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blksm-anvils-msg – 7/14/06

 

Blacksmithing anvils. sources.

 

NOTE: See also the files: blacksmithing-msg, blksm-forges-msg, casting-msg, blksm-welding-msg, bladesmithing-msg, metals-msg, metalworking-FAQ, metalworking-msg, enameling-msg.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

   Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                         Stefan at florilegium.org

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From: dwbutler at mtu.edu (Daniel W. Butler-Ehle)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Anvils and smiths

Date: 16 Dec 1996 20:47:44 -0500

Organization: Michigan Technological University

 

Joe Stubenrauch (yeti at linex.com) wrote:

:         1) Where can I get an anvil for a sane price?

 

Discount hardware mail-order houses like Northern Hydraulic and

Harbor Freight have them on occasion for $0.75/pound or thereabouts.

Probably not ferrier-quality, but you just need something to bang

on that is more suitable than the railroad track everyone's trying

to convince you to use, right?

 

:         2) Are there places where I would be able to buy a used anvil

:                 for a reasonable price?

 

Just dumb luck. Keep checking estate sales. See if your retired aunt

might have one hiding in her basement.  

 

Ulfin

 

 

From: "Dennis O'Connor" <dmoc at primenet.com>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Anvils and smiths

Date: 17 Dec 1996 00:07:01 -0700

Organization: Intel Corporation

 

Joe Stubenrauch <yeti at linex.com> wrote:

:         I have a keen and developing interest in blacksmithing.  However, the

: local area I am in is devoid of SCA black-smith's (and indeed, smith's at

: all).  So, I am whisking off to the library to do some more research.  

:

:         1) Where can I get an anvil for a sane price?

:         2) Are there places where I would be able to buy a used anvil

:                 for a reasonable price?

 

Look for places that sell supplies to farriers (aka horseshoers).

If necessary, look up horseshoeing in the phone book and ask

a few farriers, if you can reach them.  (We always wind up

leaving messages for ours, he's always working.)  Beware

cheap anvils, tho !

 

 

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

From: tip* at ai.chem.ohiou.edu (Tom Perigrin)

Subject: Re: Anvils and smiths

Organization: Ohio University

Date: Tue, 17 Dec 1996 02:19:49 GMT

 

In article <E2J4r9.7rB at linex6.linex.com>, yeti at linex.com (Joe Stubenrauch)

wrote:

>         I have a keen and developing interest in blacksmithing.  However, the

> local area I am in is devoid of SCA black-smith's (and indeed, smith's at

> all).  So, I am whisking off to the library to do some more research.

 

>         1) Where can I get an anvil for a sane price?

 

This is NOT easy.   You can get new cast iron anvils without a steel face.

These are of limited utility.  Or, you can haunt flea markets and junk

shops, hoping to find one for sale... this is how I got my first one.  Or,

you can take a trip to an anvil rich area of the country (Ohio, Indiana,

Virginia), and find lots of them for sale.  (You didn't say where you were

from).

 

>         2) Are there places where I would be able to buy a used anvil

>                 for a reasonable price?

 

See above... a buck a pound.

 

Tom

 

 

From: jaeger at 3lefties.com (Eric Kervina)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Anvils and smiths

Date: Tue, 17 Dec 1996 14:25:54 -0700

Organization: INET of New Mexico

 

In article <E2J4r9.7rB at linex6.linex.com>, yeti at linex.com says...

>         I have a keen and developing interest in blacksmithing.  

>

>         1) Where can I get an anvil for a sane price?

 

A real, serviceable anvil at a sane price?  Never seen such an animal,

at least not a new one.  However, for small work, a serviceable

substitute can be made out of a piece of railroad rail.

 

>         2) Are there places where I would be able to buy a used anvil

>                 for a reasonable price?

 

If you live near a rural area, you might check out estate auctions.  I

have seen a few anvils go for as little as $50.  They are not commonly to

be found, though.

 

 

From: rhayes at powerup.com.au (Robin Hayes)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Anvils and smiths

Date: 17 Dec 1996 03:40:30 GMT

 

In article <E2J4r9.7rB at linex6.linex.com>, of Mon, 16 Dec 1996 23:18:45

GMT, Joe Stubenrauch of yeti at linex.com says...

