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books-food-msg - 10/18/13

 

Books about food. Not cookbooks.

 

NOTE: See also the files: cookbooks-msg, cookbooks-bib, cookbooks-SCA-msg, cb-rv-Apicius-msg, cb-novices-msg, merch-books-msg, merch-cookbks-msg, online-ckbks-msg.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

   Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                         Stefan at florilegium.org

************************************************************************

 

From: ferzocog at ere.umontreal.CA (Ferzoco George)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: A must-read on medieval cuisine

Date: 9 Apr 1993 20:02:04 -0400

 

For all of you interested in the state of the art of research on medieval

cookery, get the book

 

        Carole Lambert, ed., "Du manuscrit a la table. Essais sur la

        cuisine au moyen age et repertoire des manuscrits medievaux

        contenant des recettes culinaires." Montreal and Paris: Presses

        de l'Universite de Montreal and Champion-Slatkine, 1992.

 

It contains 25 articles in English and French (with abstracts for each in

English and French), an incredibly useful (to scholars) list of manuscripts

containing culinary recipes, a complete bibliography, and indices of:

        titles and authors of cookery books

        Incipits of culinary texts

        titles of isolated recipes

        language of the texts

        place of production of the manuscripts

 

Ciao, George Ferzoco       ferzocog at ere.umontreal.ca

 

 

From: David Schroeder <ds4p+ at andrew.cmu.edu>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Sweet Thoughts, etc.

Date: Sat, 10 Apr 1993 15:04:25 -0400

Organization: Doctoral student, Industrial Administration, Carnegie Mellon, Pittsburgh, PA

 

Greetings good gentles --

 

I have recently been reading an entertaining volume, "Seeds of Change," by

Henry Hobhouse (a journalist, not a professional scholar).  The book looks

at the historical import of five key plants or plant products:  quinine,

sugar, tea, cotton, and potatoes. [c.1985  ISBN: 0-06-091440-8 (ppbk)].

 

Some of the more interesting tidbits are worth sharing.  For example, here's

a chart of the relative cost of 10 pounds of sugar expressed as a percentage

of 1 ounce of gold (taken as an average of London, Paris, and Amsterdam)...

 

     Period          Sugar %         Honey %

     1350-1400         35.0            3.30

     1400-1450         24.5            2.05

     1450-1500         19.0            1.50

     1500-1550          8.7            1.20

 

Note that Hobhouse doesn't cite his sources for this table and doesn't

mention that the "value" of an ounce of gold may have changed in the

last period due to the huge captured troves of the Aztecs and Incas,

but it's still an interesting chart, if only to see the relative expense

of sugar and honey.  Clearly, using refined sugar in a dish would have

been an expensive proposition during almost all of the Society's scope.

 

Hobhouse also says:

 

"The sugar industry survived the gradual expulsion of the Moors from

the Mediterranean littoral, and was carried on by both Moslems and

Christians as a profitable, expanding concern for two hundred years

from about 1300.  [Production was centered in Syria, Palestine, the

Dodecanese, Egypt, Cyprus, Crete, Sicily, North Africa, and Southern

Spain. *B*]  The trade (as opposed to production) was under the domi-

nance of the merchant bankers of Italy, with Venice ultimately con-

trolling distribution throughout the then known world.  The first sugar

reached England in 1319, Denmark in 1374, and Sweden in 1390.  It was

an expensive novelty and useful in medicine, being unsurpassed for

making palatable the odious mixtures of therapeutic herbs, entrails,

and other substances of the medieval pharmacopoeia."

 

Apparently, sugar cultivation in the Caribbean basin was substantial in

the second half of the 16th century leading to cheaper sugar prices and

a shift in leadership in the trade from Venice to Amsterdam.

 

TEA

On the matter of tea Hobhouse reports that in 1700 England was importing

50 short tons of tea with a wholesale value of 4,000 pounds sterling or

about two pounds of money for one pound of tea.  Again, not a cheap item!

He further states (in what is probably a typographical error) that:

 

"Tea, coffee, and cocoa all arrive in London in the same year, 1652.

[Could it be 1562 or 1552?]  The word "tea" occurs in Shakespeare

and "cha," the Canton-Macao form, crops up in Lisbon from about 1550."

 

It's hard to understand the Bard's use of a term for something introduced

to England years after his death...

 

I'd best sign off now and return to my reading...  I found the book

remaindered for $1.98 at my local Borders Bookstore, so you may have

good luck finding a copy of your own.

 

My best -- Bertram

 

+-----------------------------------------------------------------------+

Bertram of Bearington                                      Dave Schroeder

Debatable Lands/AEthelmearc/East               Carnegie Mellon University

INTERNET: ds4p at andrew.cmu.edu                         412/731-3230 (Home)

+------------------------ PREME * Press On * PREME ---------------------+

 

 

 

Angharad/Terry asks for enough info about that book out of Montreal

that I mentioned to order it. The Following might be helpful.

 

Title: _Du Manuscrit a` la Table_

Editor: Carole Lambert

Publisher: Les Presses de l'Universite' de Montre'al

          2910, boul. E'douard-Montpetit, Montre'al (Qc), Canada

          H3T 1J7

          tel. (514) 343-6929, facs. (514) 343-2232

Distributer (?): gae[umlaut]tan morin e'diteur

                diffuseur exclusif des Presses de l'Universite' de

                Montre'al

                C.P. 180, Boucherville (QC), Canada, J4B 5E6

                tel. (514) 449-7886,  facs. (514) 343-2232

ISBN: 2-7606-1564-2

 

and to whet your appetite:

 

                   TABLE DES MATIE`RES

                         (extraits)

 

Forward (or preface) by Carole LAMBERT

 

_I - ESSAIS SUR LA CUISINE AU MOYEN A^GE_

 

1. SOURCES

Constance B. HIEATT "Listing and Analyzing the Medieval English

Culinary Recipe Collections: a Project and its Problems"

 

Johanna Maria van WINTER "Une livre de cuisine ne'erlandais du XVIe

sie`cle"

 

Allen J. GRIECO "From the Cookbook to the Table: a Florentine Table

and Italian Recipes of the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries"

 

Bi SKAARUP "Sources of Medieval Cuisine in Denmark"

 

Danie`le ALEXANDRE-BIDON "A` la table des miniaturistes: arche'o-

iconographie des gestes et des mets"

 

2. DIFFUSION DES LIVRES ET DES RECETTES

Philip et Mary HYMAN "Les livres de cuisine et le commerce des

recettes en France au XVe et XVIe sie`cles"

 

Melitta WEISS-AMER "The Role of Medieval Physicians in the Spread of

Culinary Recipes and Cooking Practices"

 

Mary Ella MILHAM "Platina and Papal Politics"

 

3. CUISINE ET DISTINCTIONS SOCIALES

Bruno Laurioux, "Table et hie'rarchie sociale a` la fin du Moyen A^ge"

 

Odile REDON "La re'glementation des banquets par les lois somptuaires

dans les villes d'Italie (XIVe - XVe sie`cles)

 

Agathe LAFORTUNE-MARTEL "De l'entremets culinaire aux pie`ces

monte'es d'un menu de propogande"

 

4. PARTICULARITE'S RE'GIONALES

 

Barbara SANTICH "les e'le'ments distinctifs de la cuisine me'die'vale

me'diterrane'enne

 

Rudolf GREWE "Hispano-Arabic Cuisine in the Twelfth Century

 

Jeanne ALLARD "Nola: rupture ou continuite'?"

 

Noe[umlaut]l COULET "La cuisine dans la maison aixoise du XVe sie`cle

(1400-1450)

 

Jean-Louis FLANDRIN "Structure des menus francais et anglais aux XIVe

et XVe sie`cles

 

Michel BALARD "E'pices et condiments dans quelques livres de cuisine

allemands (XVe-XVIe sie`cles)

 

5. CUISINE ET CONTRAINTES

 

Terence SCULLY "Les saisons alimentaires du _Me'nagier de Paris_"

 

Carole LAMBERT "Astuces et flexibilite' des recettes culinaires

me'die'vales francaises"

 

Laurier TURGEON et Denis DICKNER "Contraintes et choix alimentaires

d'un groupe d'appartenance: les marins-pe^cheurs francais a' Terre-

Neuve au XVIe sie`cle"

 

6. LES DOUCEURS ET LE PLAISIR

 

Liliane PLOUVIER "Le <<letuaire>>, un confiture du bas Moyen A^ge"

 

Lucie BOLENS "Les sorbets andalous (XIe-XIIIe sie`cles) ou conjurer

la nostalgie par la douceur"

 

Mary HYMAN "<<Les menues choses qui ne sont pas de ne'cessite'>>: les

confitures et la table"

 

Bruno ROY "Trois reagards sur les aphrodisiaques"

 

_II - RE'PERTOIRE DES MANUSCRITS ME'DIE'VAUX CONTENANT DES RECETTES

CULINAIRES_

 

Pre'sentation

 

Re'pertoire

 

Bibliographie

 

Index

 

Now doesn't that make your mouth water! If no enterprising Pennsic

merchant offers one for sale, my parents have offered (without too

much arm twisting) to get me it for my birthday. Grad student budget

or not, I cant miss this one. I've just got to start those French

lessons now...

 

Hoping that helped,

Thomas/David

 

David Tallan (tallan at flis.utoronto.ca)

or David_Tallan at magic-bbs.corp.apple.com

snail: 42 Camberwell Rd. Toronto ON M6C 3E8

 

 

From: "Philip W. Troy" <troy at asan.com>

Date: Thu, 17 Apr 1997 13:49:23 -0400

Subject: Re: SC - Guinea pigs

 

Christi Redeker wrote:

>

> Also the same I believe with Guinea Pigs.  They have Capybara (sp?) in

> most central and south American areas.  Which are the largest rodent and

> in the same direct family with the Cavy (guinea pig) that we know today.

> The guinea pigs they eat in those countries are very large,

> comparatively, to what are raised as pet shop $$.  They have an average

> weight of 2-3 pounds more than the average pet type guinea pig.  (Yes

> ladies and gentlemen, I raised guinea pigs and rabbits as a child and

> actually showed them, there is and an association called the ACBA

> (American Cavy Breeders Association) just for those out there who do.

 

Have a great book somewhere. It is called "Unmentionable Cuisine," and

concerns all the foods against which taboos exist in various cultures,

i.e. in the continental U.S., that means virtually EVERYTHING.  Author

is Charles Schwabe, if I remember correctly. There's a neat chapter on

guinea pigs, among several such. I seem to recall most of the recipes

call for the cavy to be scalded and de-haired, but not skinned.

 

Yum!

Adamantius, thinking about pies now

 

 

Date: Thu, 01 May 1997 22:51:40 -0600

From: Bob Angelone <epicurus at epicurus.com>

Subject: Epicurus Online

Newsgroups: rec.crafts.brewing,rec.food.drink.beer,rec.org.sca,alt.beer,ba.food,alt.food.wine

 

As publisher of 'Epicurus Online', I would like to personally invite all

of you to visit our newest issue.

 

This month's focus is on Flowers as Food. Articles by Carol Wilson, Bob

Pastorio and others are among the many interesting and recipe filled

tidbits you will find in this issue.

 

Please join me in thanking Cindy Renfrow, our Editor-in-Chief for a job

well done by visiting the ezine and enjoying it's wonderful, informative

articles. And while you're there, please sign our guestbook.

 

Epicurus Online - http://www.epicurus.com/ezine1.htm

 

If you like Epicurus Online, please check out our main site as well:

http://www.epicurus.com

 

Thanks and I hope to see you there soon!

 

Bob Angelone

Publisher

 

 

From: alysk at ix.netcom.com (Elise Fleming )

Date: Wed, 2 Jul 1997 14:21:03 -0500 (CDT)

Subject: SC - PPC and Markham

 

Greetings! PPC (Petits Propos Culinaires) is published by Prospect

Books and is in English.  If you live in the US, one year is $23.50 and

two is $45.  Your check should be made payable to PPC North America and

sent to PPC North America, 45 Lamont Road, London SW10 OHU.  One year

consists of three issues of a small hand-size treatise.  To me it is

well worth the price, for if there is something on the Middle Ages or

Renaissance you can be sure it is documentable.  A recent issue had a

brief article on Aphrodisiacs which I meant to send to this list.  Ask

for it as a gift from relatives!

 

Alys Katharine

 

 

Date: Mon, 8 Sep 1997 10:19:32 -0500 (CDT)

From: nweders at mail.utexas.edu (ND Wederstrandt)

Subject: Re: SC - Columbus cookbook

 

Here's the info on the Columbus book plus some of the info in it.

 

The name of the book is Columbus Menu, Italian Cuisine after the First

Voyage of Christopher Columbus, by Stefano Milioni printed by the Istituto

Italiano per il Commercio Estero (Italian Trade Commission) It came out in

1992.

 

       One of the more entertaining topics he author talks about is the

reason why forks started being used.  He states it was the introduction of

the tomato to Italian cooking that caused the fork to be noticed.  Milioni

states that the fork was around but that it was regarded as an oddity.

With the use of tomatoes as sauce, Pasta was harder to eat so the fork

started being used and quickly caught on.  So thanks to spaghetti with

marinara sauce, forks became hot stuff.

He does have some dates on various food stuffs

 

Tomato - appeared in Spain early in the 16th century where it was a magical

or medicinal plant.  Someone during this time tried eating it and described

the flavor as similar to eggplant but tastless. The book further states

that the tomato while known to Italian botanists in the 16th century was

not introduced until the 17th century.  The book also suggests that it was

primarily grown as an ornamental but during a food famine someone succumbed

and cooked one and ate it. No recipes listed in period

 

Potato - introduced through Spain when it was brought back by the

Conquistadors. Clusius in 1588 described the plant based on tubers he

received from the governor of what is now modern Belguim.  He ate them and

compared them to the turnip.  During the 16th century, potatoes were being

shipped to the Spanish garrisons in the Flanders area to supplement the

rations of the soldiers there.They are also listed as food items in the

records of the Sangre Hospital in Seville (1573)  These are white or

Virginian potatoes.  In 1587, Sir Francis Drake sailed into what is now

Columbia and loaded provisions, including potatoes, on his ship.  He was

supposed to take them to feed starving colonists in Virginia.  When he got

there everyone wanted to go back to England so they and the potatoes went

back. That's the reason they were called Virginian potatoes.  No period

recipes listed.

 

Clare St. John

 

 

Date: Sat, 13 Sep 1997 20:49:49 -0600 (MDT)

From: John or Fraya Davis <gameroom at infowest.com>

Subject: SC - Food Book!

 

Just picked up what I think is the best book for medieval cooks since the

cookbook! It's called "Food" by Waverley Root, Konecky & Konecky, NY ISBN:

1-56852-101-4. It's an authorative and visual history and dictionary of the

foods of the world.  It includes much documentation of when foods were eaten

and some on how they were prepared by different cultures.  It's amazing

what's in there about the potato!  I didn't know that!

 

Gillian

 

 

Date: Thu, 16 Oct 1997 07:27:27 -0600 (MDT)

From: Mary Morman <memorman at oldcolo.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Alphabet pretzels

 

On Thu, 16 Oct 1997, Ian van Tets wrote:

> doesn't one of the recipes for jumbles recommend cutting them in Ss

> if no other letter springs conveniently to mind?

>

> Cairistiona

 

I have just gotten a nice little food book called The Dutch Table by

Gillian Riley.  It is mostly 16th and 17th century Dutch paintings of food

and kitchens - with some commentary and many undocumented recipes that she

says are from an early 17th century source but does not quote in the

original. there are numerous paintings of bread dough letters both in

homes and in markets and the author talks about them being made for the

Feast of St. Nicholas on December 6th.  There are also pictures of

traditional, twisted pretzels. It's hard to tell if the letters are

cookies or plain bread - there are some that look like each.  Most of the

paintings are slightly out of period, but this is a lovely book.

 

elaina

 

 

Date: Wed, 29 Oct 1997 16:31:27 -0500 (EST)

From: Mark Schuldenfrei <schuldy at abel.MATH.HARVARD.EDU>

Subject: Re: SC - Cookbooks

 

Most of the cookbooks you mention are reviewed in back issues of Serve It

Forth (http://oldcolo.com/~memorman/sif_home.html).

 

        Tibor

 

Here is my review of Fast and Feast:

 

Fast and Feast: Food in Medieval Society, by Bridget Ann Henisch.  Published

by Pennsylvania State University Press, Copyright 1976, fifth printing. ISBN

0-271-01230-7 (hardcover)  0-271-00424-X (paperback, reviewed).

 

A book review by Mark Schuldenfrei (Tibor of Rock Valley)

 

So, should a Society cook read a book that doesn't have recipes?  Yes, it

seems we should.  "Fast and Feast" is well researched and indexed book

covering everything about food and foodways customs from late period, except

the details of redactions.  It is also fun to read (I laughed out loud

several times), well indexed and copiously footnoted, and reasonably

priced (I paid $14.95)

 

It covers everything about food, except the actual recipes.  It covers feast

service, entertainment, the role of food in daily life and the ecumenical

calendar, the role and popular opinion of the professional cook and the

housewife, and their everyday tasks.  It covers timing of meals, quantities,

beverages, the commercial infrastructure of the time.  It even covers the

tools of cooking, and eating.  There are many reproductions of period

illustrations, and the illustrations are well used by the supporting text.

The text is heavily footnoted, with 930 notes in 236 pages of text.

 

The book does lack a glossary, and it does occasionally use terms that a

truly novice cook might not know.  However, the index is good enough to

compensate. The bibliography is totally insufficient.  Again, however,

the footnotes provide a wealth of sources.  Some of Henisch's citations

are in original languages, and are only lightly modernized or translated:

but that doesn't prevent the reader from understanding her points.  A

readersknowledge of some of the generalities of history are quite useful.

(For example, page 38 covers the impact of the Reformation on Lenten

practices, without an explanation of the Reformation.)

 

Ms. Henisch organizational ability is formidable: I was particularly

impressed with her ability to discuss trends in foodways based upon the

corpus of surviving recipes.  I found myself wondering why I hadn't seen

those trends myself.  Do be warned: on a purely academic level, she can be

slightly suspect.  Many is the time I found her drawing broad conclusions on

slender evidence, or worse, supporting narrow conclusions with references

that span the centuries and nations.  Read her footnotes more carefully than

you read the text.  (I can't say I know enough to doubt her conclusions: I

quite agree with them.  But the academic rigor is spotty.)  She also

sometimes compromises by glossing details, in order to keep the flow of her

text. (For example, oversimplifying the definitions of caudle or hypocris).

 

Certainly, she has done an admirable degree of homework.  Foodways-related

quotations come from plays, household manifests, wills, period manuscripts

and receipt books, and more besides.  She has also obviously studied

hundreds of period illustrations, and makes many useful deductions based

upon them.

 

She speaks well on Society shibboleths: are forks period, who sits at high

table, should feast halls be lit or dark.  She is an evocative writer:

consider the pain this poor man felt:

 

"For the Hoccleves of this world, their heads throbbing after the

reresopers of the night before, such aggressive, all-around virtue was

far out of reach.  Pale on his pillow, the reveler would murmur instead

  'I may noght faste, ne do penauns, ne go to cherch, ne bydde my beddys,

for I have a badde heued ... I shal noght ben wel at ese tyl I have

drunkyn agen.'  Straightaway, an affable devil settled himself on the

bed, coaxing the sufferer to eat a morsel just to keep his strength up

to serve God all the more vigorously later in the day: [...]"

 

This is the sort of book that begs to be shared.  I want to loan it to my

friend who does period mumming, another who brews and is interested in

viniculture, my wife who makes sotelties, my friends who study period table

service. And I want to revisit some old recipes with new eyes.

 

The early student of foodways will find much to benefit them in this book,

although they may not spot some of the places where enthusiasm papers over

lack of evidence.  The experienced Society cook will love how this book

completes your knowledge of everything except how many onions to chop.  I

would recommend this volume heavily, even at twice the price.

 

 

Date: Fri, 7 Nov 1997 22:28:03 -0500 (EST)

From: Carol Thomas <scbooks at neca.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Pumpkins?

 

I wish I had a copy of "Why We Eat What We Eat" by Sokolov, published by

Summit, long out of print.  

 

It had good information on topics like this.  It should be available by ILL.

 

Lady Carllein

 

 

Date: Wed, 19 Nov 1997 18:49:47 EST

From: melc2newton at juno.com (Michael P Newton)

Subject: SC - Children's book

 

My lord husband found a children's book at the library the other day I

thought that some on this list might find interesting. It's _A Medieval

Feast_ written and illustrated by Aliki. If you have young children {or

whatch pbs alot.} you may have seen it on Reading Rainbow. Anyways, it

goes through what a lord and his manor had to do to get ready and serve a

feast for visiting royalty. The pictures are based off of medieval

illustrations, and even show several subtleteys and a couple of

cockentrice. Being the Shire's MoC, as well as a novice cook, I thought it

was a really good find.

