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cookng-grains-msg – 4/24/08

 

Cooking grains in quantity.

 

NOTE: See also the files: grains-msg, rice-msg, beans-msg, cutting-onions-msg, serving-soups-msg, warming-ovens-msg, kitch-toolbox-msg, bread-for-fsts-msg, headcooks-msg.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

    Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                          Stefan at florilegium.org

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Date: Fri, 5 Nov 1999 12:42:50 -0500

From: Christine A Seelye-King <mermayde at juno.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Recipe 7-Weekend of Wisdom

 

> This recipe was problematical from the beginning and actually never

> got prepared as written. It is easy to get 2 cps. of milk to come to a

> boil without scorching it but bringing 4 gallons of milk to a boil is

> quite a  different thing. We ended up throwing out the milk and using

> water as in standard rice preparation. I think that this was my most

> disappointing dish. The rice was moist and tended to stick together.

> Again I blame this on the massive quantities used for feast preparation

> and the length the dish was held before service. I eliminated the rice

> cleaning steps because with today's packaged rice, it was unnecessary.

 

Dear Ras,

        I can see where you would have had problems with this dish.  The way I

would have handled it would have been to start with a large, flat

roasting pan, roughly 8 inches deep - one that would have covered 4

burners, or the grill top, for example (the kind one ususally finds at

large sites, or one of more modest dimensions, ie. a household roasting

pan).  Boiling the milk in that would have been easier, because the depth

of the liquid would not have been so great. Then, rather than just

pouring the liquid over the rice and waiting for it to absorb, (since you

omitted the rinsing, soaking and drying portion of the recipie which

would have not only cleaned the rice but also started the cooking

process) I would have put the roasting pan with all ingredients in a low

oven, covered with parchment paper to prevent drying out of the top

layer.  I always make rice for large quantities this way, as it avoids

the very problems you cited.

 

        Christianna

 

 

Date: Mon, 9 Apr 2001 22:59:11 -0700

From: david friedman <ddfr at best.com>

Subject: SC - Cooking rice for many

 

Anahita writes

>It sounds like a situation in which you can't do much, just go with

>the flow. Let me say that cooking rice for 200 is not an easy task

>and takes a long time. Anyone know how long does it take for all

>those gallons and gallons of water to boil?

 

I have a system for cooking large quantities of rice that I am

reasonably happy with.

 

Take a very large pot (say 6 gallons or more). Put in the right

amount of water. Bring it to a boil. Add the rice. Bring it back to a

boil, stirring occasionally.  Cover, remove from heat, and let stand.

 

This works with large quantities because they stay hot for a long

time. Its big advantage is that at the point where you are heating

the pot with the rice in it the rice hasn't been cooking very long,

so isn't yet sticking together as a mass, so you can still stir it

and don't have much of a problem of scorching. Then you take it off

the heat, which also frees up a burner.

 

If you figure on 1/2 cup cooked rice per person (the actual amount

obviously depends on the menu), a six gallon pot will provide for

almost 200 people.

- --

David/Cariadoc

http://www.daviddfriedman.com/

 

 

Date: Tue, 10 Apr 2001 10:14:28 -0400

From: "Christine Seelye-King" <kingstaste at mindspring.com>

Subject: RE: SC - rice / squash feast  - help!!

 

> It sounds like a situation in which you can't do much, just go with

> the flow. Let me say that cooking rice for 200 is not an easy task

> and takes a long time. Anyone know how long does it take for all

> those gallons and gallons of water to boil?

>

> Anahita

 

Suggest that the rice be cooked in a large pan in the oven.  It is much

easier, does not burn and stick on the bottom, and does not require constant

attention.   She might even be able to put it in the oven right before

hitting the fencing tourney, and take it out after she's done, providing she

times it right.

 

Christianna

 

 

Date: Tue, 10 Apr 2001 10:12:42 EDT

From: CorwynWdwd at aol.com

Subject: Re: SC - Cooking rice for many

 

ddfr at best.com writes:

> I have a system for cooking large quantities of rice that I am

>  reasonably happy with.

