Gd-Huswfs-Jwl-msg - 7/29/02

 

Recipes from and comments about "The Good Huswife’s Jewell" by Thomas Dawson, published 1596 in London.

 

NOTE: See also the files: 16thC-cookbk-bib, cookbooks-bib, Markham-msg, online-ckbks-msg, Redacting-art, redacting-msg, The-Saucebook-art, p-feasts-msg.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

    Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                          Stefan at florilegium.org

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To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Date: Sat, 12 Jan 2002 23:38:43 -0500

From: Kirrily Robert <skud at infotrope.net>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Well, in *that* case... some recipes

 

OK, here's tonight's transcriptions.  They're from The Good Huswife's

Jewell, by Thomas Dawson, published 1596 in London.

 

Particular features of interest here include a recipe including

"potatons", a rather topical recipe for rosehips, the world's shortest

and most pointless recipe for pigeon, and a recipe advising you to strew

spices upon your cock.

 

Feedback/questions/etc welcome -- especially if you note any typos that

look more like keyboard errors than lack-of-standardised-spelling.

 

Katherine

 

 

To make a Tarte of Prunes

 

Put your Prunes into a pot, and put in red wine or claret wine, and a

little faire water, and stirre them now nad then, and when they be

boyled enough, put them into a bowle, and straine them with sugar,

synamon and ginger.

 

To make a Tart of Ryce

 

Boyle your Rice, and put in the yolkes of two or three Egges into the

Rice, and when it is boyled, put it into a dish, and season it with

Suger, Sinamon and Ginger, and butter, and the juyce of wo or three

Orenges, and set it on the fire againe.

 

To make a Custard

 

Breake your Egges into a bowle, and put your Creame into another bowle,

and straine your egges ino the creame, and put in saffron, Cloves and

mace, and a little synamon and ginger, and if you will some Suger and

butter, and season it with salte, and melte your butter, and stirre it

with the Ladle a good while, and dubbe your custard with dates and

currans.

 

To make a Tarte of Wardens

 

You must bake your Wardens first in a Pie, and then take all the wardens

and cut them in foure quarters, and coare them, and put them into a

Tarte pinched, with your Suger, and season them with Suger, Synamon and

Ginger, and set them in the Oven, and put no cover on them, but you must

cutte a cover and lay on the Tart when it is baked, and butter the Tarte

and the cover too, and endore it with suger.

 

To make a tarte with butter and egges

 

Breake your egges and take the yolkes of them, and take butter and melte

it, let it bee verie hot readie to boyle, and put your butter into your

egges, and so straine them into a bowle and season them with suger.

 

To make a tarte of Spennedge

 

Boyle your Egges and your Creame togither, and then put them into a

bowle, and then boyle your Spinnedge, and when they are boyled, take

them out of the water and straine them into your stuffe before you

straine your Creame, boyle your stuffe and then strain them all againe,

and season them with suger and salt.

 

To make a tarte of Strawberries

 

Wash your strawberies, and put them into your Tarte, and season them

with suger, cynamon and Ginger, and put in a little red wine into them.

 

To make a Tarte of hippes

 

Take Hippes and cutte them, and take the seedes out, and wash them verye

cleane, and put them into your Tarte, and season them with suger,

sinamon and ginger.

 

So you must preserve them with suger, Cinamon and Ginger, and put them

into a gelly pot close.

 

To bake the Humbles of a Deere

 

Mince them verie small, and season them with pepper, Cinamon and Ginger,

and suger if you will, and Cloves and mace, and oates and currants, and

if you will, mince Almondes and put unto them, and when it is basted,

you must put in fine fat, and put in suger, cinamon and Ginger, and

let it boile, and when it is minced, put them together.

 

To make a veale pie

 

Let your Veale boyle a good while, and when it is boyled, mince it by it

selfe, and the white by it selfe, and season it with salt and pepper,

cinamon and ginger, and suger, and cloves and mace, and you muste have

prunes and raisons, dates & currantes on the top.

 

For to make mutton pies

 

Mince your Mutton and your white together, and when it is minced, season

it with pepper, cinamon & ginger, and Cloves and mace and prunes,

currants and dates, and reasons and harde egges boyled & choped verie

small, and throw them on the top.

