned a fair speciality from her part of the finger lakes

> region of NY, Sugar Waffles.

> From her description, it's the waffles made with these irons:

> http://www.petkeep.com/Sugar_Waffle.html

> I keep thinking there's another name for these, and also that  

> there's a period recipe similar to them -- could it be wafers?

 

Rosettes. There's a recipe in Welserin for them:

 

88 A molded and fried pastry

 

Take eight eggs and beat them well and pour them in a sieve and strain

them, put a little wine in with it, so that it goes through easily, the

chicken embryo remaining behind. Afterwards stir flour into it, until you

think that it is right. Do not make the batter too thick. Dip the mold in

with proper skill and let them fry, then it is well done. Salt the eggs

[13].

 

Margaret FitzWilliam

 

 

Date: Tue, 13 Mar 2007 07:49:32 -0700

From: Susan Fox <selene at earthlink.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Sugar Waffles?

To: jenne at fiedlerfamily.net, Cooks within the SCA

        <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Jadwiga Zajaczkowa / Jenne Heise wrote:

> A friend mentioned a fair speciality from her part of the finger lakes

> region of NY, Sugar Waffles.

>> From her description, it's the waffles made with these irons:

> http://www.petkeep.com/Sugar_Waffle.html

> I keep thinking there's another name for these, and also that  

> there's a period recipe similar to them -- could it be wafers?

 

Rosettes! They are Swedish.  I make these around Christmastime.  I

never really found documentation for working them with dipped irons like

this but I think Huette has.

 

From http://rosetteirons.com/index.html, an guide to the naming of  

names:

 

In Spain and Mexico, the pastries are called Buenellos; Scandinavian

families call them "rosettes", the French call them "Merveille", and in

Hungary, "roza frank". Even in the United States, we have many different

names for these cookies. For instance:

Minnesota = Rosette Cookie

Ohio = Sugar Waffle Cookie

Florida = Fried Cookie

New York = Italian Fried Cookie

Maryland = Lace Cookie

Georgia = Elegant Wedding Cookie

Pennsylvania = Festival Sugar Waffle

Indiana = Fair Sugar Waffle

Pukalani, Maui, Hawaii = Chinese pretzels

Philippines = Swedish rosette iron

 

Try this website for some radical shapes:

http://www.sugarcraft.com/catalog/cooky/rosette.htm

 

Yours in crunch goodness,

Selene

 

 

Date: Tue, 13 Mar 2007 16:54:46 -0700 (PDT)

From: Huette von Ahrens <ahrenshav at yahoo.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Sugar Waffles?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Yes. This is one of the recipes that I found, Selene.  There are a  

couple more in the Dutch opus.

 

Huette

 

--- "Pixel, Goddess and Queen" <pixel at hundred-acre-wood.com> wrote:

> Rosettes. There's a recipe in Welserin for them:

> 88 A molded and fried pastry

> Take eight eggs and beat them well and pour them in a sieve and strain

> them, put a little wine in with it, so that it goes through easily, the

> chicken embryo remaining behind. Afterwards stir flour into it, until you

> think that it is right. Do not make the batter too thick. Dip the mold in

> with proper skill and let them fry, then it is well done. Salt the eggs [13].

> Margaret FitzWilliam

 

 

Date: Tue, 13 Mar 2007 20:22:19 -0500

From: ranvaig at columbus.rr.com

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Sugar Waffles?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

> Rosettes!  They are Swedish.  I make these around Christmastime.  I

> never really found documentation for working them with dipped irons  

> like this but I think Huette has.

 

> From Rumpolt, Ein new Kochbuch, Von allerlei Gebackens

 

5. Mach ein Teig mit Wein und Eiern an/ oder mit

lauter Milch. Sto? den Messing Model

in heisse Butter/ da? er warm wirt/ truckne jhn

wohl ab/ sto? das Eisen in Teig/ da? er

nicht vber das Eisen gehet/ halts gegen dem

Feuwer/ da? fein trucken wirt an dem

Eisen/ und wenns trucken ist/ so sto? flugs in

heisse Butter/ so wirt der Teig vom Eisen

lassen/ backs geschwindt au?/ legs auf ein Bret oder Sib.

 

5. Make a dough with wine and eggs/ or with clean

milk. Push the brass mold (pattern) in hot

butter/ so it becomes warm/ dry it well/ push the

iron in the dough/ that it does not go over the

iron/ hold against the fire/ that it will dry

nicely on the iron/ and when dry, then push

quickly in hot butter/ then you will leave the

dough on the iron/ fry quickly/ lay on a clean

board or sieve.

 

Ranvaig

 

 

Date: Wed, 14 Mar 2007 08:08:15 -0800

From: Marion Waldegrave <marionofwintersgate at twistedsistah.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Sugar Waffles?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

I make this every christmas time, being Scandahoooovian means i have

too!, the trick with these is TEMPERATURE! If you do not have the

iron at the right temp, and the oil at the right temp and the batter

at the right temp, the cookie will stick to the iron!  I have eight

different designs to dip and you can find most of these online or at

a Scandinavian store!

 

Marion

 

 

Date: Sun, 25 Mar 2007 00:22:07 -0400

From: ranvaig at columbus.rr.com

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] clean milk?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

> 5. Mach ein Teig mit Wein und Eiern an/ oder mit

> lauter Milch.

> "with *clean* milk" ???