 

I too have a system for cooking mass quantities of rice, taught to me by the

woman who got me involved in SCA cooking.

 

I bake the rice. I put one part rice to two parts liquid (water, beef broth,

almond milk, you decide) in a deep rectangular pan, cover with foil and throw

it into the oven first thing, at about the 300-400 degree mark. The rice has

never scorched using this method and it boils and steams the rice fairly

quickly because of the increased surface area exposed to the heat.  After

it's done (I check occasionally, sometimes takes an hour but seldom if ever

more) you can put pans and all into a cooler lined with newspaper and keep

closed. It stays hot enough to blister an unwary hand for hours and can be

served up hot at the right time.

 

It ain't period I'm sure, but it helps feed the masses.

 

Corwyn

 

 

Date: Tue, 10 Apr 2001 07:49:34 -0700

From: Steve <s.mont at verizon.net>

Subject: Re: SC - Cooking rice for many

 

The "baked rice" is a method that I used when in a busy professional

kitchen.  We would prep the rice with all the dry ingredients before the

shift started then added the liquid to the pans and cooked them off as

needed.  It gave us 2-3 cooked pans all the time without having to have

someone watch the rice at all times.

 

?duin

 

 

Date: Thu, 12 Apr 2001 19:57:29 -0400

From: "Marcus Antaya" <mjantaya at home.com>

Subject: Re: SC - Cooking rice for many

 

It also depends on what kind of rice you use...

 

When I make my risotto, I use italian long grain, and then simmer the =

rice in just enough liquid to cover it, then add boiling water (about a =

cup per cup ish)and let it simmer for 45 minutes...

 

Gyric

 

 

From: rcmann4 at earthlink.net

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Date: Sun, 6 May 2001 19:22:19 -0400

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Rice success!

 

When we were discussing cooking rice for feasts, someone

(Balthazar?) suggested using disposable roaster pans in the oven,

tightly covered with tin foil.

 

Tonight, I redacted a recipe from Nola.  It's a rice casserole, made

in the oven with saffron-tinted beef broth. Since rice is cheap, I

decided to give the recipe a try in bulk.  I washed 5 cups of rice in

cold water, then hot, let it drain thoroughly, and placed it in the

roasting pan.  I boiled a pinch of saffron in 10 cups of homemade

beef broth, and poured the boiling broth over the rice.  Covered it

tightly with heavy duty foil, and baked it at 350 F for 45 minutes.  It

was perfect!  Moist, fluffy, and no toothbreakers!

 

Balthazar (or whoever suggested this), thank you very much!  I

have never been able to cook more than 2 cups of raw rice without

having it be half-mushy/half-raw.

 

Lady Brighid ni Chiarain

Settmour Swamp, East (NJ)

 

 

Date: Sun, 2 Dec 2001 23:31:30 -0800

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

From: david friedman <ddfr at daviddfriedman.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Cooking rice in feast quantities

 

Brighid asks:

>I suspect I'm not the only one who would like more detail about this

>method.  What quantity of rice did you use in one pot?  What was

>the proportion of water to rice?  And how long does it take to finish

>cooking?

 

I used 33 cups of basmati rice and a ratio of 1 3/4 c of water per

cup of rice; if I did it again with the same rice I might increase

the water slightly. Different varieties of rice differ in how much

water they need.

 

I don't know when it finished cooking, but less than an hour after I

brought the water back to a boil, that being about when I delivered

it to the servers. One advantage of this approach is that it frees up

the burner for the last hour or so--and you don't have to be paying

attention to the rice during that time either.

 

Alban asks:

>I've always wondered something about this method: as the water

>is absorbed and the water level goes down, wouldn't the rice on top

>get too little and the rice on the bottom get too much?