 

To bake calves feete

 

Season them with salte & pepper, and butter, and Currantes if you will,

and when they bee baked, put in a little white Wine and suger, or

vinegar and suger, or vergice and suger.

 

To bake Chickens in a Cawdle

 

Season them with salt and pepper, and put in butter, and so let them

bake, and when they be baked, boile a few barberries and pruines, and

currants, and take a little white wine or vergice, and let it boile and

put in a little suger, and set it on the fire a little, and straine in

two or three yolkes of egges into the wine, and when you take the dish

of the fire, put the prunes and currants and barberies into the dish,

and then put them in altogether, into the pye of chickins.

 

To bake pigeons.

 

Season them with Pepper and Salt and butter.

 

To bake a Conie

 

Season him with Pepper and Salt, and put in butter and currantes, and

when it is baked, put in a little vergice and suger into the pie, and

serve it up.

 

To bake a Gammon of bacon and keepe colde

 

You must first boyle him a quarter of an houre before you stuffe him,

and stuffe him with sweete hearbs, and harde Egges chopped together, or

parselie.

 

To bake a Fillet of beefe to keepe colde

 

Mince him very small, and seeth him with pepper and salt, and make hym

by together accordingly, and put them in your pie, and larde him verie

thicke.

 

To make fine bread

 

Take halfe a pound of fine suger well beaten, and as much Flower, and

put thereto foure Egges whites, and being very well beaten, you must

mingle them with anniseedes bruised, and beeing all beaten togither, put

into your moulde, melting the sauce over first with a lyttle butter, and

set it in the Oven, and turne it twice or thrice in the baking.

 

To bake a Neates tongue

 

First pouder the tongue three or foure dayes, and then seeth it in faire

water, then blanche it and Larde it and season it with a little pepper

and Salt, then bake it on Rie paste, and before you cloase up your pie,

strowe uppon the tongue a good quantitie of Cloves and Mace beaten in

powder, and uppon that halfe a pounde of Butter, then close by your pye

verye close but make a rounde hole in the toppe of the pie.  Then when

it hath stoode more then foure houres in the Oven, you must put in halfe

a pint of Vineger or more, as the Vineger is sharpe, then close up the

hole very close with a peece of past and set it in the oven againe.

 

To make muggets

 

First perboyle them, and take white and chop them both together, and put

Currantes, Dates, Cinamon and Gynger, Cloves and Mace, and grosse pepper

and Suger if you will, twoo or three yolkes of Egges, and seeth them

altogeather with Salt, and put in the stuffe into the cawles of Mutton,

and so put them in dishes, and take two or three egges white and all,

and put them on the cawles, and make some prettie sauce for them.

 

To make fillets of beefe or clods instead of red Deare

 

First take your Beefe, and Larde it very thicke, and then season it with

pepper, and Salt, Sinamon and ginger, Cloves and Mace good store, with a

greate deale more quantitie of pepepr and Salte, then you would a peece

of Venison, and put it in covered Paste, and when it is baked, take

vineger and suger, Sinamon and Ginger, and put in, and shake the Pastie,

and stope it close, and let it stande almost a fortnyght before you cut

it up.

 

To make a tarte that is courage to a man or woman

 

Take twoo Quinces, and twoo or three Burre rootes, and a potaton, and

pare your Potaton, and scrape your rootes and put them into a quart of

wine, and let them boyle till they bee tender, & put in an ounce of

Dates, and when they be boyled tender, Drawe them through a strainer,

wine and all, and then put in the yolkes of eight Egges, and the braynes

of three or foure cocke Sparrowes, and straine them into the other, and

a little Rose water, and seeth them all with suger, Cinamon and Gynger,

and Cloves and mace, and put in a little sweet butter, and set it upon a

chafingdish of coles betweene two platters, and so let it boyle till it

be something bigge.

