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pets-msg - 12/30/99

 

Pets at SCA events. Training them for events.

 

NOTE: See also the files: cats-msg, dogs-msg, ferrets-msg, rabbits-msg,  livestock-msg, fishing-msg, falconry-msg, mice-msg.

 

************************************************************************

NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate topics were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the message IDs were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no claims as to the accuracy of the information given by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The copyright status of these messages is unclear at this time. If information is published from these messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

    Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                          Stefan at florilegium.org

************************************************************************

 

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: animals/pets

From: Eric.Smith-1 at kmail.ksc.nasa.gov (Eric C. Smith)

Date: Tue, 13 Jun 1995 15:48:32 -0400

Organization: NASA/KSC, DL-ICD-C

 

hendricp at norand.com (Peter Hendrickson) wrote:

> For the sake of my own curiosity i am taking an informal

> poll concerning animals/pets at SCA CAMPING events.

>

> your comments are greatly appreciated.

>                                

>                                         GUTHORM SCYLDING

>                                        (Peter Hendrickson)

>                                         hendricp at norand.com

> P.S. I do bring my animals (dogs & children) to all camping events

>      in wich I participate.

 

In Trimaris, we have no camping sites which allow pets.  A few years back,

Kingdom Law was changed to specifically ban pets from all events, but that

law only lasted for the duration of that reign.  I would love to take my

dog (the cutest little sheltie you'll ever see!) to events, but alas, they

wonÕt let me.

 

Maredudd

--

Eric C. Smith                  Maredudd Cymysglyd ap Cynan

NASA/DL-ICD-C                  Kingdom of Trimaris

KSC,  FL 32899                 Shire Starhaven

Eric.Smith-1 at ksc.nasa.gov      maredudd at caer_bondu.surf.tach.net    

 

 

From: mhwag at aol.com (MHWag)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: animals/pets

Date: 14 Jun 1995 10:22:40 -0400

 

Many of the sites in Atlantia allow pets, which then must be controlled

(leashes, collars, etc.). One lady, who has recently moved out of Kingdom,

has a greyhound, which adds considerably to atmosphere. The greyhound

went visiting one night at a large camping event, and "deer sightings"

were rampant the next day.

Aileen  

 

 

From: Ann.J.Welborne.2 at nd.edu (Anna Welborne)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: animals/pets(long)

Date: 16 Jun 1995 14:04:46 GMT

Organization: Notre Dame University

 

Since I lurk on the newsgroup, I seem to have missed the original post

concerning animals..  I wish to commend the good gentle, Guthorm Scylding,

for what appears to be exemplary animal husbandry.  Only one thing more I

would have wished to seen emphasized, and that is his vigilance in cleaning

up after his dogs.  Unstated, but done nonetheless, I'm sure.  And in

further support, a responsible dog owner will *not* approach another dog

from the rear, especially if holding the leash of another dog.  The mundane

who did so was being stupid, IMO.  The responsible thing to do would have

been to cross over the path, several feet away, in order to prevent the

very altercation that took place.  Use some common sense, folks.

 

This may seem to be a non sequitur, but it needs to be said often and

loudly:

If you see a dog with a backpack or harness on, accompanying someone in a

wheelchair (or someone who is blind, or deaf or whatever), DON'T PET THE

DOG.  Lady Lizette and her beloved, trusty Hoosier will be at Pennsic, but

DON'T PET THE DOG.  Hoosier is a *working* dog, and not to be petted, fed

treats, or even talked to by anyone other than Lizette when he is "on

duty."

 

As one avidly interested in promoting animal husbandry in the SCA,

especially that of dogs, I would refer one and all to the forthcoming

October (?) Pale, in which there will be an extensive article written by

the members of the Huntly pack - those wonderful gentles, led by Master

Beowulf Gordon, who, with HRM Valtheona's queenly blessings and

participation, provide greyhound coursing demonstrations. For those who

saw them at the Mid's Coronation, I'm the lady with the little red basenji

(small cousin of the greyhounds) who coursed so eagerly and so well.

 

I do agree that the dogs add marvelously to the medieval flavor of an

event.  Especially the sighthounds, since sighthounds were so prevalent in

the middle ages.  Pigs, chickens, and various other animals running loose

would also be very medieval.  However, let's be reasonable and responsible.

From my side, the dogs give me something to do, since my lord husband is a

chirugeon, I'm bored by fighting (sorry, guys!), can only do so much

shopping, and have not the patience for needlework. Having my Pali at my

side allows me to meet and talk with all sorts of people. Working with the

greyhounds, specifically, allows me to promote greyhound rescue.  In all

cases, the SCA is to promote education.

