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fruit-wines-msg - 12/10/09

 

Non-grape fruit wines.

 

NOTE: See also the files: wine-msg, Vintng-Harvst-art, Vintng-Tools-art, Vintng-Proces-art, fresh-juices-msg, perry-msg, cider-msg, cider-art, beverages-msg.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

    Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                          Stefan at florilegium.org

************************************************************************

 

Date: Thu, 2 Jul 1998 11:39:46 +1000

From: "HICKS, MELISSA" <HICKS_M at casa.gov.au>

Subject: SC - RECIPE: Gooseberry Wine

 

>Coincidentally I found a Gooseberry wine recipe in La Varenne last night

>(17th century I know).

 

For those that asked, following is the Gooseberry Wine recipe out of La

Varenne .....

 

Regards Meliora.

 

> How to make Goofeberry Wine.

>

> Take the Goofeberries and prefs the Juice from them, and ftrain it

> very well; then take as much water as the quantity of the Juice is,

> and Boyl with refined Sugar, about the quantity of one Pound to a

> Gallon of Wine (when it is mix'd with your Water) then mix the Juice

> and water together, and fine it with Ifinglafs, as before directed,

> after the rate of an Ounce to Ten Gallons and when the Scum is raifed

> to the top, take it off, and the Liquor will be clear; then draw it

> into your Veffels, and it will finifh its Fermentation, and in a

> Months time it will be fit for Bottling, put into each Bottle a piece

> of Sugar.

>

> Currant and Rasbery Wines are after the fame manner, only the Currants

> when too Ripe are Sower, therefore muft be pull'd when juft Ripe; and

> Goofeberries the longer they are on the Tree, the fweeter they are.

>

> An Appricock or Peach bruifed, and put into a Bottle of any of thefe

> Wines, will give them a curious Flavour, and brisk Tafte.

 

 

Date: Tue, 29 Dec 1998 23:50:47 -0500

From: Marilyn Traber <margali at 99main.com>

Subject: Re: SC - gingerbrede

 

Max was by tonight and was very pleased to get the brewing recipes,

and he concurs that the oak leaf brew was something to fake out oak cask aging

for a wine.

.

margali

 

gwin dail derw - oak leaf wine

for each gallon:

a quantity of clean brown withered oak leaves gathered from the tree on a dry

day, bruised piece of whole giger, 4 lbs white sugar, 1 lb chopped rasins,

1/2 oz yeast

 

place the leaves in a china or earthenware vessel and pour sufficient boiling

water over them to cover. infuse for 4-5 days, then strain off through muslin.

 

Boil this liquid, adding a piece of bruised ginger and 4 lbs of sugar. After 20

minutes boiling, allow to cool to luke warm and return to the earthenware

vessel. Now add the 1 lb of chopped rasins and 1/2 oz yeast.Cover well and

allow to ferment for 16 days, then strain and bottle.

 

The wine will be ready to drink in three months but improves with keeping.

 

 

Date: Wed, 30 Dec 1998 15:41:53 EST

From: melc2newton at juno.com

Subject: Oak leaf wine (was Re: SC - gingerbrede)

 

On Tue, 29 Dec 1998 23:50:47 -0500 Marilyn Traber <margali at 99main.com> writes:

>Max was by tonight and was very pleased to get the brewing recipes,

>and he concurs that the oak leaf brew was something to fake out oak cask aging

>for a wine.

>margali

 

>gwin dail derw - oak leaf wine

>for each gallon:

>a quantity of clean brown withered oak leaves gathered from the tree on a dry

>day, bruised piece of whole giger, 4 lbs white sugar, 1 lb chopped rasins, 1/2

>oz yeast

 

Well, this is curious! the Oak leaf recipe I have calls for new oak

leaves, not bigger than a squirrel's ear, and no rasins!?! Mine is from

_Beer and Wines of Old New England_, Where did Max find his?

I used a quart of squirrel's sized oak leaves, and steeped, as for tea,

and then added 2 1/2 lbs of clover honey ( the recipe called for 2 lbs of

sugar, but I thought a oak leaf mead would be more interesting), for a

gallon's worth. I think the yeast I used was a wine yeast; I'd have to go

find my brewing notebook to find out which one, tho'. Since it was a

mead, rather than a wine, I'm waiting a year, before I try it .

