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French-Toast-msg - 3/12/14

 

Period French Toast and similar fried egg-dipped bread items. Pain Perdu, Sopas Doradas (Golden Sops). Recipes.

 

NOTE: See also the files: French-Toast-art, 3-F-Toast-Rec-art, frittours-msg, eggs-msg, bread-msg, fried-breads-msg, fried-foods-msg, breakfast-msg, eggs-msg.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

   Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                         Stefan at florilegium.org

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Date: Mon, 15 Nov 1999 21:36:18 EST

From: Bronwynmgn at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - French toast?

 

rkappler at home.com writes:

<< Pain Perdu:

(redacted/paraphrased): soak slices of bread in wine and rosewater.  Dredge

in beaten eggs and sugar.  Fry, sprinkle with sugar. >>

 

There's also one in Seven Centuries of English Cooking (not the best

reference) called Brown Fires which is brown bread dipped in eggs, and

saffron. Yummy; I've used it for breakfast at events with good results.

Unfortunately the original isn't in Seven Centuries, although I believe I

found it elsewhere; just can't remember where!

 

Brangwayna Morgan

 

 

Date: Mon, 15 Nov 1999 22:24:31 -0600

From: Magdalena <magdlena at earthlink.net>

Subject: Re: SC - French toast?

 

Can you tell I just got my hands on Platina?  ;>

 

Platina 8.63  Golden Balls

 

Toast chunks of bread crust a little on both sides.  When they are toasted,

soften with rose water in which there are both beaten eggs and ground sugar.

When they are taken out, fry in a pan with butter or fat, far apart so that they

do not touch each other.  When they are fried and transferred into a serving

dish, sprinkle with sugar and rosewater colored with saffron.  This pleases M.

Antonius, not undeservedly, for it fattens the body, helps liver and kidneys,

and stimulates passion.

 

- -magdalena

 

 

Date: Tue, 16 Nov 1999 08:59:36 EST

From: RuddR at aol.com

Subject: SC - Re: French toast?

 

Puck writes:

"Henisch speaks of the gluttony on Shrove Tuesday to get rid of all the

perishables before lent begins.  One of her passages involves a recipe that

sounds much to me like French Toast:

 

Pain Perdu:

(redacted/paraphrased): soak slices of bread in wine and rosewater.  Dredge

in beaten eggs and sugar.  Fry, sprinkle with sugar.

 

thoughts?"

 

It looks like French Toast to me, too.  Check out "Payn pur-dew", _Two

Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books_, p. 42; a little simpler, no wine or

rosewater, and just the egg yolks.

 

Rudd Rayfield

 

 

Date: Tue, 16 Nov 1999 08:21:53 -0700 (MST)

From: Ann Sasahara <ariann at nmia.com>

Subject: Re: SC - French toast?

 

On Mon, 15 Nov 1999, Richard Kappler II wrote:

<snip>

> Henisch speaks of the gluttony on Shrove Tuesday to get rid of all the

> perishables before lent begins.  One of her passages involves a recipe that

> sounds much to me like French Toast:

> Pain Perdu:

> (redacted/paraphrased): soak slices of bread in wine and rosewater.  Dredge

> in beaten eggs and sugar.  Fry, sprinkle with sugar.

> thoughts? Puck

 

The Hampton Court Cookery Book has an original recipe for "pain perdu" as

an example of Tudor cookery.  When I was cooking my way through the

book, I skipped the pain perdu, because it seemed too much like Henry

VIII's french toast.  (Instead, I made the salmon pie. Recipe page is

still under construction at: www.geocities.com/~ariann/SalmonPie.html.

The aulese in the upper left corner was recommended by Lord Ras).  My book

is in NM and I'm in AZ, so I will post the original pain perdu and the

redaction on Sat.

 

Ariann

 

 

Date: Tue, 16 Nov 1999 08:55:49 -0800

From: "Stephanie Dale Ross" <aislinncc at mailcity.com>

Subject: SC - Re: Payn Pur-Dew

 

I happen to have a recipe for Payn Pur-dew, gleaned from one of my very first events where I helped out in the kitchen, say uh, 17 years ago? I pasted it onto a 3x5 card all those years ago, but have never made it. Unfortunately, no sources are mentioned :(.

Aislinn Columba of Carlisle

 

Payn Pur-Dew

 

The name means either God's bread or lost bread: this is the medieval version of modern french toast.

 

7 fresh eggs, separated

4 tbsp heavy cream or milk

1/4 tsp salt

1/4 tsp cinnamon

1/2 tsp ground cumin

12 slices whole wheat, rye or pumpernickle bread, cut into four triangles or squares each

3 tbsp powdered sugar

1/4 lb butter for sauteeing the slices in a heavy frying pan or skillet

 

1. Slowly heat the butter in the heavy frying pan or skillet, being careful not to let it burn.

2. With a fork or rotary beater, beat the egg yolks with the cream or milk. Add the egg whites. Beat again.

3. Stir in the salt, cinnamon, cumin

4. Dip the bread pieces in the spiced egg until they are completely coated and remove with a spatula

5. Saute the bread on both sides in the melted butter until golden brown.

6. Remove them to a rack or the serving platter and sprinkle them with powdered sugar. Serve warm

 

The sugar originally called for in the recipe is brown, but I changed it to powdered since we had the discussion recently about what forms of sugar are period. Wish I had the source for this recipe, but except for the sugar change, I reproduced it exactly as I had it, so that someone out there might read it and remember where it originally came from.

 

 

Date: Tue, 16 Nov 1999 11:21:02 -0600

From: Chip <jallen at multipro.com>

Subject: Re: SC - French toast?

 

Puck sprach:

> Henisch speaks of the gluttony on Shrove Tuesday to get rid of all the

> perishables before lent begins.  One of her passages involves a recipe that

> sounds much to me like French Toast:

 

> Pain Perdu:

> (redacted/paraphrased): soak slices of bread in wine and rosewater.  Dredge

> in beaten eggs and sugar.  Fry, sprinkle with sugar.

 

I've always thought of pain perdu as "French" French Toast.  We never

did use wine or rosewater, but it's close to what most Americans think

of as "French Toast" (what they see on the Shoney's Breakfast Bar).

 

IIRC, 'pain perdu' literally means 'lost bread'.  (A quick

babelfish-ing confirms it).  That's always bothered me.  Why lost?  Is

it because you have to hastily use it up before Lent so it doesn't go

bad as Puck's new book suggests?  Sounds reasonable, but most anything

dredged in eggs, fried and sprinkled with sugar is welcome on my plate

and anything but "lost".  Lost down my gullet, maybe.

____________________________________________________________

Iyad ibn Bisharo, Shire of Easaraigh, Kingdom of Meridies

Chip Allen, Cookeville, TN

 

 

Date: Tue, 16 Nov 1999 13:44:16 -0500 (EST)