>        I have a keen and developing interest in blacksmithing.  However, the

>local area I am in is devoid of SCA black-smith's (and indeed, smith's at

>all). So, I am whisking off to the library to do some more research.

 

Try the knifemaking magizines. You could try contacting the armourers thru

the SCA web pages, and see if you get any pointers to books, organisations

there. Do web searches...

 

>   However, the books I have encountered there are a little out of date

>(published in the 50's and 60's) and don't have all the info that I need.

 

Often, the older the better. Just find more books.

 

>        So here are my questions:

>

>        1) Where can I get an anvil for a sane price?

>        2) Are there places where I would be able to buy a used anvil

>                for a reasonable price?

 

It depends on what work you want to do. If you want to do heavy working,

then you will need a fair sized anvil (100lbs or so or more). If you are

doing light work, you may not need a "normal" anvil at all. You can use a

heavy lump of iron/steel scrap such as a "I" or "H" beam (depends on your

point of view) or a piece of railway (or tram) line. You can buy small

"craft" anvils, often intended for things such as leather working, etc.

 

If you want to make small spoons and knives, then you only need a smallish

anvil.

 

Early period anvils were sometimes stone... you need to be sure of the

right type of stone, a hard volcanic type will last longer than shale, but

depending on what you want to do... :-) You can even (briefly) use a

hardwood block for some tasks, especially cold working of plate...

 

You may be able to get something useful for nothing. But depending on your

area, there may be possibilities of second hand ones. You will have to use

your wits as to where they would be advertised locally.

 

Robin

 

 

From: "James D. Logan/Jane Sitton-Logan" <hammer at mail.startext.net>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Anvils and smiths

Date: Thu, 19 Dec 1996 08:03:24 -0800

 

Robin Hayes wrote:

> Joe Stubenrauch of yeti at linex.com says...

> >

> >        I have a keen and developing interest in blacksmithing.  However the

> >local area I am in is devoid of SCA black-smith's (and indeed, smith's at

> >all).  So, I am whisking off to the library to do some more research.

>

> Try the knifemaking magizines. You could try contacting the armourers thru

> the SCA web pages, and see if you get any pointers to books, organisations

> there. Do web searches...

>

> >        However, the books I have encountered there are a little out of date

> >(published in the 50's and 60's) and don't have all the info that I need.

>

> Often, the older the better. Just find more books.

>

> >        So here are my questions:

> >

> >        1) Where can I get an anvil for a sane price?

> >        2) Are there places where I would be able to buy a used anvil

> >                for a reasonable price?

>

> It depends on what work you want to do. If you want to do heavy working,

> then you will need a fair sized anvil (100lbs or so or more). If you are

> doing light work, you may not need a "normal" anvil at all. You can use a

> heavy lump of iron/steel scrap such as a "I" or "H" beam (depends on your

> point of view) or a piece of railway (or tram) line. You can buy small

> "craft" anvils, often intended for things such as leather working, etc.

 

If you intend to move much Iron (make a pair of tongs heavy enough to make

hammers with) you will need an anvil of 100+ lbs anvils are not cheap and new

ones are very dear indeed. So you should be careful about your choice of anvils

and the condition that they are in. Anything smaller than 100 lbs will hamper

your work. Any mark or surface flaw in either your hammer or your anvil will be

transfered to the work.

 

> If you want to make small spoons and knives, then you only need a smallish

> anvil.

 

Horse feathers.

 

> Early period anvils were sometimes stone... you need to be sure of the

> right type of stone, a hard volcanic type will last longer than shale, but

> depending on what you want to do... :-) You can even (briefly) use a

> hardwood block for some tasks, especially cold working of plate...

 

I do a lot of work on wood blocks including cutting swageing forming etc.

and I work it hot. Especially for armouring as the wood does not pinch

cut or mark the surface of the plate.

 

> Robin

 

Laird Seamus Donnacadh Loganaich an gabhain

Or Logan the smith for those with nae Gaedhlig.

 

 

From: rhayes at powerup.com.au (Robin Hayes)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Anvils and smiths

Date: 20 Dec 1996 04:15:34 GMT

 

James D. Logan/Jane Sitton-Logan of hammer at mail.startext.net says...