 

Beatrix

Oakheart/Calontir

Springfield, Mo

 

 

Date: Fri, 18 Jun 1999 18:25:23 -0500

From: collette at kricket.net (colette waters)

Subject: Re: SC - Sake Recipie?

 

>We recall having run across a recipie for making your own brewed sake.

>Of course, now that we go looking for it, it is nowhere to be found.

>Does anyone out there have a recipie to make rice wine, aka sake?

>

> Christianna

 

I have a recipe for rice wine.  I've not made it before and not sure if it

is sake or not.

 

2 lbs rice, 1 gallon water; 3 1/2 lbs sugar; 2 lbs raisins; 1 lemon; 4

oranges; yeast; yeast nutrient; 1 tbsp fresh made tea

Place grain and sugar in crock, add hot water, stir until sugar is

dissolved.  Add chopped raisins, and when cool enough yeast and yeast

nutrient.  Stir the ingredients.  Add juice of lemon and oranges with the

grated peel of two oranges.  Ferment for 10 days or until primary

fermentation is over, then strain solids out through several folds of

cheesecoth and press out all the liquid you can.  Siphon liquid and tea into

secondary fermentation vessel with traps attached .  When ready, tranfer

wine into bottles and age.

Begga

 

 

Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2000 07:43:34 -0500

From: grizly at mindspring.com

Subject: Re: Re: Pomegranate concentrate (was Re: SC - Re:Juice of Sour Oranges)

 

<<<<<Actually, the stuff I am referring to has just enough sugar to take away the bitterness of the pomegranate.  It is not syrupy-sweet.  Maybe that's still too sweet...I don't know.  Just thought I'd deliver the info.

Balthazar of Blackmoor>>>>>>

 

Texts refer to sweet and sour pomegranates, so it would depend on what you were trying to use.  BTW, if you add the pomegranate concentrated 'molasses' to some water, apple juice and honey, you can ferment out one da*ned fine melomel.  Pomegranate wine is referenced by Pliny the Elder as well as cargo manifests from 14th century Naples.  I have discovered no extant recipes or infredient lists for dame, so we came up with this mixture as an approximation of what 'could be'.  The straight pomegrante and honey (with water to dilute) turned out a wine very bitter, with a somewhat bitter aftertaste, giving it the overall impression of bitter.  That pomegranate bitter that you get in little squirts when you eat the seeds will get REALLY concentrated when you make a wine with them.

 

YMMV, but when you use a case of 32 fresh pomegranates and squeeze the little buggers for juice, you will get in the neighborhood of one gallon of fresh, clear juice.  It was an adventure relished, but not wanted for repeat.  We found the bottled juice and molasses work just as well for this application.

 

niccolo difrancesco

frementer of nigh anything that won't jump out of the brewpot :o)

 

 

From: soh at inm.mod.uk

Date: Wed Jul 9, 2003 6:19:29 AM US/Central

To: "'stefan at florilegium.org'" <stefan at florilegium.org>

Subject: Medlar

 

I have just come across your website.

I have a medlar tree outside my office window.

A few years ago, a colleague made Medlar wine from its fruit and I think that it was the most disgusting thing I have ever tried to drink !

 

So if anyone is thinking of winemaking with the Medlar fruit - DON'T is my advice !!!

 

Steve Moore

Gosport, England

 

 

Date: Tue, 7 Oct 2003 06:01:02 -0700 (PDT)

From: Marcus Loidolt <mjloidolt at yahoo.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re: Oak leave wine

To: stellararts at yahoogroups.com

Cc: Priscilla Sage <pthun at ori.net>, sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

Greetings, Priscilla, or anyone on the list, ever

heard of this recipe? I hadn't, but Master Charles

Oakley provided this one, might be interesting to try

on a good brave spring day!!??

 

Abot Johann

 

--- c.oakley at att.net wrote:

> Hey Johann...

>

> Actally the wine recipe came from a real life

> printed book from our library

> over in Peoria! I don't remember the book but it

> was a rather small one.