 

Lady Beatrix of Tanet

 

 

Date: Wed, 19 Nov 1997 21:03:11 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Children's book

 

Michael P Newton wrote:

> My lord husband found a children's book at the library the other day I

> thought that some on this list might find interesting. It's _A Medieval

> Feast_ written and illustrated by Aliki. If you have young children {or

> whatch pbs alot.} you may have seen it on Reading Rainbow. Anyways, it

> goes through what a lord and his manor had to do to get ready and serve a

> feast for visiting royalty. The pictures are based off of medieval

> illustrations, and even show several subtleteys and a couple of

> cockentrice. Being the Shire's MoC, as well as a novice cook,I thought it

> was a really good find.

> Lady Beatrix of Tanet

 

Yes, that's a pretty good book. I don't recall that Aliki attempts to

perpetuate the myth about rotten meat and spices, which is a Good Thing.

One aspect he does mention, which is quite important and rarely

examined, is the question of cost. For some members of the aristocracy,

it could be quite crippling for the family fortune to find yourself on

the Royal Progress, with nothing to be done but grin, bear it, and go

into hock.

 

You might also check out Piero Ventura's "Food: Its Evolution through

the Ages", which is for somewhat older kids (maybe ten or so?). It gives

an overview of basic culinary history, from paleolithic man to the

present. It includes references to connections between, say, the

invention of better plows, which contributed to the Viking raids on

Northern Europe, etc. Illustrations aren't as pretty as Aliki's but

better detailed and more informative. All in all, very cool.

 

Got a copy of each for my son, and our friends look at the bookshelves

and say, "Look, how cuuuute! Brennan's got his own little books of

culinary history, just like Daddy!"

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Mon, 1 Dec 1997 16:40:48 -0500

From: "Louise Sugar" <dragonfyr at tycho.com>

Subject: SC - Fw: For the Cooks Among Us....

 

Here is a goodie from a friend of mine on another list

 

- -----Original Message-----

From: Henderson, Sharon <Meli at agent.infodata.com>

To: dragon at portcullis.maxson.com <dragon at portcullis.maxson.com>

Date: Monday, December 01, 1997 10:58 AM

Subject: For the Cooks Among Us....

 

An *extremely* cool book, excellent especially for people doing redactions or

trying to understand foreign terminology, is now available in the US again:

 

Hering's Dictionary of Classical and Modern Cookery.

13th English Edition by Walter Bickel.

Fachbuchverlag Dr. Pfannenberg & Co. 35390 Giessen, Germany.

 

English - 852 pages and no illustrations or photographs. This hard to find

essential dictionary is the comprehensive gastronomic encyclopedia and

reference work for chefs, culinary students, food and beverage managers, and

other professionals in the food service industry. This precious small red

precious volume with three complete indices contains more than 13,000

curtailed recipes; a comprehensive glossary of kitchen terms in English,

French, German, Italian, and Spanish; information on table service,

wine, dietaries and carving. Available from C.H.I.P.S, 1307 Golden

Bear Lane, Kingwood, TX 77339; Tel. U.S.A. + (281) 359-2270; Fax.

U.S.A. + (281) 359-2277, or by accessing the internet at

http://www.chipsbooks.com

 

Meli

 

 

Date: Thu, 4 Dec 1997 16:42:29 -0600 (CST)

From: alysk at ix.netcom.com (Elise Fleming )

Subject: SC - Cookery Myths and a "New" Book (Longish)

 

Greetings! I've been meaning to write about some of the "new" books I

found when a recent post "tickled" my memory from one of them.  Someone

mentioned that Catherine de Medici brought Italian cooks to France,

which is apparantly an "old cooks' legend" and not accurate.  Elizabeth

David, one of the cooking "gods" has a new version of her _Italian

Food_ which I was going to tell you all about.  (Actually, her estate

does. She died a few years ago.) (ISBN 0-7651-9651-4)  The book

currently appears to be on "mark down" at Borders Bookstores for $5.99!

The book is profusely illustrated, mostly with reproductions of

_period_ art which depict various aspects of cookery.  For the pictures

and documentation alone, it's worth the price.

 

The book contains some brief historical information in each of the

chapters and she refutes some of the "legends" that she passed on in

the earlier versions.  The recipes are modern but would be useful when

attempting to re-create similar "period" dishes.  She refutes the

legend of Marco Polo bringing noodles to Italy as well as the Catherine

de Medici one that someone repeated in an earlier post.  This is what

Ms. David writes: "To my original Introduction I have made only one

significant revision, and that concerns the paragraph dealing with the

influence on French cookery traditionally exercised by Catherine de

Medici and the Florentine cooks she is said to have brought with her to

France. These cooks, I now find, are part of a myth originating in

mid-nineteenth-century France, perhaps in the imagination of one of the

popular historical novelists who flourished at that period, and

certainly without historical fact.  As briefly as possible, what _is_

historical fact is that when Catherine arrived in France in 1533 to

marry Henri Duke of Orleans, younger brother of the Dauphin, she was

fourteen years old, had barely emerged from the Florentine convent in

which she had been brought up, and had already been granted French

nationality. All her attendants were French.

 

"Whatever the Italian influence exercised on French cultural life in

general and on culinary developments in particular by Catherine's

marriage to the boy who was later to become Henri II of France, that

transalpine influence had already been active at least since the end of

the previous century...."  She goes on for another paragraph and a half

detailing what influences occurred under Charles VIII and in

Catherine's reign as Queen Consort and Queen Dowager.

 

On the topic of "puff pastry", etc, part of another paragraph reads,

"One of her pastrycooks is credited with the invention or at any rate

with the introduction of flaky pastry, but then so are other

personages, among them the much later painter Claude Lorrain, who is

said to have learned how to make it in Rome.  Many food historians

would say that some form of fine-leaved pastry had been known at least

since the days of the Romans, and I think they would be right, but

equally I have doubts about the claim that Catherine's pastrycooks made

their "feuillete' " with butter rather than with oil or lard.  One does

not hear much about the use of butter in France at this period...."

 

A lovely book!  Do you have a Borders Bookstore in your area???  I've

bought six books already for use as gifts!

 

Alys Katharine

 

 

Date: Wed, 17 Dec 1997 16:34:07 -0500

From: margali <margali at 99main.com>

Subject: Re: SC - nasty medieval food was re: pre 1500 cookery

 

There is a fairly good book by Ann Hagen called A Handbook of

Anglo-Saxon Food:Processing and Consumption, isbn

0-9516209-8-3,Anglo-Saxon Books, 25 Malpas Dr, Pinner, Middlesex, Eng.

that I rather enjoyed and is relatively scholarly, though some of her

conclusions are not what I would have drawn given the same data, but

those are my personal opinions.

 

I got it from, iirc Poison Pen Press or Small Churl Books at an even several years ago.

 

margali

 

 

Date: Sun, 11 Jan 1998 22:58:24 EST

From: Seton1355 <Seton1355 at aol.com>

Subject: SC - New book - very good!!

 

Greetings to all the good gentles on this list!

 

I just found this wonderful book at Borders Bookstore.  Perhaps some of you

might be interested.

 

The Food Chronology by James Trager, Henry Holt Publisher, 1995

 

It's basicly a food timeline and chock full of useful & interesting info.

 

Pax, Phillipa Seton

 

 

Date: Mon, 12 Jan 1998 14:43:30 -0600

From: "Decker, Terry D." <TerryD at Health.State.OK.US>

Subject: RE: SC - New book - very good!!

 

>I just found this wonderful book at Borders Bookstore.  Perhaps some of you

>might be interested.

>The Food Chronology by James Trager, Henry Holt Publisher, 1995

>It's basicly a food timeline and chock full of useful & interesting info.

>Pax, Phillipa Seton

 

I agree, it's a good book.  I use it as a starting point for outlining

things I want to research.  However, I will make a few caveats.

 

Trager, both in his The Food Chronology and his earlier The Foodbook,

does not appear to do a great deal of research, depending on the

scholarship of others for accuracy.  He presents a generally accepted

view of food history, but he tends to ignore scholarly disputes.  His

major sin is not providing source notes of a bibliography.

 

BTW, I think the MS Encyclopedia has incorporated parts of The Food

Chronology. A number of the subjects in the Encyclopedia use precisely

the same wording as The Food Chronology.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Sun, 18 Jan 1998 08:22:23 -0600 (CST)

From: alysk at ix.netcom.com (Elise Fleming)

Subject: SC - Period Dairying, Etc.

 

Greetings.   For the person looking for information on period dairy

practices and cheesemaking try _The English Housewife_ by Gervase

Markham, 1615.  There is a good edition out by Michael Best,

McGill-Queen's University Press, 1986, ISBN 0-7735-0582-2.  He has a

chapter on the practices that a good housewife should follow.  While I

don't believe there are "recipes" per se he does mention certain types

of cheeses and what one should do with the whey, curds, etc.

 

There is also another fascinating book, _The Country House Kitchen,

1650-1900_, edited by Sambrook and Brears.  While the dates indicate

OOP, this book takes some of the manors belonging to England's National

Trust and details the architectural plans and layout of the kitchens

and related rooms.  Tucked in with all the OOP material are references

to period practices.  There are numerous references to dairies and

dairying. I don't know where one might find the book.  It is esoteric

enough that most public libraries wouldn't have it and expensive enough

that most SCAers wouldn't have it.  I have a copy, but then, I'm single

and a pack rat for books!  If there's something specific - dairy

layout, items needed for a "perfect" dairy or dairyroom, post me and I

will send what I can find, time willing.

 

Publisher is Alan Sutton Publishing Limited (in association with the

National Trust). Date is 1996, and ISBN is 0-7509-0884-X.  If you have

Poison Pen Press's e-mail or address, I believe I got it from her two

Pennsics ago.

 

Alys Katharine

 

 

Date: Sun, 18 Jan 1998 17:28:09 +0000

From: James and/or Nancy Gilly <KatieMorag at worldnet.att.net>

Subject: Re: SC - Period Dairying, Etc.

 

Amazon.com lists it two ways:

 

   *The Country House Kitchen*, $21.56

   *The Country House Kitchen 1650-1900, Skills and Equipment for

        Food Provisioning*, $23.77

 

Alasdair mac Iain

 

 

Date: Thu, 28 May 1998 12:12:41 -0200 (GMT)

From: Jessica Tiffin <melisant at mweb.co.za>

Subject: RE: SC - A Good Book

 

Bear wrote:

>For food history, I like Reay Tannehill's Food in History.  There is at

>least one other translated from the French, but I can not remember the name

>at the moment.

 

I've always had a lot of fun with Maguelonne Toussaint-Samat's History of

Food - is that the one you mean?  A lot of what she says refers to food

types and sources in modern France, but she gives wonderful historical

overviews and is very entertaining to read.  I also picked up a new

paperback copy at a ridiculously low price, so I'm somewhat enchanted with it.

 

Mesliant de Huguenin

Minister of Arts and Sciences, Shire of Adamastor, Drachenwald

 

 

Date: Thu, 28 May 1998 07:17:20 -0500

From: "Decker, Terry D." <TerryD at Health.State.OK.US>

Subject: RE: SC - A Good Book

 

> Bear wrote:

> >For food history, I like Reay Tannehill's Food in History.  There is at

> >least one other translated from the French, but I can not remember the name

> >at the moment.

> I've always had a lot of fun with Maguelonne Toussaint-Samat's History of

> Food  - is that the one you mean?

> Mesliant de Huguenin

 

That's the one!  I don't own a copy, so I keep forgetting the author and

title. Like Tannehill, it has the pleasant attribute of being in print.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Mon, 02 Nov 1998 22:28:56 -0500

From: "Philip W. Troy & Susan Troy" <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - "On Food and Cooking" book

 

Donna Hrynkiw wrote:

> On Food and Cooking -- The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

> Harold McGee

> Fireside / Simon & Schuster

> 1984

> ISBN 0-684-84328-5

> $21.00, very thick trade paperback

> Chapters on grain, meat, plant matter, milk, sugar, etc. Very readable.

> Elizabeth

 

Oh, yeah. That's pretty much been one of my culinary Bibles. Learn how food

behaves, and why, and you can predict what it will do under a given set of conditions. Very, very valuable.

 

Adamantius

Østgardr, East

 

 

From: alysk at ix.netcom.com(Elise Fleming)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Elizabethan Dining Question

Date: 17 Nov 1998 00:31:21 GMT

 

"DnA" <dna at z95.com> writes:

>A friend of mine's daughter is doing a high school report on the type

>of food that was eaten during the late 1600's - early 1700's (she's

>studying Shakespeare).  

 

A good out-of-print book is _Dining With William Shakespeare_ by Madge

Lorwin. A library (or interlibrary loan) might find it.  She takes

quotes from Shakespeare and recipes from cookery books of the late

1500s and the 1600s with modernized versions.  She also explains some

of the customs of the times.  Once you get into the mid-1600s there are

quite a few cookery books.  You might also try _Martha Washington's

Booke of Cookery_ by Karen Hess.  The recipes are from the early 1600s

up to the end of the century.

 

Alys Katharine

 

 

Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 08:16:43 -0500

From: Melanie Wilson <MelanieWilson at compuserve.com>

To: LIST SCA arts <sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu>

Subject: More on Food & Society Books ed C Anne Wilson

 

AS requested further blurb !

 

Food for the community- Monastic Medieval diets in England, Servants

feeding from middle ages to 19th C, Sailors diets 1530-1830. School dinners

Louis XIV, Workhouse soup Yorkshire, soldiers food in the 19th C

 

Liquid Nourisment -Possets, cider, pery, hot ale, water of life, pottages &

soups, sherbets prehistory to present day

 

Appetite & the eye visual aspects of food, its presentation within their

historical context.

 

Waste not want not-hording methods etc from prehistory to present day.

 

Hope that helps ?

 

I have a couple of copies if anyone wants them.

 

Mel

 

 

Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 09:51:15 -0600

From: "Decker, Terry D." <TerryD at Health.State.OK.US>

Subject: RE: SC - barley

 

> << I have borrowed a friend's copy of History of Food  >>

> Could someone please send the information about this book? Thank you,

> Molly Kekilpenny

 

Toussaint-Samat, Maquelonne, The History of Food; Blackwell, ISBN

0631194975, paperback, $29.95.

 

Tannahill, Reay, Food in History; Crown, ISBN 0517884046, paperback, $16.00.

 

Both of these are in print.  They are primarily global reviews of the

history of food and eating from prehistory to the present.  Their scope is

such that they tend to be shallow in the particulars of any given foodstuff.

They do make good starting points for deeper research.

 

Comments have been made about errors in both books and about

Toussaint-Samat's Franco-centric view, but as surveys of the field, they are

the best available.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Wed, 13 Jan 1999 12:59:10 -0600

From: "Decker, Terry D." <TerryD at Health.State.OK.US>

Subject: RE: SC - Period Chili

 

> << Trager places the introduction of paprika into Hungary as 1529 when the

> Turks first took Buda. >>

> What part of the date is open to questions, when the Turks took Buda or

> when they introduced paprika?

> Noemi

 

The introduction of paprika is the questionable aspect.  This particular

entry is from The Food Chronology, which is a useful timelime, but which is

not fully indexed, has some errors of fact, does not properly differentiate

between the factual and the apocryphal, and provides no bibliography of

sources. I use The Food Chronology to locate temporal relationships in food

and cooking, but unless I have or can locate other sources, I consider the

information I find there questionable.

 

As for the capture of Buda, it was taken by the Turks in 1529, appears to

have been lost or ceded following the first siege of Vienna in 1529, and

retaken in 1541.  It was liberated in 1683 after the second siege of Vienna.

Which is about all the information and mis-information I have on the

subject.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Thu, 14 Jan 1999 08:09:56 -0600 (CST)

From: alysk at ix.netcom.com (Elise Fleming)

Subject: SC - Re: Old World/New World Foods

 

Cariadoc/David mentioned that PPC had articles on New World foods and

suggested that you look for back issues.  Acanthus Books now carries

back issues.  I’m lousy for URLs, but Amanda haunts this list and might

provide it.  They are approximately $7.50 per issue (at least from

Prospect Books) but worth it.

 

Also, look for Sophie Coe’s _America’s First Cuisines_, Univ. of Texas

Press, 1994, ISBN (paperback) 0-292-71159-x.  It contains basically the

same material (but greatly expanded) that appeared in the PPC articles

mentioned above.  She details Aztec, Maya, and Inca foods.  What I

found so interesting was the influence of Old World foods on the New

World, why some New World foods didn’t catch on right away, and so

forth. This might explain why, even though capsicums were _brought_ to

the Old World in period they were not _used_ .  (That is, they might

have been cooked and presented to royalty, and noted in a report - from

which we get historical “proof” - but they weren’t incorporated into

dishes served at feasts.)

 

A third source would be the older _The Columbian Exchange, Biological

and Cultural Consequences of 1492_, by Alfred W. Crosby, Jr., Greenwood

Press (Connecticut), 1972, ISBN 0-8371-7228-4 for the paperback.  It

has had at least four printings.  To me, it is a “dryer” read than

Coe’s book, but I haven’t read it for quite a few years now.

 

Alys Katharine, having a second "snow day" following yesterday's free

day!

 

 

Date: Thu, 14 Jan 1999 09:30:14 -0500

From: renfrow at skylands.net (Cindy Renfrow)

Subject: SC - Re: Petits Propos Culinaires, was old world/new world foods

 

>Petits Propos Culinaires is an international journal on food, food history,

>cookery and cookery books. Inquiries should be addressed to PPC North

>America, c/o Jennifer & Nic Spencer, 5311 42nd St NW, Washington, D.C.

>20015. Currently a subscription costs $18 for one year (three issues).

>(from the Miscellany; I don't know if the address and price are still

>correct).

>David/Cariadoc>http://www.best.com/~ddfr/

 

Here is a post from Sept.? by Dame Alys with the current information:

 

To forestall the inevitable posts about where to get this lovely

pamphlet/booklet:

 

Cost for 3 issues (1 year): In the UK: 12 pounds; in the USA, $23.50. Cost

for 6 issues (2 years): In the UK: 23.50 pounds; in the USA, $45.

 

In the UK: 45 Lamont Road, London SW10 OHU. Make sterling cheques payable

to Prospect Books Ltd.

 

In the USA: same address as above. Make dollar cheques payable to PPC North

America.

 

In Canada: c/o Ann Semple, 1897 Prince of Wales Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K2C

3J7. Make cheques payable to Ann Semple.

 

In Australia: c/o Barbara Santich, 13 King Street, Brighton 5048. Cheques

payable to Barbara Santich.

 

In New Zealand: c/o Helen Phare, PO Box 5775, Wellesley Street, Auckland.

Cheques payable to Helen Phare.

 

When PPC comes into my mailbox, my day is automatically brighter and my

bathroom stays become longer!

 

Alys Katharine

 

Cindy/Sincgiefu

renfrow at skylands.net

 

 

Date: Thu, 14 Jan 1999 11:06:47 EST

From: Acanthusbk at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - PPC

 

Cariadoc wrote:

> Petits Propos Culinaires is an international journal on food, food history,

> cookery and cookery books. Inquiries should be addressed to PPC North

> America, c/o Jennifer & Nic Spencer, 5311 42nd St NW, Washington, D.C.

> 20015. Currently a subscription costs $18 for one year (three issues).

> (from the Miscellany; I don't know if the address and price are still

> correct).

> I wouldn't expect most libraries to carry it.

 

Current details for US PPC subscriptions are:

Six issues (2 years) $45, three issues (one year) $23.50

 

If you would like to subscribe send your US$ check to:

PPC (Petits Propos Culinaires)

45 Lamont Road

London SW10 0HU

ENGLAND

 

tel/fax (from the US) 011-44-171-351-1242

email AEDavidson at compuserve.com

 

Tell them Amanda at Acanthus Books referred you. Also, FYI, Acanthus will

shortly have in stock the complete inventory of back issues of PPC.

 

Amanda

 

 

Date: Thu, 14 Jan 1999 11:49:53 EST

From: Acanthusbk at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - PPC

 

Alys Katherine wrote:

> Cariadoc/David mentioned that PPC had articles on New World foods and

> suggested that you look for back issues.  Acanthus Books now carries

> back issues.  I’m lousy for URLs, but Amanda haunts this list and might

> provide it.  They are approximately $7.50 per issue (at least from

> Prospect Books) but worth it.

 

I just received word yesterday the first shipment of back issues is in transit

and will arrive within the next couple of weeks. Issues up to the most recent,

#60, will be available. PPC's standard retail price for back issues is $7.95.

Acanthus' standard retail will be $7, and there will be standard quantity

discounts offered, as well as discounts on assembled packages of interest to

SCA cooks.

 

I'll be posting more details soon, and pending Alan Davidson's permission will

have scans of the table of contents pages available. An online index for PPC

issues 46-55 is currently available on Russell Harris' homepage at

http://members.tripod.com/~rdeh/index.html

and you can download a text file containing the complete index for issues

1-55.