 

The rice on the top is a little drier, but not much. The pot is

covered, so the whole thing is full of steam. And of course, when you

start, the water level is well above the top of the rice.

--

David Friedman

 

 

Date: Mon, 03 Dec 2001 04:47:48 -0500

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Cooking rice in feast quantities

 

Ted Eisenstein wrote:

>>The solution is to bring the water to a boil, add the rice, bring it

>>back to a boil (stirring some), cover, turn off the heat and wait.

>>With large volumes, the rice stays hot long enough to  cook itself.

>>Since you are turning off the heat before the rice becomes sticky,

>>you can do it without scorching.

>

> I've always wondered something about this method: as the water

> is absorbed and the water level goes down, wouldn't the rice on top

> get too little and the rice on the bottom get too much?

> Or is this a stupid question and I'm missing something obvious?

 

Depending on your method, this is to some extent true, but again,

depending on your method, while the rice on the bottom gets more contact

with liquid, the rice on the top gets more steam, so the impact of the

difference is less. If that makes any sense.

 

I've found that the method His Grace describes works especially well

with basmati. I've also had good results with finishing rice in a

low-temperature oven, either in a pilaf method, or what is known as the

Creole method, where the rice is boiled more or less like pasta for

about ten minites, drained, and either steamed or finished, again, in

covered pans in the oven. Obviously you'd need huge quantities of water,

though.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Mon, 03 Dec 2001 05:25:17 -0500

From: Philip & Susan Troy <troy at asan.com>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Cooking rice in feast quantities

 

david friedman wrote:

> The rice on the top is a little drier, but not much. The pot is

> covered, so the whole thing is full of steam. And of course, when you

> start, the water level is well above the top of the rice.

 

And, of course, maybe ten minutes before serving, you can remove this marginally drier layer, invert it, and get a somewhat more uniform effect. But as His Grace suggests, it probably isn't a big deal.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Wed, 19 Feb 2003 12:34:34 -0800

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] how to cook 20 lbs of rice

 

"Vincent Cuenca" <bootkiller at hotmail.com> wrote:

>I know I got this info last year, but I can't lay hands on it just now.

>

>Does anyone remember HG Cariadoc's method for cooking large amounts of rice

>in a pot?  Specifically, how much water in proportion to the volume of rice?

>I remember the method well enough.

>

>A similar method for couscous would be greatly appreciated as well.

 

Can't tell you Cariadoc's method, but i cooked couscous for 150

people last summer...

 

We used modern processed couscous - traditional couscous is cooked in

a special pot, called a couscousiere.

 

Anyway, we dumped several boxes of couscous into each of two large

aluminum baking dishes, poured in boiling water and covered the pans

with aluminum foil. Periodically i lifted the foil and gave the stuff

a stir. While it was still warm i added a generous amount of olive

oil, stirred it some more, and recovered it with the foil.

 

This was done at an outdoor camping event - we don't really have

feasts in the West Kingdom (although we do in various Principalities,

Shires, etc.), so this was unusual.

 

For indoor feasts, i borrow several rice cookers, and cook the rice

in that. It makes better rice, in my limited experience, than trying

to cook it on a stove or bake it in an over. AND it has the advantage

of leaving the the burner free and the oven free to cook other things.

 

Anahita

 

 

Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2003 16:08:31 -0400

From: "Generys ferch Ednuyed" <generys at blazemail.com>

Subject: RE: [Sca-cooks] Cooking Couscous for 200

To: "'Cooks within the SCA'" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Couscous, at least the small "French" kind, is IMO easier to cook for a

large group than rice.  I did it for 120 for a feast recently, and simply

got my broth boiling, then added the couscous. Stir for like, 2 minutes and

it's done - you can do it right before serving.  If I remember correctly, it

was a 2:1 ratio, but I could be wrong.

 

Generys

 

<<< I know I have seen people give their secrets for cooking large amounts of

rice but what about couscous for 200 people? I'd like to cook it with a

chicken broth since it is going underneath a chicken recipe. I will

probally bake it instead of doing it on the stove. I'm more or less

looking for a ratio of broth versus dry couscous.