> Huh? As opposed to what? Dirty milk? Sour milk?

 

Pure might be a better translation.  Rumpolt uses

"lauter" about eggs, almonds, water, blood, wine,

butter, lemon juice, "Rosensaft" rose juice, and

broth after it has been strained or skimmed.

 

And uses "gel?utert" - purified, about sugar and syrup.

 

Ranvaig

 

 

Date: Sun, 25 Mar 2007 06:32:34 -0500

From: "Terry Decker" <t.d.decker at worldnet.att.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] clean milk?

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

> 5. Mach ein Teig mit Wein und Eiern an/ oder mit

> lauter Milch.

> "with *clean* milk" ???

> Huh? As opposed to what? Dirty milk? Sour milk?

 

Pure might be a better translation.  Rumpolt uses

"lauter" about eggs, almonds, water, blood, wine,

butter, lemon juice, "Rosensaft" rose juice, and

broth after it has been strained or skimmed.

 

And uses "gel?utert" - purified, about sugar and syrup.

 

Ranvaig

 

La:utern can also mean strain or clarify.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Mon, 26 Mar 2007 09:49:19 -0500 (CDT)

From: "Pixel, Goddess and Queen" <pixel at hundred-acre-wood.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Sugar Waffles

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

On Sat, 24 Mar 2007, Stefan li Rous wrote:

> Rosettes. There's a recipe in Welserin for them:

> 88 A molded and fried pastry

> Take eight eggs and beat them well and pour them in a sieve and strain

> them, put a little wine in with it, so that it goes through easily, the

> chicken embryo remaining behind. Afterwards stir flour into it, until you

> think that it is right. Do not make the batter too thick. Dip the mold in

> with proper skill and let them fry, then it is well done. Salt the eggs

> [13].  >>>

> Oh! Thank you. Until you gave this period reference I was considering

> the info on these pastries interesting, but only of passing interest.

> I did think the stuffed sandwich maker which could be used over a

> campfire interesting as well. I wonder if they could be convinced to

> make a unit making flatter wafers with a period design.

> I've never heard of anything like these sugar wafers before. The

> result doesn't resemble my preconceived ideas of either a wafer or a

> waffle. I guess it is a regional difference. How are these sugar

> wafers usually eaten? As is? or sprinkled with powdered sugar? Or are

> the hollow sections filled with something and then eaten? What about

> in period?

 

Welserin doesn't say how they're served. I suspect that sprinkled with

sugar would be a valid presentation, but my focus is England/France

medieval, not German. The German experts on the list will probably  

have a better idea.

 

Modernly I know rosettes as a Xmas cookie (of which there were many) in

our family. Since none of the family lived in a heavily Swedish

neighborhood, I had no idea that rosettes were a general Scandahoovian

thing until we moved up here to MN, where they appear in the grocery

stores in early December (dyed red or green, yech!).

 

Grandpa (who was Swedish and Austrian) served them sprinkled heavily with

powdered sugar, which is how I serve them when I make them.

 

Margaret FitzWilliam

Northshield

 

 

Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2008 03:23:24 -0800 (PST)

From: Huette von Ahrens <ahrenshav at yahoo.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] PPC 84 / doughnuts

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

I received my issue # 84 of PPC on Tuesday.  I have had great respect  

for the editors of PPC up until now.  Sigh.  In this issue is a 23 page article entitled "The Origins and the Early History of the Doughnut" by Brian Brivati.

 

Seeing this title, I was very excited and started to read the article   almost immediately upon opening up the envelope.  He starts nicely, but then proceeds to ramble through North America and practically stating that the Native American fry bread was an ancestor to doughnuts.  He then rambles off to Ancient Egypt and talks about the origins of bread and yeast and throws in apocryphal stories, along with quotations from the Bible, both old and new testaments.  He then rambles to Ancient Greece and Athenaeus' "The Deiphnosophists" stating that the 'krimnitas' or 'chondrinos' of Thessaly were the ancient ancestor of doughnuts.  

 

He then wanders to Cato and 'Of Agriculture' and stated that the clearest ancestor of the doughnut is either "placenta" or "globi".  From there he wanders to early medieval England, talks about fairs and festivals and fast food, eventually making a statement that "payne puff", "pain pendu" and "mistembec" were ancestors of doughnuts. He wanders more and eventually states that the doughnut might have been brought over on the Mayflower.  He briefly mentions the Dutch 'olie-koeck' [which he mis-spells as 'olyoek'].  Not once does he mention 'krapfen'.  He quotes from various historic texts, but he does not document [at least in my opinion any of his theories.  If you can't tell by   now, I am extremely disappointed in this article.

 

So, who else has read this article?  What is your opinion of it?  Am I right in thinking it is a poorly written and researched article?  Or am I totally off base?

 

Huette

 

 

Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2008 16:57:56 -0600

From: "Terry Decker" <t.d.decker at worldnet.att.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] PPC 84 / doughnuts

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

> Do you think that Krapfen is an ancestor to doughnut?

> Emilio

 

Krapfen is a fairly broad term covering fritters, turnovers and other fat

fried pastries including Berliners.  I would argue that Cato's Globi are an

early form of doughnut and they appear to be a close ancestor to recipe 173

"Wie man krepflen pfligt zu niernberg jn der fasnacht zu machen" from Sabina

Welser. Thus Krapfen are likely in the true line of doughnut evolution.