 

To stewe a Cocke

 

You must cutte him in sixe peeces, and washe hym cleane, and ake

pruines, Currantes and Dates cutte verye small, and Reasons of he Sunne,

and Suger beaten verye small, Cinamone, Gynger, Nutmegs likewise beaen,

and a little Maydens hayre cutte very small, and you must put him in a

pipkin, & put in almost a pinte of Muscadine, and then your spice and

Suger uppon your Cocke, and put in your fruite betweens every quarter,

and a peece of Golde betweene every peece of your Cocke, then you must

make a Lidde of Woode fit for your pipkyn, and close it as close as you

can with paste, that no ayre come out, nor water can come in, and then

you must fill two brasse pots full of waer, and set on the fire, and

make fast the pipkin in one of the Brasse pottes, so that the pipkins

feete touch not the brasse pot bottom, nor the pot sides, and so let

them boyle foure and twentie houres, and fill up the pot still as it

boyles away, with the other pot that standes by, and when it is boyled

take out your Golde, and let him drinke it fasting, and it shall helpe

him, this is approoved.

 

To preserve all kinde of fruites, that they shall not breake in the

preserving of them.

 

Take a platter that is playne in the bottome, and laye suger in the

bottome, then cherries or any other fruite, and so between everie row

you lay, throw suger, and set it upon a pots heade, and cover it with a

dish, and so let it boyle.

 

To make a sirop for bake meates

 

Take Ginger, Cloves and Mace, Nutmegs, beat al these togeather very

fine, and boyle them in good red Vineger until it be somewhat thicke,

thyse beeyng doone, draine your pye when it is harde baked, and a small

hole being made in the cover hereof at the first, with a Tunnell of

paste, you must powre the sirropps into the pye, that doone, cover the

hole with paste, and shalb the pye well, and set it againe in the Oven

till it be throughly baked, and when you have drawne it, turne the

bottome upward until it be served.

 

To roast a Carpe or Tench with a Pudding in his belly

 

Take the Rones of a Pike and choppe them very small, and put in grated

bread, two or three egges

--

Lady Katherine Rowberd (mka Kirrily "Skud" Robert)

katherine at infotrope.net  http://infotrope.net/sca/

Caldrithig, Skraeling Althing, Ealdormere

 

 

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Well, in *that* case... some recipes

Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 01:02:21 -0500

From: Kirrily Robert <skud at infotrope.net>

 

Stefan wrote:

>> To make muggets

>>

>> First perboyle them, and take white and chop them both together, and put

>> Currantes, Dates, Cinamon and Gynger, Cloves and Mace, and grosse pepper

>> and Suger if you will, twoo or three yolkes of Egges, and seeth them

>> altogeather with Salt, and put in the stuffe into the cawles of Mutton,

>> and so put them in dishes, and take two or three egges white and all,

>> and put them on the cawles, and make some prettie sauce for them.

>

> So, what is a "mugget"?

 

Well, I was assuming it was some kind of offal, but didn't really know.

 

> I take it that these are in order here, but from where in the

> manuscript are these recipes? Are these the first in the book?

> Are there numbers attached to these recipes? I'm trying to figure

> out how to place the next set of recipes in referance to these, so

> everything stays in the order of the original recipes since sometimes

> the order does matter. Such as the first example I mentioned might

> point out.

>

> Is there any kind of table of contents in the original manuscript

> that lists the recipes?

 

The recipes are from pages 17-21 of the book, roughly. Earlier recipes

can be found at http://infotrope.net/sca/texts/good-huswifes-jewell/

where my work in progress is kept.  They're in the order in which they

appear in the book.

 

There's no table of contents, and the book isn't broken down into

sections much, or at least not as far as I can see.  It seems that the

author would wander along on one subject, such as "pies and tarts" until

he was distracted by something else, and go off on a tangent there, and

perhaps come back again later or perhaps not.  So you can't really draw

any conclusions from the ordering of the recipes, except that there is

a moderate likelihood (but no certainty) that two adjacent recipes are

related in some way.

 

On page 23, which I'm fast approaching, there is a list of "The names of

all thinges necessary for a banquet", and then it seems to go into a few

recipes for banquetting dishes. I was quite expecting a coherent section

on banquetting dishes, since that seems to be common in books from

around this time, but it only holds for a couple of pages before it goes

off in totally different directions.

 

Here's a quick list of recipe names, in order, from that section:

 

To make Manus Christi

To make a Caudle to comfort the stomacke, good for an olde man

TO make a Trifle

To make Marmelat of Quinces

To make butter paste

To make Fritter stuffe

To make a made dishe of Artechokes

To frie Bakon

To frie Chickins

To make a Sallet of all kinde of hearbes

A sauce for a conie

To make a Sallet of Lemmons

To make a sausedge

 

... so you can see, he's not so good at staying on topic.

