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Anglo-Saxon history, clothing and culture.

 

NOTE: See also the files: AS-jewelry-art, fd-Anglo-Saxn-msg, fd-Arthur-msg, jewelry-msg, pouches-msg, England-msg, Normans-msg, Picts-msg.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

   Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                         Stefan at florilegium.org

************************************************************************

 

From: aj at wg.icl.co.uk (Tony Jebson)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Buring Times and Weenie Roast

Date: 31 Oct 1994 11:31:32 -0600

 

TRISTAN CLAIR DE LUNE (v081lu33 at ubvms.cc.buffalo.edu) writes:

>      For one, by "co-opted" pagan, etc. forms, I meant that a lot of

> Christian holidays happen to coincide with pagan holidays. For instance,

> making Christmas December 25 helped make the religion more palatable to

> the Romans. And for another example, there was a version of the Gospels

> written as a Saxon ballad.

 

On the issue of the Anglo-Saxons and paganism, I think I ought to expand

on what Tristan has said.

 

There are two types of paganism that must be considered when talking about

Anglo-Saxon England:

 

First, English Paganism. That is, paganism within the Anglo-Saxon population.

The Anglo-Saxons were converted to Christianity quite early, starting with

St. Augustines mission in 597. By the time of Bede England had been converted.

 

Second, paganism *within* England. That is, paganism re-introduced by

successive waves of Scandinavian settlers. This was problem that the

English Church had to contend with from about 750-800 until the Norman

Conquest!

 

Little is known about English paganism. Early writer such as Bede are

silent about pagan practises in England (understandably, they wish to

promote Christianity). It is known that the pagan English worshipped the

Germanic pantheon, but little is known about *how*. One piece of evidence

for English paganism has survived to the present day. Consider the names of

the days of the week: Sun day, Moon day, Tiw's day, Woden's day, Thunor's

day, and Friya's day! Other pieces of evidence can be found within things

like the Rune Peom, and a set of Metrical Charms (you can call some of them

spells if you like ;) ).

 

The Scandinavian pagan influx appears to have had some influence over

popular belief: there are a handful of Northumbrian place names and

picture stones that can be considered as evidence, and the 11th century

laws of Cnut speak out strongly against pagan practises such as witchcraft

and divination. However, it had >>NO<< influence at all on the surviving

literature (which is primarily southern, and not from the area of Viking

settlement).

 

However, I'm not sure that I would use literature as evidence of "populist"

religion. Literacy in Anglo-Saxon England was restricted to the church and

a small group of nobles. Also, much of the literature that survives requires

quite a high sophisticated of knowledge about the basis of Christianity, and

can't really be considered as a pagans guide to Christianity. Much of this

literature was intended to be used within the established church rather

than as texts for missionaries.

 

BTW, none of the four Gospels survives in verse form. The closest are

three poems (known as Christ A, B, C) which tell of Christ coming to earth,

his ascension, and his return as judge. There are also sections of the

Old Testament which survive in verse. All the Gospels survive in prose

translation.

 

--- Tony Jebson

 

 

From: aj at wg.icl.co.uk (Tony Jebson)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: 5th c. England: sources

Date: 22 Nov 1994 03:23:55 -0600

Organization: UTexas Mail-to-News Gateway

 

Mellyrn (mellyrn at enh.nist.gov) writes:

> Anybody know of some good treatises on 5thc English history?

 

Well, you could try some of the following:

 

Gildas: Arthurian Period sources Vol. 7.

   ISBN 0 85033 296 6

   [Gildas wrote in the mid 5th century; translation and Latin.]

 

The Origins of Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms

   Ed. Steven Bassett

   [collection of papers about the origin of some of the more obscure

   A-S kingdoms: Hwicce, the Magonsaete, etc. Well know contributors include

   David Dumville, Barbara Yorke, Margaret Gelling]

 

The Age of Sutton Hoo

   Ed. Martin Carver

   [collection of papers, mostly archaeological though some discuss

   symbolism; vocabulary of "Beowulf"; etc]

 

The English Conquest: Gildas and Britain in the fifth century

   N.J.Higham

   [in-depth discussion of Britain in the time of Gildas. Though I

   personally think he reads a little too much into Gildas]

 

Rome, Britain and the Anglo-Saxons,

   Nicholas Higham

   [good discussion of sub-Roman England and the coming of the Saxons. Loads

   of Archaeology + Gildas (see above!)].

 

> How about 10th-11thc Ireland?

 

Nope... I know nothing!

 

--- Tony Jebson

 

 

From: priest at vassar.edu (Carolyn Priest-Dorman)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Viking and Anglo-Saxon Hats

Date: 25 Feb 1996 00:38:20 GMT

Organization: Vassar College

 

Greeting from Thora Sharptooth!

 

About the ninth to eleventh centuries, Ben Levick

(ben at hrofi.demon.co.uk) asked:

 

1) Does anyone out there have any evidence from this period of English

>men of a non-military nature (i.e. civilians) wearing hats (with the

>notable exception of the well known manuscript showing the king and

>his Witan wearing their √ędunces' caps√≠), or were hats seen primarily

>as the mark of a military man?

 

The best single source I have for this is Gale Owen-Crocker's _Dress in

Anglo-Saxon England_, which suggests that hats may not have been

particularly common in the tenth and eleventh centuries.  She mentions

the "hufe," an ecclesiastical cap of some sort, but most other headgear

appears to have been military in nature.

 

>2) We are all familiar with the rather stylish Viking' fur-brimmed

>leather hat, used by Viking re-enactors all around the world,

>but what evidence is there for its use in this period, particularly

>in western Scandinavia and the British Isles? Was it really used or

>is it another one of those items, like cross-gartered leg bindings

>and double-headed axes, that are more common in modern reconstructions

>than contemporary sources?

 

At least two main types of men's headwear have been found in Sweden, in

the Birka men's graves of the ninth and tenth centuries.  One type

(Hagg's "Type A") has been mutated by many re-enactors into the

aforementioned fur-brimmed leather hat, although the originals appear

to have been neither leather nor fur-brimmed.  Both types of headgear

correlate to a specific men's overgarment, believed by some historians

to have been a Rus military garment.

 

However, I haven't seen any archaeological sources that conclusively

document any specific type of men's headgear in the western Viking

milieu in the same period.

 

For sources, contact me privately.