 

I would also argue that placenta has nothing to do with doughnuts, so I

would flag the article that initiated this thread as being of questionable

accuracy until it can be verified.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2008 18:49:19 -0800 (PST)

From: Huette von Ahrens <ahrenshav at yahoo.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] PPC 84 / doughnuts

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Thank you.  I was hoping that you would comment on this.  I was thinking of recipe #173 and also recipe #95.  There are also four similar recipes in Ein Buch von Guter Spise: #58, 59, 60, and 61.

 

Huette

 

--- Terry Decker <t.d.decker at worldnet.att.net> wrote:

> Krapfen is a fairly broad term covering fritters, turnovers and other fat

> fried pastries including Berliners.  I would argue that Cato's Globi are an

> early form of doughnut and they appear to be a close ancestor to recipe 173

> "Wie man krepflen pfligt zu niernberg jn der fasnacht zu machen" from Sabina

> Welser.  Thus Krapfen are likely in the true line of doughnut evolution.

> Bear

 

 

Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2008 21:04:49 -0600

From: "Terry Decker" <t.d.decker at worldnet.att.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] PPC 84 / doughnuts

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Since Globi and the Shrove Tuesday Nuremberger Krapfen seem to be related, I

wonder if the recipe was transferred into Germania by the Legions or if it

is a later addition to the German corpus?

 

Bear

 

> Thank you.  I was hoping that you would comment on this.  I was thinking

> of recipe #173

> and also recipe #95.  There are also four similar recipes in Ein  

> Buch von Guter Spise: #58, 59, 60, and 61.

> Huette

 

 

Date: Sun, 10 Feb 2008 20:23:07 -0500

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] PPC 84 / doughnuts

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

> Huette von Ahrens wrote:

>> I received my issue # 84 of PPC on Tuesday.  I have had great  

>> respect for the editors of PPC

>> up until now.  Sigh.  In this issue is a 23 page article entitled  

>> "The Origins and the Early

>> History of the Doughnut" by Brian Brivati. snipped  If you can't  

>> tell by now, I am extremely

>> disappointed in this article.

>> So, who else has read this article?  What is your opinion of it?  

>> Am I right in thinking it is a

>> poorly written and researched article?  Or am I totally off base?

>> 

>> Huette

 

Ok the doughnut article--

This "the Origins and Early History of the Doughnut" by Brian Brivati on

pages 51-74 of PPC 84 is a very strange one. Here are some quick thoughts.

 

To start --

No footnotes, references, bibliography, or sources are listed. So we have the author quoting large amounts of text without scant attribution at times. He

mentions the internet and apparently quotes text from websites without naming the websites.

 

He mentions for instance Martha Carlin and writes

"Martha Carlin writing of the fast-food industry..." on page 68. Now where

exactly did Martha Carlin write about the fast-food industry. He fails

to say.

 

I happen to know that he is referencing this article:

Carlin, Martha. "Fast Food and Urban Living Standards in Medieval England."

*Food and Eating in Medieval Europe.*

Edited by Martha Carlin and Joel T. Rosenthal.

London: The Hambledon Press, 1998. pp. 27-51.

 

Many other readers might not know that.

I have to wonder if the sources or notes were just omitted from the end

of the article.

 

He early on states "I define the doughnut as wheat-based risen dough

which is fried and then finished sweetly." page 51.

 

As to his definitions, he doesn't reference OED, MED, or such works asone might expect like Dictionary of American Regional English (DARE/) or/The Historical Dictionary of American Slang. He also doesn't mention using the Oxford Companion to Food and Drink or the Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America*

 

*The article as has been noted by Mistress Huette is all over the place and even tries to tie into a Native American pre-historical connection on pages 53-54. Here he seems to be ignoring his own definition that was just offered two pages earlier. But no matter because he then tries to tie in ancient Egypt, Greece, Rome and the Bible. Then it's off to feast days and fairs in the Middle Ages and the already mentioned Martha Carlin article. It's confusing at best.

 

In conclusion I will mention that the author on page 52 proclaims in nouncertain terms "Sally Levitt Steinberg's The Doughnut Book is the only previous work on the history of the doughnut." (There's actually two edition of this book by the way--1987 and 2004.The author was featured in a Travel Channel's documentary /Donut  Crazy/.)

 

Brivati is just wrong here as John T. Edge's excellent small history titled Donuts. An American passion came out in 2006. Had he read John Edge's book he might have gained a better perspective as to what doughnuts or donuts are or are not. Edge writes on page 14 of his book "The truth is that fried pastries are universal. They are historical."

 

In conclusion I think people should just skip the article and read JohnEdge's book or perhaps wait until September. I will add that another book on doughnuts titled "Glazed America: A Social History of the Doughnut" will be published in September 2008 by University Press of Florida.

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2008 10:47:28 -0400

From: "Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius" <adamantius1 at verizon.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] OOP Frying Question

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

On Apr 12, 2008, at 10:23 AM, rattkitten wrote:

> Ok so when making Funnel Cakes with a deep fryer how do you keep the

> batter from sticking to the bottom side of the basket? It pours through

> and we get little dots on the bottom of the basket and the cake part

> ends up having to be almost cut off from the basket after it drains.  We

> have even tried to scrape it up while it was frying to very little

> avail.

 

Maybe you need a thicker batter and hotter oil? The trick is to get

the cake to develop a partial "skin" before it reaches the bottom of

the basket. Easier said than done, of course, until you have a little

experience and tinkering time.