 

Still no idea what a mugget is.  Anyone got an OED handy?

 

Katherine

--

Lady Katherine Rowberd (mka Kirrily "Skud" Robert)

katherine at infotrope.net  http://infotrope.net/sca/

Caldrithig, Skraeling Althing, Ealdormere

 

 

From: LadyPDC at aol.com

Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 01:16:35 EST

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Well, in *that* case... some recipes

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

skud at infotrope.net writes:

> Still no idea what a mugget is.  Anyone got an OED handy?

 

No OED but according to an online dictionary:

 

Mugget \Mug"get\ (?), n. The small entrails of a calf or a hog.

 

Constance

 

 

Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 06:12:21 -0500

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Well, in *that* case... some recipes

 

> So, what is a "mugget"?

 

The mugget referred to may be a veal tripe entity also known as the

margut or marrowgut. It's some kind of gut piping found only in unweaned

calves, like a very tender second esophagus (remember calves are

ruminants); its character changes entirely when the calf is weaned.

Margut is considered an indispensable ingredient for the cowboy stew

known as S.O.B. However, Michael Best, in his glossary for his edition

of Gervase Markham's "The English Housewife", simply says a mugget is

entrails or chitterlings.

 

What _I_ want to know is, is there a word missing following the word

"white" in the first line of this recipe?

 

Adamantius

 

 

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Well, in *that* case... some recipes

Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 12:18:56 -0500

From: Kirrily Robert <skud at infotrope.net>

 

Adamantius wrote:

> What _I_ want to know is, is there a word missing following the word

> "white" in the first line of this recipe?

 

Nope.  This particular recipe book uses "white" as a noun all over the

place.  From context and comparison with similar texts, I'm 99.9% sure

it refers to suet.

 

Katherine

--

Lady Katherine Rowberd (mka Kirrily "Skud" Robert)

Caldrithig, Skraeling Althing, Ealdormere

 

 

Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 19:53:42 -0500

From: johnna holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] DAWSON CORRECTION was Well, in *that* case... some

recipes

 

Greetings from Johnnae llyn Lewis

 

I do not [know] which "edition" that

Lady Katherine Rowberd (mka Kirrily "Skud" Robert)

is making use of for her transcriptions that she

is posting here, but let me reassure everyone that

Thomas Dawson's Good Huswifes Jewell, 2 parts,

STC numbers 6392 and 6395 does in fact contain

"The table of the booke follovving gathered according

to euery folio throughout the whole Booke".

This section follows the first part of The

Good Huswifes Jewell and consists of 5 pages.

It does detail the recipes in the original

volume first part by Thomas Dawson.

Then "The Second part of the good Huf-wiues

Iewell" follows with "The Table" for that book

found immediately after the title page.

Both books do contain title pages.

This is the 1596 first part and the 1597 Second

Part. I would be most happy to provide a full

bibliographic statement for both for those that

cannot have their librarians locally provide one.

The work is course available in a 1977 facsimile,

on microfilm through UMI, and now online through

EEBO. It was reprinted in a combined edition by

Southover Press in the United Kingdom in 1996.

 

Johnna Holloway, MS LIS

 

Kirrily Robert wrote:

> The recipes are from pages 17-21 of the book, roughly.  Earlier recipes

> can be found at http://infotrope.net/sca/texts/good-huswifes-jewell/

> where my work in progress is kept.  They're in the order in which they

> appear in the book.

>

> There's no table of contents, and the book isn't broken down into

> sections much, or at least not as far as I can see.

 

 

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Date: Sat, 16 Feb 2002 13:48:17 -0500

From: Kirrily Robert <skud at infotrope.net>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] More from the Good Huswife's Jewell

 

Here's my latest batch of transcriptions.  They directly follow the last

lot I posted.  The full lot will be posted on my website in due course;

please either check there or be patient if you're interested in the

rest of the contents.

 

Let me know if you find any typos.

 

Yours,

 

Katherine

 

 

To roast a Carpe or Tench with a Pudding in his belly

 

Take the Rones of a Pike and choppe them very small, and put in grated

bread, two or three egges, Currans, Dates, Suger, Sinamon and Ginger,

and Mace, Pepper and salte, and put it in his bellye, and put him on a

Broche, and make sweete sauce with Barberyes, or Lemmons minced, and put

into the sweete sauce, and then put it on the Carpe, when you serve it

up.