>

> The recipe basically went:

>

> In the spring of the year pick oak leaves when they

> are about the size of the

> palm of your hand.  Put them into a large container

> and pour boiling water

> over them (I boiled about two gallons even though I

> was making a one gallon

> batch)...  the boiling water breaks down the cell

> structure of the leaves and

> releases the clorophil, etc.  Let the whole mess sit

> until the water cools...

>

> Add sugars (I think I used about 5 cups) and mix

> thoroughly... let the whole

> mess sit covered for about two or three days...

> sturing often...

>

> Strain the liquour off of the leaves and put into

> the jug with an airlock on

> it and let it do its fermenting thing...

>

> Its a pretty simple process... and... ummm...

> washing the leaves in cold

> water prior to hitting them with the boiling water

> would probably be a good

> idea... but...as I recall I don't think I did...

> gives the whole disaster a

> more 'period feel'... ;-)

>

> Chas.

 

 

Date: Tue, 7 Oct 2003 08:47:52 -0700 (PDT)

From: Huette von Ahrens <ahrenshav at yahoo.com>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Re: Oak leave wine

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

It doesn't state which kind of oak leaves.  Just

ones that are as big as the palm of your hand.

 

Now all the oak trees I have seen in California

don't have such big leaves, so I am wondering if

the wine is only good for a certain kind of oak.

 

Huette

 

--- Marcus Loidolt <mjloidolt at yahoo.com> wrote:

> Greetings, Priscilla, or anyone on the list ever

> heard of this recipe? I hadn't, but Master Charles

> Oakley provided this one, might be interesting to try

> on a good brave spring day!!??

>

> Abot Johann

 

 

Date: Tue, 7 Oct 2003 12:35:27 -0500

From: "Decker, Terry D." <TerryD at Health.State.OK.US>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re: Oak leave wine

To: "'sca-cooks at ansteorra.org'" <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

Just for fun, I did a quick search.  Here's some additional information.

Bear

 

Which oaks can be used:

http://winemaking.jackkeller.net/oakleaf.asp

 

A Welsh oak wine recipe:

http://www.red4.co.uk/Recipes/oakleaf-wine.htm

 

The Florilegium's entry:

http://www.florilegium.org/files/BEVERAGES/wine-msg.html

 

> Greetings, Priscilla, or anyone on the list, ever

> heard of this recipe? I hadn't, but Master Charles

> Oakley provided this one, might be interesting to try

> on a good brave spring day!!??

>

> Abot Johann

 

 

Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 21:01:36 -0500

From: "Robin Carroll-Mann" <rcmann4 at earthlink.net>

Subject: e: [Sca-cooks] Blueberry/ Gooseberry Wine Documentation?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

On 19 Jan 2004, at 9:37, david friedman wrote:

>> De Nol mentions sour pomegranate wine ("vino de granadas agras" --  

>> wine made from sour pomegranates).

>> Brighid ni Chiarain *** mka Robin Carroll-Mann

>

> Is it possible that "vino" is being used loosely for an unfermented

> fruit juice? Pomegranate juce (both sweet and sour) is mentioned in

> the 13th c. Andalusian Manuscrito Anonimo.

 

I wouldn't think so, because there are many other references to pomegranate

juice ("jugo de granadas") in the same work.  I checked it against the 1520

Catalan editon, and that same recipe says "vi" (Catalan for "wine").

 

I just did a little poking around the Web, and a search on "vino de granadas"

brought up an interesting reference.  There is an online transcription of a

1551 health manual, the "Libro del Regien de Salud" by Luis Lobera de Avila.

http://www.ucm.es/info/folchia/LOBERA3.htm

 

He says that in some cases, before bleeding a patient, the person should be

given a sop in pomegranate wine or in verjuice ("sopa en vino de  

granadas o en agraz").

 

My guss would be that pomegranate wine was used medicinally, and as a

souring ingredient in cooking, but I have not found any evidence that  

it was used as a beverage.

 

Brighid ni Chiarain *** mka Robin Carroll-Mann

Barony of Settmour Swamp, East Kingdom

rcmnn4 at earthlink.net

 

 

Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 21:01:36 -0500

From: "Robin Carroll-Mann" <rcmann4 at earthlink.net>

Subject: e: [Sca-cooks] Blueberry/ Gooseberry Wine Documentation?