>Robin Hayes wrote:

>>

>> In article <E2J4r9.7rB at linex6.linex.com>, of Mon, 16 Dec 1996 23:18:45

>> GMT, Joe Stubenrauch of yeti at linex.com says...

>> >

>> >My Ladies and Lords,

>> >

>> >        I have a keen and developing interest in blacksmithing.  

 

<SNIP>

>> If you want to make small spoons and knives, then you only need a smallish

>> anvil.

>

>Horse feathers.

 

Well, I am always prepared to defer to greater knowledge and experience,

but your mileage may vary depending on the brand of horse feathers you use.

There are tricks to using a smaller anvil (i.e.) the lump of iron. The mass

is important in order to provide a resistance to allow the under surface to

be struck back and work that surface. More mass, or allowing the mass of

iron to be mounted on Ironback stump (a native Australian wood, bloody

solid stuff very hard and rigid) to effectively beef up the mass of the

anvil can give satisfactory results for smallish objects. If you want to

work large lumps of meatal, I agree with my learned friend, bigger is

better, and indeed small is useless for large things.

 

I know local (Australian) smiths who take small portable forges and small

anvils to fairs to work with. They make only small objects such as knives

from the blade of large grass mowers that are towed behind tractors, and

spoons.

I should perhaps have added to my original posting : "for a start until you

get something bigger". I will agree that bigger is usually better in terms

of the anvil, but I was talking to someone who alleged he had no contact,

and was totally lacking knowledge.

 

<snip>

 

Safe Hammering...

Robin

 

 

From: david.razler at worldnet.att.net (David M. Razler)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Anvils and smiths

Date: Sat, 21 Dec 1996 02:52:00 GMT

 

dwbutler at mtu.edu (Daniel W. Butler-Ehle) wrote:

 

| Discount hardware mail-order houses like Northern Hydraulic and

| Harbor Freight have them on occasion for $0.75/pound or thereabouts.

| Probably not ferrier-quality, but you just need something to bang

| on that is more suitable than the railroad track everyone's trying

| to convince you to use, right?

 

While I have had no experience with the made-in-China anvils sold by the above

firms, my experience with their other metal goods and other Chinese tools

tells me to look at their anvils very carefully before committing.

 

Fragile, large-grained cast iron is used in places where a much higher-quality

steel is the proper material. From a distance, it appears at least some of the

Chinese anvils I have seen consist of a plate of steel on a poor cast-iron

body. I fear that even just banging on one of these anvils could crack it in

no time.

 

                               dmr

David M. Razler

david.razler at worldnet.att.net

 

 

From: dwbutler at mtu.edu (Daniel W. Butler-Ehle)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Anvils and smiths

Date: 21 Dec 1996 14:24:15 -0500

Organization: Michigan Technological University

 

David M. Razler (david.razler at worldnet.att.net) wrote:

: dwbutler at mtu.edu (Daniel W. Butler-Ehle) wrote:

:

: | Discount hardware mail-order houses like Northern Hydraulic and

: | Harbor Freight have them on occasion for $0.75/pound or thereabouts.

: | Probably not ferrier-quality, but you just need something to bang

: | on that is more suitable than the railroad track everyone's trying

: | to convince you to use, right?

:

: While I have had no experience with the made-in-China anvils sold by the above

: firms, my experience with their other metal goods and other Chinese tools

: tells me to look at their anvils very carefully before committing.

:

: Fragile, large-grained cast iron is used in places where a much higher-quality

: steel is the proper material. From a distance, it appears at least some of the

: Chinese anvils I have seen consist of a plate of steel on a poor cast-iron

: body. I fear that even just banging on one of these anvils could crack it in

: no time.

 

Yep, those are the ones. Pieces of junk.  Not hard enough for continued

use, but they're heavy enough and are more or less the right shape.

May be just about right for a hobby that you might spend eighty hours on

during the first couple months that you get into it and then only

0-15 hours per year after that.  I'm gonna back off a bit on my

discounting of anvils made from rail, but those I know who have

used them for armoring have almost immediately abandoned them for

*anything* else.  They do work for many, though. And the price is

good when they can be gotten (although "cheap" and "legal" don't

always go together well on this). And they are neither flat nor

hardened.