 

Working with the dogs at an event is *work*, in that one must be constantly

vigilant.  Vigilant against the untaught, over-trusting children who race

up behind a dog and grab at it.  Vigilant against the untaught, should know

better adults who would slip my dog chocolate behind my back. (Chocolate is

POISON to a dog!)  Vigilant to see that my dog does not relieve himself in

an inappropriate place, or if he does, to *immediately* clean up the mess.

 

And so, in answer to the one gentle's question of whether pets should be

allowed at camping events, my vote is yes.  It's a selfish vote, but having

my dog along makes the event *much* more enjoyable for me. However, just

like with drinking, there will be irresponsible people who make it

difficult for the rest of us to present a good image. There will also be

those, who because of allergies, may protest the presence of animals.  For

that same reason, I could protest the presence of lighted cigarettes, but I

wouldn't dream of banning the smokers themselves (especially since those in

the Huntly Pack smoke!).

 

The bottom line, like all the bottom lines in our never-ending banter of

rules and whatnot, is COMMON SENSE and RESPONSIBILITY. Yes, dogs should be

allowed at events, but only if the owner is practicing common sense and has

a strong sense of responsibility.  If a fighter is acting irresponsibly

with his weapons, if a gentle is drinking irresponsibly, if whoever is

acting irresponsibly, then the autocrat should intervene.

 

Responsibly yours,

 

Amaran MacConnachie

dwelling in White Waters Shire

(but Rivenstar is home!)

Midrealm

*********************************************************************

Anna Welborne                   Press on, mi amigo! Press on, mon amie!

welborne.2 at nd.edu               Walk on in the face of the mystery.

Notre Dame University           When the night hides the light,

Philosophy Department           And the journey is long,   <B Sprague>

Notre Dame, IN  46556           Tie your shoes, my dear friend. Walk on.

*************** Sighthounds ---- Addicted to Speed! *******************

 

 

From: noramunro at aol.com (Noramunro)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: animals/pets(long)

Date: 16 Jun 1995 20:50:19 -0400

 

There's not a whole lot I can add to this discussion, but I do want to

commend all the responsible dog owners of the SCA that have posted so far,

and make a plea:  don't give up.  I try to take my dogs as many places as

I can, always leashed, always obedience trained, and always with a supply

of plastic baggies (the long ones that newspapers are sometimes wrapped in

are really good) stuffed in my pocket or belt-pouch for cleanup.  If all

the people out there like me continue to do this, we can at least hold our

ground, if not gain some.  I'd especially like to recommend the American

Kennel Club's Canine Good Citizen certificate program (to dogowners in the

US, anyway), which is open to both purebreds and mixed breeds, and, I

think, could probably save many of us from problems in the future.  The

testing is based on a combination of AKC obedience and temperment testing.

Passing dogs receive a certificate, good for brags, and also potentially

as evidence for the dog's good temperment and behaviour in altercations.

It's not total proof of course, but it could give a dog owner an edge.  If

anyone out there would like more information on the program, please

contact me in email, and I'll pass along what contacts I have.

 

In service to the Society and the noblest of beasts

Alianora Munro

Barony of Bright Hills, Atlantia

email: noramunro at aol.com

 

 

From: sclark at blues.epas.utoronto.ca (Susan Carroll-Clark)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: animals/pets(long)

Date: 22 Jun 1995 16:12:43 GMT

Organization: University of Toronto -- EPAS

 

Greetings!

      I've considered from time to time taking one of my herd of

cats to an event, but have always nixed it.  Why?

      --pets (particularly) cats are like young kids--you have to

      have someone keep an eye on them at all times.

      --cats (unlike some dogs) are not particularly happy most of

      the time to simply sit tied to a post for hours at a time.

      --fleas.  My guys are indoor cats.

      --At events, I am seldom not doing something.  If I could really

      go to an event and not be fencing/pewter casting/running some

      activity/shopping/heralding, I might consider bringing along

      a cat. But only if I think the cat might enjoy the event ...:-)

 

      By the way, I've seen a wide variety of pets at events, from dogs

(usually the big friendly kind), cats, rats, birds, snakes, and ferrets to my

favorite, a brown bat. (She had a little batbox around her neck for it.

Looked like a cute mouse with wings.)  The majority of folks with pets,

like the majority of people with kids, are responsible--but one bad incident

leaves a lot of memories.

 

Cheers!

Nicolaa/Susan

(and Napoleon, Caellin, Cyrano, and Orlando)

Canton of Eoforwic

sclark at epas.utoronto.ca

 

 

From: djheydt at uclink.berkeley.edu (Dorothy J Heydt)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: animals/pets(long)

Date: 22 Jun 1995 18:28:03 GMT

Organization: University of California, Berkeley

 

Susan Carroll-Clark <sclark at blues.epas.utoronto.ca> wrote:

>     I've considered from time to time taking one of my herd of

>cats to an event, but have always nixed it.  Why?