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at ansteorra.org>

 

On 19 Jan 2004, at 9:37, david friedman wrote:

>> De Nol mentions sour pomegranate wine ("vino de granadas agras" --  

>> wine made from sour pomegranates).

>> Brighid ni Chiarain *** mka Robin Carroll-Mann

>

> Is it possible that "vino" is being used loosely for an unfermented

> fruit juice? Pomegranate juce (both sweet and sour) is mentioned in

> the 13th c. Andalusian Manuscrito Anonimo.

 

I wouldn't think so, because there are many other references to pomegranate

juice ("jugo de granadas") in the same work.  I checked it against the 1520

Catalan editon, and that same recipe says "vi" (Catalan for "wine").

 

I just did a little poking around the Web, and a search on "vino de granadas"

brought up an interesting reference.  There is an online transcription of a

1551 health manual, the "Libro del Regien de Salud" by Luis Lobera de Avila. http://www.ucm.es/info/folchia/LOBERA3.htm

 

He says that in some cases, before bleeding a patient, the person should be

given a sop in pomegranate wine or in verjuice ("sopa en vino de

granadas o en agraz").

 

My guss would be that pomegranate wine was used medicinally, and as a

souring ingredient in cooking, but I have not found any evidence that

it was used as a beverage.

 

Brighid ni Chiarain *** mka Robin Carroll-Mann

Barony of Settmour Swamp, East Kingdom

rcmnn4 at earthlink.net

 

 

From: "Sue Warner" <ashgrove at bright.net>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: the lion's tooth

Date: Mon, 21 Jun 2004 16:32:02 -0400

 

> I'm also interested in finding a recipe for dandelion wine; I had some

> once and it was not bad!

>

> AG

 

Don't have the recipe for the wine that Dad used to make from dandelion.

But I did have to help pick the rotten things and if you leave the green

bits on the head the wine gets bitter.

 

And it takes an amazing amount of heads to fill a measuring cup when all you

are using is the yellow petals.  (he used to find a well "fertilized" field

to pick, heads are MUCH bigger)

 

Mariassa

 

 

From: "Sue Warner" <ashgrove at bright.net>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: the lion's tooth

Date: Mon, 21 Jun 2004 16:32:02 -0400

 

> I'm also interested in finding a recipe for dandelion wine; I had some

> once and it was not bad!

>

> AG

 

Don't have the recipe for the wine that Dad used to make from dandelion.

But I did have to help pick the rotten things and if you leave the green

bits on the head the wine gets bitter.

 

And it takes an amazing amount of heads to fill a measuring cup when all you

are using is the yellow petals.  (he used to find a well "fertilized" field

to pick, heads are MUCH bigger)

 

Mariassa

 

 

Date: Thu, 20 Oct 2005 07:41:03 -0700 (PDT)

From: Aurelia Coritana <aurelia_coritana at yahoo.com>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] raisin wine update in Texas

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

For those who have expressed interest, I found two wineries in Texas that make raisin wine:

 

Bruno and George Winery: http://www.brunoandgeorge.com/raisin_wine.htm

Lehm Berg Winery: http://www.lehmbergwinery.com/wines.html

 

I didn't find these easily while shopping for ingredients, though, so  

I substituted a red port (with the beets with leeks and wine) and it turned out very nicely.

 

~Aurelia

 

 

Date: Sun, 17 Feb 2008 03:57:25 +0000 (GMT)

From: emilio szabo <emilio_szabo at yahoo.it>

Subject: [Sca-cooks] wines -- De diuersorum vini generum natura liber,

        1559 (books.google)

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

 

Book about the nature of the different kinds of wine

(liber - de natura - diversorum generum - vini )

 

natura/nature = humoral, medical properties, temperament

 

http://books.google.com/books?

id=6O7VubsbM_QC&printsec=frontcover&dq=intitle:vini&lr=&num=100&as_brr=1

&hl=de#PPT1,M1

 

E.