 

Russell's homepage also has an index to the Oxford Symposium proceedings for

the years 1981-1994. Acanthus Books has proceedings from the years

1986-current in stock, plus earlier years available as used books.

 

Anyone with questions about PPC (or the Oxford Symposium) can email me at

acanthusbk at aol.com.

 

Amanda

 

 

Date: Sat, 16 Jan 1999 10:08:42 -0500

From: "Daniel Phelps" <phelpsd at gate.net>

Subject: Re: SC - Salsify-update and useful info

 

My copy of "Larousse Gastronomique the Encyclopedia of Food, Wine and

Cookery" in English translation (Prosper Montagne, Crown Publishers, Inc. NY

1961 Library of Congress Cat. # 61-15788) says that what is called Salaify

is actually two plants the "...root of the plant of the Compositae family

which alone is entitled to it, but also for that of another plant on the

same family which botanically is called scorzonera."  The entry goes on to

say that the flesh of the roots of both plants are very similar in taste and

are prepared in exactly the same way.  The word Scorzonera comes from

Catalan "escorso" or in English viper as it was formerly believed to be a

specific against its bite.  The entry in my edition provides 11 recipes.

 

Copies of Larousse Gastronomique, at least in West Palm Beach, can often be

found in the book secions of charity thrift stores for about $5 or $6 if you

keep your eye out for it, about $20 in used book stores and over $75 new.

 

Daniel Raoul Le Vascon du Navarre'

 

 

Date: Thu, 28 Jan 1999 11:20:51 -0800

From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Byzantine Sources

 

At 3:00 AM -0800 1/28/99, James L. Matterer wrote:

>Several years ago there was in circulation a newsletter entitled EARLY

>PERIOD. I know very little about this publication except that it dealt

>with mostly pre-1000 recreation, and was produced by people involved

>with the SCA.

 

I read it for some time. It was an admirable effort, but not very reliable

in terms of historical authenticity, in part because a lot of what they

were trying to do was stuff for which period sources were scarce to

nonexistent.

 

David Friedman

Professor of Law

 

 

Date: Sun, 31 Jan 1999 01:14:53 EST

From: Vanishwood at aol.com

Subject: SC - Question about source "All Manners of Food"

 

Has anyone read "All Manners of Food:  Eating and Taste in England and

France From the Middle Ages to the Present"

 

It doesn't have recipes but it (through what I've read) appears to be an

analysis of eating habits.  So far it appears to be a good source for cooks to

understand the economic and social factors in cooking during the period the

SCA covers.....

 

If you read it, what did you think about it?  So far I found it very

informative.

 

Ethelwulf

 

 

Date: Sun, 31 Jan 1999 07:19:59 -0600

From: "Decker, Terry D." <TerryD at Health.State.OK.US>

Subject: RE: SC - Question about source "All Manners of Food"

 

> Has anyone read "All Manners of Food:  Eating and Taste in England and

> France From the Middle Ages to the Present"

> Ethelwulf

 

It is interesting and possibly useful, but it is also the source of an

erroneous quote I made about Piers Plowman, so caveat emptor.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Wed, 17 Feb 1999 11:04:46 -0500

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Shakespeare

 

Cindy Renfrow wrote:

> Hello!  Does anyone have a listing of food & feasting references in

> Shakespeare's plays?

 

You might check out Madge Lorwin's "Dining With William Shakespeare",

1976 Atheneum, New York City, ISBN 0-689-10731-5 .

 

Mostly this is yet another forum for Renaissance and Early Modern

English recipes from sources like Plat, Digby, May, Rabisha, etc., but

there are quite a few actual food references from Shakespeare's plays

and sonnets in there too.

 

Adamantius

Østgardr, East

 

 

Date: Wed, 17 Feb 1999 21:30:06 -0500

From: Bonne <oftraquair at hotmail.com>

Subject: SC - Horseflesh, guinea pigs, insects etc.

 

> See James Frazer's "The Golden Bough" for more on this, as well as

> Calvin W. Schwabe's "Unmentionable Cuisine";

 

Funny you should mention this. Last week while rummaging through the Chapel

Hill public library for sources for my feast I came across it and spent much

too much time reading it instead of more pertinent books. I took some notes

to tell the list about it, here it is anyway for the others that hadn't heard

about it.

 

Unmentionable Cuisine

Calvin W. Schwabe

Univ. of Virginia Press 1979

ISBN 0-8139-0811-6

 

Schwabe was some sort of vetrinary researcher who travelled the world and

began collected recipes for portions of animals, or entire animals that are

considered inedible in the U.S.  This book could be considered the evil twin

to "Diet for a Small Planet".  While that book argues that feeding animals

grain in order to butcher them for meat is an inefficient way to feed the

world, this one argues that if we are going to feed the grain to the animals,

we might at least eat the animal more efficiently.  Being picky about which

parts of the animals we eat is silly in his view. Regarding the usual meat

animals (cattle, pigs, sheep, goat, chicken) there are recipes for all sorts

of organ meats, including stuffed eyeballs.  There are also chapters devoted

to less often eaten animals like guinea pigs and various game animals and to

insects.

 

Bonne

 

 

Date: Thu, 22 Jul 1999 08:45:19 -0400

From: Melanie Wilson <MelanieWilson at compuserve.com>

To: LIST SCA arts <sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu>

Subject: Books on eBay Gardening & Cookery

 

Appetite & The Eye ed C Anne Wilson

 

Vol 2 Chapters include: Ritual Form & colour in the Medieval Food

Tradition, From Medieval great hall to country house dining room: the

furniture and setting of the social meal, Decoration of the Tudor & Stuart

table, Ideal meals and their menus from the Middle Ages to the Georgian

Era. , Keeping up appearances: the Genteel art of dining in Middle class

Victorian Britain.

 

A book originating in the Leeds Symposium on Food.  Leading Food

Historians share their insights. NEW PB.  Buyer pays actually shipping

costs.

 

Mel

 

 

Date: Sat, 27 Feb 1999 01:22:34 -0000

From: "=?iso-8859-1?Q?Nanna_R=F6gnvaldard=F3ttir?=" <nannar at isholf.is>

Subject: Re: SC - Summertime Cerulean Blue Sauce

 

>Excellent quote.  Could you please provide the title of the work?  I don't

>recognize the author.

 

John Ayto, British, author of many reference works, mostly concerning the

origin of words and names, like The Dictionary of Word Origins, The Oxford

Dictionary of Slang, some translations from Middle English I believe, and

the work I´m quoting from, A Gourmet´s Guide, which is mostly concerned with

the origin and development of food terms. A valuable and entertaining work

in my opinion, and one I´ve made much use of. For some reason it was earlier

published as both The Diner´s Dictionary and The Glutton´s Glossary.

 

Nanna

 

 

Date: Mon, 1 Mar 1999 17:59:41 EST

From: LrdRas at aol.com

Subject: SC - Opinions needed

 

I purchased 'Culinary Cultures of the Middle East; ed. by Sami Zubaida and

Richard Trapper " to day. Any opinions on this book? The collection of

lectures, papers and essays includes Perry and many others. Since it is

definitely written for  more academically minded individuals, I was wondering

about accuracy, etc. before devoting my time to reading and studying it

since it will take much time.

 

Ras

 

 

Date: Fri, 26 Mar 1999 10:43:09 -0600From: "Decker, Terry D." <TerryD at Health.State.OK.US>Subject: RE: SC - Book opinion wanted

> Hey, Amazon came up with this book on my reccomendations page> today, and I was wondering if anyone out there had read it, and> would care to comment? Thanks in advance.>       -----Gille MacDhnouill>> All Manners of Food : Eating and Taste in England and> France from the Middle Ages to the Present>      by Stephen MennellI would recommend you borrow it from the library first.  It deals primarilywith the social history of food, only the first few chapters deal withmedieval food, and there are some errors (i've been bit, using it as areference).  The book is not particularly useful in redacting recipes,although the hardbound edition had some recipes on the endpapers (IIRC).This is one to read before you buy.Bear

 

Date: Tue, 25 May 1999 11:59:43 -0700

From: "James L. Matterer" <jlmatterer at labyrinth.net>

Subject: Re: SC - What's cooking at the Tabard?

 

You might like to check out my website on Chaucerian Cookery. I've

researched Chaucer's writings for references for food and have related

them to corresponding period recipes. All of "Chaucer's Foods" are

listed there (bread, cheese, ale, wine, bake mete, etc.) with the

location in Chaucer's poetry where they might be found.  And there are

some pretty graphics, too, and other literary/food info.

 

It's at:

 

A Chaucerian Cookery

http://www.labs.net/dmccormick/ccookery.htm

 

I received my laurel for researching the food of Chaucer's time and

poetry, so this is certainly one of my favorite subjects!

 

Maste Huen/Jim Matterer

- --

A Boke of Gode Cookery

http://www.labs.net/dmccormick/huen.htm

 

 

Date: Thu, 24 Jun 1999 16:13:40 EDT

From: THLRenata at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - Book opinions

 

Since Bonne asked:

 

<< The Food Chronology : A Food Lover's Compendium of Events and

Anecdotes, from Prehistory to the Present ~ James Trager / Henry Holt

(Paper) / June 1997 >>

 

This is a fascinating book!  I did notice a tendency toward the "medieval

food was over-spiced to disguise bad meat" attitude and should point out that

more than 50% of the book deals with the 20th Century.  Still, I do plan to

get my own copy someday.

 

Renata

 

 

Date: Sat, 11 Sep 1999 21:36:11 -0400

From: "Jennifer Conrad" <CONRAD3 at prodigy.net>

Subject: SC - Shakespeare and Food (web page)

 

http://www.soupsong.com/ibard.html

 

This site lists foods mentioned in Shakespeare's plays  and where in the

play the mention happens.

 

Luveday

 

 

Date: Fri, 08 Oct 1999 21:57:36 +0100

From: Thomas Gloning <Thomas.Gloning at germanistik.uni-giessen.de>

Subject: SC - Food in high medieval theology (new book)

 

Philip Lyndon Reynolds just announced his new book about food in

medieval theology:

 

<<< Dear Colleagues:

(...) I wanted to announce that my book, _Food and the Body: some

peculiar questions in high medieval theology_ (Leiden: Brill), is now

out. As a result of an experiment with our kitchen scales, I can reveal

that it will cost about 3 dollars and 25 cents per ounce. (...)

Philip Lyndon Reynolds >>>

 

I must confess that I know something about the role of medicine in

medieval nutrition and cookery, but not much about the role of theology.

Therefore, I look forward to see this book.

 

Thomas

 

 

Date: Fri, 08 Oct 1999 14:53:38 -0700

From: "Laura C. Minnick" <lcm at efn.org>

Subject: Re: SC - Food in high medieval theology (new book)

 

Thomas Gloning wrote:

> Philip Lyndon Reynolds just announced his new book about food in

> medieval theology:

> <<< Dear Colleagues:

> (...) I wanted to announce that my book, _Food and the Body: some

> peculiar questions in high medieval theology_ (Leiden: Brill), is now

> out. As a result of an experiment with our kitchen scales, I can reveal

> that it will cost about 3 dollars and 25 cents per ounce. (...)

> Philip Lyndon Reynolds >>>

> I must confess that I know something about the role of medicine in

> medieval nutrition and cookery, but not much about the role of theology.

> Therefore, I look forward to see this book.

 

Thomas and all,

 

       If you are interested in the theological implications of food,

particularly in the practices of the female mystics, Caroline Walker

Bynum has several titles on different aspects of the subject. _Holy

Feast and Holy Fast_ is probably her best known work on the subject. In

the academic community, the subect of female mysticism and related food

disorders, etc., has been hot for the past ten years or so. I even wrote

a paper on the subject a couple of years back, titled "Bite me:

Eucharistic Devotion and the Corporeal Christ". I thought it was awful

but I got a good grade on it- ain't academics wonderful?

 

'Lainie

 

 

Date: Fri, 29 Oct 1999 21:20:15 -0700

From: "Laura C. Minnick" <lcm at efn.org>

Subject: Re: SC - Book Review

 

Kekilpenny at aol.com wrote:

> Is anyone familiar with this book?

> "Medieval Feast, by Aliki. This picture book for ages 7 to 11 details the

> elaborate preparations that had to be made whenever a lord and lady had to

> prepare to entertain the King. It took them weeks to set up the rooms and

> prepare the feast itself. And they really did bake four and twenty blackbirds

> into a pie! This is a must-read for those studying medieval history. Cat.

> #72, $5.95."

> It is available at Amazon right now.

> Molli Rose

> Sol Haven (LMoC)

 

It's a really cute book- one of the better children's books on the

subject- useful for demos, working with pages, etc. Roughly set in the

reign of one of the Three Edwards. Been a few years since I've seen it,

but I remember it- which is a good sign!

 

'Lainie

 

 

Date: Fri, 29 Oct 1999 15:37:14 +0100

From: Christina Nevin <cnevin at caci.co.uk>

Subject: RE SC - Recommended Books

 

A book you really do want is Terrence Scully's "The Art of Cookery in the

Middle Ages" (1995 Univ of Rochester Press; ISBN: 0851156118). Admittedly

there are no recipes (though reading it always inspires me to go cook!), but

I learnt a lot from it which affected the way I cooked and thought of

medieval cooking and food.

 

Lucretzia

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Lady Lucrezia-Isabella di Freccia   |  mka Tina Nevin

Thamesreach Shire, The Isles, Drachenwald | London, UK

 

 

Date: Sat, 30 Oct 1999 08:56:20 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Book Review

 

Kekilpenny at aol.com wrote:

> Is anyone familiar with this book?

> "Medieval Feast, by Aliki. This picture book for ages 7 to 11 details the

> elaborate preparations that had to be made whenever a lord and lady had to

> prepare to entertain the King. It took them weeks to set up the rooms and

> prepare the feast itself. And they really did bake four and twenty blackbirds

> into a pie! This is a must-read for those studying medieval history. Cat.

> #72, $5.95."

 

Overall, I like it. Not all of the historical information is strictly

accurate, but it's pretty close, and it's hard to be both general and

accurate on the topic of A Medieval Feast; so much of what is true of

one isn't true of another, so you have to be very slective. There's

nothing in there about overspicing bad meat or anything like that. The

subtlety of a pie of live birds seems to me, based on what I've seen, to

be more a renaissance thing, but that's a minor quibble when you

consider that the information is given to children in such a way as to

portray these people's customs and actions as reasonable and

understandable, even if a bit alien to us. For example, the author

speaks of the stress on the lord of the Castle who may not be able to

afford the financial burden of a Royal Progress visit and series of

feasts without spending most of his stores and fortune, and possibly

even endangering his serfs as they struggle through the winter to come,

all with the risk of Official Displeasure and its various tangible

ramifications, should the feast not go well for some reason.

 

It paints with a pretty broad brush, but I think it does its job, which

is to educate and entertain children on this topic, and if the kids find

out later about the four-and-twenty blackbirds, that won't negate the

benefits of the rest of it.

 

Or, to put it another way, my kid liked it, and related it to SCA feasts

he's been to, some of which I've cooked, and he had a better sense of

all that went into producing such a feast, even now. Then he went around

the hall telling people, "See that rice stuff? My Dad cooked that for

you! Do you like it?"

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Sat, 30 Oct 1999 12:20:56 -0500

From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Book Review

 

At 11:52 PM -0400 10/29/99, Kekilpenny at aol.com wrote:

>Is anyone familiar with this book?

>"Medieval Feast, by Aliki.

 

I read it some time back and thought it did a pretty accurate

job--certainly much better than I expect of children's books.

 

David/Cariadoc

http://www.best.com/~ddfr/

 

 

Date: Thu, 04 Nov 1999 22:32:35 PST

From: "kylie walker" <kyliewalker at hotmail.com>

Subject: SC - witchcraft, food and jesus

 

I hope that got your attention - didn't quite know how to summarise 15 essay

titles in one line...

 

The Research Centre for the History of Food & Drink at the University of

Adelaide (in Australia) is about to launch a book I thought might interest

some of you. "Food, Power and Community: Essays in the History of Food and

Drink" is a collection of refereed papers from the research centre's first

International Conference, held earlier this year. Some of the essays have an

exclusively Australian focus, but there are a couple of much earlier ones:

Michael Symons on "Did Jesus Cook", Barbara Santich on "Who were the most

temperate and best mannered people in medieval Europe?"  and John Cashman on

" 'La cuisine diabolique': the functions of food in early modern European

witchcraft".

 

If anyone wants further details, let me know. (I have nothing to do with the

book. My only connection is that as a member of the centre, I pay my $10

every year, longingly read the list of events and conferences and then admit

reluctantly that I can't be in two places at once...)

 

Kylie

 

 

Date: Wed, 15 Dec 1999 14:37:52 -0600

From: "Decker, Terry D." <TerryD at Health.State.OK.US>

Subject: RE: SC - Re: SC-Olives, and I've got a new book

 

> Funny you should bring this up.  I just got a new book (new to me, it is a

> used book) it is titled:

> Four Seasons of the House of Cerruti trans. by Judith Spencer.  It is said

> to be a facsimile of I think a 13 or 14th century manuscript. <clipped>

> I was going to write to the list today and ask if anyone else had looked

> over the book and what they thought about it.  I am, for now, treating it

> as a source of information that needs verifying until I can determine it's

> accuracy.

>       Angeline

 

IIRC, The Four Seasons of the House of Cerruti is a decent modern

translation of a 14th Century translation and commentary of an 11th Century

work by Ibn Butlan, On the Management of Diseases for the Most Part Through

Common Foodstuffs and Medicine for the Use of Monks of the Cloister and

Whoever is Far From the City.  (I had to check a crib sheet for that one.)

 

Ibn Butlan (d. 1066) was a Christian physician originally from Baghdad who

travelled widely in the Middle East before settling in Antioch and becoming

a monk.  He is supposedly the Ellbochasim mentioned in The Four Seasons.

 

I only have a few excerpts from the book, but what I have seen is

worthwhile.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Thu, 16 Dec 1999 02:44:05 +0100

From: Thomas Gloning <Thomas.Gloning at germanistik.uni-giessen.de>

Subject: SC - Four seasons of the House of Cerruti / Tacuin sanitatis [books]

 

This is about some books and manuscripts.

 

<< IIRC, The Four Seasons of the House of Cerruti is a decent modern

translation of a 14th Century translation and commentary of an 11th

Century work by Ibn Butlan >>

 

The Four seasons of the House of Cerruti (Hausbuch der Cerruti) is a

manuscript now asserved in the "Oesterreichische Nationalbibiothek" in

Vienna under the shelfmark Cod. ser. nov. 2644. It is from the end of

the 14th century. Other manuscripts of this type are asserved in Rome

(Bibliotheca Casanatense), in Paris (National Library of France), in

Vienna again (Cod. vind. 2396; some pages reproduced in Zotter) and in

other libraries.

 

These are not really translations of Ibn-Butlan's text. Rather, they are

picture manuscripts with a very much abbreviated text. The original text

of Ibn-Butlan has no pictures, but is in the form of _tables_. Of

course, the abbreviated picture manuscripts are valuable for their

illustrations in other respects.

 

If you want to have the original Ibn-Butlan text, you might want to look

at the critical edition prepared by Hossam Elkhadem [with a translation

into French]:

 

- -- Elkhadem, H. (éd.): Le Taqwim al-Sihha (Tacuini Sanitatis) d'Ibn

Butlan: un traité médical du XIe siècle. Histoire du Texte, Édition

Critique, Traduction, Commentaire. Louvain (Peeters) 1990.

 

Elkhadem also wrote a short article about the textual history of the

tacuin sanitatis:

 

- -- Elkhadem, H.: Le Taqwim al-Sihha (Tacuini Sanitatis): Un Traité de

Diététique et d'Hygiène du XIe Siècle. In: Jansen-Sieben, R./ Saelemans,

F. (réd.): Voeding en Geneeskunde/ Alimentation et Médecine. Bruxelles

1993, 75-93.

 

There are several Latin manuscripts, but there is no critical edition of

the Latin version up to now. In the meantime you can use a printed

edition from 1531:

 

- -- Tacuini Sanitatis Elluchasem Elimithar Medici de Baldath, De sex

Rebus non naturalibus, earum naturis, operationibus, & rectificationibus

(...). Straßburg (Joh. Schott) 1531.

 

Based on this edition, there is a German translation prepared by Michael

Herr in 1533 (reprinted as a facsimile several times):

 

- -- Herr, M.: Schachtafelen der Gesuntheyt (...) Durch bewarung der Sechs

neben Natürlichen ding (...) durch erkantnussz/ cur/ vnd hynlegung Aller

Krankheyten (...) Aller lxxxiiij. Tafelen sonderlich Regelbuch (...).

Straßburg 1533. Nachdruck Leipzig 1985.

 

Some useful commentary material can be found in:

 

- -- Tacuinum Sanitatis. Das Buch der Gesundheit. Hg. von L.C. Arano.