 

One thing you'll probably want in an anvil is a hardie hole (the

square hole for holding fullers, swages, clamps, etc.).  Cheapo

anvils probably don't have 'em; rail anvils never do.  A pritchel

hole is certainly handy too, but not tough to improvise.

 

Yes, cheapo anvils are crap steel.  They won't stand up to

years of farrier work.  But they may stand up to a lifetime of

causual armoring (i.e., you're not making a business out of it).  

It depends on what you want to do with it.  The face will lose

flatness, but how flat do you need it to be?  The hardy hole

might wear out before the face becomes unusable.  And when it

wears out, it becomes your travel anvil (and you trade your car

for a quality anvil).

 

I met a professional metalworker (and SCA armourer) in SE Michigan

who has a very old anvil (~200 years?).  It's a block anvil, was

probably never hardened in any modern sense.  When the face became

too sunken to use (like it has a 3cm dip in it), one of the

previous owners just turned it on its side and remounted on the

stump. It's still perfectly fine for some things, but perfectly

wrong for others.  Cheapo import anvils probably aren't much

worse.

 

A word of caution on buying old anvils. . .I was once witnessed

some haggling over an anvil at an estate sale (the price was

already way too high, but I followed it with interest anyway).  

The face was shot, but the auctioneer insisted that all you

would have to do to make it "like new" would be give someone in

a machine shop a few bucks to mill it, dress it, and reharden it.

I've never actually tried this, but I highly suspect it would be

much less economical than merely "a few bucks".  You get what

you pay for--or less.

 

I posted earlier about using a handheld propane torch to make

tools. I didn't intend to imply that that would be any kind of

longterm substitute for a forge, just that it worked well

enough to give me a bit of a taste for smithing without the

investment in equipment.  (I already had a vise, some locking

pliers, and a grinding wheel.)  

 

I wouldn't go as far as to recommend it because without

sufficient research on proper smithing, improvisation leaves

plenty room to develop bad habits. But I was surprised to

discover that it really was quite adequate for hot working,

annealing/hardening, and tempering the forming stakes and cold

chisels I was making.  The cost of propane cylinders would have

added up quickly if I had continued with the method, but in the

shortterm, it was certainly cheaper than buying the real stuff.

I was just dabbling anyway.

 

I've also used a wood furnace (with forced air underneath) as

a forge for small knives. It was a bit of a stretch to do blades

in it, but it would have been more than adequate for making

nails.

 

Earlier I commented on the use of an old barbecue as a forge.

I assumed that the poster meant the cast-steel Habatchi-style

BBQ from the 70s, not the pressed-sheet Weber-style grill that's

more common today (these would be outright wrong). If it's free

(disposable...Dad doesn't need it back), it might make a suitable

firepot for the shortterm, just use it in a place where it won't

be a problem if it breaks (and be prepared for when it does).  

 

If the poster was referring to a permanent, outdoor barbie made

of brick, I don't know...it should be able to take the heat, but

whether it can be converted into a suitable forge would depend,

I suppose, on the geometry.

 

I'm ashamed that when asked what equipment is absolutely necessary

that I said nothing about safety equipment.  Fortunately, someone

provided good suggestions on the matter.  Also, I missed

mentioning a grinding wheel, which I find essential (but you

might not).

 

Sincerely yore's,

Ulfin

 

 

From: jhrisoulas at aol.com

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Anvi refacing

Date: 23 Dec 1996 14:58:55 GMT

 

dwbutler at mtu.edu (Daniel W. Butler-Ehle) writes:

>A word of caution on buying old anvils. . .I was once witnessed

>some haggling over an anvil at an estate sale (the price was

>already way too high, but I followed it with interest anyway).  

>The face was shot, but the auctioneer insisted that all you

>would have to do to make it "like new" would be give someone in

>a machine shop a few bucks to mill it, dress it, and reharden it.

>I've never actually tried this, but I highly suspect it would be

>much less economical than merely "a few bucks".  You get what

>you pay for--or less.

 

Ulfin:

 

If that salesman actually believed that you could get that done for a "few

bucks" I would like to know where!