 

To make a fresh Cheese and Creame

 

Take a gallon or two of Milk from the Cowe and seethe it, and when it

doth seeth, put thereunto a quarte or two of morning Milke in faire

cleansing pans, in such place as no dust may fall therein, and this is

for your clowted Creame, the next morning take a quart of mornings

Milke, and seeth it, wne when it doth deeth, put in a quarte of

Creame therunto, and take it off the fire, and put it into a faire

earthen pan, and let it stand untill it be somewhat bloud warme, but

firste over night put a good quantity of Ginger, with Rosewaer, and

stirre it together, and let it settle all night, and the next day put it

into your said blood-warme milke to make your Cheese come, then put the

Curdes in a faire cloth, with a little good Rosewater, and fine powder

of Ginger, and a little Suger, so last, great soft rowles together with a

thread and crush out the Whey with your clouted Creame, and mixe it with

fine powder of ginger, and Suger, and so sprinkle it ith Rosewater, and

put your Cheese in a faire dishe, and put these cloutes round about it,

then take a pinte of rawe Milke or Creame, and put it in a pot, and all

to shake it, untill it be gathered into a froth like Snowe, and ever as

it commeth, take it off with a Spoone, and put it into a Collender, then

put it upon your freshe cheese, and pricke it with Wafers, and so serve

it.

 

THE NAMES OF ALL

thinges necessary for a banquet

 

Suger

Cinamon

Licoras

Pepper

Nutmegs

All kinds of Cumfets

Saffron

Saunders

Anniseedes

Coriander seedes

Orenges

Pomegranet

Damaske-water

Tornesell

Lemons

Prunes

Rosewater

Dates

Currans

Raisins

Cherries conserved

Barberies conserved

Ginger

Sweete Orenges

Peper white and browne

Cloves and Mace

Wafers

For your Marchpanes seasons and unseasoned, Spinndges

 

To make Manus Christi

 

Take five spoonefull of Rosewater, and graines of Ambergreece, and 4

grains of Pearle beaten very fine, put these three together in a Saucer

and cover it close, and let it stande covered one houre, then take foure

ounces of very fine Suger, and beate it small, and search it through a

fine search, then take a little earthen pot glased, and put into it a

spoonefull of Suger, and a quarter of a spoonefull of Rosewater, and let

the Suger and the Rosewater boyle together softelye, till it doe rise

and fall againe three times.  Then take fine Rie flower, and sifte on a

smooth borde, and with a spoone take of the Suger, and the Rosewater,

and first make it all into a roundcake and then after into little Cakes,

and when they be halfe colde, wet them over with the same Rosewater, and

then laye on your golde, and so shall you make very good Manus Christi.

 

To make a Caudle to comfort the stomacke, good for an olde man

 

Take a pinte of good Muscadine, and as much of good stale ale, mingle

them together, then take the yolkes of twelve or thirteene Egges newe

laide, beat well the Egges first by themselves, with the wine and ale,

and so boyle it together, and put thereto a quarterne of Suger, and a

fewe whole Mace, and so stirre it well, til it seeth a good while, and

when it is well sod, put therin a few slices of bread if you will, and

so let it soke a while, and it will be right good and wholsome.

 

To make a Trifle

 

Take a pinte of thicke Creame, and season it with Sugar and Ginger, and

Rosewater, so stirre it as you would them have it, and make it luke

warme in a dish on a Chafingdishe and coales, and after put it into a

silver peece or a bowle, and so serve it to the boorde.

 

To make Marmelat of Quinces

 

You must take a pottle of Water, and foure pound of Suger, and so let

them boyle together, and when they boyle, you must skumme them as cleane

as you can, and you must take the whites of two or three Egges, and beat

them to froth, and put the froth into hte pan for to make the skum to

rise, then skimme it as cleane as you can, and then take off the Kettle

and put in the Quinces, and let them boyle a good while, and when they

boyle, you must stirre them stil, and when they be boyled you must bore

them up.