 

Lavender >>>

 

 

Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2003 16:14:03 -0400 (EDT)

From: <jenne at fiedlerfamily.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Cooking Couscous for 200

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

<<< I know I have seen people give their secrets for cooking large amounts

of rice but what about couscous for 200 people? I'd like to cook it with

a chicken broth since it is going underneath a chicken recipe. I will

probally bake it instead of doing it on the stove. I'm more or less

looking for a ratio of broth versus dry couscous. >>>

 

Don't bother baking it. Put the dry cous-cous in a pan at least double

its depth. Heat the appropriate amount of broth to boiling. Pour broth in.

Stir. Cover. Walk away. Come back in 10 minutes. Done!

 

-- Pani Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika   jenne at fiedlerfamily.net

 

 

Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2003 17:04:58 -0400

From: "a5foil" <a5foil at ix.netcom.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Cooking Couscous for 200

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Couscous -- at least the packaged kind I buy -- is precooked, so it doesn't

really need to be cooked further -- just pour on boiling liquid, stir well,

and let it sit. Stir again before serving to break up any lumps. And it

doesn't have to be fixed right before serving, either, as it's good warm or

room temperature. Or you can steam the soaked couscous for a few minutes

just before serving to heat it up again, but I think that would be difficult

to do for 200 servings.

 

The recipe I fixed last night used about 1 3/8 cup liquid (1 cup water plus

lemon juice, vinegar and oil) to 1 cup of couscous, for 4 side servings. You

ought to get 8 to 10 servings per pound of couscous.

 

Cynara

 

 

Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2003 10:39:17 +1000

From: Robyn.Hodgkin at affa.gov.au

Subject: RE: [Sca-cooks] Cooking Couscous for 200

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

Couscous is a brilliantly easy alternative to rice, which I highly recommend for cooking for large numbers.  Using broth instead of plain water is great, but as everyone said, with modern couscous' you don't have to boil or bake, just add water.

 

My hint is: DO NOT ADD AS MUCH SALT AS THE PACKAGE MIGHT SAY.  I would in fact not add salt at all beyond what is in your broth.

 

Kiriel

ps. would love to hear more about use of couscous in non-middle eastern, period cooking.  Haven't seen it referred to anywhere and would dearly love to be able to use it.

 

 

Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2003 15:42:02 -0400

From: "Christine Seelye-King" <kingstaste at mindspring.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Big batches of rice

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Don't be scared of large quantities of rice, bake them!

Large Quantities of Grain - . When cooking a large batch of grains, instead

of using a pot with boiling water on top of the stove, bake it as a Œpilafı!

In a large, deep, baking pan, place grain, liquid, fat, and seasonings.

Heat oven to 350 degrees (25 degrees in either direction wonıt hurt if youı

ve got something else in the oven as well, just watch the cooking time).

Place baking parchment or wax paper over the top to keep the top layer of

grains from drying out, and bake for between 45 - 90 minutes.  Check after

30 minutes to adjust cooking time.  No more nasty burns or sticking to the

bottom of a large pot to deal with!

If it's white rice, go for two parts liquid to one part rice, a bit more

liquid if its brown rice.  Your liquids can be water, stock, soup, etc.  The

fat is just enough to oil the pan usually, but can be more if you want a

richer final product.

One of the nicest parts about this is that you can put it in the oven and

not worry about stirring it, just check on it half way through and again

towards the end.  It frees up your stove space (but takes up oven space),

and usually gives beautiful results.  Problems tend to be not enough water

or not enough cooking time= crunchy rice.

Seriously, this method beats boiling a bunch of noodles!