***********************************************************************

Carolyn Priest-Dorman                     Thora Sharptooth

priest at vassar.edu                      Frostahlid, Austrrik

          Gules, three square weaver's tablets in bend Or

***********************************************************************

 

 

From: mulvanem at fp.co.nz (Maggie Mulvaney)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: What did they do with the skirt edges?

Date: 19 May 1996 01:58:36 GMT

Organization: Fisher & Paykel Limited.  

 

David Friedman (ddfr at best.com) wrote:

: > Someone wrote:

: > > Hmmm, I thought the assumption was one of birth not social status. The

: > > two are not necessarily the same, are they?

: > Someone replied:

That was Bryan.

: > >>Before 1800, you bet your biffy, they were!

: I asked:

: > Who was Harold Godwinsson's grandfather?

: Bryan replied:

: > Ah, so this sort of social mobility can thus be ascertained to be the norm,

: > the dominant cultural emic and etic, the most likely way things were done,

: > eh?

: I do not see how that follows from what I posted. The claim was that birth

: rank and social status were "necessarily the same"--indeed that you can

: "bet your biffy ...  they were." One counterexample is sufficient to

: refute "necessarily the same," and there are quite a lot.

 

To add to that - with documentation - Read the paper entitled 'The Thriving

of the Anglo-Saxon Ceorl' by Sir F.M. Stenton, published in

Preparatory to Anglo-Saxon England

1970 Oxford University Press

 

It wasn't particularly common, but it was in no way impossible. It _was unusual

for the grandson of a Ceorl to become King of England, but Harold's time was

unusual anyway. On the other hand, a Ceorl could quite conceivably aspire to

become a Thegn.

 

Cheerfully

Muireann ingen Eoghain

 

 

From: hrjones at uclink.berkeley.edu (Heather Rose Jones)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Anglo-Saxon?

Date: 23 Oct 1996 03:57:37 GMT

Organization: University of California, Berkeley

 

Terry Aucoin (HDXQ27A at prodigy.com) wrote:

: Hi I have read a little about the Anglo Saxons and wanted to know what

: did they wear? Clothing that is?  I know from an article I read they used

: Chainmail mostly as armor, round or tear drop shields.  

 

The best single source I've found on Anglo-Saxon clothing is Gale R.

Owen-Crocker's "Dress in Anglo-Saxon England" (Manchester University

Press, 1986, ISBN 0-7190-1818-8).

 

: Where their names the same like the Vikings?

 

Many Anglo-Saxon names are cognate with Old Norse names, but the spelling

and pronunciation will be somewhat different. E.g., Old Norse

"A{dh}alvaldr" versus Anglo-Saxon "AEthelweald".

 

Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn

 

 

From: David Corliss <corlisd at aa.wl.com>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Anglo-Saxon?

Date: Fri, 01 Nov 1996 17:03:50 -0400

Organization: Retro Team, Parke-Davis Ann Arbor

 

Heather Rose Jones wrote:

> Terry Aucoin (HDXQ27A at prodigy.com) wrote:

>

> : Hi I have read a little about the Anglo Saxons and wanted to know what

> : did they wear? Clothing that is?  I know from an article I read they used

> : Chainmail mostly as armor, round or tear drop shields.

>

> The best single source I've found on Anglo-Saxon clothing is Gale R.

> Owen-Crocker's "Dress in Anglo-Saxon England" (Manchester University

> Press, 1986, ISBN 0-7190-1818-8).

 

This is indeed a very fine source. Allow me to give you a strong caution concerning existing documentation on Anglo-Saxon Culture: It is _very_ strongly slanted toward a very narrow time frame: February to October of 1066. Your present knowledge reflects this: you describe the equipment of a small elite fighting force, the Housecarls, that fought in the war of 1066. If your particular area of interest is the time of the Norman Invasion, there is much available. Some is excellent; other is less good. Much is based on subjective interpretation of a single article: the Bayeaux Tapetry. If you find your interest lying in a different period of Anglo-Saxon Culture, you will need

to do a bit of searching.

 

> : Where their names the same like the Vikings?

>

> Many Anglo-Saxon names are cognate with Old Norse names, but the spelling

> and pronunciation will be somewhat different. E.g., Old Norse

> "A{dh}alvaldr"  versus Anglo-Saxon "AEthelweald".

>

> Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn

 

Another fine observation from Tangwystyl - she must have some Saxon in her, for when have the dark Welsh been so erudite?

 

A modern analogy may help. The language spoken in the American Midwest, American

Southeast, New England, England, Scotland, Australia, and Kenya are often so different that basic comprehension is threatened. Yet, all these languages go by the title "English". Similarly, at the time of the Conquest, Angles,Saxons, Danes, Swedes, Norse, Icelanders, Frisians (living on the islands off the coast of what is now the Netherlands), and the Dutch all spoke for what passed as a single language. (The Icelanders still speak their version of it; Norse is little changed.) During the late Saxon period, these languages had as much in common as the diffent varieties of English do today. A Saxon speaking to a person from Norway probably encountered a situation similar to you speaking to a person from Kenya, Australia, or Louisiana.

 

If there is anything I can do for you, do not hesitate to write me.

 

Beorthwine of Grafham Wood

David Corliss

corlisd at aa.wl.com

 

 

From: hrjones at uclink.berkeley.edu (Heather Rose Jones)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Anglo-Saxon?

Date: 2 Nov 1996 01:25:00 GMT

Organization: University of California, Berkeley

 

David Corliss (corlisd at aa.wl.com) wrote:

: Heather Rose Jones wrote:

: > The best single source I've found on Anglo-Saxon clothing is Gale R.

: > Owen-Crocker's "Dress in Anglo-Saxon England" (Manchester University

: > Press, 1986, ISBN 0-7190-1818-8).

 

: This is indeed a very fine source. Allow me to give you a strong caution  

: concerning existing documentation on Anglo-Saxon Culture: It is _very_  

: strongly slanted toward avery narrow time frame: February to October of 1066.

 

I don't think you meant to imply that Owen-Crocker's book was this

narrowly focussed, but let me re-emphasize, its coverage is quite broad

and deep with respect to AS culture.

 

<snip>

 

: Another fine observation from Tangwystyl - she must have some Saxon in her,  

: for when have the dark Welsh been so erudite?

 

[icily] I BEG your pardon!

 

Tangwystyl

 

 

From: mulvanem at fp.co.nz

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Anglo-Saxon?