 

I have done a few refacing jobs and they are NOT EASY.. I have given up on

the one piece face technique as it is far too difficult to get the anvil

face to a proper welding heat using my facilities.  I have however had

excellent results using hard facinmg rod and a very high output arc

welder. You simply add layer after layer of the hard face rod to build up

the tickness to approx 3/8" thick..Now this takes some considerable

time...After that is done, you do have to heat treat the face...All that

is needed is to bring the face up to a medium Cherry Red and let air cool

and you are hard..  Then a quick clean up with a grinder and you all set.

 

The hardest part of doing this is the heat treating as it requires the

entire face to be heated and on a 200# anvil that can be a little

difficult.... I have done this one 5 anvils so far with no problems....

 

The best bet is to simply keep looking for a decent one...But if you can't

find one, refacing can be done...

 

Your servant,

Atar Bakhtar OL

 

 

From: rhayes at powerup.com.au (Robin Hayes)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Anvils and smiths

Date: 25 Dec 1996 04:58:58 GMT

 

jhrisoulas at aol.com of jhrisoulas at aol.com says...

>Please let me interject a few words gleaned from a couple of years

>experience in this sort of thing:

>

>(Robin Hayes) writes:

 

<Large SNIP of stuff concerning size of anvil and mentioning Iron bark

stumps to mount the anvil on to increase the mass.>

 

>(on a personal note: where can I obtain a sample of this  Ironback

>wood????)

 

A brief note on Ironbark...

 

I spoke about size of anvils, and that it was possible to use a smallish

anvil.

 

I said Quote

 

There are tricks to using a smaller anvil (i.e.) the lump of iron. The mass

is important in order to provide a resistance to allow the under surface to

be struck back and work that surface. More mass, or allowing the mass of

iron to be mounted on an Ironback stump (a native Australian wood, bloody

solid stuff very hard and rigid) to effectively beef up the mass of the

anvil can give satisfactory results for smallish objects.

 

Unquote

 

The other day, at a contry markets display place, I was looking at working

blacksmith shop with a forge where a 50 lb anvil was set on a large piece

of iron bark sunk many feet in the ground. It works as well as the 100 lb

anvil at the forge on the other side of the shop. The stump was between 2-3

ft in diameter. The anvil is securely pinned to the stump.

 

You want a timber that will NOT bounce when struck....

 

The 2-3 ft diameter block is set some feet 3/4/5, how deep a hole do you

want, and how big is your stump... in the ground, and the hole compacted.

The anvil is pinned to the top, bringing it to working height. If you can

get a lump 3 or 4 feet in diameter, and high enough to mount your anvil on

while the block rests on a concrete floor, you can almost get the same

results, because a block this size is so heavy I cannnot lift it,

definitely heavier than a 100 lb anvil on its own...

 

The Good Doctor asked what is this ironbark wood, and where would he get

it...

 

Well...

 

Australians have a tradition of wood so hard that it shatters axes, heavy,

almost imperviouis to weathering, etc. Thus "Ironbark" is more of a common

name, which may apply to several different types of native Australian

Woods.

 

Now for some hard facts...

 

I picked up Johnson on Wood [2] (a superb 275 page book with many period

references with pictures  including pictures of a first century wooden doll

and an Egyptian ride on horse AD200 - P212), and of course, it does not

recognise the slang Australian term.

 

Encl Brit [1] has a sizeable relevant entry on Ironwood. Briefly, there are

many types of this sort of timber, in the US it mentions the most widely

distributed as being hop hornbeam, and blue birch. ther are many others. Of

course, no refernce to Australian timbers...

 

Back to Johnson [2]... it mentions Ironwood, and gives examples. I am not

an expert, but from vague memories, and some searching I believe Australian

"Ironwood" is in the Eucalyptus family, some of them being Blackbutt (so

hard it cannot be nailed, but must be drilled first), Jarrah, and Karri,

quantities of logs of which were exported internationally for bridges,

piers and wharves.

 

The classic definition of Iron wood is that it sinks in water, it is so

heavy. Consequently, is is so dense, that it will absorb the shock of the

hammer blow and not "kick back", adding to the inertial mass of the anvil.