 

Are you putting the batter into the basket and lowering it in, or

lowering the empty basket first?

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2008 11:44:49 -0400

From: rattkitten <rattkitten at bellsouth.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] OOP Frying Question

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

The oil is at 375 which is as hot as the poor little thing will go...

makes me miss the commercial fryer I had at the Restaurant. (We don't

use one at the School I am at so that our little darlings don't grow up

with fried foods... )  anyways the batter was sort of thick but I guess

it could have been a little more.  And yes we are lowering the basket

into the oil before we pour in the batter.  One thing that worked sort

of was using a spoon and pouring the batter into that after submerging

the spoon into the oil.... But we shouldn't have to do that... I just

think the damn thing is too small.... Need to get me a BIGGER FRYER....

aaruh aruh aruh... (Thank You Tim Allen) LOL.  We got this thing back at

Christmas and I have been slowly playing with it... I generally avoid

fried foods.  But it has been fun for French Fries and Won Tons, Egg

Rolls, Shrimp Chips... etc... We just got up this morning and said mmm

donuts. Ended up with funnel cakes. and crumbs...

 

Good Breakfast though.

 

Nichola

 

Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius wrote:

> Maybe you need a thicker batter and hotter oil? The trick is to get

> the cake to develop a partial "skin" before it reaches the bottom of

> the basket. Easier said than done, of course, until you have a little

> experience and tinkering time.

> Are you putting the batter into the basket and lowering it in, or

> lowering the empty basket first?

> Adamantius

 

 

Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2008 19:08:58 -0700

From: "Sarah Fitzpatrick" <fitz at ccountry.net>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Funnel cakes

To: <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

These things are cooked in a pot of oil with no basket. You put the batter

into a funnel.  Hold your finger over the end of the spout and let some

dough drop into the hot oil. They fall into flatish curls. When you have

enough, a couple of circles, put your finger back over the end to stop the

flow. Pick them up with tongs or a fork.

 

They do make specific pouring things now. A syrup pitcher might work.

 

Sarah

 

 

Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2008 23:42:01 -0600

From: "S CLEMENGER" <sclemenger at msn.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Funnel cakes

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

It's been years since I made them (and I do mean MANY years!), but  

IIRC, we used a cleaned syrup bottle--the Aunt Jemima kind that's got  

the little spout like dish soap bottles do.

--Maire

 

<<<  These things are cooked in a pot of oil with no basket. You put the batter

   into a funnel.  Hold your finger over the end of the spout and let some

   dough drop into the hot oil.

 

   Sarah >>>

 

 

Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2008 09:28:14 -0400

From: "Elaine Koogler" <kiridono at gmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] OOP Frying Question

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

This reminds me of the Daifur, or Braided Bread, that we served at our

recent ME event.  The two major differences are that this is made with

semolina flour and the dough is braided before frying, rather than put into

a pretzel shape.  The recipe for this can be found in the file about the

event that I put up on the SCA Cooks Yahoogroups site.  It can also be found

in Cariadoc's Miscellany, on the Web.  However, if anyone wants a separate

copy, let me know.  It was a howling success at our event...folks were

meeting the servers at the door before they could even get to the mezze

table! It is, however, quite labor-intensive, but we felt that it  

was well worth it!

 

Kiri

 

On Sun, Apr 13, 2008 at 12:11 AM, <ranvaig at columbus.rr.com> wrote:

> Or Jalebi, which are rather like small funnel cakes that are fried then

> dipped into syrup. They are bright orange and intensely sweet, and taste

> rather less interesting than they look, IMO.

> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jalebi

> <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tv13kzR4wBU>;

 

 

Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2008 13:18:19 -0400

From: ranvaig at columbus.rr.com

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] OOP Frying Question

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

> This reminds me of the Daifur, or Braided Bread, that we served at our

> recent ME event.  The two major differences are that this is made with

> semolina flour and the dough is braided before frying, rather than  

> put into a pretzel shape.

 

The Jabebi are made from a batter and poured in the oil, not formed  

into shape.

 

Ranvaig

 

 

Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2008 10:32:38 -0700

From: Lilinah <lilinah at earthlink.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] OOP Frying Question

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

Someone wrote:

> I keep seeing something that looks like funnel cakes

> in the Indian markets in the neighborhood, that must have been poured

> through an opening the thickness of a pencil, or less. I haven't tried

> them, but they look cool.

 

And Ranvaig replied:

> I can think of two things this could be:

> Sev a dry crispy snack of chickpea flour, sometimes served on top

> of Bhel puri.

 

Let me note that sev are savory, not sweet. They are quite opaque.

 

> Or Jalebi, which are rather like small funnel cakes that are fried

> then dipped into syrup. They are bright orange and intensely sweet,

> and taste rather less interesting than they look, IMO.

 

Well, perhaps soaked in syrup would be more appropriate description

:-) They're rather translucent, compared to sev, and they're not made

with chickpea flour.

 

They are quite popular throughout the Arabic speaking world from

Morocco at least to Syria and Lebanon - i don't own a modern Iraqi

cookbook, but i'd lay odds that they're eaten in Iraq, too. And, of

course, as Ranvaig makes clear, all the way to South Asia.

 

> I think I saw Jalebi in Nimatnama.  They might be period (at least

> the name if not the modern recipe).  I only have a scanned copy, but

> will try to look for it.