Date: 8 Nov 1996 02:21:17 GMT

Organization: magh_seireadh

 

In article <54ile9$1u1k at useneta1.news.prodigy.com> <54k53h$m67 at agate.berkeley.edu> <327A65B6.3760 at aa.wl.com>,

   David Corliss <corlisd at aa.wl.com> wrote:

> Heather Rose Jones wrote:

> > The best single source I've found on Anglo-Saxon clothing is Gale R.

> > Owen-Crocker's "Dress in Anglo-Saxon England" (Manchester University

> > Press, 1986, ISBN 0-7190-1818-8).

> This is indeed a very fine source. Allow me to give you a strong caution

> concerning existing documentation on Anglo-Saxon Culture: It is _very_

> strongly slanted toward a very narrow time frame: February to October of 1066. > Your present knowlegde reflects this: you describe the equipment of a small

> elite fighting force, the Housecarls, that fought in the war of 1066. If your

> particular area of interest is the time of the Norman Invasion, there is much

> available. Some is excellent; other is less good. Much is based on subjective

> interpretation of a single article: the Bayeaux Tapetry. If you find your

> interest lying in a different period of Anglo-Saxon Culture, you will need

> to do a bit of searching.

 

While this is not actually true for Owen-Crocker's book, it _is_ almost true for

many other tomes out there. I'd like to amend it, though. Much documentation exists for _early_ Anglo-Saxon times, mainly in the form of primary sources, documents and archaeological finds. These latter tend to lessen as the Christianising of the Saxons meant less gravegoods being put aside for our convenience. Documentation picks up again from the end of the tenth century, and frustratingly, the biggest single source of documentation, the Domesday book, was provided by the Normans. Damn inconsiderate, really, especially for those of us interested in the intervening time. There is stuff available, however.

 

One note on Owen-Crocker's book - her theories are not universally accepted.

As a backup I suggest looking at the HMSO book on textiles and clothing. It

is much later, of course, but many of the techniques described therein are

valid for earlier times, based on what little such documentation I've been able

to find from other sources, and there is some discussion on background data.

 

While I am nowhere near the calibre of expertise of Tangwystyl or Beorthwine,

feel free to contact me if you want to talk Anglo-Saxon clothing... <g>

 

Muireann ingen Eoghain

Resident of the most Fair Southern Reaches of Caid

 

 

From: djheydt at uclink.berkeley.edu (Dorothy J Heydt)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Saxon Cloaks

Date: 20 Dec 1996 02:27:29 GMT

Organization: University of California at Berkeley

 

Nothmund <nothmund at aol.com> wrote:

>   I am planning to make a cloak, and would like some information as to

>the type of cloak that would have been worn by a saxon of the late nineth

>century...

 

The usual cloak for men of that period was a rectangle, draped

around the neck and pinned on the right shoulder, leaving the

swordarm free.  If the cloak was very large--the size of a

blanket--it could be folded in half before being pinned.  For

more details, see if you can find a copy of Gail Owen-Crocker's

_Dress in Anglo-Saxon England,_ Manchester University Press,

1986. This is the best source I know of.

 

Dorothea of Caer-Myrddin                          Dorothy J. Heydt

Mists/Mists/West                                Albany, California

PRO DEO ET REGE                                     djheydt at uclink

 

 

Newsgroups: rec.food.historic,rec.org.sca

From: wp823 at freenet.victoria.bc.ca (Jo Beverley)

Subject: Re: history of mustard

Organization: Victoria Freenet Association

Date: Thu, 9 Jan 1997 21:12:38 GMT

 

As a lurker here (I confess, I just skim through looking for anything

that might berelevant to one of my romance novels) I'll contribute the

fact that mustard seed was known and used in Anglo-Saxon times.

 

If anyone here is interested in research of that period, a UK company

called Anglo Saxon Books puts out some detailed works, such a two-volume

set on food. I use them because my novels are late 11th, early 12th

century and most books favor the later period.

 

       http://www.anglo-saxon.demon.co.uk/asbooks/

 

Jo Beverley

 

 

From: djheydt at uclink.berkeley.edu (Dorothy J Heydt)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Pre-Norman invasion clothing.

Date: 6 Mar 1997 04:19:58 GMT

Organization: University of California at Berkeley

 

Aethelwulf <uptoic at hg.uleth.ca> wrote:

 

|I am looking for information on the styles of men's clothing worn during

|the late tenth-early eleventh centuries.  Also, any information on where

|to find patterns would be appreciated.

 

Try to find a copy (in your friendly neighborhood university

library is likeliest) of Gale Owen-Crocker's _Dress in Anglo-

Saxon England_ (Manchester University Press, 1986).  In this

book Owen-Crocker assembled all the *facts* she could find

about the topic, from manuscripts and grave goods and sculpture

and everything else surviving.  She's a little short on

*speculation,* so that at times you find yourself wanting

to shout, "JUST TELL ME WHAT TO WEAR!"  But it's an excellent

place to start.

 

Looking quickly at Chapter VII, "Men's costume in the tenth and

eleventh centuries," I find knee-length cloaks clasped by a

brooch on the right shoulder and falling away to leave the

sword-arm free; or fastened in front and falling away on either

side (several of these on seated kings).  Layered T-tunics whose

knee- or mid-calf-length skirts have been cut as wide as possible

to make them full.  Sometimes, very long sleeves that bunch up

on the forearm.  Hosen that are sometimes bound or cross-gartered

around the shin; sometimes they are very long and bunching too.

A belt around the waist.  Lots of fancy trim around neck, wrists,

hems. Flat, black ankle shoes with a white strip down the front.

Men's hair is generally shown cut short.  The Bayeux Tapestry

distinguishes Normans, cleanshaven with the hair cut away from

the nape, from Saxons with longer hair (at least, longer than

the Normans') and long mustaches.  Men frequently went bare-headed,

even in winter; some conical hats are seen, probably of leather,

sometimes bent over at the top, Phrygian-cap style.  

 

Dorothea of Caer-Myrddin                          Dorothy J. Heydt

Mists/Mists/West                                Albany, California

PRO DEO ET REGE                                     djheydt at uclink

 

 

From: David Corliss <corlisd at aa.wl.com>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Pre-Norman invasion clothing.

Date: Thu, 06 Mar 1997 17:04:42 -0400

Organization: Retro Team, Parke-Davis Ann Arbor

 

uptoic at hg.uleth.ca (Aethelwulf) wrote:

> I am looking for information on the styles of men's clothing worn during

> the late tenth-early eleventh centuries.  Also, any information on where

> to find patterns would be appreciated.