 

You may be lucky... or you may find a suitable timber locally. Little

scraps are useless, you want MASS in that block of wood... :-)

 

~~~~~

Ref:

(1) Encl Brit 1961 (my copy) Vol 12 Pg 675  entry on Ironwood.

 

(2) The International Book of Wood - Hugh Johnson 1976/79/80

Mitchell Beazley Publishers Ltd

87-89 Shaftesbury Avenue London

ISBN 085533 081 3 Hardbound

ISBN 085533 182 8 Paperback

 

Robin

 

 

Newsgroups: rec.crafts.metalworking,rec.org.sca

From: Michael Corman <cormam at pfizer.com>

Subject: Re: Anvil Wanted

Organization: Pfizer, Inc

Date: Thu, 9 Jan 1997 17:54:39 GMT

 

Bill McNutt wrote:

> bjm10 at cornell.edu says...

> >Friend of mine uses a piece of railroad track, top planed and polished, as

> >the face of an "anvil".

>

> It's looking like I'm going to have to start there, but I was really hoping to

> do some hot cutting and I need a hardie hole for that.

 

I realize this probably isn't the way you want to go, but it is possible

to get just the hardie hole (no anvil) from some of the larger jewelry

tool suppliers (for example Rio Grande Jewelry Supply). These can be

mounted to, say, a section of tree trunk and provide a holder for your

hardie stakes. They are much cheaper and easier to find than an anvil,

but of course they don't have the striking surface. Unfortunately, it

seems that most people with good anvils know what they've got.

 

Michael die Fledarmus

Mike Corman

cormam at pfizer.com

 

 

From: Lughaid at pacbell.net (Michael Horgan [Lughaid])

Newsgroups: rec.crafts.metalworking,rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Anvil Wanted

Date: Wed, 08 Jan 1997 20:58:40 GMT

 

Have you guys checked out Ernie Leimkuhler's design on the Metal Web

News site at http://tbr.state.tn.us/~wgray/howto/anvil/anvil.html ?

It's a good starting point, and probably cheaper than all but the most

broken down chinese anvil you'll find.

 

>Bill McNutt (mcnutt at web.ce.utk.edu) wrote:

>: I'm in the market for a good, hobby-quality anvil.  I'm looking for one with

>: a tempered face, and pritchell and hardie hole.  Something in the 80 - 100

>: lb range.  None of this chinese-made-mild-steel-barely-better-than-an-ingot

>: I keep finding.

>:

>: Can anyone help me find a vendor, or better yet, a used one?

>

>Me too, please!

>

>Nahum

 

Michael Horgan (Lughaid at pacbell.net)

http://users.aol.com/Lughaid

 

 

Newsgroups: rec.crafts.metalworking,rec.org.sca

From: kinsler at bobcat.ent.ohiou.edu (Mark Kinsler)

Subject: Re: Anvil Wanted

Organization: Ohio University, Russ College of Engineering and Technology

Date: Thu, 9 Jan 1997 21:18:12 GMT

 

Michael Horgan [Lughaid] <Lughaid at pacbell.net> wrote:

>Have you guys checked out Ernie Leimkuhler's design on the Metal Web

>News site at http://tbr.state.tn.us/~wgray/howto/anvil/anvil.html ?

>It's a good starting point, and probably cheaper than all but the most

>broken down chinese anvil you'll find.

 

Is this the one that he cut out of 6" steel plate with a cutting torch

and then ground for about ten days?  I'm sure that he made a splendid

anvil, but the article, which is well worth reading, convinced me that

it's a good idea to make anvils in an anvil factory.  

 

                                       Mark Kinsler

                                heading for the rail yard w/a cutting torch

 

 

From: thorgrim at naxs.com (Thorgrim inn islendingr)

Subject: Re: Anvil Wanted/Hardie Holder

Organization: Nant-y-Derwyddon, Meridies

Date: Thu, 09 Jan 97 22:31:22 GMT

Newsgroups: rec.crafts.metalworking,rec.org.sca

 

> It's looking like I'm going to have to start there, but I was really hoping

> to do some hot cutting and I need a hardie hole for that.

 

You can find one on page 111 of the current centaur forge catalog.

Their phone number is 414-763-9175

 

Thorgrim

 

 

From: jeanclaude at bham.net

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: WANTED - ANVIL

Date: 15 Jan 1997 11:19:58 -0800

 

In article <5artd8$98n at gaia.ns.utk.edu>,

mcnutt at web.ce.utk.edu (Bill McNutt) wrote:

> I'm in the market for a good, hobby-quality anvil.  

(snip)

> Can anyone help me find a vendor, or better yet, a used one?

 

Hi, Bill!

 

Check out http://www.bham.net/afc/ ... that's the website for

