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Janissaries-msg - 1/11/02

 

Notes on the Janissaries, an elite corps in the service of the Ottoman Empire (Turkey) composed of war captives and Christian youths pressed into service. They were converted to Islam and trained under the strictest discipline.

 

NOTE: See also the files: mercenaries-msg, Turkey-msg, fd-Turkey-msg.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

   Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                         Stefan at florilegium.org

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Date: Wed, 19 Sep 2001 10:34:47 +0200

From: Volker Bach <bachv at paganet.de>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Jannissary Cooks

 

"Craig Jones." schrieb:

> ""The "folded sleeve" Janissary hat has a special brass holder in the

> ""front for an elaborate plume or for a wooden spoon. Among the most

> ""respected members of a particular group of Janissaries were the two

> ""men who carried the HUGE bronze/copper cooking pot. They had a

> ""specific outfit so they were readily identified.

>

> Wasn't there a rank of Janissary officer called a Corbasi (Soup

> maker)?  Can anyone confirm this?

 

The table of organisation of the Janissary Corps I

work off (Hans Miksch, I don't really know how

good he is) gives the following officer ranks:

 

Aga - tactical commander of the Orta (roughly

batallion equivalent)

 

Djorbajibashi (head soup cook) - administrative

officer in charge of the Orta

 

Kethuda and Obadashi - tactical officers

subordinate to the Aga

 

Adjibashi (head cook), Sakkabashi (head water

bearer) and Wekelikhardj (food fund manager) -

administrative officers subordinate to the

Djorbajibashi

 

I distinctly recall seeing large spoons being

worn/carried by janissary officers as a badge of

rank, and the subordinate tactical units were

designated as 'messes' sharing a cookpot in the

field, whence its symbolic significance.

 

I wonder if anyone would agree to creating a

Janissary household?

 

(Sensing military career opprtunities)

Giano

 

 

Date: Wed, 19 Sep 2001 16:01:36 +0200

From: Volker Bach <bachv at paganet.de>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Re: Jannissary Cooks

 

Susan Laing schrieb:

> Giano scribed....

> >Aga - tactical commander of the Orta (roughlybatallion equivalent)

> >Djorbajibashi (head soup cook) - administrative officer in charge of the

> >Orta

> >Kethuda and Obadashi - tactical officers subordinate to the Aga

> >Adjibashi (head cook), Sakkabashi (head water bearer) Wekelikhardj (food

> >fund manager)

>

> Oooohhhh - period cooking garb!!! <drool!>

>

> Giles/Drakie/Mel - wanna find some pictures/ clothes discriptions and see if

> they're specy enough for the Lochac Event Catering Corp??? ;-)

 

There is an Osprey Elite Series book (by David

Nicolle IIRC) called The Janissaries that's full

of pictures and has a set of modern reconstruction

color plates in the middle. I don't know how good

the text is (if I'm right about David Nicolle that

should be no worry, but some of the Osprey stuff

is definitely below par), but the pictures should

be worth getting it. The price should come out

around $20 if you can't get your library to get it

for you.

 

Giano

 

 

From: lilinah at earthlink.net

Date: Wed, 19 Sep 2001 12:51:36 -0700

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Jannissary Cooks

 

Elaine Koogler <ekoogler at chesapeake.net> wrote:

>Not sure, but I do know that Ted Moennich (SCA name is Karl von Nordmark),

>who heads up a music group called Turku.  They played at Pennsic last

>year.  He had a troup of Jannissaries that he paraded around on occasion.

>I'm not sure how to get in touch with him...I think he still lives in North

>Carolina, but they may have a web page.

>

>Kiri

 

Uh, i've seen photos of them in their garb. Really, really not

correct for Jannissaries from pre-1601 (or for any period). The group

at Pennsic were all wearing red - which 16th c. Jannissaries did not

- and they were wearing modern vests, salwar of the wrong shape,

exposed white shirts (the gomlek is "underwear" and only the

neckline, cuffs, and hem might show), and few entaris (!!!). And they

were not wearing the right kinds of headgear.