The Normanization of England did not happen in a day or a year. It can

be said to begin in 1016, when the desscendants of the old Anglo-Saxon

manarchy fled  from the conquest of Canute and were sheletered in

Normandy. Hastings was a high point but certainly not the end: The 1087

campaign in the North of England, relatively untouched in the Conquest

of 1066, and the Domesday Survey were important landmarks. The

Normanization can be said to be fairly complete by the establishment of

the New Forest at the end of the century.

 

Even before 1016, Norman cultural influence and intermarriage was

extensive: that is why the English monarchy fled to Normandy. The point

of all of this is: some of the best sources for English costuming in the

period of which you speak are from Normandy.

 

You can find minor cultural differences: English often wore silly

pointed hats and wore beards more often the Normans; the Norman dresses

were often more close fitting. At this time, the Normans were not yet

wearing the ridiculous haircuts worn at the time of the conquest. The

differences are minor and variable: tendencies and trends rather than

rules.

 

Look at Norman sources: they are often a good complimentary point of

informnation.

 

Beorthwine of Grafham Wood

 

 

From: priest at vassar.edu (Carolyn Priest-Dorman)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Pre-Norman invasion clothing.

Date: 7 Mar 1997 17:13:34 GMT

Organization: Vassar College

 

Greeting from Thora Sharptooth!

 

There is information on Viking menswear in that period at my website:

 

       http://www.cs.vassar.edu/~capriest/vikresource.html

 

Some of the information on which that article is based comes from

Anglo-Scandinavian areas such as York.

 

As Dorothea notes, Owen-Crocker is the best currently accessible single source

for answers for Anglo-Saxons.

***************************************************************************

Carolyn Priest-Dorman                        Thora Sharptooth

priest at vassar.edu                            Frostahlid, Austrriki

         Gules, three square weaver's tablets in bend Or

***************************************************************************

 

 

From: Angelcyn at hrofi.demon.co.uk

Newsgroups: soc.history.medieval,rec.org.sca

Subject: New Anglo-Saxon Helmet discovered in England

Date: Thu, 24 Apr 1997 20:14:21 GMT

Organization: Angelcynn

 

On Monday 21st April I saw a news report that said an Anglo-Saxon

helmet had been discovered in Northamptonshire.   My immediate

reaction was shock (in a most pleasant way), followed by a great need

to find out more.    I've since followed up  by contacting both the

archaeologist who excavated it and the conservator who is working on

it.   Here's what I was able to find out:

 

At the moment most of the information about the helmet's construction

comes from X-rays of it.   There should be more information

forthcoming as the conservation work takes place. The helmet seems to

be constructed completely of iron (which is unusual as all three of

the other surviving, reconstructable helmets use non-ferrous metals as

well as iron).   It is surmounted by an iron crest in the shape of a

boar - only the second example found on a helmet anywhere in the world

(although there are boar crests that have been found without helmets,

including a bronze Anglo-Saxon one).   It is similar in construction

to the Anglian helmet from Coppergate, with a wide brow-band and  a

nape to nose band ending in a round tipped nasal.   There are  bands

running from ear to ear, with metal infil panels.   It has cheek-flaps

very similar in shape to the Coppergate helmet, with an edging strip.

There are holes around the back of the brow band which seem to have

supported some sort of neck-guard.   This part of the helmet has been

damaged by a plough at some point so the exact nature of the neck

guard is not clear at present, although it seems to be constructed of

metal rods, perhaps some sort of 'link-mail' (not chain-mail as in the

Coppergate helmet or a solid guard as in the Sutton Hoo helmet).   The

only other decorative feature apart from the boar seems to be narrow

bands making a cross pattern  running along the nose to nape and ear

to ear bands.

 

The cost of excavation and conservation costs are being met by Pioneer

Aggregates who own the site (well done Pioneer Agregates, let's hope

more companies will follow your example in future).   The helmet is

already being referred to as 'The Pioneer Helmet'.

 

Other Items in the burial are a decorative bronze bowl with enammelled

escutcheons, a pattern welded sword in its scabbard, a small iron

buckle which seems to be associated with the scabbard and a small iron

object which is probably a knife.   There may have originally have

been other items which have been lost through plough action.   The

grave also included long bone(s) from the leg, the top of the skull

and both sets of teeth.   The position and nature of the skull suggest

that the head probablly rested on a pillow, and wear on the teath

shows that the body was probably not that young (perhaps 35-45).

Current thoughts are that the man buried was probably a prince or

important nobleman.   The archaeologists are fairly certain that the

burial dates to between 600 and 650AD.

 

Other work on the site shows that there was a Roman Vinyard capable of

producing about 15,000 bottles of wine a year (!), an Iron Age

settlement and some neolithic remains.

 

I will be posting a sketch of the helmet on the Angelcynn website at

http://www.hrofi.demon.co.uk/angelcyn

over the weekend, so check that out if you want to see what it looks

like.

 

Ben Levick

Angelcynn - Anglo-Saxon Living History 400-900AD

------------------------------------------------

URL: http://www.hrofi.demon.co.uk/angelcyn

URL: http://www.geocities.com/Athens/2471

E-mail: Angelcyn at hrofi.demon.co.uk

 

 

From: Angelcyn at hrofi.demon.co.uk

Newsgroups: soc.history.medieval,rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: New Anglo-Saxon Helmet discovered in England

Date: Fri, 25 Apr 1997 19:27:15 GMT

Organization: Angelcynn

 

"Nathan A. Breen" <nbreen at sprynet.com> wrote:

>I had read, in the NY Times online (4-23-97) I believe, that it wasn't

>just a helmet that was found, but an entire corpse and a few other

>objects (one of them a bowl, I think).  Is this true?  The report also

>stated that the primary belief is that the body, according to its

>trappings, was that of a nobleman, possibly a prince from about 1000

>years old.  Can anyone confirm or deny this report?

>Thanks!

 

There was indeed a sword (a fine pattern welded one) and an ornate

bronze bowl as well as the helmet.   There was also an iron buckle and

knife.   It is believed to be a nobleman's grave from about 600-650AD,

so it's about 1,400 years old.