Good luck,

Mistress Christianna MacGrain

 

 

Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2005 12:56:39 -0500

From: "Phlip" <phlip at 99main.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Olwen's Rice (was OOPS! 12th Night Feast)

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> 55 pounds of dry short grain rice.  Cooked 4 cups at a time with extra rice

> flour added to make extra sticky sushi rice.  After cooking, each batch

> weighed just over 5 pounds.  I cooked rice for three days straight.  I still

> can't go near the sink to clean the last of the mess because it smells like

> rice.

> Pictures will follow sometime soon.

> Olwen

 

Oh dear....

 

Suggestion:

 

55lbs of _jasmine_ rice. Large pot- 2 waters, one rice. Bring water to boil,

add rice, bring to second boil, cover, turn off fire, or move someplace warm

and forget. Ignore for an hour or so. Start second batch. Do something else

until first batch has finished, and then add the sweet vinegar, etc,

stirring until cool. Place in other container, and restart your 3rd batch in

the first pot. Finish second batch, and restart 4th batch. Continue until

done.

 

I've only done 15 cups at a time, but there's no reason 20 wouldn't work.

Much easier than trying to do 4 c at a time, and should only take you a long

afternoon.

 

Saint Phlip,

CoD

 

 

Date: Tue, 2 Aug 2005 20:47:11 +0200

From: Volker Bach <carlton_bach at yahoo.de>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] rice pudding

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Melissa Carter <homefrogs at houston.rr.com> wrote:

> I'm a relatively new feast

> steward and I have a small question. What would be the best way to go  

> about preparing rice pudding for 85 people without it burning?

 

This will depend on equipment availability, but you can get very large (30-40

liter) pots with inbuilt heating elements and thermostats for home canning

(heat-sterilising the jars and sealing them). I don't know how common they

are where you live, but around here they're common enough to show up second

hand quite frequently. Anyway, what you can do is put your liquid into such

a pot in the morning, set the thermostat to 80°C, around noon throw in the

rice and leave it standing till the evening, when the pudding will be hot and

ready to serve. We've done soups and porridges that way, and nothing ever

went wrong (except once when too much salt got in, but that wasn't the pot's

fault)

 

Giano

 

 

Date: Tue, 2 Aug 2005 11:06:27 -0700 (PDT)

From: Pat <mordonna22 at yahoo.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] rice pudding

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Cook the rice pudding in the oven: Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Put all  

ingredients in a buttered baking dish and stir to blend. Bake 3 1/2  

hours or until set, stir 3 times 1st hour so rice won't settle.

 

Lady Anne du Bosc

known as Mordonna the Cook

Shire of Thorngill, Meridies

Mundanely, Pat Griffin of Millbrook, AL

 

 

Date: Tue, 2 Aug 2005 14:56:00 -0500 (GMT-05:00)

From: Christiane <christianetrue at earthlink.net>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Riso con lo zafferano and rice puddings

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

<snip>

 

Now, for the rice puddings for 100 question, I found a feast listing  

for Messisbugo:

 

BANCHETTO ORGANIZZATO DAL MESSISBUGO PER 104 INVITATI, A FERRARA NEL  

1529 (Banquet organized by Messisbugo for 104 guests, at Ferrara in  

1529), take a look at the fourth course:

 

  IV° vivanda

  Capretti ripieni arrostiti; capponi in pasta; piccioni ripieni alla

lombarda; arrosto con salsa francese; lucci al sale ricoperti di salsa

gialla, trote al vino alla ungherese con fette di pane; rombi fritti,

coperti di salsa e mostarda; sarde fritte con arance e zucchero;  

pasticci di pasta reale ripieni di riso alla turca, fritti e ricoperti

di zucchero.

 

"Pasticci di pasta reale" = mess of royal pasta, i.e. marzipan

"ripieni di riso alla turca" = stuffed with rice made in the Turkish  

fashion (royal Ottoman kitchens were famous for their  

rosewater-flavored rice puddings).