 

A group of Jannissaries is a fun idea and there's plenty of

information on how to do it before 1601. Use real source material,

such as surviving garments, Ottoman Turkish paintings, and European

"eyewitness" drawings and paintings, which often give better details

and proportions.

 

As far as i can tell, Jannissaries didn't have a single uniform color

(pun intended), but wore 2 layers of fully lined entaris

(button-front tunics) in a variety of bright colors over a white

gomlek (undertunic) and brightly colored salwar (pants) which do NOT

have wide legs with gathered ankles, but have loose thighs but narrow

ankles. The headdresses and certain costume details seem to point to

rank - and the Ottomans were pretty "anal" about status. Historically

accurate garments are easy to make. But the headgear is a bit

trickier, but not impossible.

 

The Osprey book is a good starting point - actually, there are 2

Osprey books on Jannissaries before 1601, one in the "Men at Arms"

series and one in the "Warrior" series - but the modern artist who

made the color plates (?Christa Hook?) did a terrible job, especially

with the earlier depictions. Examine the actual art in the book

(including photos of actual cooking pots!) and find a book with color

plates of actual Ottoman art. The Osprey books have bibliographies,

which should help.

 

Right now, i'm reading a facsimile of the 1585 English translation of

Nicholas de Nicholay's "The Nauigations into Turkie" which has plates

possibly drawn by an artist who accompanied him, including a couple

Jannissaries.

 

Anahita

 

 

Date: Wed, 19 Sep 2001 15:16:03 -0700 (PDT)

From: Huette von Ahrens <ahrenshav at yahoo.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Jannissary Cooks

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

Here are several books on Janissaries.

 

Huette

 

+++++++++

 

Nicolle, David.

The Janissaries / text by David Nicolle, colour

plates by Christa Hook. -- London : Osprey, 1995.

64 p. : ill. (some col.), maps ; 25 cm. -- (Elite

series ; 58)

ISBN 1855324970

 

Nicolle, David.

The Janissaries / text by David Nicolle, colour

plates by Christa Hook. -- London : Reed International Books, 1997.

64 p. : ill. (some col.), maps ; 25 cm. -- (Elite series ; 58)

ISBN 185532413X

 

Goodwin, Godfrey.

The Janissaries / Godfrey Goodwin. -- London : Saqi, 1997.

288 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

ISBN 0863560490 (hb). -- ISBN 0863560555 (pbk)

 

Palmer, J. A. B.

The origin of the Janissaries / by J.A.B. Palmer. --

Manchester : The Librarian, The John Rylands Library

..., 1953.

 

Evliy=E8a, efendi, ca.1611-ca.1682.

In the days of the Janissaries; old Turkish life as

depicted in the "Travel-book" of Evliy=E2a Chelebi, by

Alexander Pallis. Introd. by Philip Graves. London,New

York, Hutchinson, 1951.

236p. 36 plates (incl. ports.) map (on lining papers) 23cm.

 

 

Date: Thu, 20 Sep 2001 13:16:05 +0200

From: Volker Bach <bachv at paganet.de>

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Jannissary Cooks

 

Huette von Ahrens schrieb:

> Nicolle, David.

>   The Janissaries / text by David Nicolle, colour

> plates by Christa Hook. -- London : Osprey, 1995.

> 64 p. : ill. (some col.), maps ; 25 cm. -- (Elite

> series ; 58)

>   ISBN 1855324970

>

> Nicolle, David.

>   The Janissaries / text by David Nicolle, colour

> plates by Christa Hook. -- London : Reed International

> Books, 1997.

> 64 p. : ill. (some col.), maps ; 25 cm. -- (Elite

> series ; 58)

>   ISBN 185532413X

 

Thanks, that's very useful (my wallet *doesn't*

say thanks, but it's going lean these days

anyway...). BTW, in case anyone doesn't know these

two are substantially the same book with different

covers. Osprey publishes 'trade editions' of its

more popular titles through Reed International.

 

Giano

 

<the end>



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Comments to the Editor: stefan at florilegium.org