 

If you want to find out about the newly discovered Anglo-Saxon helmet

(with pictures) check out our page about it:

 

http://www.hrofi.demon.co.uk/angelcyn/helmet.html

 

Waes thu hael

 

Ben Levick

Angelcynn - Anglo-Saxon Living History 400-900AD

------------------------------------------------

URL: http://www.hrofi.demon.co.uk/angelcyn

URL: http://www.geocities.com/Athens/2471

E-mail: Angelcyn at hrofi.demon.co.uk

 

 

From: The Shrew <shrew at peak.org>

Newsgroups: alt.archaeology,alt.armourers,alt.history.living,rec.org.sca,soc.history,soc.history.ancient,soc.history.living,soc.history.medieval

Subject: Re: Come and see a Reproduction of the New Anglo-Saxon Helmet Discovery

Date: Fri, 02 May 1997 18:49:17 -0700

Organization: Shrewsbury Renaissance Faire

 

Gilla wrote:

> Pictures of our reproduction of the recently discovered Anglo-Saxon

> Helmet (the Pioneer Helmet) are now available at:

>

> http://www.hrofi.demon.co.uk/angelcyn/helmet.html

>

> Waes thu hael

>

> Ben Levick

> Angelcynn - Anglo-Saxon Living History 400-900AD

 

This is a great site!  Thanks!  Can't wait for the updates as they

happen.

the Shrew ~~~~~( 8:>

--

Shrewsbury Renaissance Faire

Teaching History Through Faire Play

Email: shrew at peak.org

 

 

From: powers at woodstock.cis.ohio-state.edu (william thomas powers)

Newsgroups: soc.history.medieval,rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: New Anglo-Saxon Helmet discovered in England

Date: 3 May 1997 20:32:31 -0400

Organization: The Ohio State University, Department of Computer and Information Science

 

>I'm not quite sure of articles on weaponry in Beowulf, but for

>information on early swords, a good book to look at is Hilda S.

>Davidson's _The Anglo-Saxon Sword_.  You may also be able to get other

>sources from her bibliography.

 

Would this be "The Sword in Anglo-Saxon England: by H.R. Ellis Davidson

 

Boydell Press, isbn 0-85115-355-0?

 

A great book and very readable--I've been trying their suggestions on

possible blade echants, salt and vinegar, tannic acid both seems to work

as required---I hardly ever use ferric chloride any more!

 

wilelm the smith

 

 

From: cea20 at cus.cam.ac.uk (Carl Edlund Anderson)

Newsgroups: soc.history.medieval,rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: New Anglo-Saxon Helmet discovered in England

Date: Sun, 04 May 1997 01:49:03 +0100

Organization: St. John's College, University of Cambridge

 

"Nathan A. Breen" <nbreen at sprynet.com> wrote:

> I'm not quite sure of articles on weaponry in Beowulf, but for

> information on early swords, a good book to look at is Hilda L.S.

> Davidson's _The Anglo-Saxon Sword_.

 

   Quick bibliographic correction: Hilda Ellis Davidson.

 

Carl

 

 

Date: Thu, 15 May 1997 19:44:07 GMT

From: mmy at fp.co.nz (Maggie.Mulvaney)

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Anglo-Saxon Neck Lines

 

On Thu, 15 May 1997 07:51:01 -0700, you wrote:

>      I would appreciate any input on period neck line treatments for late

>Anglo-Saxon tunics.  I am interested in the period just prior to 1066.

>References to pictures on the internet would be especially useful.

 

try looking up Regia Anglorum

 

http://www.ftech.net/~regia/

 

and Angelcynn

 

http://www.hrofi.demon.co.uk/angelcyn/index.html

 

They are both Anglo-Saxon reenactment groups from the UK, and should

have relevant information. I think what you're looking at are keyhole

necks, with the slit either central or offset to one side.

 

/mmy

* MMY             *               Maggie.Mulvaney at fp.co.nz *

* Maggie Mulvaney * http://www.fpnet.co.nz/users/m/maggiem *

 

 

From: Ben <ben at hrofi.demon.co.uk>

Organization: Angelcynn

To: "Mark S. Harris" <markh at risc.sps.mot.com>

Date: Sun, 12 Oct 1997 14:16:12 +0000

Subject: New Anglo-Saxon Horseman discovered in England

 

Have you heard about the discovery of an Anglo-Saxon mounted warrior

and his horse in Suffolk.  Find out more at the Angelcynn web-page.

 

http://www.hrofi.demon.co.uk/angelcyn/horsewar.html

 

Waes thu hael

 

Ben Levick

-------------------------------------------------

Angelcynn - Anglo-Saxon Living History 400-900AD

URL: http://www.hrofi.demon.co.uk/angelcyn

URL: http://www.geocities.com/Athens/2471

E-mail: Angelcyn at hrofi.demon.co.uk

 

 

Date: Thu, 20 Nov 1997 10:20:47 -0600 (CST)

From: Lorine S Horvath <lhorvath at plains.NoDak.edu>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Costume Research

 

Try Anglo-saxon dress and accessories by Gale Owen Crocker.  It is one of

the best sources I know of for pre-1066 northern european garb.  

 

 

From: powers at tortoise.cis.ohio-state.edu (william thomas powers)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Books on Saxons.

Date: 1 Jan 1999 18:00:42 -0500

Organization: The Ohio State University, Department of Computer and Information Science

 

>where I can find books on Saxon garbs,

>armor, history, and other odds-and-ends of the sort.  

 

I'm guessing that you are interested in the ones in England and not

the ones in the area that is now Germany?  If so I have appended a few

books that I saw in a quick glance over our shelves, (note many books on

early medieval/dark ages also refer to the saxons as well.)

 

Thomas

 

"The Sword in Anglo-Saxon England"  H.R.Ellis Davidson isbn 0-85115-355-0

 

"Everyday Life in Roman and Anglo-Saxon Times" Marjorie and C.H.B.Quennell

isbn 0-88029-125-7

 

"The Anglo-Saxons: edited by James Campbell isbn 0-14-014395-5

 

"Anglo-Saxon Art" David M. Wilson 0-87951-976-2

 

"Celtic and Anglo-Saxon Painting" Carl Nordenfalk  isbn 0-8076-8026-2

 

 

From: rlobinske at aol.com (RLobinske)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Books on Saxons.

Date: 2 Jan 1999 00:40:21 GMT

 

>"Anglo-Saxon Art" David M. Wilson 0-87951-976-2

>"Celtic and Anglo-Saxon Painting" Carl Nordenfalk  isbn 0-8076-8026-2

 

Wahh!, I don't have those... to add to the list:

 

"King Alfred the Great"  Alfred P. Smyth.  ISBN 0-19-822989-5

 

"Anglo-Saxon Chronicles"  There are a number of good translations out there.