Einführung von H. Schipperges und W. Schmitt. München 1976. [There is

also an English version of this book.]

 

- -- Zotter, H. (Hg.): Das Buch vom gesunden Leben. Die

Gesundheitstabellen des Ibn Butlan in der illustrierten deutschen

Übertragung des Michael Herr (Straßburg 1533). Mit Einleitung,

Faksimile, neuhochdeutscher Übersetzung und Abb. aus dem Cod. vind.

2396. Graz 1988.

 

Best,

Thomas

 

 

Date: Fri, 21 Jan 2000 01:20:07 -0500

From: "Robin Carroll-Mann" <harper at idt.net>

Subject: SC - Spanish food/health manual

 

I just got in an intersting book via ILL.  It's a modern reprint of a 16th

century Spanish food/health manual.  (In Spanish -- it hasn't been

translated that I know of.)

 

The book is "Banquete de Nobles Caballeros" ("Banquet of Noble

Gentlemen") by Luis Lobera de Avila, who was physician to the Spanish

Emperor Carlos V.  It was written in 1530.  I would compare it to Platina

minus the recipes.  The book contains many 1-2 page chapters, each

on a different type of food, with comments on how it affects the

humours, and what Galen and Avicenna and other authorities have to

say about it.  There are also some chapters on the scheduling and

sequence of meals, as well as comments on the health benefits and

risks of such activities as baths, sex, and midday naps.

 

The bibiographic information:

 

Lobera de Avila, Luis, "Banquete de Nobles Caballeros", San Sebasti·n

: R & B Ediciones, 1996.  ISBN 8488947593

 

There's also a 1952 edition, published in Madrid.

 

I don't know how many libraries carry it; I'm in New Jersey, and the ILL

copy I received was from the Library of Congress.

 

I haven't had a chance to do more than skim the book.  A few tidbits of

information:

 

Raw apples cause flatulence and indigestion.  These problems can be

avoided by eating apples that have been preserved with sugar, or

roasted and served with sugar or anise.

 

Eating radishes will protect against the venom of a scorpion, if one is

stung that same day.  (I'm in the wrong kingdom to test this.  Any

Ansteorrans out there who'd like to conduct some research?)

 

Bread is more nutritious and easier to digest when made from flour

which has not had the bran removed out of it.

 

Roasted chestnuts are healthier than raw.  Those of choleric

temperament should eat them with sugar; those who are phlegmatic,

with honey.

 

Beef (especially from older cattle) should be eaten infrequently, in small

quantities, and with mustard sauce to counteract its melancholic

humours.

 

I wouldn't call it an essential title in the field, but it's an intriquing book

for those interested in period Spanish cuisine.

 

Lady Brighid ni Chiarain

Settmour Swamp, East (NJ)

 

 

Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2000 17:14:03 -0600

From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Spanish food/health manual

 

At 1:20 AM -0500 1/21/00, Robin Carroll-Mann wrote:

>I just got in an intersting book via ILL.  It's a modern reprint of a 16th

>century Spanish food/health manual.  (In Spanish -- it hasn't been

>translated that I know of.)

>The book is "Banquete de Nobles Caballeros" ("Banquet of Noble

>Gentlemen") by Luis Lobera de Avila, who was physician to the Spanish

>Emperor Carlos V...

 

This sounds a lot like the _Taciunum Sanitatas_, which is a Latin

version of an Arabic original. We have two modern editions in

translation with illustrations, _A Medieval Health Handbook_ and _The

Four Seasons of the House of Cerrutti_ (that's by memory, so I may

not have them exactly right.) This book gives, for each food or

activity, its nature by the theory of the humors, its benefits, its

risks, and how to neutralize the risks.

 

Elizabeth/Betty Cook

 

 

Date: Thu, 17 Feb 2000 22:37:02 -0500

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Sausages

 

Huette von Ahrens wrote:

> > <<Unmentionable Cuisine>>

 

> Is this cookbook worth buying?  If so, please list the

> author, publisher etc.?

 

Calvin W. Schwabe, University Press of Virginia, Charlottesville, 1979

and 1992. ISBN 0-8139-1162-1

 

I think it's worth buying, although to be honest it isn't always what I

would consider the definitive source for several of its recipes. Its

whole point/crusade is to get people to admit that we are eating

something like 20% of our viable protein sources, and that a measurable

proportion of the world's population is starving to death because we

aren't using our resources properly, in his view due to food prejudices.

Basically, eat a squid, or an armadillo, a piece of calves' liver, or a

witchetty grub and help fight world hunger.

 

While there are no other easily available sources for some of its

material, some of what it does contain is available elsewhere, better.

So, for example, while Schwabe does want us all to eat little bony fish,

and they are included in his bouilliabaise recipe, and quite

authentically so, it's not the first place I'd look for a proper

bouilliabaise recipe: I'd check out Curnonsky, or Larousse, or even

Julia Child, first. But they don't tell you how to skin and bake a

muskrat ;  ).

 

Another thing about UC is that if you're the kind of cook that needs (or

even _wants_, Huette ;  )  ) everything spelled out in detail, you may

be mystified with Schwabe's instructions that call for some large turkey

testicles sauteed in just enough olive oil, and then add some mushrooms

and cook till done, I'd say you'd have to be at least an enthusiastic

amateur cook, rather than a complete beginner, to benefit fully from it.

 

With those caveats, though, I'll simply say it's fun, informative

reading and I'm very glad to own a copy.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Fri, 10 Mar 2000 17:19:18 -0000

From: Christina Nevin <cnevin at caci.co.uk>

Subject: SC - Book Review   WAS  Verjus

 

Magdalena asked:

> Gillian Riley (RENAISSANCE RECIPES) in her glossary states that

> the English (not big grape growers) used the juice of green plums and

> gooseberries instead.

 

I've seen recipes for crab apples, but not green plums.  Does she

document her sources?

 

Not at all. Here is my review of her book - YMMV:

 

"RILEY, Gillian. Renaissance Recipes

Pomegranate Artbooks. 1993.

An amusing enough coffee table book. It talks about renaissance cooking and

customs, has redactions, and mentions original sources, but has the

irritating flaw of giving no solid references outside the bibliography.

Nonetheless, it is a nice book to have for the pictures of food and feasts -

useful for tabledressing and selection of feastgear. It also is the first

place I've found that mentions zabaglione as being in period, for which I am

happy to forgive it much!

Recommended as a picture book only or an on-sale buy."

 

Lucretzia

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Lady Lucrezia-Isabella di Freccia   |  mka Tina Nevin

Thamesreach Shire, The Isles, Drachenwald | London, UK

 

 

Date: Fri, 10 Mar 2000 15:22:16 -0800

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

Subject: SC - Book: A Feast of Words

 

"A Feast of Words: Banquets and Table Talk in the Renaissance"

by Michael Jeanneret, Jeremy Whiteley (Translator), Emma Hughes (Translator)

Paperback / University of Chicago Press / October 1991 / $21.00

 

Anyone familiar with this book? I found it while meandering around

Barnes & Noble

http://www.bn.com

 

"Synopsis

The first part of this study considers "the Renaissance banquet as

alimentary experience: Food, diet, hygiene, nutrition, cuisine,

gastronomy, appetite, and table manners. . . . The Renaissance feast

provided both an outlet for hedonistic pleasures and the occasion for

disciplining natural drives into refined behavior. . . . Part 2 takes

up talk at table. . . . Renaissance banquet literature, like the six

dialogues of Erasmus's Colloquies set at table feasts on words, takes

up elements of philology, lexicography, linguistics, and semantics."

(Am Hist Rev) Index."

 

While my persona is Near Eastern (and i'm collecting related stories

for table talk), i figure Renaissance table talk is more appropriate

than such standards as "my job, my car, waddaya thinka (title of

latest popular exploding movie), didja catch the latest episode of

(popular sitcom), how about them (fill in popular sports team)", et

al ad nauseum.

 

Gotta fill in all the space in my mind left by all the stuff i've forgotten,

 

Anahita Gauri al-shazhiyya bint-Karim al-hakim al-Fassi

 

 

Date: Mon, 13 Mar 2000 11:36:25 -0600

From: "Bob Dewart" <gilli at seacove.net>

Subject: SC - Re: Book Enquiry - long

 

>I have in front of me a book I just checked out of the library.  It is

>called _Food:  a Culinary History from Antiquity to the Present_ published

>by Columbia University Press.

>It is part of a series called "European Perspectives".  The editors are

>Jean-Louis Flandrin and Massimo Montanari.  According to the book jacket

>Flandrin is a Professor Emeritus at the University  Paris VII-Vincennes and

>a founder of the international review "Food and Foodways".  Montanari is a

>Professor at the University of Bologna specializing in food of the Middle

>Ages.

>Is anyone familier with this work?  It does not appear to have any actual

>recipes in it, but seems to cover everything else from argricultural

>economics to kitchen utensiles from different time periods in Europe.

>HL Darcy Evaline of Lasgwm

>Ansteorra

 

The English edition was supervised  by Albert Sonnenfeld and translated by

Clarris Botsford, Arthur Goldhammer, Charles Lambert, Grances M.

Lopez-Morillas and sylvia Stevens.

 

The ISBN is 0-231-11154-1

 

General: The book  is broken down into 7 major sections and each section is

subdivided into specific  topics.  Each chapter has its own biliography.

There are two small sections of black and white reproductions of paintings

which to my mind  are rather dark and murky.  Indexed.

 

Contents:

 

Preface by Albert Sonnenfeld

Introduction to the Original Edition by Jean-Louis Flandrin and Massimo

Montanari

 

PART ONE - Prehistory and Early civilizations

Introduction - the Humanization of Eating Behaviors by  Jean-Louis Flandrin

Chapter I - Feeding strategies in Prehistoric Times  by Catherine Perles

Chapter 2 - The social function of Banquets in the Earlier Civilizations by      

   Francis Joannes

Chapter 3 - Food culture in Ancient Egypt by Edda Bresciani

Chapter 4 - Biblical reasons: The dietary Rules of the Ancient Hebrews by Jean

   Soler

Chapter 5 - The Phoenians and the Carthaginians:  the Early Mediterranean Diet

     by Antonella Spano Giannellaro

 

PART TWO - The Classical World

Introduction - Food Systems and Models of Civilization by Massimo Maontanari

Chapter 6 - Urban and Rural diets in Greece by Marie-Clare Amouretti

Chapter 7 - Greek Meals: A Civic Ritual by Pauline Schnitt-Pantel

chapter 8 - The culture  of the Symposium by Massimo Vetta

Chapter 9 - the Diet of the Etruscans  by Giuseppe Sassatelli

chapter 10 - The Grammar of Roman Dining by Florence Dupont

Chpater 11 - The Broad Bean and the Moray: Social Hierachies and Food in

   Rome by Mireille Corbier

Chapter 12 - Diet and Medicine in the Ancient World by Innocenzo Maxxini

Chapter 13 - The Food of Others by Oddone Longo

 

PART THREE From the late Classical Period to the early Middle Ages (5th - 10th

   Centuries)

Introduction - Romans, Barbarians, Christians: The Dawn of the European Food

   Culture by Massimo Montanari

Chapter 14 - Production Structures and Food Systems in the Early Middle Ages by

   Massimo Montanari

chapter 15 - Peasants, Warriors, Priests: Images of society and Styles of Diet

   by Massimo Montanari

 

PART FOUR - Westerners and Others

Introduction - Food Models and Cultural Indentity  by Massimo Montanari

Chapter 16 - Christians of the East: Rules and realities of the Byzantine Diet

   by Ewald Kislinger

chapter 17 - Arab Cuisine and Its Contribution to European Culture by Bernard

   Rosenberger

chapter 18 - Mediterranean Jewish Diet and Traditions in the Middle Ages  by

   Miguel-angel Motis Dolander

 

PART FIVE - The Late Middle ages (11th - 14th Centuries)

Introduction - Toward a New dietary balance by Massimo Mantanari

Chapter 19 - Society, Food and Feudalism  by Antoni Riera-Melis

Chapter 20 - Self-Sufficiency and the Market: rural and Urban Diet in the

   Middle Ages by Alfio Cotonesi

Chapter 21 - Food Trades by Francoise Desportes

Chapter 22 - the Origins of Public Hostelries in Europe by Hans Conrad Peyer

Chapter 23  - Medieval cooking by Bruno Laurioux

Chapter 24 - Food and Social classes in Late Medieval and Renaaisaance Italy

   by Allen J Grieco

Chapter 25 - Seasoning, cooking and Dietetics in the Late Middle ages by

   Jean-Louis Flandrin

chapter 26 - "Mind your Manners" Etiquette at the Table by Daniela Romagnoli

Chapter 27 - From Hearth to Table: Late Medieval Cooking Equipment  by

   Francoise Piponnier

 

PART SIX - The Eurpean Nation-States (15th - 18th Centuries

Introduction - the Early Modern Period by Jean-Louise Flandrin

Chapter 28 - Growing without knowing why: Production, Demographics and Diet

     by Michel Morineau

Chapter 29 - Colonial Beverages and the Consumption of Sugar by Alain Huetz de

   Lemps

Chapter 30 - Printing the Kitchen: French cookbooks, 1480-1800 by Philip Hyman

   and Mary Hyman

Chapter 31 - Dietary Choices and culinary Technique, 1500 - 1800 by Jean-Louis

   Flandrin

Chapter 32 - From dietetics to Gastronomy: the Liberation of the Gourmet by

   Jean-Louis Flandrin

 

PART SEVEN - the Contemporary Period (19th and 20th Centuries)

Introduction - From Industrial Revolution to Industrial Food by Jean-Louise

   Flandrin

Chapter 33 - the Transformation of the European Diet by Hans Jurgen

   Teuteberg and Jean-Louis Flandrin

Chapter 34 - The Invasion of Foreign Foods by Yves Pehant

Chapter 35 - the Rise of the Restaurant by Jean-Louis Flandrin

Chapter 36 - The food Indusrty and New Preservation Techniques by Giorgio

   Pedrocco

chapter 37 - The Taste for Canned and Preserved Food by Alberto Capatti

Chapter 38 - the Emergence of regional Cuisines by Julia Csergo

Chapter 39 - The Perils of Abundance: Food, Health and Morality in American

   History by Harvey A. Levenstein

Chapter 40 - The McDonaldization" of Culture by Claude Fischler

Conclusion - Today and Tomorrow by Jean-Louise Flandrin and Massimo

   Montanari

 

 

Date: Mon, 20 Mar 2000 20:13:57 +1030

From: "David & Sue Carter" <sjcarter at dove.net.au>

To: <sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu>

Subject: New Book - All the Kings Cooks

 

Our local book store is getting to know me so well that they are buying in

books for me to look at, unordered, with almost complete certainty that I

will succumb (deliciously evil people that they are)

 

This was the latest, and I thought I would share it with you, as it is a lot

more that a collection of recipes:

 

Peter Brears

All the Kings Cooks: The Tudor Kitchens of King Henry VIII at Hampton Court

Palace 1999, Souvenir Press (note odd spelling)

43 Great Russell Street, London, WC1B 3PA

 

ISBN 0 285 63533 6 (hardback) 192 pgs

 

As the jacket says, it is a practical guide to the running of the Royal

Kitchens in the last years of King Henry's reign.

Peter Brears, and a band of volunteers actually cook period food in the

period way in the real kitchens for a few days each year (Has someone on

this list been to one of these? If so, what was it like?)

 

He talks about the joys, pitfalls and all the required problem solving

inherent in this sort of living history work, and the book is divided into

topics according to the function of certain parts of the kitchen complex.

(see below: contents page)

 

There are some wonderful colour pictures of huge coloured marchpanes, wild

boar, peacock, garnished brawn and a set table, and lots of black and white

illustrations of equipment.

 

There are lots of high quality recipes, but this is my one frustration with

the book: the original and the source are not given next to each recipe,

although they are numbered to an source index in the back.  Luckily I own

enough of his published recipes to have copies of most of them that DO have

these other bits of info, but anyone else would have to track them down to

check them.

 

The contents are:

Introduction

1. The Counting House : the hub of the enterprise

2. Serving The Court: numbers, quantities, Costs

3. The Outer Courts: poultry, Bakehouse, Woodyard

4. The Greencloth Yard:Jewel House, spicery chandlery

5. The Pastry Yard: saucery, Confectionary, Pastry

6. The Paved Passage: Larders, Boiling House, Workhouses

7. The Hall-place and the Lord's-side Kitchens: Boiling, Broiling and

Roasting

8. The Privy Kitchen: Food for the King

9. Preparing for Dinner: Pantry and Cellars

10. Serving the King: a Royal ceremony

11. Dining in Chamber and Hall: Etiquette and Ritual

 

Bibliography, notes, indices.

 

I haven't had a thorough read of all of it, yet, but it is promising to be a

very good book.

 

Cheers

 

Esla of Ifeld

mka Sue Carter

 

 

Date: Wed, 22 Mar 2000 09:58:52 -0700 (MST)

From: Mary Morman <memorman at oldcolo.com>

Subject: Re: SC - new book

 

> Someone just wrote me with a good review of a fairly new book called"All

> the Kings Cooks".  It seems to be more of a what-was-what rather than

> primarily a cook book.  Has anyone read this and could tell us more?

> gwyneth

 

i've ordered it, and seen some reviews.  it is a discussion, with lots of

photos, of king henry vii's time at hampton court and uses household

records to talk about food, purchases, staff, etc.  supposed to be VERY

good.

 

elaina

 

From: David & Sue Carter <sjcarter at dove.net.au>

To: <sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu>

Sent: Monday, 20 March 2000 8:13

Subject: New Book - All the Kings Cooks

 

Our local book store is getting to know me so well that they are buying in

books for me to look at, unordered, with almost complete certainty that I

will succumb (deliciously evil people that they are)

 

This was the latest, and I thought I would share it with you, as it is a

lot more that a collection of recipes:

 

Peter Brears

All the Kings Cooks: The Tudor Kitchens of King Henry VIII at Hampton Court

Palace. 1999, Souvenir Press (note odd spelling)

43 Great Russell Street, London, WC1B 3PA

 

ISBN 0 285 63533 6 (hardback) 192 pgs

 

As the jacket says, it is a practical guide to the running of the Royal

Kitchens in the last years of King Henry's reign.

Peter Brears, and a band of volunteers actually cook period food in the

period way in the real kitchens for a few days each year (Has someone on

this list been to one of these? If so, what was it like?)

 

He talks about the joys, pitfalls and all the required problem solving

inherent in this sort of living history work, and the book is divided into

topics according to the function of certain parts of the kitchen complex.

(see below: contents page)

 

There are some wonderful colour pictures of huge coloured marchpanes, wild

boar, peacock, garnished brawn and a set table, and lots of black and white

illustrations of equipment.

 

There are lots of high quality recipes, but this is my one frustration with

the book: the original and the source are not given next to each recipe,

although they are numbered to an source index in the back.  Luckily I own

enough of his published recipes to have copies of most of them that DO have

these other bits of info, but anyone else would have to track them down to

check them.

 

The contents are:

Introduction

1. The Counting House : the hub of the enterprise

2. Serving The Court: numbers, quantities, Costs

3. The Outer Courts: poultry, Bakehouse, Woodyard

4. The Greencloth Yard:Jewel House, spicery chandlery

5. The Pastry Yard: saucery, Confectionary, Pastry

6. The Paved Passage: Larders, Boiling House, Workhouses

7. The Hall-place and the Lord's-side Kitchens: Boiling, Broiling and Roasting

8. The Privy Kitchen: Food for the King

9. Preparing for Dinner: Pantry and Cellars

10. Serving the King: a Royal ceremony

11. Dining in Chamber and Hall: Etiquette and Ritual

 

Bibliography, notes, indices.

 

I haven't had a thorough read of all of it, yet, but it is promising to be

a very good book.

 

Esla of Ifeld

mka Sue Carter

 

 

Date: Wed, 26 Apr 2000 14:24:46 -0500

From: "Decker, Terry D." <TerryD at Health.State.OK.US>

Subject: SC - Food A Culinary History

 

"Food A Culinary History from Antiquity to the Present" arrived today.  A

quick look at the book suggests it is going to be an important addition to

my historical research bookshelf.

 

The book is divided into periods; Prehistory and Ancient Civilizations, The

Classical World, From the Late Classical to the Early Middle Ages, etc.

Each chapter is a separate paper covering some aspect of cooking and culture

within the period.  Each paper has its own bibliography and/or notes.

 

I'll probably start with "Diet and Medicine in the Ancient World", "From

Hearth to Table:  Late Medieval Cooking Equipment", and "Seasoning, Cooking

and Dietetics in the Late Middle Ages."  I expect it will take me a couple

weeks to read the entire book.  I'll be able to give a more detailed opinion

then.

 

In case anyone is interested, the book is:

 

Flandrin, Jean-Louis and Montanari, Massimo, Food A Culinary History from

Antiquity to the Present; Columbia University Press, New York, 1999.  ISBN

0-231-11154-1.