 

They are indeed period, although they often have a more "complicated"

name, jalabiyya. They appear in many of the surviving SCA-period

Arabic-language cookbooks.

 

> I found this on the web, but no citation

> "Jalebi originated in Arabia, where it was called Zalabia. It was

> brought to India during Moghul Empire."

> http://www.indiacurry.com/desserts/ds008jalebi.htm

 

There's no way to know if they originated in Arabia, since we have no

Arabian cookbooks, and not much information on Arabian food.

 

However, they are in many Arabic language cookbooks, bearing in mind

that dishes in these cookbooks come from many different cultures

(including Byzantine), but were somewhat standardized in the Abbasid

dynasty (Arabic, but not Arabian).

--

Urtatim (that's err-tah-TEEM)

the persona formerly known as Anahita

 

 

Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2008 14:13:47 -0700

From: Lilinah <lilinah at earthlink.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] OOP Frying Question

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

Kiri wrote:

> On Sun, Apr 13, 2008 at 12:11 AM, <ranvaig at columbus.rr.com> wrote:

>> Or Jalebi, which are rather like small funnel cakes that are fried then

>> dipped into syrup. They are bright orange and intensely sweet, and taste

>> rather less interesting than they look, IMO.

>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jalebi

>> 

>> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tv13kzR4wBU

> This reminds me of the Daifur, or Braided Bread, that we served at our

> recent ME event.  The two major differences are that this is made with

> semolina flour and the dough is braided before frying, rather than  

> put into a pretzel shape.

 

Actually , there's another huge difference between Dafair (it's a

three syllable word - da-FA-ir) and Jalabiyya (that's the period

name, obviously the modern shorter names is derived from it). (i

don't know about the videos, but i've been exposed to modern jalebi

and recipes for them)

 

Dafair is a raised yeasted bread that is cooked in an oiled pan. Then

topped with drizzles of spiced honey.

 

Jalabiyya is a relatively liquid batter which is drizzled (from a

funnel, or can with a hole in it, or a squeeze bottle, or a pitcher)

into hot deep fat so that it becomes translucent and crispy. Then it

is soaked in syrup.

--

Urtatim (that's err-tah-TEEM)

the persona formerly known as Anahita

 

 

Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2008 17:27:27 -0400

From: "Elaine Koogler" <kiridono at gmail.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] OOP Frying Question

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

On Sun, Apr 13, 2008 at 5:13 PM, Lilinah <lilinah at earthlink.net> wrote:

> So i'm interested in knowing how far ahead i can make them. The other

> sweets will keep for several days if tightly sealed. I won't have

> access to an oven on site, since the kitchen will be occupied with

> the feast, but i might be able to set up my camp stove in the parking

> lot to warm them up.

 

OK...let's try this again.  We wound up making them the day of...they were

wonderful coming out of the pot hot and crispy.  You could probably make the

dough up the day before, but I'd recommend not cooking them until just

before you serve them.  They were ok cold, but I would think that if they

sat for any length of time (like overnight) they'd lose their crispness.

Your mileage may vary, but that's our experience...

 

Kiri

 

 

Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2008 22:26:18 -0700 (PDT)

From: Lawrence Bayne <shonsu_78 at yahoo.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] OOP Frying Question

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

> Ok so when making Funnel Cakes with a deep fryer how do you keep the

> batter from sticking to the bottom side of the basket?

 

> Nichola

 

Don't use the basket. Fish the funnel cake out and

turn it with a chinese strainer.

 

Lothar

 

 

Date: Thu, 17 Jun 2010 11:17:44 -0700 (PDT)

From: wheezul at canby.com

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] cheese bread

 

<<< I struggled with deciding on choosing the meaning of pipe/tube in a recipe

recently. The recipe for 'strauben' (funnel cakes) in Anna Wecker's

cookbook uses the word 'rohren' (pipes/tubes) for the shape that flows

from the funnel into the frying pan.  Rohren (or forms of it) are also

the word used to distinguish the number of branches on a candlestick or

ring. Ultimately I settled on 'pipes'.

 

I'd guess that the recipe might imply to roll out the dough on dry flour

(to keep it from sticking to the board) into pipe shapes and then cook it.

I also wonder what sort of nuance is present in the word for biscuit - do

you have the original untranslated version?  If it is gebacken or a

version of it, they can be both fried or baked.

 

Katherine >>>

 

<< Interesting.  Rohr can refer to "reed" or the thin round cane used in

wickerwork. Wecker may be referring to the similarity between woven reed

and the shapes produced by funnel cakes.

 

Bear >>

 

I'll let the recipe do the talking:

 

Page 67

Strauben von Mandeln

Mach ein gute dicke Mandelmilch/Klopff Eyer darein/fast Eyer und Milch

gleich/thu ein wenig salz und zucker darein/von wegen des schmalzes/ein

wenig Rosewasser/mach mit Sch?nem Meel ein straubenteig nicht zu

d?nn/bachs wie andere strauben/oder lauter stern/mit ziemlichen

r?hrlein/nit zu klein/leges auff ein sch?nes wei?tuch/darnach bestrewe es

wol mit Zucker/sie werden sch?n unnd gut.  Also magstu s?sse Oepffel klein

hacken/und in einen straubenteig thun und mit grossen r?hren backen/sind

fast gut.