 

 

Date: Wed, 14 Oct 2009 19:24:38 -0400

From: "Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius" <adamantius1 at verizon.net>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] non-grape period wines

 

On Oct 14, 2009, at 7:11 PM, Mark S. Harris wrote:

<<< While I have a few non-grape wine recipes, it appears that most  

period wines, as today?, were made from grapes. Although some, like  

pears and apples, get their own name. We tend to say apple cider or  

perry, not apple wine or pear wine.  I do have recipes for dandelion  

wine and a few other non-grape wines. Does anyone know of other  

references to or recipes for non-grape wine? >>>

 

I expect there are some, but one thing you may find is that not all  

fruits are satisfactorily fermentable without added sugar.  

Unless, of course, one is speaking of fully ripe quinces.

 

And, since sugar becomes more accessible, less expensive and less  

likely to be viewed as a pharmaceutical the  

later in period we get, this is perhaps a reason to see more of this  

type of thing in later and post-period sources.

 

And then, of course, there's the gap in exposure for most SCAdians  

between English and non-English, untranslated sources.

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Wed, 14 Oct 2009 19:40:18 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae at mac.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] non-grape period wines

 

On Oct 14, 2009, at 7:11 PM, Mark S. Harris wrote:

<<< Can someone post the recipe for this quince wine from this "Farley's  

Art of London Cookery"? When was this printed? >>>

 

The London art of cookery, and housekeeper's complete assistant

 By John Farley

 

Quince Wine.

 

TAKE twenty large quinces, gathered when they be dry and full ripe.  

Wipe them clean with a coarfe cloth, and grate them with a large grate or rafp as near the cores as you can; but do not touch the cores. Boil a gallon of fpring-water, throw in your quinces, and let them boil  

foftly about a quarter of an hour. Then strain them well into an  

earthen pan on two pounds of double-refined fugar. Pare the peel off  

two large lemons, throw them in, and fqueeze the juice through a  

fieve. Stir it about till it be very cool, and then toaft a thin bit  

of bread very brown, rub a little yeft on it, and let the whole ftand  

clofe covered twenty-four hours. Then take out the toaft and lemon,  

put the wine in a cafk, keep it three months, and then bottle it. If  

you make a twenty gallon cafk, let it ftand fix months before you  

bottle it; and remember, when you ftrain your quinces, to wring them  

hard in a coarfe cloth."

 

It's up on Google Books in the  Edition: 4 - 1787. page 364

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Fri, 16 Oct 2009 11:00:58 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae at mac.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] non-grape period wines

 

On Oct 14, 2009, at 7:11 PM, Stefan asked: <<< Does anyone know of other  

references to or recipes for non-grape wine? >>>

 

Here's the beginning of what

Maison rustique, or The countrey farme? Compyled in the French tongue  

by Charles Steuens, and Iohn Liebault, Doctors of Physicke. And  

translated into English by Richard Surflet, practitioner in physicke.  

Now newly reuiewed, corrected, and augmented, .... by Geruase Markham.  

1616

 

says:

 

CHAP. XLIX.

A briefe discourse of making of drinkes of the iuices of Fruits.