>     --pets (particularly) cats are like young kids--you have to

>     have someone keep an eye on them at all times.

>     --cats (unlike some dogs) are not particularly happy most of

>     the time to simply sit tied to a post for hours at a time.

>     --fleas.  My guys are indoor cats.

>     --At events, I am seldom not doing something.  If I could really

>     go to an event and not be fencing/pewter casting/running some

>     activity/shopping/heralding, I might consider bringing along

>     a cat. But only if I think the cat might enjoy the event ...:-)

 

All these are good reasons for not taking to an event any of the

cats you currently have.

 

We have three cats.  Only one goes to events.  Gwenhwyfar, our

tourney cat, was trained from adolescence to be a tourney cat. We

put her in her harness a lot and got her used to it.  We took her

in the car a lot, so she doesn't (like many pets) associate a

ride in the car with a trip to the vet.  We got her used to

riding in her cat carrier.  Most of these things we did by taking

her to fighter practice every Thursday evening, where she also

got used to loud noises and crowds of people, many of whom kept

coming up and crooning "Oh, let me pet the kitty...."

 

As a result, she's very gregarious and will sit there and let

people take their kitty-fix off her for hours on end.  If we're

in one part of the camp and she's in another, she'll meow

plaintively till we come where she is or bring her where we are.

But if we're not in camp at all, she'll go into our pavilion and

go to sleep on (or in) our bed.

 

She's an indoor/outdoor cat so there are fleas anyway.  We did

take her to one site where it was announced that there was plague

in the area, so we had to flea-bathe her as soon as we got home.

Otherwise, nobody seems to mind.

 

And one of these days I'm gonna write a song about the time she

was out wandering about camp on her 15-foot leash, around 5 a.m.,

and somebody's Shar Pei decided to tangle with her.  (The dog was

scratched and bitten.  I was scratched and bitten when I tried to

mix in. There wasn't a mark on the cat.)

 

Dorothea of Caer-Myrddin          Dorothy J. Heydt

Mists/Mists/West                 UC Berkeley

Argent, a cross forme'e sable            djheydt at uclink.berkeley.edu

PRO DEO ET REGE

 

 

From: mordraut at bga.com (Mordraut Freyulf)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: animals/pets

Date: Mon, 3 Jul 1995 07:55:48

Organization: Dark Horde Moritu

 

(DEREK BROUGHTON) writes:

(snip)

>I agree with Guthorm.  The problem, Hal, is that this _can't_ be

>just discrimination in favor of competence.  The only way to

>qualify for this discrimination is to know someone. There can be

>hundreds of people with dogs who might qualify to attend a

>'no-pets' event, but unless they're personally known to the

>autocrats they won't be permitted to attend with their pets.

 

>Unless the 'petocrat' is willing to interview and certify every

>owner & pet, there should be no exceptions - either pets are

>allowed (Yea!) or not (grudgingly accepted).

 

      There is a way to allow only dogs with good manners.  The AKC sponsors a

Canine Good Citizenship (CGC) test.  It is open to all dogs even mixed

breeds.  Your dog doesn't have to have AKC papers.  The dog and owner are

tested on 10 things.  Some are:  walking on a leash, sit/stay, allowing

a stranger to shake hands with the owner, and the dog must remain calm while

the owner is out of sight for 5 minutes.

      This is not an easy test for most dogs to pass.  It can be taken

again if the dog fails.  When the dog passes it gets CGC added after its

name.  It takes commitement from a responsible owner to get their dog to pass

the CGC.  A responsible owner is also more likely to pick up behind their

dog and not let the dog annoy others.  This is an objective way for autocrats

to screen which dogs are allowed at events.  

      I know there are some sites where the site rules prohibit dogs, but

there are just as many sites where the autocrat doesn't want to be bothered.  

I really think the Canine Good Citizenship test is a fair way to discriminate

in favor of competent dog owners.  

|-------------------------------------------------------------------------|

| Margaret              |    IF YOU'RE NOT HAVING FUN                    |

| Mirrim of Bristol     |   YOU'RE NOT DOING IT RIGHT!                    |

| mordraut at moritu.com   |                                                 |

|------------------------- Finger For PGP Public Key ---------------------|

 

 

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

From: hopkins at hopkins.rtp.dg.com (Edward Hopkins)

Subject: Animal-crat?

Summary: Great concept; not so great name.

Date: Fri, 30 Jun 95 14:34:37 GMT

Organization: Data General Corporation. RTP, NC.

 

Coryn llith Rheged (derek.broughton at onlinesys.com)wrote:

>ritchiek at expert.cc.purdue.edu (karen ritchie) wrote:

>

>KR>        ....  In the Middle Any event that has horses present must

>KR>have an equestrian marshal on site as well, Perhaps all groups having

>KR>any type of animals should consider an Animal-crat-Isabeau P.