 

My attempt at translation:

 

Almond funnel cakes

Make a good thick almond milk/beat eggs into it/mix the eggs and milk

together/add a bit of salt and sugar into it/from a weight of fat/a bit of

rosewater/make with nice (fine?) flour into a strauben batter not too

thin/bake as for other strauben/or plain stars/with seemly [appropiate

sized] pipes [understood smallish]/not too small/lay on a clean white

cloth/thereon strew well with sugar/they are nice and good.  Also you can

hack sweet apples small/and put in a strauben batter and bake with large

pipes/[they]are quite good.

 

These actually sound really nummy.  Even if apples are diced small, the

'pipes' still are of a somewhat larger size than a reed.  Welser has a

recipe, I think, for the lauter sternen.  Rontzier says to fry strauben in

butter.

 

Katherine

 

 

Date: Sun, 22 Aug 2010 10:58:53 +0200

From: Ana Vald?s <agora158 at gmail.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Honey Sopapilla!

 

In Chile the sopapillas are made with flour, salt, water and pumpkin.

In Argentina and Uruguay they are made with flour, salt and water, no baking powder and no lard. They are eaten covered with sugar.

 

Ana

 

On Sun, Aug 22, 2010 at 3:53 AM, Terry Decker <t.d.decker at att.net> wrote:

<<< Sopapilla appears to derive from the Iberian Arabic "xopiapa" meaning

"bread soaked in oil."  Wikipedia, BTW, suggests that the Arabic derives

from the German "suppa."  This makes me wonder if the word may not derive

from the Visigoths in North Africa.

 

As we know them, sopapillas have been around since the 18th Century and

probably earlier, but they appear to be a New World dish.  The New Mexican

style dessert sopapilla you are talking about is made with flour, salt,

lard, and milk leavened with baking powder.  So, sopapillas are probably not

in the Medieval/Rennaisance corpus.  The puff is from the frying.

 

As for deep frying not being period, what do you mean by deep?  Foot deep

frying vats may not be period, but most deep frying can be done in an inch

or two of oil. >>>

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Wed, 25 Aug 2010 13:09:54 -0400 (EDT)

From: Christiane <christianetrue at earthlink.net>

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

Subject: [Sca-cooks] The medieval origins of zeppole and cheesy

        doughnuts

 

Food historian Clifford Wright has a new (new to me, anyway) article up on his site about Sicilian zeppole where he talks about their medieval origins, and he has some interesting period citations in it:

http://www.cliffordawright.com/caw/food/entries/display.php/topic_id/13/id/124/

 

He also gives in this article a period recipe by the traveler Abdalbasit ibn Halil for a fried cheese doughnut called mujabbana, which I am going to try making. What are your theories as to the "piece of cheese" placed in the middle of the cheesy dough?

 

Mmmm, cheesy doughnuts ...

 

Adelisa de Salernum

 

 

Date: Wed, 25 Aug 2010 17:32:33 -0700

From: Glenn Gorsuch <ggorsuch at gmail.com>

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Cheezy doughnuts

 

Earlier this year I did a redaction for Samartard (from, if I remember

right, A Noble Booke off Cookerie), which was essentially a

funnel-cake/deep-fried snack-y thing, that uses fresh cheese in the batter,

and is sprinkled with sugar.  Pretty tasty, even if the cheese wasn't

overwhelmingly present flavor-wise.  And I seem also to recall a recipe from

Sabrina Welserin that is a battered, fried piece of cheese...so it's a

pretty common idea, deep frying cheezy goodness.

 

Which cheese to use is a toughie.  Most fresh cheeses, if formed into a

solid piece, don't melt well, so if your mujabbana is supposed to have a

solid lump o' cheese, I'd go with that--they're quick and easy enough to

make with whatever animal's milk you are justified in using.  If you think

it's supposed to be crumbled into the dough, again those fresh cheeses are

pretty crumbly.  If you think it's supposed to be melty, well, I don't know

enough about cheeses of that part of the world that ARE melty to guess.

 

Gwyn

 

<<< He also gives in this article a period recipe by the traveler Abdalbasit

ibn Halil for a fried cheese doughnut called mujabbana, which I am going to

try making. What are your theories as to the "piece of cheese" placed in the

middle of the cheesy dough?

 

Mmmm, cheesy doughnuts ...

 

Adelisa de Salernum >>>

 

 

Date: Thu, 26 Aug 2010 12:53:57 +1200

From: Antonia Calvo <dama.antonia at gmail.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Cheezy doughnuts

 

Glenn Gorsuch wrote:

<<< Which cheese to use is a toughie.  Most fresh cheeses, if formed into a

solid piece, don't melt well, so if your mujabbana is supposed to have a

solid lump o' cheese, I'd go with that--they're quick and easy enough to

make with whatever animal's milk you are justified in using.  If you think

it's supposed to be crumbled into the dough, again those fresh cheeses are

pretty crumbly.  If you think it's supposed to be melty, well, I don't know

enough about cheeses of that part of the world that ARE melty to guess. >>>

 

I make mujabbana with 3/4 white, non-gooey cheese (like young, mild

feta) and 1/4 mild, slightly gooey cow's milk cheese (like asiago,

gouda, colby, etc).

--

Antonia di Benedetto Calvo

 

 

Date: Thu, 26 Aug 2010 19:18:05 +1200

From: Antonia di Benedetto Calvo <dama.antonia at gmail.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] The medieval origins of zeppole and cheesy

        doughnuts

 

Ian Kusz wrote:

> please share yr redaction and results.