_IN such Countries as the vine cannot beare fruit in, because of the  

cold distemperature and churlish roughnesse of the aire, and whereas  

not|withstanding there grow singular good fruits, and in great  

aboundance in recompence of the same (as in Britaine, Normandie, the  

countrie of Mans, Chartraine, and Touraine) although there be the  

meanes to make Wine of a certaine kind of corne, called Bier: yet by  

reason of the lesse cost and charges, as also by reason of the greater  

profit, they vse to make diuers sorts of drinkes of fruits: and to  

giue them their seuerall and particular names from the seueral and  

particular fruits whereof they are made. As for example, that which is  

made of apples, cider or citer, and so the Normans and other countries  

bordering thereupon doe call it, as hauing a smell or other excellent  

qualitie resembling the citron. Perrie which is pressed out of the  

Peares, and ceruise Wine, quinceWine, pomegranat Wine, mulberrie Wine,  

gooseberrie Wine, and slo?Wine, vvhich are made of the juices of these  

fruits pres|sed out. And hereof vve are to obserue that all fruits are  

not fit to make Wine of; but onely those vvhich vvill not putrifie  

easily, and haue great quantitie of Wine juice vvithin them, of vvhich  

kind these are vvhereof I haue now spoken. For of cherries there is  

not any Wine to be pressed, because their juice doth easily corrupt  

and putrifie verie quickly: neither yet of Almonds, Common nuts,  

Filberds, Pine, nuts, or other such fruits, for they yeeld an oylie  

and not a Wine-like humour. But for as much as we are not determined  

to speake in this place of all these sorts of fruit drinkes, but onely  

of them vvhich are called cider, perrie, and carasie, vvhich next vnto  

the juice of the vine, are the most profitable and necessarie liquor  

for the life and health of man: vve vvill set downe before hand a  

certaine summarie, and as it vvere a transition and plaine declaration  

of and vnto as well the making, as also of and vnto the qualities and  

vertues of the said cider, perrie, and carasie, and will referre the  

Reader vnto the Latine Booke now long agoe looked for from Moun|sier  

Paulmie Doctor of Physicke at Paris, therein to read and learne the  

intire and perfect knowledge of this so pleasant and delightsome a  

drinke. And to begin with our purposed matter, I intend not here to  

stand about the finding out of the first in|uentour and deuisour of  

this drinke; onely I will say, that as Noe carried away with the  

pleasant taste of the juice, vvhich he pressed out of the grape of the  

wild vine planted by him, was the first inuentor of making and  

drinking of vvine: so a certaine Norman hauing his taste vvonderfully  

pleased vvith a delicate and daintie taste and rellish of the iuice of  

Apples and Peares, inuented the making of Cider and Perrie I say, a  

certaine Norman, for this is in base Normandie called the Countrey of  

Ne-z, where this drinke had first his beginning.

 

The way then to make these kinds of drinkes generally, is to gather  

the fruit not all out ripe, and after to let them ripen some certaine  

time in the open ayre or to drie them in the Sunne, for the spending  

and wasting of their waterie humour; then to breake and crush them  

with Mil-stones, or such other heauie instruments; and lastly, to  

presse them out: but withall you must obserue this speciall qualitie  

in certaine Apples, which the longer they are kept, and the riper they  

be, the better and greater store of iuice they yeeld, though then  

indeed it be not so durable.

 

On the contrarie, wild Peares doe yeeld more liquor, and of a better  

tast, and withall of longer continuance, than doe the tame and garden  

ones. When the iuice is pres|sed out from the fruit, it must be put  

into caske, for to boile therein a certaine time, and to be ordered  

after the manner of the ordering of the iuice of Grapes, as we intend  

to declare more particularly.

 

 

The 1658 English edition is up now on Google Books by the way as is  

the 1640 French edition. The work appeared as early as "published in  

1564 as L'Agriculture ou la maison rustique."

 

Johnnae

 

 

Date: Fri, 16 Oct 2009 12:23:29 -0400

From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae at mac.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] non-grape period wines

 

Could be. They started printing Arnold de Villanova in the early 16th century so portions of works attributed to him probably appear in a number of places.

 

Markham improved the 1616 edition and tailored to an English audience.

We know he often borrowed too. This advice all gets recycled to some  

extent in The English Housewife.

 

I think the citation to there being an English 1658 English edition   

up now on Google Books is wrong. I think that's just another French edition.

 

Johnnae

 

On Oct 16, 2009, at 11:38 AM, Phil Troy / G. Tacitus Adamantius wrote:

On Oct 16, 2009, at 11:00 AM, Johnna Holloway wrote:

<<< Here's the beginning of what

Maison rustique, or The countrey farme? Compyled in the French  

tongue by Charles Steuens, and Iohn Liebault, Doctors of Physicke.  

And translated into English by Richard Surflet, practitioner in  

physicke. Now newly reuiewed, corrected, and augmented, .... by  

Geruase Markham. 1616 >>>

 

Isn't this the work widely rumored to be partially cribbed from  

Arnold de Villanova?

 

Adamantius

 

 

Date: Fri, 16 Oct 2009 10:30:37 -0700

From: David Friedman <ddfr at daviddfriedman.com>

To: Cooks within the SCA <sca-cooks at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] non-grape period wines

 

I believe there is some basis in Islamic tradition for holding that

date wine fermented no more than three days is permissable. I haven't

seen any recipes and I don't know whether one should describe

something as a wine after that short a fermentation.

--

David/Cariadoc

www.daviddfriedman.com

 

<the end>



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