 

"Harold. The Last Anglo-Saxon King"  Ian W. Walker.  ISBN 07509-1388-9

 

"Hereward" Victor Head.  ISBN 0-7509-0807-6

 

"The Anglo-Saxon Age.  c.400-1042"  DJV Fisher.  ISBN 0-88029-894-4

 

"The Fighting Kings of Wessex"  GP Baker.  ISBN 0-938289-63-2

 

"Anglo-Saxon England.  An Introduction"  Peter Hunter Blair.  ISBN

0-76070-306-X

 

"Anglo-Saxon Cemetaries.  A Reapprasial"  Edmund Southworth (Ed.).  ISBN

0-86299-818-2

 

"Whos Who in Roman Britain and Anglo-Saxon England"  Richard Fletcher.  ISBN

0-85683-114-X

 

"Discovering Anglo-Saxon England"  Martin Welch.  ISBN 0-271-00894-6

 

Osprey Titles:

 

"Saxon, Viking and Norman"  Terence Wise.  Men-at-Arms # 85.  ISBN

0-85045-301-1

 

"Arthur and the Anglo-Saxon Wars"  David Nicolle.  Men-at-Arms # 154.  ISBN

0-85045-548-0

 

"Anglo-Saxon Thegn.  449-1066AD.  Mark Harrison and Gerry Embleton.  Warrior #

5. ISBN 1-85532-349-4

 

"Germanic Warrior.  236-568 AD.  Simon MacDowall and Angus McBride.  Warrior #

17. ISBN 1-855325-586-1

 

"Hastings 1066  The Fall of Saxon England"  Chistopher Gravett.  Campaign # 13.

ISBN 1-85532-164-5

 

Have fun and welcome.

 

Victor Hildebrand vonn Koln

Trimaris

 

 

From: "Harold D Sherman" <HALFRED at prodigy.net>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Books on Saxons.

Date: 2 Jan 1999 01:26:13 GMT

 

Nosnejnneb <nosnejnneb at aol.com> wrote

> I'm a newcomer to SCA and I was wondering if any of you out there -- most

> preferably fellow Saxons or Angles -- where I can find books on Saxon garbs,

> armor, history, and other odds-and-ends of the sort.

>

>     The Saxon Naif (still working on a name)

 

Check out these addresses:

 

http://www.englisc.demon.co.uk/         (Anglo-Saxon Books)

http://www.scholarsbookshelf.com/       (The Scholar's Bookshelf)

 

Aelfred Halvdan of Holdene

 

 

From: gunnora at bga.com

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Books on Saxons.

Date: Sun, 03 Jan 1999 00:54:28 GMT

 

nosnejnneb at aol.com (Nosnejnneb) wrote:

>I'm a newcomer to SCA and I was wondering if any of you

> out there -- most preferably fellow Saxons or Angles --

> where I can find books on Saxon garbs, armor, history,

> and other odds-and-ends of the sort.

 

>The Saxon Naif (still working on a name)

 

Don't turn your nose up at recommendations from non-Saxons.  Some of the rest

of us have good suggestions to offer as well.

 

You're in luck, in that there is quite a lot of information available on the

Saxons due to the body of scholarship based on Old Norse literature.  Here's a

few sources that you may find useful as you're starting out:

 

Gale R. Owen-Crocker.  Dress in Anglo-Saxon England.  Manchester: Manchester

Univ. Press. 1986.  ISBN 0-7190-1818-8. (To order from Amazon.com

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0719018188 /thevikinganswerl)

[This is probably the definative beginning source for Anglo-Saxon dress.]

 

Hilda R. Ellis-Davison.  The Sword in Anglo-Saxon England. reprint. Boydell &

Brewer. December 1998.  ISBN 0851157165. (To order from Amazon.com

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0851157165/thevikinganswerl)

[A really comprehensive look at swords in archaeology, and a look at the

literature about these swords and the mythology surrounding them.]

 

Martin Carver, ed. The Age of Sutton Hoo.  Woodbridge: Boydell. 1992. ISBN

0851153615. (To order from Amazon.com

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0851153615/thevikinganswerl)

[Articles about culture, literature, and burial during the 7th century in

northwestern Europe.]

 

D.J.V. Fisher.  The Anglo-Saxon Age.  Totowa: Barnes and Noble. 1973.  ISBN

0880298944.(To order from Amazon.com

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0880298944/thevikinganswerl)

[A history of the Anglo-Saxons from 400 to 1042 CE.  Traces the evolution of

the Germanic peoples that migrated into England from a loose conglomeration of

tribes to a prosperous single monarchy at the time of the Norman invasion.]

 

Victor Head. Hereward.  Allan Sutton Publishing. 1995.  ISBN 0750912448. (To

order from Amazon.com

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0750912448/thevikinganswerl)

[An account from the end of Saxon rule of the famous Saxon resistance leader

Hereward the Wake.  Head's work proves the historicity of a real Hereward and

traces his life and times.]

 

 

LEARNING OLD ENGLISH GRAMMAR: Mitchell, Bruce and Fred C. Robinson, eds.  A

Guide to Old English.  5th ed. New York: Basil Blackwell. 1991. ISBN

0631166572. (To order from Amazon.com

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0631166572/thevikinganswerl) [This is

the most widely used and is my recommendation].

 

Sweet, Henry. Sweet's Anglo-Saxon Primer. Norman Davis (Ed.) 15th ed. Oxford:

Oxford Univ Press. 1975.  ISBN: 0198111789.  (To order from Amazon.com

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0198111789/thevikinganswerl)

 

Cassidy, F.J., R. Ringler, James Wilson Bright. Bright's Old English Grammar

and Reader. 3rd ed. Holt Rinehart & Winston. 1997.  ISBN. 0030847133.  (To

order from Amazon.com

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0030847133/thevikinganswerl)

 

Diamond, Robert E. Old English Grammar and Reader. Wayne State Univ Pr. 1973.

ISBN 0814315100. (To order from Amazon.com

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0814315100/thevikinganswerl)

 

Quirk, Randolph, C.L. Wrenn. An Old English Grammar. Northern Illinois Univ

Pr. 1994.  ISBN: 0875805604. (To order from Amazon.com

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0875805604/thevikinganswerl)

 

Campbell, Alan. Old English Grammar Oxford: Clarendon. 1983. ISBN 0198119437.

(To order from Amazon.com

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0198119437/thevikinganswerl)

 

DICTIONARIES:

 

Barney, Stephen A.  Word-Hoard: An Introduction to Old English Vocabulary. 2nd

ed. New Haven: Yale Univ. Press. 1985. ISBN 0300035063. (To order from

Amazon.com http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0300035063/thevikinganswerl)

 

Bosworth, Joseph. An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary, Based on the Manuscript

Collections of the Late Joseph Bosworth. Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press. 1998.