 

To make butter paste

 

Take floure, and seven or eight egges, and cold butter & faire water, or

Rosewater, and spices (if you will) & make your paste and beat it on a

boorde, and when you have so done, devide it into two or three partes,

and drive out the peece with a rowling Pinne, and doe with butter one

peece by another and then folde up your paste upon the butter and drive

it out againe, and so doe five or sixe times together, and some not cut

for bearings, and put them into the Oven, and when they be baked, scrape

suger on them, and serve them.

 

To make Fritter stuffe

 

Take fine flower, and three or four egges, and put into the Flower, and

a peece of Butter, and let them boyle altogether in a dish or a chafer,

and put in suger, synamon and Ginger, and Rosewater, and in the boyling

put in a little grated bread to make it bigge, and then put it into a

dish and beate it well together, and so put it into your moulde, and

frye it with clarified butter, but your butter maye not be too hotte nor

too colde.

 

To make a dishe of Artechokes

 

Take your Artechokes and pare away all the top even to the meate and

boyle them in sweete broth till they be somewhat tender, then take them

out, and put them into a dishe, and seethe them with Pepper, synamon and

ginger, and then put in your dishe that you meane to bake them in, and

put in Marrowe to them good store, and so let them bake, and when they

be baked, put in a little Vinegar and butter, and sticke three or foure

leaves of the Artechoks in the dishe when you serve them up, and scrape

Suger on the dish.

 

To frie Bakon

 

Take Bacon and slice it very thinne, and cut away the leane, and bruse

it with the backe of your knife, and fry it in sweet Butter, and serve

it.

 

To frie Chickins

 

Take your chickins and let them boyle in verye good sweete broath a

prittye while, and take the chickens out, and quarter them out in

peeces, and then put them into a Frying pan with sweete butter, and let

them stewe in the pan, but you must not let them be browne with frying,

and then put out the butter out of the pan, and then take a little sweet

broath, and as much Vergice, and the yolkes of two Egges, and beate them

together, and put in a little Nutmegges, synamon and Ginger, and Pepper

into the sauce, and then put them all into hte pan to the chickens, and

stirre them together in the pan, and put them into a dish, and serve

them by.

 

To make a boyle meat after the French waies

 

Take Pigions and larde them, and then put them on a Broach, and let them

be halfe rosted, then take them off the broach, and make a Pudding of

sweete hearbes of everye sorte a good handfull, and chop Oxe white

amongst the hearbes very small, and take the yolkes of five or sixe

egges and grated bread, and season it with Pepper, Sinamon and Ginger,

Cloves and Mace, suger, and Currans, and mingle all together, and then

put the stuffe on the pigeons round about, and then put the pigeons into

the Cabeges that be perboyled, and binde the Cabeges fast to the

Pigeons, and then put them into the pot where you meane to boyle them,

and put in Beefe broth into them, and cabeges chopped small, nad so let

them boyle, nad put in Pepper, cloves, and Mace, nad pricke the Pigions

full of Cloves before you put the pudding on them, and put a peece of

Butter, Synamon, and Ginger, and put a little Vinegar and white wine, &

so serve them up, and garnishe them with fruite, and serve one in a

dish, nad but a little of the broath you must put into the dish when you

serve them by.

 

To make a Sallet of all kinde of hearbes

 

Take your hearbes and picke them very fine into faire water, and picke

your flowers by themselves, and washe them al cleane, and swing them in

a strainer, and when you put them into the dish, mingle them with

Cowcumbers or Lemmons payred and sliced, and scrape Suger, and put in

vineger and Oyle, nad throwe the flowers on the toppe of the sallet, and

of every sorte of the aforesaide things and garnish the dish about with

the foresaide thinges, and harde Egges boyled and laide about the dish

and upon the sallet.

 

A sauce for a Conie

 

Cut Onions in rundels and frie them in butter, then put to them wine

Vineger, salt, ginger, camomill and pepper, and a little suger, and let

it boyle till it be good and fast, then serve it upon the conie.

 

To make a Sallet of Lemmons

 

Cut out slices of the peele of the Lemmons long waies, a quarter of an

inche one peece from an other, and then slice the Lemmon very thinne and

lay him in a dish crosse, and the peeles about the Lemmons, and scrape a

good deale of suger upon them, and so serve them.

--

Lady Katherine Rowberd (mka Kirrily "Skud" Robert)

katherine at infotrope.net  http://infotrope.net/sca/

Caldrithig, Skraeling Althing, Ealdormere

 

<the end>



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