the Alabama Forge Council.  They have a section that's devoted

to swaps and sales.  If nothing else, you could probably either

post something there or find a link that would help you.

 

BTW: I'm hoping to get my POP access back by Friday, but

don't expect to be able to pick up my email before then.  SIGH!

 

Dieu vous garde,

Jean-Claude/Doug

 

 

From: blackbow at sprynet.com

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Anvils Revisited

Date: 24 Feb 1997 17:32:50 GMT

 

Just for interest's sake...

 

I recently told a gentle who posted a question about anvils here on the Rialto

that Northern Hydraulics had them for sale.

 

That much is true.  However, I have since learned that the things they sell

aren't really very good; they're pot metal at best.  A friend of mine has one,

and told me that they dent easily and often.

 

So, I guess anybody who really wants a decent anvil had better go find an abandoned railroad rail.  If you get anything useful out of it, email me back; I'd like a chunk of it.

 

With thanks,

Ld. Jonathan Blackbow

House O'Shannon

 

 

From: Brian Dorion <brian.dorion1 at sympatico.ca>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Anvils Revisited

Date: Thu, 27 Feb 1997 00:21:52 -0500

 

If you are interested in buying an anvil new, you are looking at a fair

piece of change.  A friend of mine sells anvils.  I think that they are

east european, but I'm not sure.  I'm not sure about price,but my guess

is about $4 a pound.

 

If you're interested, his name is David Robertson (Brenneth) and his

number is (519) 837-3666.  Tell him Konrad sent you.

 

It might be easier to look in blacksmithing magazines for a more local

supplier of anvils.

 

Konrad

 

 

From: Richard Tucker <nitecrawler7 at worldnet.att.net>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Blacksmithing, anvils

Date: Sun, 19 Apr 1998 19:36:44 -0500

 

Calum MacDonald wrote:

>

> Stefan li Rous wrote:

> >

> > >I have found myself a blower.

> > >What I've been trying to find is the forge and anvil.

 

> > I use a piece or Railroad track for my anvil (Cut it to shape with a

> > grinder)

>

> If you can't find railroad track, some machinists supply shops may have

> anvils.

 

Centaur Forge, Burlington Wisconsin.  Anvils from Germany, good but

pricey. A good used one goes for a dollar a pound, plus $25 to 50 for a

hard cap (a vital feature for welding or other yellow work).

 

 

From: James Crouchet <james at crouchet.com>

Date: June 24, 2005 10:20:13 AM CDT

To: Barony of Bryn Gwlad <bryn-gwlad at ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Bryn-gwlad] RR rail anyone?

 

Is there a specific sort of work you want to do for which a rail works

well? In general these rails make crummy anvils. Better than nothing but

still crummy. The curved top, lack of a horn, poor stability on the stump

and lack of good 90 degree angles make it a less than optimum choice.

 

I would recommend one of the 110 lb anvils from Harbor Freight for about

$80. They are good except that the horn will need to be ground to a

smoother finish and the hardy tool hole in the back is rotated 45 degrees

off from where it needs to be. Of course, a rail has no hardy tool hole

anyway so I assume you do not plan to use them.

 

If you are looking for a smaller, cheaper (protable?) anvil they also have

some nice smaller models in the 10lb range. However, AVOID THE 55 LB ANVIL

since it is nothing but a big door stop.  Made of CAST IRON, the surface

will dent and chip the first time you use it.

 

I plan to buy one of the 110 lb anvils but not the current crop because of

the misaligned hardy tool hole. My brother John (the blacksmith) is

teaching me the ways of the forge so I actually need to be able to use the

hardy tools. Harbor Freight gets in a couple of shipments of those anvils

each year and, randomly, some have the hardy tool hole set right and some

do not. If the next batch is right, I will get one.

 

Doré

 

 

On Thursday 23 June 2005 09:57 pm, deddy2 at austin.rr.com wrote:

>    Does anyone know where I can get Railroad rail for

> anvils? I think all I need is a foot or two.

>

>    Thanks in advance.

>

>    Jovian

 

<the end>



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