 

The price is $39.95, but it may be cheaper through one of the large

booksellers.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Tue, 2 May 2000 16:09:20 -0400

From: "Gaylin Walli" <gwalli at infoengine.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Period Corks

 

Balthazar wrote:

>If I'm not mistaken, the greeks used to seal Amhorae with clay corks, and

>then waterproof them with either wax or pitch.  I have made several sizes of

>clay corks for my brewing bottles out of Sculpey clay, which works well

>(aside from the fact that it is not meant to be used with comestibles...)

 

I seem to remember doing a bit of research on this when I was

looking into typical closures used for containers that might

have held ointments in period. One of the books I do remember

reading that may have additional information in it, secondary

reference type only, is:

 

Yarwood, Doreen. The British Kitchen: Housewifery Since

Roman Times. Batsford. 1981.

 

Someone may want to check on that publishing info, though,

because I'm going on what's scribbled on the back of a lunch

napkin in my desk drawer rather than the Library of Congress

(my connex to it is down right now).

 

A good book in general related to our cooking stuff here,

but only about the first half of it is useful. Tons of very

interesting information, though, both in period and out.

 

Jasmine

Iasmin de Cordoba

 

 

Date: Thu, 04 May 2000 20:37:05 -0700

From: "Laura C. Minnick" <lcm at efn.org>

Subject: Re: SC - Holy Feast and Holy Fast

 

Marian Deborah Rosenberg wrote:

> For those who have read it, what was their opinion of Caroline Walker Bynum's

> Holy Feast and Holy Fast?  Expecting something more on food and maybe cooking,

> I was rather surprised to discover the main focus being spirituality of food

> and the context of that spirituality in the middle ages.

 

I have not only read it, I have worked with the book in an academic

context. I own two of her other books- and they are wonderful. Fine

work.

 

As to the unrealized expectations- you missed part of the title on the

first pass- 'Holy'. Food and fasting and body issues are deeply imbedded

into the medieval psyche. There are female mystics, particularly in the

14th and 15th century during the heyday of something called 'affective

piety', who eat nothing but the Host, or report mystical experiences

while eating it. There are those who imagined/dreamed/envisioned

drinking from the wound in Christ's side. Really weird stuff. More

similar weird stuff has been written by Karma Lochrie (best known for

her work on Margery Kempe). I have others but the books are in Eugene

and I am not. Really interesting stuff though, if you are interested in

the flakier side of medieval life. Some of these folks, if living now,

would be heading for Roswell and telling the _Weekly World News_ about

being abducted and probed and made to eat large quantities of

Cheez-Whiz...

 

You might have been looking for _Fast and Feast_ by Barbara Ann Henisch,

which _is_ about food and eating and not eating (Lent and such). I

highly recommend it.

 

'Lainie

 

 

Date: Fri, 12 May 2000 17:55:03 -0700 (PDT)

From: Huette von Ahrens <ahrenshav at yahoo.com>

Subject: SC - does anyone have this book?

 

Has anyone seen or own this book?

 

Parkinson-Large, Pamela.

  A taste of history : the food of the Knights of

Malta / by Pamela Parkinson-Large ; illusstrated by

George Large.  Lija, Malta : MAG Publications, 1995.

190 p.

 

ISBN 9990996555

 

The Library of Congress give these subjects to this

book:

 

Cookery--Europe--History

Cookery, Medieval

Knights of Malta--History

Cookery, Malta

 

If someone has this book, is it worth buying?  I have

already checked Amazon.com who says it is

out-of-print. Before I go check the OP dealers, I

would like to know if this book is worth pursuing.

 

Huette

 

 

Date: Tue, 16 May 2000 17:37:55 -0700 (PDT)

From: Huette von Ahrens <ahrenshav at yahoo.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Fooles and Fricassees

 

- --- "Adler, Chris" <Chris.Adler at westgroup.com> wrote:

> This exhibit booklet was mentioned recently. I tried to find it on the Net

> at the Folger Library bookstore, but couldn't find it. Is this the Folger

> Library in Washington DC, or is there a Folger in England?

>

> Would the gentle who has this booklet please post

> the website of the museum where they saw this exhibit?

>

> Thanks muchly, Katja

 

I think that you could buy this from any reasonable

bookstore.

 

Here is the Folger Library library catalog

description:

 

Folger Shakespeare Library

Fooles and fricassees : food in Shakespeare's

England / edited by Mary Anne Caton ; with an essay by

Joan Thirsk ; [foreward by Rachel Doggett].

Washington, DC : Folger Shakespeare Library ; Seattle

: Distributed by University of Washington Press, 1999.

128 p.

 

ISBN 0295879267

 

Perhaps our AnTirean friends could pick us up a few

copies?

 

Huette

 

 

Date: Mon, 05 Jun 2000 03:42:33 +0200

From: Thomas Gloning <gloning at Mailer.Uni-Marburg.DE>

Subject: SC - School of Salerno

 

A version of the famous Regimen sanitatis of the School of Salerno with

some food content is on Ulrich Harsch's site too (this address is sort

of mirror site of his fh-augsburg-site):

 

http://www.cefe.de/~harsch/Regimen/reg_sana.html

 

Best, Thomas

 

 

Date: Fri, 16 Jun 2000 12:08:04 -0400 (EDT)

From: alysk at ix.netcom.com

Subject: SC - "Eat, Drink & Be Merry" (long)

 

Stefan asked for more information on _East, Drink & Be Merry:

The British at Table, 1600-2000_, edited by Ivan Day, Philip

Wilson Publishers, London, 2000, isbn 0 85667 519 9.

 

"The publication of this book accompanies a three-venue touring

exhibition...a collaboration between Norfolk Museums Service, the

York Civic Trust and English Heritage...Comprising over thirty

important paintings, some four hundred decorative arts objects and

numerous culinary masterpieces, all brought together in historic

room settings, and cased displays, the exhibition helps bring to

life in a very tangible way the daily rituals of the British at

table."

 

The meals are recreated in real items (sugar paste, for example) and

in plastic, so real that a particular visitor (a marine biologist?)

was trying to determine whether the seafood was authentic.  The

particular meals recreated are: The Garter Feast of 1671; Duke of

Newcastle's Feast (c. 1710) which uses recipes from May; a British

breakfast, teatime, a picnic from 2000, and an Elizabethan

banquet.

 

Each particular section of the book gives historic information for

that meal, along with specific descriptions of some of the re-created

foods/dishes. I was enthralled to learn that the white decorations

on one of the edges of a dish were cock's combs, which turn white when

cooked. I still am flabbergasted at the exquisite reproduction of

some of May's pies, which have to be seen to be appreciated.

 

While OOP for us, the descriptions, pictures of the dishes on the

table, etc. for the meals from the 1600s and 1700s helped me more

clearly see how little we really recreate when we do foods.  If you

are interested in late period cookery, you will get some good nuggets

of information.  

 

I went to England for two days last April to attend the Leeds Food

History Symposium at which Ivan Day gave a presentation from this

touring display.  He showed photos (similar to the photos in the book)

and went into more detail about the construction and re-creation of

some of the items.  Obviously, I was most interested in the Elizabethan

banquet that was recreated.  While one can see things in the photos in

the book, it's not always obvious what they are.  The white "stuff"

marking the walkways surrounding the sugar paste banqueting house is

actually hundreds and hundreds of comfits.  

 

One of the rooms in the display is a kitchen, with sugar paste flowers

hanging to dry, some sugar paste statues (Grecian) in various stages of

completion, a mold for making them, the hanging basin and tools needed

to make comfits, and so on.  The frontispiece for the book shows the

completed statues and the parterre (?) of dough and (custards?) that

complete the display on the table.

 

The book is a good resource for facts and information about late period

foodways. This includes things such as how much of particular items

was ordered or used, how the staff served the food to the king, the

table arrangements (one of the displays is an accurate reproduction

of a table display from a cookery book), and so on.  There is clear

evidence (p. 87) that the king, for example, didn't eat some of every

dish that was in a course.  IIRC, we had a discussion something similar.

Were folk supposed to eat some of every dish or only certain ones?  This

notes that the king had 20 dishes to choose from in each of two courses,

but only picked 4 dishes in the first and perhaps one in the second.

 

Obviously, because of the dates (1600-2000), most of the

emphasis is on OOP food, but I am very happy to have this as part of

my collection.  I am doubly happy that I decided to be bold and travel

up to York from Leeds on my one "free" day, so I could personally see

the exhibit rather than just read about it in the book.  It helped to

have read the book the night before.  I could then sound "intelligent"

when I pointed out to other visitors the cocks' comb decorations.  That

particular lady countered with an explanation of one of the pies... She

knew from its contents just what it was and had eaten some like

it when she was a child.  I wanna go ba-a-a-ck!

 

Alys Katharine, stuck in the US

 

 

Date: Fri, 21 Jul 2000 22:36:23 +0200

From: Thomas Gloning <gloning at Mailer.Uni-Marburg.DE>

Subject: SC - New Book: Food and nutrition around 1000

 

There is a new book (for those with a command of German):

 

- -- Gesellschaft und Ern‰hrung um 1000. Eine Arch‰ologie des Essens.

Herausgegeben von Dorothee Rippmann und Brigitta Neumeister-Taroni.

Vevey: Alimentarium/MusÈe d'alimentation/Food museum 2000.

ISBN: 2-940-284-05-9

('Society and nutrition around the year 1000. An archaeology of food and

eating'.)

 

Many good articles, lots of beautiful and interesting images from old

manuscripts, e.g. from the Ms. Hrabanus Maurus, De rerum naturis,

Montecassino 1023. In addition there are new archaeological findings

from Switzerland and France ...

 

Thomas

 

 

Date: Sat, 19 Aug 2000 21:13:43 -0500

From: "Decker, Terry D." <TerryD at Health.State.OK.US>

Subject: RE: SC - History of Food

 

I like Toussaint-Samat for casual reading.  There is a bunch of good

information, but the writing is Francocentric and stresses the "French

connection." I've spotted the occasional error and (IIRC) some of the work

based on archeological evidence is debatable.  At $5 it's a good buy.  If

this is a HB, then it sounds like B&N is remaindering a print run they used

to distribute at $19.95.

 

Bear

 

> My husband picked up this for me at B&N for $5 -- The History of Food by

> Maguelonne Toussaint-Samat, translated by Anthea Bell.  Can anyone tell me

> how good this is?

>

> Raoghnailt

 

 

Date: Fri, 25 Aug 2000 09:21:57 -0700

From: "E. Rain" <raghead at liripipe.com>

Subject: SC - The Oxford Companion to food  WAS: filo/phyllo

 

Adamantius asked:

> BTW: How much should I pay for The Oxford Companion to Food? I saw it

> the other day in The Strand for, IIRC, ~$40, which I gather is a fair

> markdown from the cover price.  Is it worth it?

 

Yes! I have had this book out of the library almost non-stop for the last 4

months. (List price is $60 and I'm on book probation till I get to Europe).

It was very useful in updating the Reference Manual & for answering

questions on this list.  It has several good articles on various cuisines

both modern & historical.  No it doesn't give historical background on every

single item, but it's a good tool nonetheless.  It's on my wishlist for the

holidays this year along with "Art Culture & Cuisine" and the perenial

request for my own copy of Florio :->

 

Eden Rain

 

 

Date: Fri, 25 Aug 2000 10:32:42 -0700 (PDT)

From: Huette von Ahrens <ahrenshav at yahoo.com>

Subject: Re: Filo/phyllo-- was [Re: SC - duck and bread]

 

- --- Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com> wrote:

> BTW: How much should I pay for The Oxford Companion to Food? I saw it

> the other day in The Strand for, IIRC, ~$40, which I gather is a fair

> markdown from the cover price.  Is it worth it?

>

> Adamantius

 

The cover price is $60.  Amazon.com has it for $48.

Yes, in my opinion, it is well worth any one of the

prices, even $60.  It is a huge book full of the most

amazing facts and insights.  And it has a wonderfully

large bibliography.  The only negative thing that I

have heard about it was from Nana, who said that the

Icelandic article had a few inaccuracies.  

 

Huette

 

 

Date: Mon, 28 Aug 2000 01:24:48 -0000

From: "=?iso-8859-1?Q?Nanna_R=F6gnvaldard=F3ttir?=" <nannar at isholf.is>

Subject: SC - Re:Oxford Companion to Food was: Filo/phyllo

 

Huette wrote:

>The only negative thing that I

>have heard about it was from Nana, who said that the

>Icelandic article had a few inaccuracies.

 

Actually, it has a whole bunch of inaccuracies and has already been

completely rewritten for the next edition - I¥m just now waiting for Alan to

send me a copy of the new entry on Iceland and a few related entries to read

through.

 

After having waited for years for this book to be published, I was very

disappointed with the entry on Iceland and was rather wary of the book at

first because of the inaccuracies this single entry contained. But, I¥ve

been using the OCTF extensively for almost a year now (in fact I¥ve got two

copies, one at home, one at work) and this is the only major defect I¥ve

found - of course there are some minor inaccuracies and omissions but I

haven¥t seen anything bad.  I find the OCTF quite invaluable and the

bibliography has already helped me many times (and cost me some money

because I¥ve found so many books there that I really need).

 

Nanna

 

 

Date: Fri, 8 Sep 2000 09:12:43 -0000

From: "Nanna Rognvaldardottir" <nanna at idunn.is>

Subject: Re: SC - Another Catalan/Spanish translation resource

 

Brighid wrote:

>Thank you for the information.  What is "Mediterranean Seafood"?  A

book? It sounds like something I should know about.

 

One of Alan Davidson’s (author of the Oxford Companion to Food) early books;

a reference work/cookbook and a very informative and enjoyable book (it was

Alan¥s North Atlantic Seafood, a work of similar scope, that first got me

interested in food writing). Both books are divided into two sections. The

first half deals with all the edible species found in the area, with

descriptions, drawings, some history, information on cooking, and a list of

names in the various languages. The second half is divided by countries and

gives authentic seafood recipes from each country. Both books have extensive

bibliographies.

 

Sadly, Mediterranean Seafood is out of print but you could probably find an

used copy for around $20. Or that was the price of the last copy I came

across.

 

Nanna

 

 

Date: Mon, 16 Oct 2000 17:42:50 -0400

From: "Daniel Phelps" <phelpsd at gate.net>

Subject: SC - New Book

 

Just when I thought it was safe to go back into the book store I read a

review of a new foodie book!  The review is in the latest issue of the

"Economist" Oct. 14 thru 20th.  The title "Pickled, Potted and Canned: The

Story of Food Preservation" by Sue Shepard.  If I read the blurb right its

published by Headline and runs 368 pages and 15.99 pounds.

 

Looks to be a very interesting book.   If anyone on the other side of the

pond picks it up please give us a cooks list review.  One bit of trivia, I

learned about the worship of Roguszys.

 

Who was Roguszys you ask?

 

Why the ancient Lithuanian diety of pickled food.  You guessed it the god

of sauerkraut.

 

 

Date: Tue, 17 Oct 2000 02:23:21 GMT

From: "kylie walker" <kyliewalker at hotmail.com>

Subject: Re: SC - New Book

 

I'm reading Pickled etc at the moment - actually, I've had it for about a

month, but I'm often reading several books at once, so my lack of progress

is not necessarily a reflection on how interesting the book is.

 

My general impression so far is that it's interesting, but not all that

specific (from memory, she doesn't use a lot of footnotes, but says she is

happy to be contacted if people want specific references); a good general

primer that gives a good idea of why various preserving practices developed

or died out (lack of salt here, wars there). And there's a nice 16th century

illo on the front ...

 

Kylie

 

 

Date: Fri, 1 Dec 2000 17:19:02 -0500 (EST)

From: Jenne Heise <jenne at mail.browser.net>

Subject: SC - Book review from _Choice_

 

Reviewed in Choice magazine:

 

"Symons, Michael.  A history of cooks and cooking.  Illinois, 2000. 388p

bibl index afp ISBN 0-252-02580-6, $30.00 . Reviewed in 2000dec CHOICE.

 

    Symons's book contains accurate history, is a fascinating read, and

will delight anyone interested in food. He shows food to be one of the arts, albeit a consumable one. The wonderful mix of present day and ancient times presents aspects as diverse as the relationship of food to gender, literature, the Industrial Revolution, and global exploration and immigration. Symons shows us that lore and history of food is factual, fascinating, and fundamental. Food is so fundamental to language that many food terms have been absorbed into language and have long lost their original association.

 

Food is so fundamental to culture that, like language, it can define it. Symons serves all these topics and more in foretastes, entrÈes (entrees) and desserts with word derivations, stories, historical accounts, and even a look at a chef creating his art in fusion cuisine restaurant. Anyone with an even slight connection to food will want this award-winning, well-written, and well-documented volume to sit with and read, and to have as a resource. All levels."

 

 

Subject: Re: ANST - good cooking resource book

Date: Wed, 10 Jan 2001 17:31:44 -0600

From: willow taylor <jonwillowpel at juno.com>

To: ansteorra at ansteorra.org

 

Hi  everyone  this is willow

 

I just got a  new  book at   Barnes and Nobles. It is called 'Acquired

Taste, the French Origins  of  Modern Cooking"  by T. Sarah Peterson.  It

is a  wonderful  resource book  giving detail  essays on  ancient,

medieval, Renaissance  and modern cooking.. It even touches on the

medical use of  food. It  is  at half price  right  now so it  costs

about  five dollars.

 

 

Date: Sat, 10 Mar 2001 10:12:57 -0500

From: "John Page" <kdp at tiac.net>

Subject: SC - Re: sca-cooks V1 #3020

 

Copies from the AIA new publications post:

 

Ancient Food Technology. By Robert I. Curtis. Cloth with dustjacket (xxx,

510 pp., 21,6 x 30 cm., 75 illus.) ISBN 90 04 09681 7

List price EUR 121.- / US$ 149.- / DGL 266.65

Price for subscribers to the series EUR 115.- / US$ 141.- / DGL 253.43

Technology and Change in History, 5. (Forthcoming from Brill).

 

Employing a wide variety of sources, this book discusses innovations in

food processing and preservation from the Palaeolithic period through the

late Roman Empire.

 

All through the ages, there has been the need to acquire and maintain a

consistent food supply leading to the invention of tools and new

technologies to process certain plant and animal foods into different and

more usable forms. This handbook presents the results of the most recent

investigations, identifies controversies, and points to areas needing

further work.

 

Robert I. Curtis, Ph.D. (1978) in Ancient History, University of Maryland,

is Professor of Classics at the University of Georgia. He has published on

Roman social and economic history, including Garum and

Salsamenta. Production and Commerce in Materia Medica (Brill, 1991).

 

A little early but probably useful

 

Eithne

 

 

Date: Fri, 16 Mar 2001 21:17:29

From: "Vincent Cuenca" <bootkiller at hotmail.com>

Subject: SC - re: Workshop (long)

 

>Does anyone have any books or articles that they can recommend which are

>good on these topics - especially the religious restrictions topic?

>('Lainie?) Only in English please (dangling appropriate foreign language

>texts in front of me is merely cruelty disguised as helpfulness ;-). MTIA.

 

A really good book (IMHO) on European food culture (not just Middle Ages) is

"The Culture of Food" by Massimo Montanari.  He touches on the impact of

famines and prosperity on social stratification, on the impact of Roman vs.

barbarian cultural models of consumption, and on the social implications of

humoral theory.  It's a whacking good read.  I don't have my copy with me

right now; I can get publication info to the list on Monday.

 

Vicente

 

 

Date: Mon, 19 Mar 2001 23:17:16 -0500

From: "Daniel Phelps" <phelpsd at gate.net>

Subject: SC - Odd Book

 

Went by my favorite used book shop the other day and found a rather odd

book, Columbus Menu; Italian Cuisine after the First Voyage of Chistopher

Colmbus" by Stefano Milioni, Istituyo Italiano per il Commercio Estero,

Italian Trade Commission.

 

Its chapters are short histories of the tomato, the potato, corn (Maize),

Beans and Green Beans, squashes, sweet and hot peppers, the turkey and

cacao.   Nice general historical notes, most of the historical recipes are

out of period though.  There is one Italian recipe for turkey from

Bartolomeo Scappi, 1570 quoted in translation.  It contains a description of

the "rooster of India"  which clearly by its description identifies the bird

as being a turkey.  As the book does not have a bibliography can anyone tell

me anything about the source?

 

Daniel Raoul

 

 

Date: Mon, 19 Mar 2001 23:22:49 -0600

From: "Decker, Terry D." <TerryD at Health.State.OK.US>

Subject: RE: SC - Odd Book

 

> There is one Italian recipe for turkey from

> Bartolomeo Scappi, 1570 quoted in translation.  It contains a description of

> the "rooster of India"  which clearly by its description identifies the bird

> as being a turkey.  As the book does not have a bibliography can anyone

> tell me anything about the source?