ISBN: 0198631014 [This is the absolute best of all the dictionaries -- it is

essentially the unabridged dictionary of Old English.  The price tag reflects

this.] (To order from Amazon.com

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0198631014/thevikinganswerl)

 

Clark-Hall, John R.  A Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary.  (Medieval Academy

Reprints for Teaching, 14)  4th reprint ed.  Toronto: University of Toronto

Press. 1984. ISBN: 0802065481  [This is my pick for most affordable and

easiest to use.] (To order from Amazon.com

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0802065481/thevikinganswerl)

 

OTHER: Bowden, Betsy. Listeners Guide to Medieval English : A Discography

(Garland Reference Library of the Humanities, Vol 912) Garland Pub. 1989.

ISBN. 0824063473 [A listing of audio recordings of readings in Old English

and Middle English.  This can be extremely useful in helping to learn Old

English.] (To order from Amazon.com

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0824063473 /thevikinganswerl)

 

Gunnora Hallakarva

Herskerinde

 

 

Date: Fri, 22 Jan 1999 09:26:41 -0500

From: Melanie Wilson <MelanieWilson at compuserve.com>

To: Blind.Copy.Receiver at compuserve.com

Subject: New book Anglo Saxon Weapons & Warfare

 

A friend of mine, Richard Underwood's new book Anglo Saxon Weapons & Warfare

is out in Feb 1999 for those interested in that area.

 

ISBN 0 75241427 it is GBP 18.99

 

Not sure if it is going to the States too, but I'm stocking it if you want

it, and can't get it.

 

Mel

 

 

Date: Fri, 5 Feb 1999 02:09:03 -0500

From: Melanie Wilson <MelanieWilson at compuserve.com>

To: LIST SCA arts <sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu>

Subject: Anglo Saxon, Axes, NO  Saws & Feet

 

I saw I program we have here last night called meet the ancestors, they dig

up sombody & try to find out more about it, reconstruct the face etc etc.

 

Anyway yesterday they found what the thought was and Anglo Saxon male. A

couple on interesting things emerged, Anglo Saxons did not have saws, only

axes. The axes were a T shape with the I bit quite short , the I bit was

the bit fixed to the wooden shaft. All houses etc were built with axes work

only.

 

Also they decided the man wasn't a AS he was a Brit, how did they know this?

Well apparently there are fundemental differences in the skeletal

structure of the feet ! I'd heard talk of this before but this was the

first time I saw the details on it.

 

Mel

 

 

Date: Fri, 10 Sep 1999 00:47:23 -0500

From: Stefan li Rous <stefan at texas.net>

Subject: Re: SC - favorite sweet

 

Ras asked:

> Anyway Elysant has a book that she got at Pennsic which has all these cool

> maps where Middle Eastern stuff was found in digs in England, etc. I can't

> remember the name of the book but she could share it with us. ;-)

 

The book is: "An Atlas of Anglo-Saxon England", David Hill, 1981, paperback,

$19.95.

 

This is a wonderful book with lots of useful information. Very graphics

oriented with lots of maps. Once I saw Elysant's copy, I really wanted

one for myself. Unfortunately, the bookseller she bought it from at Pennsic

didn't have any more, at least at Pennsic. It is on my list of future

purchases when I get around to it.

 

Although my persona is that of an 1150's Anglo-Norman I think a lot of

this info will be useful to me. Now if someone would just do an

equivalent book for Norman England.

- --

Lord Stefan li Rous    Barony of Bryn Gwlad    Kingdom of Ansteorra

Mark S. Harris             Austin, Texas           stefan at texas.net

 

 

From: maggie at forest.gen.nz (Maggie Forest)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Anglo-Saxon/Viking Garb: Pre-12th Century

Date: Tue, 05 Sep 2000 01:59:47 GMT

Organization: Asia Online NZ

 

On Mon, 04 Sep 2000 21:05:51 -0400, "Eric DeBlackmere, S.O.C."

<edeblack at earthlink.net> wrote:

>1) A merchant of ready-to-wear Anglo-Saxon/Viking garb, pre-12th

>century or...

>2) A merchant of patterns for such garb.

>       My wife and her mother are really interested in joining me in

>the SCA and are busy researching that era with me, to work on

>personas. Need to find garb or patterns (my mother-in-law is an

>accomplished seamstress) for men, women AND children, as we want our

>3-yearl-old daughter to join in. And, once our son is born in

>December, him, as well.

 

Well, I can't help you with patterns or merchants, but;

 

Get hold of a book called

Owen-Crocker, Gale R. Dress in Anglo-Saxon England. Manchester:

Manchester University Press, 1986. (ISBN 0-7190-1818-8, LC 85-23186)

It is the book on clothing of the era.

 

If you combine that with a couple of articles on basic t-tunics and

pants - IIRC there's one in the Known World Handbook which you should

hopefully  be able to borrow from someone in your local group - your

MIL will probably be able to make sense of it.

 

Also, for an understanding on how garments were made in the Middle

Ages, take a look at Marc Carlson's pages on the topic at

 

http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Parthenon/5923/cloth/bockhome.html

 

Finally, check out Angelcynn's pages at

 

http://www.geocities.com/Athens/2471/

 

No doubt there'll be lots more information forthcoming from others.

Good luck!

 

/maggie

 

 

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

From: djheydt at kithrup.com (Dorothy J Heydt)

Subject: Re: Anglo-Saxon/Viking Garb: Pre-12th Century

Organization: Kithrup Enterprises, Ltd.

Date: Tue, 5 Sep 2000 02:22:14 GMT

 

Eric DeBlackmere, S.O.C. <edeblack at earthlink.net> wrote:

>       Could use some advice on where to find the following:

>1) A merchant of ready-to-wear Anglo-Saxon/Viking garb, pre-12th

>century or...

>2) A merchant of patterns for such garb.

 

Have no idea if anybody's making patterns, but if you can find a

copy, take a look at Gale R. Owen-Crocker's _Dress in Anglo-Saxon

England._  Manchester University Press, 1986.  Very, very good.

She presents all the available data and presents the different

ways they might be interpreted.  There are times when one might

be tempted to say, "Never mind the scientific method, just tell

me WHAT TO WEAR!" but she won't do that, she's honest.  It's the

best place to start from, preparatory to making your own

decisions on how to interpret the evidence... rather like

redacting the recipes in a medieval cookbook.