 

You may only have to use half as much rice pudding if you're making  

individual servings encased in marzipan. That's still a helluva lot of

rice pudding and a lot of pots to use to make it, though. As well as  

some very strong arms needed to stir the pots and keep the bottoms from  

sticking. I'd like to see Messisbugo's recipe for this.

 

Might just baked rice puddings serve? Figure a large pan can serve 8 to  

10, and it's something you can make ahead of time and freeze?

 

Gianotta

 

 

Date: Tue, 2 Aug 2005 18:08:44 -0400

From: <kingstaste at mindspring.com>

Subject: RE: [Sca-cooks] rice pudding

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

>>>

I'm a relatively new feast steward and I have a small question.  What would

be the best way to go about preparing rice pudding for 85 people without it

burning?

 

Hedwig

<<<

 

Bake it in the oven.  For large amounts of grains, baking is the best way to

go.  You can prepare the rice in a large baking pan first, using the

standard 2 parts liquid to one part grain.  Then, once the rice is cooked,

make up your custard with or without eggs, with milk or almond milk, the

seasonings like cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, etc., and raisins if you like.

Cook the eggs and milk in a pot first, then pour it over your rice and mix

all ingredients well. Then, back into the oven to finish it off. No burned

spots on the bottom, even cooking all around.  Do make sure you cover the

top with some parchment paper at the very least, or a metal tray over the

top of the pan works well.

 

Christianna

 

 

Date: Wed, 3 Aug 2005 06:52:39 -0600

From: "caointiarn" <caointiarn1 at juno.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] rice pudding

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

At 1/2 cup per person, that's 43 cups, that's 11 quarts, that will need 2

big {6 quart sized} crockpots.  Very doable.  and very little attention  

once it is cooking.

 

>> Hey, I was gonna say crockpot . . . .Caointiarn

>

> Crockpots are super for this kind of thing, but with 85 people you'd  

> need more than one.

>

> Adele de Maisieres

 

 

Date: Wed, 05 Oct 2005 16:59:01 -0700

From: Maggie MacDonald <maggie5 at cox.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Rice in a roaster?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

>>>

Has anyone ever tried doing quantities of rice (with

meat in it) in a roaster?  Did it work?  if not, how

about in a regular oven?  how did that work out?

Gwen Cat

<<<

 

Yes, I've done rice for a feast in a roaster. It didn't work too

badly at all. Just allow extra time for cooking. I don't remember the

exact quantity we did, but at a later time I boiled the water/etc in

a roaster and did cous cous without it getting all mushy and

nasty.  (both feasts were for about 150 people).

 

Maggie

 

 

Date: Thu, 06 Oct 2005 13:13:41 +1300

From: Adele de Maisieres <ladyadele at paradise.net.nz>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Rice in a roaster?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> Has anyone ever tried doing quantities of rice (with

> meat in it) in a roaster?  Did it work?  if not, how

> about in a regular oven?  how did that work out?

 

I haven't done rice in a roaster (although it should work).  I _have_

done rice in a regular oven and it is by far the easiest way to do rice

for a crowd, especially if oven space is plentiful.

 

The procedure is basically:

 

Remember that rice more than doubles in volume, so be sure you have

enough pan for your rice.  Also, consider what the pan is going to

weigh.  Ideally, find pans that will let you do 8-10 cups (or less) of

rice per pan.  Pretty much any ovenproof dish is OK for this, as long as

you can cover it tightly.

 

Preheat the oven to 350F/180C

 

Put the rice in the pan with and add twice as much boiling water as

rice.  (So, if you have six cups of rice, you need twelve cups of water,

etc).   Cover the pan _tightly_ with foil.  Bake for an hour (or a bit

less if you're using a convection oven).  Take the rice out of the oven

and let it stand for ten minutes, then uncover, fluff it up with a fork

and serve.

 

Everything else:

Naturally, you can add salt, spices, butter, etc. to this dish.  Just

put them in the pan before you add the boiling water.  If you want to

use broth or something instead of water, that's fine too.