>

> Daniel Raoul

 

Cuoco Secrete di Papa Pio Quinto (Cooking Secrets of Pope Pius V), commonly

referred to as Scappi's Opera.  Published in Venice in 1570.  The book has

28 copperplate illustrations of cooking utensils and kitchens.  I don't know

of an English translation, but the illustrations occasionally are reprinted.

 

IIRC, Scappi was the cook for Cardinal Michaele Ghislieri and was his cook

after Ghislieri became Pope Pius V (1566-1572).  

 

Bear

 

 

From: Christina Nevin <cnevin at caci.co.uk>

To: "'SCA Cookslist'" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

Date: Wed, 6 Jun 2001 16:24:03 +0100

Subject: [Sca-cooks] FW: RE: SC - new/old Speculum article - Scully article

 

        >Are you talking about his commentary on Mayneri's Opusculum de

Saporibus?

        That's the one!  Where can I find it?

        Vicente

 

Details below of where I got it from.

Ciao,

Lucrezia

 

        <snip>

> a really great resource for those (like me) without access to either a

> good library or friendly librarian - the University of Heidelburg Library,

> which has loads of different magazines including Speculum and Medium

> Aevum, sells articles over the Internet and sends them via mail, fax, and

> electronically.

> I ordered the "A medieval Sauce Book" article (Thorndike, L. "A medieval

> sauce-book" Speculum 9 1934) and Scully's commentary on it  (Scully, T.

> "The 'Opusculum Sporibus' of Magninus Mediolanensis"  Medium Aevum LIV

> 1985) on the Wednesday and got notification of where to download them from

> on the Friday. It cost me about US $7.50 or UKP 5.00.

> Needless to say I am a very happy girl!

> <Lucrezia does the Happy Hamster Dance>

        Ordering forms and information are supplied in English and you can

pay by credit card over the net. Here's the URL:

> http://ssgs.uni-hd.de.

> Al Servizio Vostro, e del Sogno

> Lucrezia

> ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

> Lady Lucrezia-Isabella di Freccia   |  mka Tina Nevin

> Thamesreach Shire, The Isles, Drachenwald | London, UK

 

 

Date: Thu, 21 Jun 2001 03:53:01 +0200

From: tgl at mailer.uni-marburg.de

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re: dietary theory/humors (was: what is your project?)

 

> I was reading a few months ago in a magazine (I think Scientific American?)

> that someone was bringing out a book on the history of dietary theory, which

> would naturally include a section on humors. Does anyone have details of

> this?

 

Whatever you saw mentioned, you might also look for:

 

-- Ken Albala: For the stomach's sake. Food and nutrition in the

Renaissance. Berkeley (Univ. of Calif. Press) 2001.

 

To appear in fall, if I am not mistaken. I saw the source list, which

looks VERY promising.

 

Th.

 

 

Date: Sat, 23 Jun 2001 23:12:05 +0200

From: tgl at mailer.uni-marburg.de

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Michalangelo's Lunch & a question on Pontormo

 

Speaking of the daily food of artists, the diary of Pontormo (1554-56)

comes to mind. I have a German translation, but the translator left out

major portions, stating that it contained "only reports on food and

dishes". I know that there is a 1956 Italian edition and a 1996

fac-simile of Pontormo's diary, but I did not see them yet.

 

Parts of the text are online in English at:

-- http://www.thing.de/projekte/7:9%23/pontormo.html

(is there a complete version anywhere??)

 

Now: does anybody know if and where the diet and food habits of this

artist has been portrayed in some detail?

 

Th.

 

 

From: "Decker, Terry D." <TerryD at Health.State.OK.US>

To: "'sca-cooks at ansteorra.org'" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

Date: Thu, 2 Aug 2001 16:56:11 -0500

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Cambridge World History of Food

 

Here's the website for the Cambridge World History of Food complete with

links to some of the articles including those for potatoes and water.

 

http://www.cup.org/books/kiple/contents.htm

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Fri, 03 Aug 2001 22:40:25 +0200

From: Volker Bach <bachv at paganet.de>

To: SCA Cooks List <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Pictures of Medieval Food

 

An enquiry a while ago, the copy of which i

inadvertently deleted from my mailbox, had as its

subject books regarding the appearance and form of

medieval foods. I have now relocated the book I

was anbout to recommend at the time, namely:

 

Bruno Laurioux: Le Moyen Age a Table (Adam Biro,

Paris 1989)

 

(An English translation may well be available. A

German one is)

 

Its text is restricted largely to france, but it

provides a wealth of pictorial sources (mostly

manuscript illuminations, with a leavening of

stained glass windows, tableware and sculpture)

from all over Europe regarding medieval food,

eating habits and table manners, much of it in

color.

 

Also, the text isn't half bad :-)

 

Giano

 

 

Date: Sun, 05 Aug 2001 10:29:16 -0400

From: johnna holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Re:Larousse

 

Johnnae llyn Lewis sends greetings.

 

Actually Larousse has other errors as well, but

people actually never sit down and read it from

cover to cover. I did a very comprehensive project

for a graduate advanced reference course

on sci/tech literature back in 1982 and did a major

investigation of Larousse then for that project.

It's always been one of those works that was an

accepted reference source that Librarians never

questioned when answering queries from the public.

My argument then as now was that it was questionable

in a lot of cases. I just pulled up the three reviews

from 1988 that were in major newspapers. It got 2

short reviews and a longer one from the LA Times that

noted that the wording even in the new edition was

quaint and arbritrary. That some definitions read

like they were still written for the UK although this

was a US edition. That the "tandoori" entry focused

on the wrong meat, etc. It also noted that the 8500

recipes had been reduced to 4000. There are of course

other editions than this 1988 American one, inc. one

that Books In Print lists for $350.00.

I have not seen anything about the new edition except

that it was slated for publication.

 

Of course, if you picked it up at a remaindered $10.

then buy it. It makes a nice bookend.

 

Speaking about the Oxford Companion, you ought to

also take a look at the Cambridge World History

of Food which went Oxford one better by making

theirs a two volume set and twice the price.In very

odd ways they really compliment each other in coverage.

 

Johnna Holloway

 

Daniel Phelps wrote:

> Johnnae llyn Lewis so sagely wrote:

> I wouldn't

> >recommend Larousse to anyone less than expert level

> >because of the number of food history mistakes and

> >errors that are in the work. Classic, it might be

> >but accurate it isn't. Save your money and buy

> >the Alan Davidson THE OXFORD COMPANON TO FOOD

> >and I would price that through some online sources

> >for the best buy.

> Indeed my lady I've been meaning to take a look at the Oxford.  I suggested

> Larousse because it has such an encyclopedic approach to food and its

> preparation and second hand older editions are so cheap.  I use it to check

> a redaction against a modern standard for the same foods.   I didn't realize

> that its forays into food history were so flawed.  Francocentric and

> Anglophobic I recognized as a given, ...presumedly its remarks about Henry

> VIII and "Sir Loin" and the "Baron of Beef" in the 1961 copy I own are to be

> taken with a grain of salt. :-P

> Daniel Raoul

 

 

Date: Wed, 17 Oct 2001 22:18:04 -0400

From: johnna holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] documentation search: snack and tourney food...

 

jenne at fiedlerfamily.net wrote:>

> I'm interested in information from published sources about what kind

> of 'snack' food people in the Middle Ages and Renaissance consumed.

--------------------------------------------------------------

Take a look at:

London Eats Out. 500 Years of Capital Dining.

London: Museum of London, 1999.

It dicusses the 16th and 17th centuries with

lots of footnotes. cookshops, street food, etc.

 

Johnnae llyn Lewis   Johnna Holloway

 

 

Date: Thu, 18 Oct 2001 09:10:21 -0400

From: johnna holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] documentation search: snack and tourney food...

 

jenne at fiedlerfamily.net wrote:>

> I'm interested in information from published sources about what kind of

> 'snack' food people in the Middle Ages and Renaissance consumed.

--------------------------------------------------------------

Carlin, Martha. "Fast food and Urban Living Standards

in Medieval England."  Food and Eating in Medieval England,

edited by Martha Carlin and Joel T. Rosenthal. London: The

Hambledon Press, 1998. ISBN: 1-85285-148-1.

 

Pages: 27-51.  112 footnotes.

 

This is probably the paper to start with.

 

Johnnae llyn Lewis   Johnna Holloway

 

 

Date: Fri, 1 Mar 2002 09:54:21 -0700 (MST)

From: Ann Sasahara <ariann at nmia.com>

To: <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] prehistoric food

 

_A Taste of History: 10,000 Years of Food in Britain_

Edited by Maggie Black. British Museum Press, 1993.

ISBN 0-7141-1788-9

 

Ariann

 

 

Date: Thu, 07 Mar 2002 17:02:24 -0500

From: johnna holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

To: "sca-cooks at ansteorra.org" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] New Books of Possible Interest

 

During the past few days I have come across

these new and recent titles that might be

of interest to members of the list. I

thought that I would play librarian and post

them, so that you could keep an eye out for

them or ask at a local library

They are:

 

Ken Albala

Eating Right in the Renaissance.

California Studies in Food and Culture, 2

Publication Date: February 2002

324 pages, 6 x 9 inches, 12 b/w illustrations

Clothbound: $39.95  0-520-22947-9.

Provides information on foods while

examining the wide-ranging dietary

literature of the Renaissance.

http://www.ucpress.edu/books/pages/9222.html

 

 

The following titles are available from

Tempus or Arcadia publishing.

FOOD IN ROMAN BRITIAN

Author(s): JOAN ALCOCK

Series: GENERAL HISTORY

Details: TRADE PAPERBACK / 192 Pages

ISBN: 0752419242 Price: $27.99

no description given by the press.

Scholar's Bookshelf says it uses

new archaeological findings to come

up with what the basic and gourmet foods

were in Roman Britain. Illustrated.

 

PREHISTORIC COOKING

Author(s): JACQUI WOOD

Series: ARCHAEOLOGY

Details: TRADE PAPERBACK / 176 Pages

ISBN: 0752419439 Price: $26.99

Description:

BASED ON EXPERIMENTAL ARCHAEOLOGY

AT THE AUTHORS WORLD-FAMOUS RESEARCH

SETTLEMENT IN CORNWALL, THIS BOOK DESCRIBES

THE INGREDIENTS OF PREHISTORIC COOKING

AND THE METHODS OF FOOD PREPARATION.

A GENERAL OVERVIEW OF THE LIFESTYLE OF

OUR PREHISTORIC ANCESTORS IS FOLLOWED BY

DETAILED SECTIONS (PLUS COOKBOOK-STYLE RECIPES)

ON: BREAD, DAIRY FOODS, STEWS, WATER PITS AND

HUNTING FOODS, CLAY-BAKED FOOD, THE SEASHORE MENU,

BEANS & LENTILS, HERBS & SPICES, VEGETABLES, WINE,

BEER & TEAS, SWEETS & PUDDINGS.

 

NOTE: I have no idea here what they mean by

"teas" in Roman Britain.

 

The press also offers:

QUEST FOR FOOD

Author(s): IVAN CROWE

Series: GENERAL HISTORY

Details: HARDCOVER / 258 Pages

ISBN: 0752414623 Price: $37.50

 

FARMERS IN PREHISTORIC BRITAIN

Author(s): FRANCIS PRYOR

Series: ARCHAEOLOGY

Details: TRADE PAPERBACK / 160 Pages

ISBN: 0752414771 Price: $24.99

 

and then this one

 

RECREATING THE PAST

Author(s): VICTOR AMBRUS & MICK ASTON

Series: ARCHAEOLOGY

Details: TRADE PAPERBACK / 120 Pages

ISBN: 0752419099 Price: $19.99

Description:

A DRAMATIC CHRONOLOGICAL SURVEY OF BRITISH

HISTORY, AS REVEALED BY ARCHAEOLOGY.

 

Found at http://www.tempuspublishing.com/p02.htm

 

Also Penguin has republished

Sydney Mintz's Sweetness and Power: the Place

of Sugar in Modern Society in paperback

for $15.00

 

Johnnae llyn Lewis

Johnna Holloway

 

 

Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2003 09:00:00 -0400

From: johnna holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Tannahill was Tomato References

 

There's also the issue with Tannahill in that one

should be using the revised text that was updated.

 

Here is my description from my article in

Serve It Forth number 16.

 

"Food in History, Reay Tannahill, 1973. This was the first general

market mass release food history book and was used as a

textbook in several social history courses. Penguin in the

U. K. re-released Food in History in a =93New, Fully Revised

and Updated Edition=94 in 1988. A U.S. revised paperback edition

was released in April 1995. Do use the revised edition, as

Tannahill corrected and updated information provided in

the 1973 original edition."

 

See her introduction for details.

 

Johnnae llyn Lewis   Johnna Holloway

 

Terry Decker wrote:

 

> Tannahill covers the subject, but not very thoroughly.

> Bear

> -------------------------

>> Tannahill's "Food In History" covers the spread of tomatoes throughout

>> Europe quite well.

>> -Lorenz

 

 

From: Devra at aol.com

Date: Tue, 6 May 2003 15:21:11 EDT

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re: new book rev'd in PPC 72

 

Just got my PPC 72, and they have a review (fairly favorable) for

BRITISH FOOD; AN EXTRAORDINARY THOUSAND YEARS OF HISTORY. Author is Colin

Spencer, publisher Grub Street, 2002. Since it costs 25 lb, it would be

about $60 US, I'm wondering whether anyone thinks it is any good before I

spend my time and money getting copies in from England

      Thanks

           Devra

 

Devra Langsam

www.poisonpenpress.com

 

 

Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2003 20:26:01 -0400

From: johnna holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] "All the King's Cooks"

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

I have been recommending it off and on for at least two years,

especially with regard to the sugarwork sections. You might also like

the books The Tudor Kitchens Cookery Book. Hampton Court Palace and also

The Tudor Kitchens Hampton Court Palace which can be ordered from

Hampton Court Palace. You can order them as well as the general guide to

the palace from

 

http://www.historicroyalpalaces.com/shop/howto.php

 

Johnnae llyn Lewis

 

jenne at fiedlerfamily.net wrote:

>>> 

Ok, I picked up "All the King's Cooks" at Pennsic and am finding it

fascinating reading, though not for the neophyte-- snipped

 

I've never seen this book discussed on the Cooks list. Is it because the

originals of the redacted recipes aren't included?

 

-- Pani Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika

<<< 

 

Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2003 21:03:12 -0400

From: johnna holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] "All the King's Cooks"

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

I recommend it very highly. The original recipes are directly noted as

to source and place. If you can read a footnote, you can find the source

and then locate the original recipes with only a bit of bother. The

original works are now available on EEBO or microfilm or have been

published in facsimiles or reprint volumes.

 

Just because Brears saved the space and did not include the original

recipes is no reason not to buy this book. Anyone into 16th century

kitchens and/or cookery ought to buy a copy while it is still available.

There is a strong chance that it will go OP and never be printed in

paperback.

 

And yes the information is very good and as always in any Brears' text

highly readable.

 

Johnnae llyn Lewis

 

Greg noted--

It's in Jaella's bibliography:

>>> 

http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/articles/food_bibliography.html

As you've guessed, she recommends against the recipes.

<<< 

 

Jadwiga wrote

>>> 

Actually, to directly quote Jae's annotation:

 

"An excellent overview of the Tudor kitchens of Henry VIII at Hampton

Court Palace, and what was done there. However, the included recipes do not have the originals included, so this is RECOMMENDED for the

information, and NOT RECOMMENDED for the recipes."

 

So, can we talk about the information? Pretty please? I'm all excited

about roasts and boiling kettles and food service and so forth...

 

-- Pani Jadwiga Zajaczkowa,

<<< 

 

 

Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 05:33:16 -0500

From: Robert Downie <rdownie at mb.sympatico.ca>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] "All the King's Cooks"

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

0 285 63533 6

Souvenir  Press Ltd

I also recommend it highly!

 

Faerisa

 

Cathy Harding wrote:

>>> 

anyone have the ISBN for this?

Maeve

<<< 

 

 

Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2003 14:37:44 -0400 (EDT)

From: <jenne at fiedlerfamily.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] "All the King's Cooks"

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

>>> 

Is there much in the sugarwork section on poured and blown sugar, or is

it mostly about sugar paste and such?

<<< 

 

There is a little on poured sugar, though more about sugar paste.

Certainly more about poured sugar than I had seen elsewhere.

 

-- Pani Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika jenne at fiedlerfamily.net

 

 

Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2003 14:14:15 -0400

From: johnna holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

To: "sca-cooks at ansteorra.org" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] More new titles

 

Here are some more new titles coming out this fall. Some are rather

weird-- The new Shakespeare title is due out in October.

 

 

The Pharaoh's Feast: From Pit-Boiled Roots to Pickled Herring, Cooking

Through the Ages with 100 Simple Recipes

by Oswald Rivera

ISBN: 156858282x Publisher: Four Walls Eight Windows  October 2003

Paperback 256 pages

"recreates ingredient lists and recipes to allow modern cooks to prepare

historic delights from Esau's biblical mess of pottage to contemporary

pasta primavera." Packed with fun facts, this culinary history includes

such treats as a seven-course dinner from King Srenika’s royal bash in

first millennial Indus Valley, Colonial New England’s Johny Cakes and

the modern era's meatloaf. B/white illus. accompany this lively history

of cooking."

 

---------------------

 

Cuisine and Culture: A History of Food and People

by Linda Civitello

ISBN: 0471202800 Subtitle: A History of Food and People Publisher: John

Wiley & Sons  August 2003  384 pages

"examines the relationship between food and history, from prehistoric

times to the 21st century." Amazon has sample sections up to examine."

 

-----------------------------

A Thousand Years Over a Hot Stove: A History of American Women Told

Through Food, Recipes, and Remembrances

by Laura Schenone

ISBN: 0393016714 Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company October 2003  416 pages

 

  "Recounts how American women have gathered, cooked, and prepared food

for lovers, strangers, and family throughout the ages. ... the shared

history of all American women."

-------

 

I should also mention that C. Anne Wilson's classic Food and Drink in

Britain is out now again in paperback. Borders in Ann Arbor had it

yesterday. It was announced as 2001 and came out in 2003.

 

Johnnae llyn Lewis

 

 

Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2003 14:21:50 -0400

From: johnna holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Two  Books on Sweets

To: "sca-cooks at ansteorra.org" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Here are a couple on sweets--

 

A King's Confectioner in the Orient: Friedrich Unger, Court Confectioner

to King Otto I of Greece

by Friedrich Unger

ISBN: 0710309368 Subtitle: Friedrich Unger, Court Confectioner to King

Otto I of Greece Translator: Merogullari, Renate Translator: Akmak,

Maret Publisher: Kegan Paul International Ltd. September 2003 in the UK

  208 pages. Also listed as being pub. in December 2003 in the USA.

 

Acc. to the publisher-

"This book, written in 1837 by Friedrich Unger, Chief Confectioner to

King Otto I of Greece, is a remarkable window onto what is in many

respects a lost world. Only a professional confectioner could have

understood the techniques, equipment and ingredients sufficiently to

leave a record so invaluable for recreating oriental confectionery.  His

book is comprehensive and detailed, with recipes for 97 confections,

some of which have disappeared entirely today. The light the book throws

on relations between Turkish and European confectionery is of particular

interest."

 

The author Mary Isin has translated over 150 books from Turkish to

English. She began researching the history of Turkish cuisine in 1981,

publishing a Turkish cookery book in 1985, and an annotated

transcription of an Ottoman cookery book into modern Turkish in 1998.

She lives in Istanbul and has two daughters.

 

This is apparently translated  from the German by Merete Çakmak and

Renate Ömerogullari according to a publisher's note.

 

http://www.keganpaul.com/product_info.php?products_id=741&;osCsid=15355addd75604ee634970ebaf4872fa

 

lists what the chapters include.

----------------------

 

Sugar-Plums and Sherbert: The Prehistory of Sweets

by Laura Mason is available again in paperback.

ISBN: 1903018285 Subtitle: The Prehistory of Sweets Publisher: Prospect

Books ( August 2003  Paperback)

 

Johnnae llyn Lewis

 

 

Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 10:05:30 -0400

From: johnna holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] "All the King's Cooks"

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Greg Lindahl wrote:

>>> 

On Mon, Aug 25, 2003 at 09:03:12PM -0400, johnna holloway wrote:

> I recommend it very highly. The original recipes are directly noted as

> to source and place. If you can read a footnote, you can find the source

> and then locate the original recipes with only a bit of bother.

 

A footnote is a good start, but have you looked, and are these

redactions good ones? I don't think Jaella actually looked, as it's a

lot of work...

 

-- Gregory

<<< 

 

The redactions are fine. It's a British book so he gives things such as

900g/ (2 lb) or 1150 ml (2 pt) and oven temperatures are 180 degrees C

(350 degrees F, gas mark 4). The recipe instructions are given in

numbered paragraphs and are quite complete.

 

Why should we doubt the work of Peter Brears?