 

Dorothea of Caer-Myrddin                        Dorothy J. Heydt

Mists/Mists/West                              Albany, California

PRO DEO ET REGE                               djheydt at kithrup.com

                 http://www.kithrup.com/~djheydt

 

 

Date: Fri, 9 Mar 2001 14:51:37 +0100

From: "Cindy M. Renfrow" <cindy at thousandeggs.com>

Subject: SC - Ornithology of Anglo-Saxon England

 

Good site:

http://www.kami.demon.co.uk/gesithas/birdlore/fugsrc.html

The Ornithology of Anglo-Saxon England

 

When you're done with this page, click on the bird at the bottom.

 

Cindy

 

 

Date: Thu, 24 Apr 2003 03:08:43 -0700

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

From: "Laura C. Minnick" <lcm at efn.org>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Anglo/Saxon source motherlode...

 

Just found this- and yes, there's some jiffy keen food and food-related

stuff. BIG bibliography.

http://bubl.ac.uk/docs/bibliog/biggam/

http://www2.arts.gla.ac.uk/SESLL/EngLang/ihsl/projects/ASPNS/

bib.htm#Title

 

'Lainie

 

 

Date: Thu, 20 Jan 2005 18:21:12 -0600

From: Robert Downie <rdownie at mb.sympatico.ca>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] [tmr-l at wmich.edu: TMR 05.01.31 Pollington,

        The Mead-Hall: Feasting in A-S England (Bruce)]

To: jenne at fiedlerfamily.net, Cooks within the SCA

        <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Jadwiga Zajaczkowa / Jenne Heise wrote:

> I have this guy's work on Anglo-Saxon medical treatises, and its really

> pretty darn solid, though I disagree with him here and there (well,  he's

> not a gardener, and that may be the source of my disagreements with one

> or two of his identifications.) This should be a very solid work!

> Pollington, Stephen. "The Mead-Hall: Feasting in Anglo-Saxon

> England". Norfolk, England: Anglo-Saxon Books, 2003. Pp. 283, 24

> illustrations by Lindsay Kerr, and bibliography. $27.00 (hb). ISBN

> 1-898281-30-0.

 

Yes, we own a copy of _The Mead-Hall_ and are very impressed with it!

Mind you, my husband is the real Anglo-Saxon buff of the family :-)

 

Faerisa

 

 

From: "willowdewisp at juno.com" <willowdewisp at juno.com>

Date: January 24, 2008 1:27:53 AM CST

To: ansteorra at lists.ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Ansteorra] traveling to the Court of King Alfred

 

http://www.ravensgard.org/gerekr/anglo.html

this is a Great Saxon site.

 

willow

 

 

From: Randwulf aet Blacwulveslea <randwulf922 at gmail.com>

Date: April 29, 2010 12:03:24 AM CDT

To: southdowns at yahoogroups.com, trimaris-temp at yahoogroups.com,  meridian-ty at yahoogroups.com

Cc: chez_weasel at yahoogroups.com

 

http://parkerweb.stanford.edu./parker/actions/page_turner.do?ms_no=173

 

 

Date: Fri, 21 May 2010 06:58:37 +1000

From: Marie M <madmender at gmail.com>

Subject: [Lochac] Anglo Saxon finds at Cheltenham Academy

To: lochac at lochac.sca.org

 

Anglo-Saxon finds at new Cheltenham academy site:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/gloucestershire/8691565.stm Two

skeletons, pottery and a large timber hall, all thought to date back to

between the 6th to 8th Century, have been uncovered.

 

Thought this might interest a few people.

 

Thyri

 

 

Date: Tue, 25 May 2010 08:22:24 +1000

From: Raymond Wickham <insidious565 at hotmail.com>

Subject: [Lochac] how to know if you have been bad

To: lochac <lochac at sca.org.au>

 

PENITENTIALS are lists of sins and the penances prescribed for them. These texts governed the practice of private confession and penance in the early Middle Ages. This database contains all the vernacular penitentials that survive from Anglo-Saxon England, a period extending from the seventh to the eleventh century.

 

http://www.anglo-saxon.net/penance/index.html

 

 

From: Miriam von Schwarzwald <miriamvonschwarzwald at GMAIL.COM>

Date: July 8, 2010 7:12:54 AM CDT

To: CALONTIR at listserv.unl.edu

Subject: [CALONTIR] Anglo-Saxon Archive

 

I found this last night/this morning when I couldn't sleep. It

occurred to me I hadn't seen anyone post to the list about it. I know

more than a few of us are interested in Anglo Saxon studies.

 

Oxford University opens Anglo-Saxon archive to online submissions:

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2010/jul/06/oxford-university-anglo-saxon-archive

 

Miriam

 

 

Date: Mon, 26 Jul 2010 12:37:19 +1000

From: Zebee Johnstone <zebeej at gmail.com>

Subject: [Lochac] Anglo Saxon resources

To: "The Shambles: the SCA Lochac mailing list"

        <lochac at lochac.sca.org>

 

For the early period amongst us...

http://projects.oucs.ox.ac.uk/woruldhord/

 

Welcome to the University of Oxford's Project Woruldhord web site. The

project is part of the JISC-funded initiative Runcoco: How to Run a

Community Collection Online and sets out to collect together into an

online hoard, digital objects related to the teaching, study, or

research of Old English and the Anglo-Saxon period of history. The

collection is now open, and will close on October 14th 2010. Go to the

collection site to make a submission.

 

The concept is quite simple. Members of the public, of academia, of

special interest groups are asked to submit via an online web site any

images, documents, audio, video they have of material they would be

happy to share with the rest of the world to further the study of Old

English and the Anglo-Saxons.

 

We would welcome images of buildings, sites, artefacts; teaching

handouts or presentations; audio of readings or interviews; video

clips of crafts, sites; and so on. In fact anything that you feel

would benefit teachers, researchers, and interested parties who wish

to learn more about the Anglo-Saxons.

 

Oxford University will collect the material together and then make

everything submitted freely available on the web for educational

purposes to a worldwide audience. You will retain copyright over

anything you submit but you will simply have to agree to its

redistribution on the website. The collection is now open, and will

close on October 14th 2010. Go to the collection site to make a

submission.

 

<the end>



Formatting copyright © Mark S. Harris (THLord Stefan li Rous).
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Comments to the Editor: stefan at florilegium.org