--  

Adele de Maisieres

 

 

Date: Thu, 06 Oct 2005 07:31:13 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnna at sitka.engin.umich.edu>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Rice in a roaster?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

We used commercial rice packages (36 servings to the box)

and did rice in the oven according to the package instructions.

Used the deep pans that the kitchen had in stock.

225 people. Worked fine. This was 24 years ago at this point.

I can't remember anything special about it at this point. It just

worked.

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Thu, 06 Oct 2005 08:34:27 -0500

From: Heather M <margaretnorthwode at frontiernet.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Rice in a roaster?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Cat . wrote:

> Has anyone ever tried doing quantities of rice (with

> meat in it) in a roaster?  Did it work?  if not, how

> about in a regular oven?  how did that work out?

 

> Gwen Cat

 

You can do rice in a roaster. Just, take my warning - give it more than

forty-five minutes from start to finish. I put some in a roaster for a

feast this past weekend, having never used the roaster for rice alone,

and my sous chef/chief kitchen drudge and I ended up having to take it

out of the roaster and into a just emptied-and-cleaned stockpot to cook.

In a half-hour at 400 deg. F. the water in the roaster had warmed up

only to the point that it was uncomfortable to handle, and the rice had

absorbed but little water.

 

It turned out tasty, and on time, but just barely. (The real saver here

was having the almond milk already ready - thanks, list!)

 

Margaret Northwode, Meridies

 

 

Date: Thu, 6 Oct 2005 08:21:15 -0700 (PDT)

From: "Cat ." <tgrcat2001 at yahoo.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks]       Re: Rice in a roaster Sca-cooks Digest, Vol 29,

        Issue 12

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

> Gwen Cat the curious PEST again.

> Has anyone ever tried doing quantities of rice (with

> meat in it) in a roaster?

snip

 

Based on what I found in the files and the helpful

replies here, I did a test run last night.  Boy Howdy,

how easy was that.

 

I used a 2 lb (~4 cup) bag of rice (same kind, but

smaller amount from what I will use Saturday), and 7-8

cups of water.  Set the roaster at 350 and walked

away.  It took a little under 1.5 hours before it

smelled done, so I turned it off and let it steam a

bit longer.  IT WAS PERFECT!  I never stirred, though

I peeked a couple of times to be sure it was ok, and

just ignored it otherwise.  I did not have meat to

throw in it, but I expect no trouble for the pre

cooked chicken chunks Iım tossing in for the real

thing.  I do expect it to take at least twice that

long to do the amounts I need, but as long as I start

them by 8:30 I should hope they will be done at noon.

 

Thank you all for helping me work it out!

 

In Service

Gwen (now to make carrotsticks for 150) Cat

 

 

Date: Thu,  6 Oct 2005 11:34:40 -0400

From: "Jeff Gedney" <gedney1 at iconn.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Rice in a roaster?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

> In a half-hour at 400 deg. F. the water in the roaster

> had warmed up only to the point that it was uncomfortable

> to handle, and the rice had absorbed but little water.

 

Why did you start with cold water?

Seems to me such an application ought to start with

boiling water.

 

A Roaster is really good at holding temp, but it has

to be a damn good roaster to bring a large thermal sink

like a gallon of cold water to boiling temps at any

rate resembling that of a good stove.

 

Capt Elias

Dragonship Haven, East

(Stratford, CT, USA)

Apprentice in the House of Silverwing

 

 

Date: Thu, 06 Oct 2005 12:09:55 -0400

From: "jehan.yves" <jehan.yves at signofthetiger.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks]  Re: Rice in a roaster Sca-cooks Digest, Vol

        29, Issue 12

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

          A real help, timewise, would be to bring your water to a

boil before adding it to the roaster. A large pot, on an outdoor

fryer base, can bring the water to a boil pretty quick.