Brears after all did the Tudor sections for the English Heritage series

which was released in hardbound as A Taste of History. He also published

some of the sugarpaste/dessert recipes in the conference proceedings

from Leeds that was edited and released as 'Banquetting Stuffe' under

the guidance of C. Anne Wilson. Moreover, these recipes are based on the

work of Brears and his staff through the years of actually working in

these kitchens and putting on these sorts of feasts at Christmastime

beginning in the early 1990's.

 

All in all it's a very good book and for anyone into Tudor-Elizabethan

cookery a must have volume. Just because I own 10,000 plus cookbooks and

books on food history does not mean that I do not examine and carefully

review volumes that I recommend. As a librarian as well as collector, it

would be professionally irresponsible not to carefully consider which

volumes I care to endorse. This is one of the great volumes. I use and

recommend it often.

 

Johnnae llyn Lewis

 

 

Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2003 12:02:58 -0400

From: johnna holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: Re: originals and redactions Re: [Sca-cooks] "All the King's

      Cooks"

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

But this is the question that comes up whenever one approaches any

cookbook that features traditional or heirloom or historical recipes.

The question always arises as to how true the recipes are with what was

actually being cooked. Did the author stand at the grandmother's elbow

and record every measurement that was made? Was the recipe simplified

for an American audience because the ingredients were not available? Was

the recipe and method and amounts improved upon or edited for length by

the author or the editor? Mastering the Art of French Cooking, volume 2,

[1970] contains a recipe for "croissants" that begins on page 96 and

ends on page 103. Most recipes today are at best a page or a long

paragraph. The better books discuss the recipes and the dishes and

mention any changes or variations, but this is not alway the case.

 

With regard to Brears it ought to be noted that the audience in Britain

for this book is partly made up of teachers who are looking for

information for their National Curriculum studies. With regard to the

original recipes, Brears notes that

"The fact that their recipes consist usually of little more than a list

of ingredients demonstrates that they were simply aides-memoire, for

they already knew by heart all the major repertoires and finer points of

technique. It is worth noting that only in recent years have some

cookery books descended to the level of idiots' guides, proffering

foolproof methods for boiling eggs!"

 

Had the original recipes been included the book might easily have been

another 50 pages longer and cost perhaps 1/3 more. Given the cost

factors, I think that this is the corner that was cut. They kept the

drawings and color photography and directed the readers to the original

sources via footnotes and a bibliography.

 

Johnnae llyn Lewis

 

jenne at fiedlerfamily.net wrote: snipped

>>> 

It's interesting to think about this... obviously a combination of

originals and good redactions would be the best sort of source... but we

often recommend books that have the originals even if the redactions are

bad. Is this a good practice? Certainly, it does help people's critical

reading skills.> -- Pani Jadwiga Zajaczkowa,

<<< 

 

 

Date: Mon, 01 Sep 2003 11:56:31 -0400

From: johnna holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Near a Thousand Tables

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

lilinah at earthlink.net wrote:

> Has anyone on this list read "Near a Thousand Tables" by Felipe

> Fernandes-Armesto? Apparently it presents food as cultural history,

> beginning with when humans figured out cooking...

> Anahita

 

It's ok but not outstanding. You can get it cheap at the moment in some

of the used book outlets. It's a highlights version of food--history

that offers up tidbits of this and that fact and then quickly moves on

to the next theme that he has chosen to cover. I'd borrow a copy and

read it before buying if you can. It may not be to your taste.

 

Johnnae llyn Lewis

 

 

Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 10:20:56 -0400

From: Sandra Kisner <sjk3 at cornell.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] period smoke houses?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> Also sprach Stefan li Rous:

>> What do we know about period smoke houses? Do we have any still existing

>> ones? Or diagrams, pictures or illuminations? Do we have any written

>> information on them that might, for instance, tell us which woods they

>> used or preferred to use?

> But we know they did it: there are both Roman and 17th-century recipes

> that call for hanging foods up to smoke in the kitchen fire or  chimney. It

> may be that the smoke is incidental, and that the warm, dry, updraft is

> the aspect of the process these cooks were going for.

> I think, for what you're looking for, we would need a period book on  pig

> farming for a really detailed description.

> Adamantius

 

A review just appeared today on the BMR listserve of Peter Fowler,  Farming

in the First Millennium AD: British Agriculture between Julius Caesar and

William the Conquerer.  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002.  Pp.

412.  ISBN 0-521-89056-X.  $38.00.  It mentions "Agriculture includes not

only crop farming but also animal husbandry and associated activities on

the landscape (such as herb production). Despite the title, there is less

about actual methods and processes of production and more concentration on

an overview of country life throughout the examined timeframe. While

landscape organization and exploitation, such as what field systems looked

like in the Roman period, dominates, there are briefer explorations of

social issues, such as belief and conservatism in the countryside, that

enrich the book. Judicious use of textual evidence in certain instances

permits insight into the working and living conditions of those on the  

land across the millennium."

 

The review is a bit long to post here, but is available at the BMCR website

(http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/bmcr/), or I could mail it to anyone who is

interested.

 

Sandra

 

 

Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2003 16:53:54 -0400

From: johnna holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re: more on King's Confectioner

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

On August 27th I posted a note uder the heading  Two  Books on Sweets

and included details about a new book entitled

>  A King's Confectioner in the Orient: Friedrich Unger, Court Confectioner

> to King Otto I of Greece

> by Friedrich Unger

> ISBN: 0710309368

 

I located some more information about the book. Priscilla Mary Islin who

did the notes for the book did an article that appeared in PPC 69 (Feb.

2002) where she talks about the book in detail and includes a number of

recipes. The article "A King's Confectioner in the Orient" appears on

pages 110-121.

 

Johnnae llyn Lewis

 

 

Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2003 11:46:47 -0600

From: "Terry Decker" <t.d.decker at worldnet.att.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Le Menagier's chicken in orange sauce

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> Harold McGee, "On Food And Cooking". If anyone waves a copy of

> Waverly Root's "Food" at you, run. Don't stop and look back, just run.

> Adamantius

 

So what egregious errors did you find in "Food"?

 

I will agree that McGee is the superior work (for one thing, he includes a

bibliography).  I find that Root has his uses, but one needs to check his

quotes and his facts to ensure accuracy. Root is generally correct, but his

errors tend to show when checking specifics against contemporary or quoted

sources.

 

If you want truly problematic references try James Trager.  I find his "The

Food Chronology" useful as a temporal starting point, but I don't depend on

it for accurate information.

 

Bear

 

 

Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2003 17:24:16 -0500 (EST)

From: <jenne at fiedlerfamily.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] "Creatin Community With Food and Drink in

        Merovingian  Gaul"

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> Creating Community With Food an Drink in Merovingian Gaul

> by Bonnie Effros  List Price: $49.95

 

It appears to be a book of essays. This is the info about it in the

Oxbow books site:

 

"Displaying, consuming and abstaining from food were powerful social

metaphors in the early day of Christianity and were widely open to

manipulation. The clergy in particular used occasions of feasting and

fasting to define relationships between themselves and the laity and

enforce their authority and power over them. These five essays by Bonnie

Efos look for evidence of the use of food and drink in the literary works

of early medieval Gaul, including saints' Lives, canonical legislation,

theological tracts, religious manual and so on. She explores the many

different roles of food, for example in defining gender and authority, as

a source of healing and power, as an important part of commemoration and

celebration in funerary contexts, and as forms of hospitality that could

be granted or denied. 174p, b/w illus (The New Middle Ages, Palgrave

2002)"

-- Pani Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika jenne at fiedlerfamily.net

 

 

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 09:30:55 -0500

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] "Creating Community With Food and Drink in   

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

This is quick and not at all formal.

 

       Creating community with food and drink in Merovingian Gaul / by

       Bonnie Efros.

 

It's comprised of:

Introduction pp. 1-8

I. The Ritual Significance of Feasting in the Formation of Christian

Community with subtitles:

1. Saints and Sacrifices in Sixth-Century Gaul 2. Saints and the

Provisioning of Plenty 3. Defining Christian Community through the Fear

of Pollution 4. Conclusion

 

II. Food, Drink, and the Expression of Clerical Identity pp.9-24

1. Defining Masculinity without Weapons: Amicitia among Bishops 2. Monks

and the Significance of Convivia in Ascetic Communities 3. Amicitia

between Clerics and Laymen 4. Bishops and Civitias in Late Antique and

Early Medieval Gaul 5. Conclusion

 

III. Gender and Authority: Feasting and Fasting in Early Medieval

Monasteries pp. 25-37

1. Feasting and the Power of Hospitality 2. The Claustration of Nuns in

Sixth-Century Gaul 3. Caesarius' Rule for Nuns and the Prohibition of

Convivia 4. Radegund of Poitiers' Relationship to Food and Drink 5.

Conclusion

 

IV. Food as a Source of Healing and Power pp. 55-67

1. Healing Alternatives in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages 2.

Christian Cures: Blessed Oil and Holy Relics 3. Anthimus' Guide to a

Proper Diet for a Merovingian King 4. Conclusion

 

V. Funerary Feasting in Merovingian Gaul pp 69-91

1. Ancient Sources and Early Medieval Practices 2. Christian Attitudes

to Funerary Meals in Early Medieval Gaul 3. Interpreting Early Medieval

Archaeological Evidence for Feasting 4. Future Directions for Research

 

Epilogue pp93-95

Footnotes--pp 97-143

Bibliography 145-167

 

Library of Congress subject headings for the book include--:

Merovingians Food Social aspects,

Fasts and feasts France History,

Dinners and dining France History,

Civilization, Medieval,

France Social life and customs.

 

Those are slightly misleading as it's the only book under the first two

headings.

There are no other books at LC with those headings. It's the only book out

there on this subject which does make it rather unique.

 

It's not a disjointed series of papers as was suggested but a whole work

that examines

various and related aspects of the role of Christianity and food in the

Merovingian communities.

This work  is extraordinarily academic and if you hate footnotes

just forget it. There's nearly 50 pages of footnotes to wade through.

The author writes about the Merovingians exclusively. One of her other

titles is:

Merovingian Mortuary Archaeology and the Making of the Early Middle Ages.

For most people it's not a practical book, but if you are into

Merovingian history (or doing

a very special early French or Merovingian event) or want

to collect comprehensively on France, then you may want to interlibrary

loan it and read it.

A knowledge of Latin

and French is also helpful as well as a background in early French history.

(Once upon a time I did a graduate level course on Charlemagne, and I

have both

Latin and French, so I can get things out of it. I am glad that I bought

it. And I did not

pay this price, but got it at a conference special.)

I can't recommend it at $50 for most culinary scholars. If  the price

drops to $15 in paperback,

then it might find a wider audience. It's very very specialist.

 

What it reminds me

of are those works that examine religious women and the role of food in

their lives, such as

Holy Anorexia and Holy Feast and Holy Fast, although they are much

longer and oriented towards

women in history. They are also more accessible to a general audience.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Johnnae llyn Lewis

 

 

Date: Wed, 10 Mar 2004 19:31:51 -0500

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Bottero book on Mesopotamian Cooking

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

The University of Chicago Press catalog arrived today with

the news that Jean Bottero's  book is now out.

The Oldest Cuisine in the World:

Cooking in Mesopotamia.

Translated by Teresa Lavender Fagan. 152 p.  2004

 

Cloth $22.50 0-226-06735-1 Spring 2004

 

Cumin, garlic, and leeks. Sound familiar?

What about francolin, halazzu, and kissimu?

In this intriguing blend of the commonplace and the

ancient, Jean Bottéro's The Oldest Cuisine in the World

gives us the first comprehensive look at the delectable secrets of

Mesopotamia. Bottéro's anthropological perspective encompasses

the religious rites, everyday rituals, attitudes and taboos, and even  

the detailed preparation techniques involving food and

drink in Mesopotamian high culture during the second

and third millenniums BCE, as the Mesopotamians recorded them.

 

With offerings including translated recipes for pigeon and

gazelle stews, the elements and uses of medicinal teas and broths,

and the origins of ingredients native to the region,

this book reveals the cuisine of one of history's most fascinating

societies.

 

http://www.press.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/hfs.cgi/00/16219.ctl

 

Another new one from Chicago is

 

Ferguson, Priscilla Parkhurst Accounting for Taste:

The Triumph of French Cuisine. 256 p. (est.), 10 halftones, 11 line

drawings. 2004

 

Cloth $25.00 0-226-24323-0 Spring 2004 Available 05/04.

 

It's described as a---

"culinary journey [that] begins with Ancien Régime cookbooks and

ends with twenty-first-century cooking programs. It takes us from Carême,

the "inventor" of modern French cuisine in the early nineteenth century, to

top chefs today, such as Daniel Boulud and Jacques Pépin.

Not a history of French cuisine, Accounting for Taste focuses on the

people, places, and institutions that have made this cuisine what it is

today:.."

 

I was wondering why we needed another history of French cuisine at the

moment-- glad to know this is a "journey"!

 

Johnnae llyn Lewis

 

 

Date: Tue, 23 Mar 2004 18:38:00 -0800

From: "Wanda Pease" <wandap at hevanet.com>

Subject: RE: [Sca-cooks] new book review-- _Feast_

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteora.org>

 

Feast: A History of Grand Eating, Roy Strong, 2002, ISBN 0-15-I00758-6

 

2.   Feast: A History of Grand Eating

by Roy Strong Author) (Hardcover )

 

List Price:   $35.00

 

Regina

 

 

From: sca-cooks-bounces at ansteorra.org

[mailto:sca-cooks-bounces at ansteorra.org] On Behalf Of Wanda Pease

Sent: Thursday, March 18, 2004 10:44 PM

To: Cooks within the SCA

Subject: RE: [Sca-cooks] new book review-- _Feast_

 

I have had my copy since December and I like it very much. It covers

from Greek through Victorian dining, with pictures from the period.  Not food as

Johnnae says, but about food service.   I was beginning to wonder if it were

somehow "off" because none of the people I expected to say good or bad

had mentioned it.

 

Regina Romsey

 

> I bought the English published edition several months ago and like it

> a lot. It's good for reading and the notes are good. Great for

> ideas.

> Johnnae

 

 

Date: Wed, 06 Oct 2004 14:19:19 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] New In Print

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

The Guardian Review of the Cardinal's Hat is at--

http://books.guardian.co.uk/reviews/history/0,6121,1217670,00.html

There are used copies and new imported copies available via www.

bookfinder.com for people who are interested in the title.

 

Johnnae

 

Elise Fleming wrote: snipped

> 5. _The Cardinal's Hat.  Money, ambition and housekeeping in a Renaissance

> court_ by Mary Hollingsworth, 308 pages, 18.99 pounds.  I will quote their

> review since in trying to summarize it, I would be saying the same stuff!

> "This is based on the MSS and financial accounts of Cardinal Ippolito

> d'Este, the second son of Lucretia Borgia and the brother of the Duke of

> Ferrara, mostly during the years 1530-40.  You will get a true idea from

> its pages of the importance of salad to the Renaissance way of  catering,

> and you will have the most immense fun reading a book that extracts the

> maximum from dry details of finance as you can imagine.  My second-best

> Christmas present."

> Alys Katharine

 

 

Date: Thu, 18 Nov 2004 16:36:27 -0500

From: Jadwiga Zajaczkowa / Jenne Heise <jenne at fiedlerfamily.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] A question about a book

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> While Googling, I came across this book ...

>      Dangerous Tastes: The Story of Spices

>      by Andrew Dalby

 

Wonderful, wonderful book. If you are interested in the history of

spices, you want this books. However, if, like some SCA-cooks, you are

only interested in period manuscripts and/or period recipes, you don't

need it-- it's a secondary and tertiary source, not a primary one.

 

-- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika jenne at fiedlerfamily.net

 

 

Date: Thu, 18 Nov 2004 15:46:58 -0800

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] A question about a book

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

Martin G. Diehl wrote:

> While Googling, I came across this book ...

>      Dangerous Tastes: The Story of Spices

>      by Andrew Dalby

> Any comments?  Is it good/bad?

> Vincenzo

 

Ooh, ooh. I love this book. Is it the best most complete story of

spices? Probably not. But it has a lot of excellent detail, wonderful

quotes from ancient texts on spices, and it's written really well and

great fun to read. The author is a noted food scholar.

 

I recommend it.

 

Anahita

 

 

Date: Sat, 22 Jan 2005 16:09:09 -0500

From: "Elise Fleming" <alysk at ix.netcom.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] PPC #77

To: "Micheal" <dmreid at hfx.eastlink.ca>,    "Cooks wthin the SCA"

        <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>,    "Elaine Koogler" <ekoogler1 at comcast.net>

 

Da wrote:

>  I have to ask what are these PPC books, pamphlets , magazines. That I see

> continuously being referred to that is. I am in a little backwater up here

> so I don`t know of them, nor how to get my hands on them.

 

Petits Propos Culinaires is "an international journal on food, food

history, cookery and cookery books.  It is edited and produced in

Britain

and has been coming out three times a year since the beginning of

1979..."

This is the "real" stuff, not "SCA fantasy".  I've found that there's at

least one article in the SCA time period in each issue, sometimes more.

For me, the articles that have appeared on confections are priceless!

 

If you go to the Acanthus Books website and click on Petits Propos

Culinaires you can bring up the numbers of their publications.  Click on

the number and see a copy of the table of contents.  A number of the

contributors are well-known food historians.  While it is somewhat pricey

($34 for a year's subscription of 3 issues), back copies from Acanthus are

usually less expensive ($8-9.50 an issue).  It makes a good gift from a

relative who doesn't know what to get for you!

 

Alys Katharine

 

Elise Fleming

alysk at ix.netcom.com

 

 

Date: Sat, 22 Jan 2005 16:15:42 -0500

From: Marian Walke <marian at buttery.org>

Subject: Re: [Sa-cooks] PPC #77

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Micheal wrote:

> I have to ask what are these PPC books, pamphlets , magazines. That I

see continuously being referred to that is. I am in a little backwater

> up here so I don`t know of them, nor how to get my hands on them.

> Da

 

PPC is the usual abbreviation for Petits Propos Culinaires, a

thrice-yearly journal of culinary studies.  "Essays and notes to

do with food, cookery and cookery books," according to the

Library of Congress.  It is published by Prospect Books (Totnes,

Devon UK).  Subscriptions are $34.00/year; checks should be made

payable to PPC North America and send to PPCNA, Alaleigh House,

Blackawton, Totnes, Devon TQ9 7DL, UK. Although issue #77 was

particularly rich in period articles, every issue seems to have

at least one article of interest concerning our time frame, and

frequently several.

 

--Old Marian

 

 

Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 10:20:34 -0500

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Booklist for Culinary Novices-- Non Recipe

        texts

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Wanda Pease wrote:

> How do people feel about Roy Strong's Feast: A History of Grand Eating?

> Not as a recipe book which it is not, but as a description of actual

> settings?

> Regina

 

Here's my short review-- it's just a summary.

I haven't done the long version yet.  I have included it

in the Recreating the Elizabethan Feast handout, but not in

the essentials basics handouts.

(I have a variety of classes that I give, so I have a number of

handouts tailored to each subject or topic, each designed for the audience

and class. I redo these before each lecture, so they are up to date too. Yes,

I know that's insane, but it's the librarian in me.)

 

Johnnae

 

******

Roy Strong Feast

 

I've owned it since 2002 when it came out in the UK.

 

Strong writes very well, but it should be noted that Feast is not a cookbook or

a recipe book. It's a descriptive and tantalizing text that covers "eating in the grand fashion." It's going to frustrate Society cooks because it lacks

the details that they are going to want. (Don't count on it providing you with a

list of everything a typical banquet might have had in circa 1300 or 1560.) It's an idea book that stimulates the mind and palate;  if you are into reading about past banquets, you will be entertained.

 

Do plan on reading it closely and then going to the footnotes.

You really need to like reading footnotes too.

It's worth getting, especially at the closeout price of $5.99

which is the price being offered  by some dealers now.

 

Here's the original Guardian review--

http://books.guardian.co.uk/reviews/history/0,6121,804071,00.html

where it noted "There are endnotes but no bibliography, and it is therefore difficult to follow exactly what and where Sir Roy has been reading: all the ibids rather stick in the throat. Another lack is of specific instructions on how to stage a feast at home."

 

I would note that upon reflection this is one of those books that really

needs illustrations and lots of them. Oversized book with color photos and illustrations would have made it expensive but a work to really drool over.

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 22:43:20 -0500

From: Elaine Koogler <ekoogler1 at comcast.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Booklist for Culinary Novices-- Non Recipe

        texts

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Wanda Pease wrote:

> How do people feel about Roy Strong's Feast: A History of Grand Eating?

> Not as a recipe book which it is not, but as a description of actual

> settings?

> Regina

 

I used it as a resource for the Italian feast I did a year or so

ago...found the information it contained very useful and seemed

compatible with some of the ideas/information gleaned from reading other

sources, including period recipes.

 

Kiri

 

 

Date: Wed, 6 Apr 2005 17:49:40 -0500

From: "margaret" <m.p.decker at att.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Book Questions...