 

Here's mine.  The result is that they don't last very long.

http://cunnan.sca.org.au/wiki/Mujabbana

 

==================

Original Source

 

Know that mujabbana isn't prepared with only one cheese, but of two; that is, of cow's and sheep's milk cheese. Because if you make it with only sheep cheese, it falls apart and the cheese leaves it and it runs. And if you make it with cow's cheese, it binds, and lets the water run and becomes one sole mass and the parts don't separate. The principle in making it is that the two cheeses bind together. Use one-fourth part cow's milk and three-quarters of sheep's. Knead all until [p. 64, recto] some binds with its parts another [Huici Miranda observes that this passage is faintly written and only a few letters can be made out] and becomes equal and holds together and doesn't run in the frying pan, but without hardening or congealing. If you need to soften it, soften it with fresh milk, recently milked from the cow. And let the cheese not be very fresh, but strong without...[words missing]...that the moisture has gone out of. Thus do the people of our land make it in the west of al-Andalus, as in Cordoba and Seville and Jerez, and elsewhere in the land of the West [here written as al-Maghrib].

 

Manner of Making it

 

Knead wheat or semolina flour with some yeast into a well-made dough and moisten it with water little by little until it loosens. If you moisten it with fresh milk instead of water it is better, and easy, inasmuch as you make it with your palm. Roll it out and let it not have the consistency of mushahhada, but firmer than that, and lighter than musammana dough. When the leaven begins to enter it, put the frying pan on the fire with a lot of oil, so that it is drenched with what you fry it with. Then wet your hand in water and cut off a piece of the dough. Bury inside it the same amount of rubbed cheese. Squeeze it with your hand, and whatever leaves and drains from the hand, gather it up [? the meaning of this verb eludes me] carefully. Put it in the frying pan while the oil boils. When it has browned, remove it with an iron hook prepared for it and put it in a dipper ["iron hand"] similar to a sieve held above the frying pan, until its oil drips out. Then put it on a big platter and dust it with a lot of sugar and ground cinnamon. There are those who eat it with honey or rose syrup and it is the best you can eat.

 

(Anonymous Andalusian Cookbook, translated by Charles Perry)

 

Redaction

 

Ingredients

1 Tbsp dried yeast

1 tsp malt syrup (or sugar)

1/4 cup warm water

3 cups milk, lukewarm

up to 10 cups flour

400g mild feta or similar cheese, cut into chunks

150g mild cow's milk cheese (edam, young provolone, asiago-- even colby will do in a pinch), *grated or finely chopped

oil for frying

cinnamon

sugar

 

Method

Combine the water, malt, and yeast and let stand ten minutes or substitute sourdough starter. Combine the leavening with the warm milk and work in enough flour to make a soft dough. Knead until smooth and very springy, ~250-300 strokes. Put the dough in a clean, oiled bowl, cover, and let rise in a warm place until doubled in bulk.

 

Mash the feta in a bowl and mix in the other cheese. It should all cling together, but if it seems a bit dry and crumbly, you can add a drop or two of milk.

 

Punch down the dough and knead a few strokes. To form the mujabbana, break off a bit of dough about the size of a ping-pong ball. Make a hollow in it with your thumb and put in a spoonful of cheese. Then seal the dough thoroughly around the filling. Shallow-fry in about half an inch of oil or deep fry until golden. Drain and sprinkle with plenty of cinnamon and sugar. Serve warm. Makes around 3-1/2 dozen. Does not freeze or reheat well.

--

Antonia di Benedetto Calvo

 

 

Date: Thu, 26 Aug 2010 10:23:15 -0400

From: Robin Carroll-Mann <rcarrollmann at gmail.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] The medieval origins of zeppole and cheesy

        doughnuts

 

And a later-period recipe in the same family:

 

133. Oranges of Xativa which are Cheesecakes. You must take new cheese

and curd cheese, and grind them in a mortar together with eggs. Then

take dough and knead those cheeses with the curd cheese, together with

the dough. And when everything is incorporated and kneaded take a very

clean casserole. And cast into it a good quantity of sweet pork fat or

fine sweet oil. And when the pork grease or oil boils, make some balls

from said dough, like toy balls or round oranges. And cast them into

the casserole in such a manner that the ball goes floating in the

casserole. And you can also make bunuelos of the dough, or whatever

shapes and ostentations you wish. And when they are the color of gold,

take them out, and cast in as many others. And when everything is

fried, put it on plates. And cast honey upon it, and on top of the

honey [cast] ground sugar and cinnamon. However, note one thing: that

you must put a bit of leaven in the cheeses and in the eggs, and in

the other put flour. And when you make the balls, grease your hands

with a little fine oil, and then [the balls] go to the casserole. And

when it is inside, if the dough crackles it is a signal that it is

very soft, and you must cast in more flour [into the dough] until it

is harder. And when the fritter is made and fried, cast your honey on

it, and [cast] sugar and cinnamon on top as is said above.

 

Ruperto de Nola, Libro de Guisados, Spain, 1529.

(Translation, mine)

 

Brighid ni Chiarain

 

 

Date: Thu, 26 Aug 2010 11:48:56 -0400

From: Sharon Palmer <ranvaig at columbus.rr.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Honey Sopapilla!

 

<<< The pumpkin is cooked, made into a puree and mixed with the dough.