 

JehanYves

 

 

Date: Thu, 06 Oct 2005 14:52:39 -0300

From: Micheal <dmreid at hfx.eastlink.ca>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks]  Re: Rice in a roaster Sca-cooks Digest, Vol

        29,    Issue 14

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

  Okay this works every time I have ever done it:

 

  1pt Fat or butter

  1pt Onions finely diced

  2 ,1/2 quarts rice

  1, 1/2 gallons of water or

  1 1/2 gallons of meat or vegetable stock

 

  Method

  Melt fat add onions and cook for 2 minutes

Wash rice thoroughly in cold water drain well

  Add to melted fat , stir to coat with fat

Cook on top of stove for 5-6 min

add boiling stock Bake in oven until tender ( apox 20 min)

  Do not attempt to prepare baked rice in a larger batch then the one  

Given above.

  Yields 100, 3oz servings.

 

  Cealian Of Moray

 

 

Date: Thu, 06 Oct 2005 15:31:53 -0400

From: "Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius"

        <adamantius.magister at verizon.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Re: rice

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

On Oct 6, 2005, at 2:03 PM, Devra at aol.com wrote:

> Maybe the rice was old. Master Adamantius cooked a wonderful 12th

> Night event in RI, and made a seafood rissotto, which unfortunately was

> extremely crunchy. I believe that he cooked the rice for several hours,

> too.  Tasted really nice, if you got over the feeling of eating raw rice.

>      Devra

 

Yes, I was going to point out that I had also had had the Mysterious

Waterproof Rice phenomenon occur to me. It was Blomanger of Fish, and

it should have been wonderful, and the test batches were. I'm still

not sure what the problem was, but for that dish, I think the thing

to do is to start with rice pre-cooked in plain water, rather than

cooking it in the seafood-stock-based almond milk, as I recall the

recipe stipulated. While my preference would be to follow the recipe

as written, there may have been some physical differences between the

rice I used and the stuff the 15th-century cooks/authors used, which

might account for the problem.

 

I actually don't think I would have called it crunchy, but it was

distinctly al dente, as I recall, kind of like the center of a grain

of arborio risotto, only it was throughout. More chalky. As someone

(Urtatim?) suggested, it might have been extremely old rice.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Thu, 6 Oct 2005 17:19:19 -0400

From: "Mairi Ceilidh" <jjterlouw at earthlink.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Rice in a roaster?

To: "Cooks within the SCA" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Adele de Maisieres wrote:

> That's as much a quantity thing as anything else. _Always_ use

> _boiling_ water when doing baked rice.

 

The homeless shelter where I help do dinner once a month does not have a way

to boil water.  They have a steamer thing that will hold two large steam

table pans.  We use tap water and bake it at 400* for 45 or so minutes.

Works every time.

 

Mairi Ceilidh

 

 

Date: Wed, 19 Sep 2007 20:51:50 -0400

From: "Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius" <adamantius1 at verizon.net>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] 15th C. Ottoman Bulghur w/Chestnuts

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

 

On Sep 19, 2007, at 8:19 PM, Lilinah wrote:

> Bulghur - Based on my reading of other recipes, it is likely that the

> Ottomans prepared bulghur either with broth or water. Broth would be

> more flavorful, so that what i plan to do. It is quite edible if just

> soaked in liquid and not actually cooked over a fire. Modern bulghur

> pilavs simmer the bulghur about 25 min. But if i can keep a burner

> free, that would be nice. Any opinions, based on cooking and/or

> eating bulghur, as to whether i should just soak the bulghur in hot

> broth (which would free up a stove burner) or actually put it over

> the fire?

 

Bulgur's steamed before drying, I'm pretty sure, so you can pour

boiling water over it in the right proportions, and it'll soak it up

and "cook", if it's not too coarse and you stir occasionally... this

assumes you don't want it _really_ soft.

 

I've cooked bulgur in food service operations, when no one was

looking, with hot water from the coffee urn ;-). People kept asking

what my secret for perfect bulgur was.

 

Adamantius

 

<the end>



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