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

I reviewed this for Serve It Forth! a few years back.  Trager mixes fact,

apocryphy, and myth with gay abandon.  This is his writing style, so any

works by him are suspect.  The work can not be used uncritically.  That

being said, the book is useful in tying various food stuffs to locations,

events and dates.  I use it as a quick reference to bootstrap further

research. The more one knows about culinary history, the more likely the

book is to be useful.

 

Bear

 

> I recently picked up a used copy of

> The Food Chronology by James Trager

> It is organized by century, each broken down into years, with significant

> food, economic, and political tidbits with each. It begins with very early

> pre-history (pre-human, in fact) not broken by year :-) The volume i have

> ends with 1995. The book is 783 pages long, with 109 pages devoted to

> pre-1601, 60 pages of index and no bibliography. It attempts to cover the

> whole world, but i assume is stronger on Europe and North America.

> --

> Urtatim, formerly Anahita

 

 

Date: Wed, 6 Apr 2005 18:11:47 -0500

From: "margaret" <m.p.decker at att.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Book Questions...

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

The Food Chronology is a history timeline with brief entries on a year by

year basis.  Tannahill's Food in History and Toussaint-Samat's History of

Food are historical surveys, broad coverage, but little depth.

Toussaint-Samat organizes the work for greater depth than Tannahill, but has

a Franco-centric view.  Flandrin and Montanari's (editors) Food: a Culinary

History is a translation (overseen by Sonnenfeld) of their French edition

and is a collection of scholarly essays on culinary history.  While the

scope of the book is world-wide, the essays are limited in scope and provide

academic depth, which explains the vocabulary.

 

All of these books contain errors, so if you are using them for research,

check the sources and the facts.

 

Bear

 

> I have just recently started the search and what not

> of history with food.  I have not heard of the book

> you mentioned, but, I did find 2 in a local library

> (Virginia Beach, VA).  One is titled "Food in History"

> and is by Reay Tannahill most recent copyright is

> 1988.  It does the same thing you are mentioning,

> timeline type of stuff starting with pre-cave man type

> all the way up to what they call 'current day'.  There

> is references and such through out the book and is

> fairly easy to read.

> The other is called "Food: A culinary History" the

> copy I have says the English Edition is by Albert

> Sonnefeld and copyright 1999.  Again, it starts with

> prehistory and early civilizations and goes up to

> current day.  It is a little more difficult to read

> due to some of vocabulary.  It also has references.

> Both not only look at food and where they come from,

> but also the cultural aspects of food and how it

> evolved.  Not sure if that helps.

> Alexa

 

 

Date: Sun, 7 Aug 2005 08:54:17 -0400

From: "The Sheltons" <sheltons at sysmatrix.net>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] New Book?

To: <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Is anyone familiar with this book that was just published this month?  Some

of it covers our time of interest, but I don't know anything about this

author and how good her research is.

 

John le Burguillun

 

 

      "Charlemagne's Tablecloth: A Piquant History of Feasting" by Nichola

Fletcher

            ISBN: 0312340680

            Format: Hardcover, 256pp

            Pub. Date: August 2005

            Publisher: St. Martin's Press

            List Price: $24.95

 

 

      FROM THE PUBLISHER

      Feasts, banquets, and grand dinners have always played a vital role in

our lives. They oil the wheels of diplomacy, smooth the paths of the

ambitious, and spread joy at family celebrations. They lift the spirits,

involve all our senses and, at times, transport us to other fantastical

worlds. Some feasts have give rise to hilarious misunderstandings, at others

competitive elements take over. Some are purely for pleasure, some connect

uncomfortably with death, but all are interesting. Nichola Fletcher has

written a captivating history of feasts throughout the ages that includes

the dramatic failures along with the dazzling successes. From a humble meal

of potatoes provided by an angel, to the extravagance of the high medieval

and Renaissance tables groaning with red deer and wild boar, to the

exquisite refinement of the Japanese tea ceremony, Charlemagne's Tablecloth

covers them all. In her gustatory exploration of history's great feasting

tables, Fletcher also answers more than a few riddles such as "Why did

Charlemagne use an asbestos tablecloth at his feasts?" and "Where did the

current craze for the elegant Japanese Kaiseki meal begin? Fletcher answers

these questions and many more while inviting readers to a feasting table

that extends all the way from Charlemagne's castle to her own millennium

feast in Scotland. This is an eclectic collection of feasts from the

flamboyant to the eccentric, the delicious to the disgusting, and sometimes

just the touchingly ordinary. For anyone who has ever sat down at a banquet

table and wondered, "Why?" Nichola Fletcher provides the delicious answer in

a book that is a feast all its own.

 

 

Date: Sun, 07 Aug 2005 10:26:46 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] New Book?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

It's been out in Canada and the UK for a year or longer now.

It has some interesting material in it, although it's not a cookbook

or a history but rather a reflection on food in history.

It does have some interesting stuff in it. The author did one of those

pastry stags that bleeds wine when an arrow is pulled out and she

included a picture of that for example.  My guess is that certain people will like it well enough  to read and enjoy it. One can get ideas and inspiration

from it.

 

Others will dismiss the book as unnecessary and worthless.

I have already heard people dismiss it.

 

Try interlibrary loaning a copy in before buying a copy.

 

Johnnae

 

The Sheltons wrote:

> Is anyone familiar with this book that was just published this month?

> Some of it covers our time of interest, but I don't know anything

> about this author and how good her research is.

>      "Charlemagne's Tablecloth: A Piquant History of Feasting" by

> Nichola Fletcher

 

 

Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2005 11:12:28 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re:Charlemagne's Tablecloth was New Book?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Saw the American edition of this at Borders this past weekend.

I was shocked to see that the color photos of the UK edition have

been changed to black and white in the US edition. It does make

a big difference given the various artworks that are reproduced here.

Half of the charm of the English edition lies in the various illustrations.

I thought I would warn people anyway that this is not the same book that

came out in the UK.

http://seriouslygoodvenison.co.uk/charlemagne_s_tablecloth.php features

the UK one.

 

Johnnae

 

> It's been out in Canada and the UK for a year or longer now.

> It has some interesting material in it, although it's not a cookbook

> or a history but rather a reflection on food in history. snipped

> The author did one of those

> pastry stags that bleeds wine when an arrow is pulled out and she

> included a picture of that for example.  My guess is that certain

> people will like

> it well enough  to read and enjoy it. One can get ideas and

> inspiration from it.

> Others will dismiss the book as unnecessary and worthless.

> I have already heard people dismiss it. Try interlibrary loaning a

> copy in before buying a copy.

> Johnnae

> The Sheltons wrote: Is anyone familiar with this book that was just

> published this month?  Some of it covers our time of interest, but I

> don't know anything about this author and how good her research

> is.     "Charlemagne's Tablecloth: A Piquant History of Feasting" by

> Nichola Fletcher

 

 

Date: Mon, 26 Sep 2005 23:07:22 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Also forthcoming

To: "mk-cooks at midrealm.org" <mk-cooks at midrealm.org>,       Cooks within the

        SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

New edition of

 

<>Food and Feast in Medieval England by P W Hammond

 

The book is now available in a smaller paperback edition with black and

white illustrations. 200p, 35 b/w pls (Sutton 1993, Pb 1995, new Pb edn

2005)

 

ISBN 0905778251. Hardback. Price US $40.00

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Sat, 08 Oct 2005 18:42:04 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Food in the Ancient World

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>,

        "mk-cooks at midrealm.org" <mk-cooks at midrealm.org>

 

Another new Greenwood title comes at the end of the year..

Food in the Ancient World by Joan P. Alcock

http://www.greenwood.com/books/BookDetail.asp?sku=GR3003

(Estimated publication date, 12/30/2005)  49.95 USDollars

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Sun, 4 Jun 2006 21:29:50 -0400

From: "Sharon Gordon" <gordonse at one.net>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Forthcoming book on Eating and Drinking in Roman

        Britain

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

http://www.cambridge.org/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=052100327X

 

Eating and Drinking in Roman Britain

H. E. M. Cool

Barbican Research Associates

Paperback

(ISBN-13: 9780521003278 | ISBN-10: 052100327X)

Also available in Hardback

 

What were the eating and drinking habits of the inhabitants of Britain

during the Roman period? Drawing on evidence from a large number of

archaeological excavations, this fascinating new study shows how varied

these habits were in different regions and amongst different communities and

challenges the idea that there was any one single way of being Roman or

native. Integrating a range of archaeological sources, including pottery,

metalwork and environmental evidence such as animal bone and seeds, this

book illuminates eating and drinking choices, providing invaluable insights

into how those communities regarded their world. The book contains sections

on the nature of the different types of evidence used and how this can be

analysed. It will be a useful guide to all archaeologists and those who wish

to learn about the strength and weaknesses of this material and how best to

use it.

 

. Draws on the full range of archaeological and literary sources

. Reveals a great regional diversity within Roman Britain

. Covers kitchenware, ingredients, cooking techniques, eating and drinking

customs

 

Contents

1. Aperitif;

2. The food itself;

3. The packaging;

4. The human remains;

5. Written evidence;

6. Kitchen and dining basics: techniques and utensils;

7. The store cupboard;

8. Staples;

9. Meat;

10. Dairy products;

11. Poultry and eggs;

12. Fish and seafood;

13. Game;

14. Greengrocery;

15. Drink;

16. The end of independence;

17. A brand new province;

18. Coming of age;

19. A different world;

20. Digestif.

 

 

Date: Thu, 03 Aug 2006 15:15:02 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Anna Martellotti  titles

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

http://www.webster.it/vai_libri-author_Martellotti+Anna-shelf_BIT-

Martellotti_Anna.html

 

I came across two titles by this author today-- Anna Martellotti.

One deals with foods related to Federico II in the 13th century.

The other with a translation of Arab recipes by Giambonino da Cremona

in the late 13th century.

 

Thought people might find them of interest.

 

Johnnae

 

 

_I ricettari di Federico II : dal "Meridionale" al "Liber de coquina"

review is here--

http://www.ext.upmc.fr/urfist/menestrel/cralimentation/Martellotti.pdf

also here

http://www.storiamedievale2.net/Rec/ricettari.htm

 

CULTURE: MIDDLE AGES - COOKBOOK ATTRIBUTED TO GOURMET EMPEROR  

FEDERICO II

Rome, Jan. 16th - (Adnkronos) - Emperor Federico II was also a

first-rate gourmet, a passionate connoisseur of the art of cooking. And

to his patronage we owe the writing up, between 1230 and 1250, of the

''Liber de coquina''. This is what is sustained by Anna Martellotti,

former German history professor at the University of Bari, in the essay

''I ricettari di Federico II'' [The recipe books of Federico II],

published by the Olschki publishing house.

 

The second is:

Il Liber de ferculis di Giambonino da Cremona : la gastronomia araba in

Occidente nella trattatistica dietetica

 

Review is in PPC 71

Anna Martellotti: Il Liber de ferculis di Giambonino de Cremona: Schena

Editore, Fasano, 2002: ISBN 88-8229-272-X: 420 pp., indexes, p/b,

L.44.000/Euro 22,72.

 

"In eleventh-century Baghdad, a physician compiled a medical

encyclopedia titled Minh?j al-Bay?n. Among its thousands of entries were

scores of recipes, soon to be excerpted and circulated on their own as a

cookbook. These doctor-approved recipes were plagiarized by several

later Arabic cookbooks, and there is much to be said about that.But what

followed was more surprising. In the late thirteenth century, 82 of the

recipes were translated into Latin by a certain Jamboninus of Cremona

under the title Liber deferculis et condimentis, and in the following

century the Latin was translated into German as P?ch von der Chosten.

Lately there has been an explosion of interest in the European versions,

culminating in the present study."

CHARLES PERRY

 

 

Date: Sun, 17 Sep 2006 11:20:32 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Oxford Companion to Food 2nd Edition

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>,

        "mk-cooks at midrealm.org" <mk-cooks at midrealm.org>

 

The Oxford Companion to Food is out in a second edition.

Borders in Ann Arbor had it Friday, but all the copies were

still wrapped, so I didn't open one up to browse it.

 

The Oxford Companion to Food

Second Edition

Alan Davidson

Edited by Tom Jaine

Consultant Editor: Jane Davidson

Research Director: Helen Saberi

936 pages; 175 line illus.; ISBN13: 978-0-19-280681-9 ISBN10:  

0-19-280681-5

 

http://www.oup.com/us/catalog/general/subject/HistoryOther/

CulturalHistory/?view=usa&ci=9780192806819

has the details.

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2006 19:16:41 +0100 (CET)

From: sera piom <serapiom74 at yahoo.it>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Privy Purse Expenses of Princess Mary,      afterwards

        Queen Mary

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

 

While searching for "Epulario" at www.books.google.com, I came across  

this book:

 

Frederick Madden: Privy Purse Expenses of Princess Mary, Daughter of  

King Henry the Eighth, Afterwards Queen Mary. With a Memoir of the  

Princess, and Notes. London: William Pickering 1831.

 

A quick look at the index shows: dishes of butter, cakes, cheese,  

chickens, cherries, cinnamon, cloves, conserves, cucumers, damsons,  

spices, ... not to speak of jewels, embroidery and such things.

 

Serafina

 

 

Date: Tue, 03 Apr 2007 07:29:10 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] 6000 Years of Bread was Fermentation Sponge

        Question

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

> What do you all think of "Six Thousand Years of Bread: Its  Holy  

> and Unholy History" by H.E Jacobs. ?

> Aldyth

 

It's considered to be one of the classic volumes. I find it a bit disjointed

which is quite understandable as the writing of the book was interrupted by the author's stays in Dachau and Buchenwald before he and his wife managed to emigrate to the United States. (His wife managed to hide the manuscript from the

Nazis who had already banned his other books.) The book was finished in the States with research at the NY Public Library. The major problem is that the text came out originally in 1944, so it of course doesn't include the past 60 years of research. There have been a number of studies and research done, especially on breads, grains, milling, etc and the medieval period. The book doesn't reflect any of those. However for 16.95 it's a good buy and good value.

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Tue, 3 Apr 2007 11:22:18 -0400

From: Jadwiga Zajaczkowa / Jenne Heise <jenne at fiedlerfamily.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Fermentation Sponge Question

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

> What do you all think of "Six Thousand Years of Bread: Its  Holy  

> and Unholy History" by H.E Jacobs. ?

> Aldyth

 

It's a fascinating book, but there's definitely a bias in it related to

handwork and bread quality. Basically what you would expect from a male

academic in 1940-- handmade bread is icky because people are touching it

and sweating and so on, and the primary goal of all society and all

people is to avoid physical labor because that's icky too.

Interestingly enough, I don't think he gives details about kneading

troughs and other large-scale bread kneading gadgets.

 

-- Jadwiga

 

 

Date: Tue, 3 Apr 2007 15:07:18 -0700 (PDT)

From: Huette von Ahrens <ahrenshav at yahoo.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Period Greek Recipes

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

I am sorry, but "The Frugal Gourmet cooks Three Ancient Cuisines" isn't a very reliable cookbook for historical research.  He doesn't document any of this recipes.  This cookbook is on par with "Fabulous Feasts" in unreliability.

 

Huette

 

--- Georgia Foster <jo_foster81 at hotmail.com> wrote:

> I have a book at home "The Frug Cooks  Three ancient Cuisines" ...  

> it is in a box but I THINK I know which box (moving is a LOW quality

> recreational experience I assure you).  Some of the recipies have dates ...

> some don't

> Malkin

> Otherhill

> Artemisia

 

 

Date: Wed, 04 Apr 2007 13:00:07 -0400

From: silverr0se at aol.com

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Fermentation Sponge Question

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

 

Great Book! I got a lot of good background info on bread from this  

one, more than I got from Elizabeth David's, although hers has recipes.

 

Renata

 

> What do you all think of "Six Thousand Years of Bread: Its  Holy and  

> Unholy History" by H.E Jacobs. ?

> Aldyth

 

 

Date: Sun, 8 Apr 2007 10:30:19 -0400

From: "Nick Sasso" <grizly at mindspring.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] "Fabulous Feasts"

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Lord Vitaliano commented:

<<< Well, this is all great stuff, I now know what NOT to read, of course,

Fab Feasts was never on my reading lists, and this Frugal Gourmet stuff

never really interested me either. >>>

 

Actually the first half of "Fabulous Feasts", the section which talks

about the history of various medieval foods and cooking isn't that

bad. The problem is with the recipes in the second half, since many

aren't that good, and no original recipes or attributions are given.

So, it isn't a bad read, just don't use the second half of the book

as good examples of medieval recipes.  > > > > > > >

 

BOTH books have value in and of themselves, from my side of the proverbial

tracks. Fab Feasts is the early incarnation of the desire for more

historically anchored meals in the SCA hobby.  The research and recipe

construction lacks the sophistication of the current corpus, some 30 years

later, but needs a tip of the hat as being part of the development of what

we do today.

 

Frugal Gourmet has many really good recipes in his body of work.  His

editorial and production staff did a little background research to give some

color to his ethnic and domestic recipes sets, and I don't think they ever

claimed to be a research resource.  They were entertaining and I daresay a

significant part of the "normalization" and popularization of cookery and

food on television.  All of the unsavory ajudicated behaviors aside, his

cookbook collection is a very decent source for beginning to intermediate

home cooks to enter some unusual cusines they might not otherwise try.

 

niccolo difrancesco

 

 

Date: Mon, 15 Oct 2007 20:28:55 -0400

From: Daniel Myers <edoard at medievalcookery.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Book Question

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

On Oct 15, 2007, at 7:25 PM, Diane & Micheal Reid wrote:

> Recently my lady picked up a book called

> Food in History by Reay Tannahill,

> Question having read a bit I wondered if it was meant as a

> generalist view or is it a book that can be used for references.

 

As a general overview it's ok, I suppose (It doesn't talk about

spices and rotten meat).  But it's very poorly documented in most

places, and the section on the medieval period is very short and way

over generalized (any book that fails to differentiate the practices

of Italy and England is doing more harm than good in my opinion).

 

I'd read it and pass it on, and then go pick up anything by Scully or

Woolgar.

 

- Doc

 

 

Date: Mon, 15 Oct 2007 20:31:49 -0500

From: "Terry Decker" <t.d.decker at worldnet.att.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Book Question

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Like most books that are global in scope and cover 15 millenia, it's a

little shallow.  While I may reference it, I usually use Tannahill as a

starting point.  The bibliography and the illistration sources are of

interest. It's better than a number of other general texts, Trager's  

Food, for instance.  For general overview, Food: a Culinary History,  

edited by Flandrin and Montinari, is a superior work.

 

Bear

 

> Recently my lady picked up a book called

> Food in History by Reay Tannahill,

> Published 1973

> Isbn 0-8128-1437-1

> Stien and Day Publishers

> 7 east street, NewYork, N.Y. 10017

> Question having read a bit I wondered if it was meant as a  

> generalist view or is it a book that can be used for references.

> Cealian

 

 

Date: Mon, 15 Oct 2007 23:23:39 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Book Question

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

The problem is that the book is very old and was published prior to food history

taking off as a field. It covers the entire world in a not very comprehensive fashion. There are numerous other studies out now that are much better-- we  

also have numerous companions and guides to food that do a better job.

 

Johnnae

 

Diane & Micheal Reid wrote:

> Recently my lady picked up a book called

> Food in History by Reay Tannahill,

> Published 1973

> Isbn 0-8128-1437-1

 

 

Date: Tue, 16 Oct 2007 21:02:13 EDT

From: Bronwynmgn at aol.com

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Book Question

To: sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org

 

dmreid at hfx.eastlink.ca writes:

<<Question having read a bit I wondered if it was meant as a  

generalist view or is it a book that can be used for  references.>>

 

In my opinion, it's a generalist view of food history all over the  

world; there is a huge bibliography; and it's a heck of a fun read.

 

Brangwayna Morgan

 

 

Date: Sun, 20 Jan 2008 14:22:48 -0500

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Books of Possible Interest

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

Daniel & Elizabeth Phelps wrote:

> What is the consensus on Food, the History of Taste?  I have Food in

> History, The History of Food and Fast and Feast.

> Daniel

 

Food the History of Taste

 

I have to admit to rather liking it generally.

The important thing to remember about this book is that it is a collection of

essays. So here is what who get--

 

"Introduction:; A new history of cuisine"

by Paul Freedman

 

"Hunter-gatherers and the first farmers: the evolution of taste in prehistory"

by Alan K. Outram  

 

"The good things that lay at hand: tastes of ancient Greece and Rome"

by Veronika Grimm

 

"The quest for perfect balance: taste and gastronomy in imperial China"

by Joanna Waley-Cohen

 

The pleasures of consumption: the birth of medieval Islamic cuisine by

H. D. Miller

 

"Feasting and fasting: food and taste in Europe in the Middle Ages"

by C. M. Woolgar

 

"New worlds, new tastes: food fashions after the Renaissance"

by Brian Cowan