Sopapillas is definitely a pastry :)

 

Ana >>>

 

Rumpolt's Gebackens chapter has several recipes that are dough fried

in butter, not exactly sopapillas, but close.

 

7. Make a dough from clean yolks/ pour a little sweet cream under it/

and mix the dough with it/ and make streusel from it/ about a finger

long/ and one Finger thick/ that see that you it do not over salt it/

throw into butter/ that is not too hot/ fry nicely/ cool off/ and

give warm or hot on a table/ sprinkle with white sugar/ like this it

is good and well tasting.

 

8. Take warm milk and beautiful flour/ put beer yeast with it/ and

mix the dough with it/ sprinkle a little with salt/ and work the

dough well/ set it to the fire/ that it goes over itself/ wash the

fists clean/ and grab into the dough/ take a piece of it/ and pull

finely from each other/ until it becomes thin and nicely long/ throw

into hot Butter/ in a longish pan/ like this you fry the dough

rapidly/ give it warm or cold on a table. You might sprinkle with

sugar or not. And in Bavaria one calls them baked Steigleder

(climbing leathers).

 

Ranvaig

 

 

Date: Thu, 26 Aug 2010 15:44:12 -0400 (EDT)

From: Christiane <christianetrue at earthlink.net>

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org, dama.antonia at gmail.com

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] The medieval origins of zeppole and cheesy

        doughnuts

 

Ian Kusz wrote:

please share yr redaction and results.

 

Dama Antonia wrote:

Here's mine.  The result is that they don't last very long.

http://cunnan.sca.org.au/wiki/Mujabbana

 

Hmmm. The Anonymous Andalusian recipe and the recipe that Brighid provided seem to be different than this:

 

"Knead the fresh cheese with your hands as you would dough. Carefully knead in the semolina. Once it has the consistency of a dough of our zal?biyya, or a rather thick consistency, then take a piece and spread it out delicately in the palm of your hand. Place a piece of cheese in the center and close it up to make a bonbon. Flatten it a little bit and deep-fry in oil. Remove and sprinkle on powdered sugar and a little powdered cumin."

 

It seems in this one, you take your fresh cheese, reduce it to a paste by kneading, then knead in semolina until the cheese-flour mixture is the texture of zalabiyya dough. That actually reminded me of how some gnocchi are made, with ricotta cheese and grated fresh cheese and flour mixed together to make the dough.

 

Incidentally, in Sicily (and among Sicilian-American and Italian-American families whose grandmothers still went through the agita of doing this) there's a form of zeppole made for Easter or for St. Joseph's day, either baked or deep fried, filled with ricotta cream. But the dough itself does not contain cheese. These are sometimes known as cassateddi, though there are other forms of cassateddi made with a filling of chopped figs instead of ricotta.

 

I think they way I am going to try to redact the recipe above is to drain a container of ricotta (Sicilian ricotta is drier than the stuff we have here), knead it with semolina flour, and see what kind of dough texture I get.

 

I am also trying to find out what are traditional Tunisian fresh cheeses. Modern Tunisia apparently produces a lot of gruyere. With the country's proximity to Sicily, I also wonder if there's a Tunisian version of ricotta.

 

Adelisa de Salernum

 

 

Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2011 13:05:11 -0800 (PST)

From: V O <voztemp at yahoo.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] question about recipes

 

Would the 1st recipe be funnel cake? And would the second one possibly be a

recipe that could be translated to be springerle? I know it says lebkuchen, but

with all of the stuff about dipping the mold into rosewater, letting them sit

overnight.? To me it sound like springerle, describing molding the

cakes/cookies and letting them dry over night. The process of cooking is very

interesting, I may just have to try this with some of my molds next time.

 

from

Das Kuchbuch der Sabrina Welserin (1553)?

 

Thanks,

Mirianna

 

99 To bake white Lautensternchen

 

Take flour and pour cold water thereon and salt and make the dough thick and

thin it with pure egg whites, until it becomes thin enough. After that take a

small Strauben funnel, which should have a very small hole, and take a small

pan, and it should run through so that it looks like Lautensternchen[14]and fry

them therein.

 

163 To make N?rnberger Lebkuchen

   <snip>

 

 

Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2011 13:55:12 -0800 (PST)

From: wheezul at canby.com

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] question about recipes

 

<<< Would the 1st recipe be funnel cake? ...

 

from

Das Kuchbuch der Sabrina Welserin (1553)

 

Mirianna >>>

 

I went through a whole funnel cake craze last spring.  I think these are a

type of funnel cake that is very light in color and dropped into the pan

in the shape of a star.  Other recipes for 'strauben' itself give

directions for the dripping that sound more like the country fair funnel

cake.

 

Katherine

 

<<< 99 To bake white Lautensternchen

 

Take flour and pour cold water thereon and salt and make the dough thick

and thin it with pure egg whites, until it becomes thin enough. After that

take a small Strauben funnel, which should have a very small hole, and take a

small pan, and it should run through so that it looks like Lautensternchen[14]and fry them therein. >>>

 

 

Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2011 18:47:32 -0500

From: Sharon Palmer <ranvaig at columbus.rr.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] question about recipes

 

> Would the 1st recipe be funnel cake?

 

More or less, using only egg whites, it would be whiter and have a

different texture, and it says to make a star shape, rather than a

random one.  Rumpolt has several strauben recipes too, let me know if

you want me to look them up.

 

Ranvaig

 

<the end>



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