>

>Not a bad idea.  I hereby volunteer to be animal-crat for any

>event that wants one in southern Ealdormere.

 

I think it's a great idea, and I hope that it's a _new_ enough

idea that it's not too late to change the name before it gets

entrenched.  Here are some suggestions:

 

"Hostler" Scrictly speaking, this is someone who cares for

        horses, but it might be obscure enough to bend to

        our will (like "seneschal")

"Menagier" Someone in charge of a menagerie.

"Beastmaster" It's direct, but it might cause PR problems.

"Zoocrat" Just in case the "-crat" ending _is_ mandatory.

 

-- Alfredo

hopkins at dg-rtp.dg.com

 

 

From: IVANOR at delphi.com

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Animal-crat?

Date: 2 Jul 1995 16:53:21 GMT

 

Quoting hopkins from a message in rec.org.sca

   > "Hostler" Scrictly speaking, this is someone who cares for

   >        horses, but it might be obscure enough to bend to

   >        our will (like "seneschal")

   > "Menagier" Someone in charge of a menagerie.

 

I always thought a menagier was in charge of a menage. i.e. a housekeeper.

 

Carolyn Boselli, Host of Custom Forum 35:  SCAdians on Delphi

Ive Annor M'Quhairr of Sighty Crag, Chronicler-elect, Dragonship Haven        

 

All right.... who siphoned the blood out of my cat?

 

 

From: vorder at tigger.stcloud.msus.edu (Andrew Vorder Bruegge)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: dogs

Date: 3 Jul 1995 19:03:47 GMT

Organization: ST. CLOUD STATE UNIVERSITY, ST. CLOUD, MN

 

Dog owners and dog lovers must also consider factors besides the behavior of dogs.  First, mnay people have horrendous allergies to dog (and cats, and ferrets, and all the other animals in the menagerie).  I myself do not suffer from allergies, but I must respect others.  

Also, at outdoor camping events, dogs and other animals could possible generate hygiene problems--manure, raiding garbage cans, etc. Of course, YOUR dog would NEVER do that.  Oh well.  

 

Leave the dog at home

Isaac

 

 

From: corun at access2.digex.net (Corun MacAnndra)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: dogs

Date: 3 Jul 1995 18:12:53 -0400

Organization: Express Access Online Communications, Greenbelt, MD USA

 

Alianora posting form Corun's account.

 

Andrew Vorder Bruegge <vorder at tigger.stcloud.msus.edu> wrote:

>Dog owners and dog lovers must also consider factors besides the behavior

>of dogs.  First, mnay people have horrendous allergies to dog (and cats,

>and ferrets, and all the other animals in the menagerie).  I myself do

>not suffer from allergies, but I must respect others.

>Also, at outdoor camping events, dogs and other animals could possible

>generate hygiene problems--manure, raiding garbage cans, etc.  Of course,

>YOUR dog would NEVER do that.  Oh well.  

 

I must take issue with two of these points.  First, while I understand and

respect the problems of those with allergies to animal dander (I suffer from

hay fever, myself, though I have never asked people to refrain from bringing

flowers to events), I fail to see how bringing my dog to an outdoor camping

event will discomfort those allergic to dogs.  The great thing about the great

outdoors is the amount of ventilation available.  Any dander shed by my dog

is going to be quite thoroughly dispersed, i.e. reduced in concentration to

a level that should NOT cause problems to the allergic, unless they come

and bury their faces in my dog's fur.

 

Part of responsible dog ownership involves preventing hygeine problems.

A responsible dog owner travelling anywhere with a pet will clean up after

the animal and will have the dog leashed and with them at all times

(including the middle of the night), which will keep the animal out of

the garbage cans.  People who bring their dogs to events and don't keep

their pets under control and their messes cleaned up are not responsible

dog owners.

 

My biggest beef (look out, here comes the soapbox) with anti-dog rules is

that they discriminate against responsible dog owners without actually

preventing the damage done by irresponsible ones.  I may leave my dog at

home, but that doesn't prevent someone else - like a neighbor to the site -

from letting his animal run loose and become a problem (spreading dander,

leaving manure, raiding the garbage cans, or worse, biting someone).  I've

put a great deal of time and effort into making my dogs well-behaved, clean,

and well-dressed (see my article in last summer's _TI_) members of my

local group.  Telling me to leave my dogs at home doesn't solve the

problem of irresponsible dog owners, it only discourages me from coming

to events at all.  And that, I think, is not the kind of effect no-dog

rules are intended to produce - I hope not, anyway.

 

<climbing back off the soapbox>

 

In service to the Society and the noblest of beasts,

Lady Alianora Munro

Barony of Bright Hills, Atlantia  

===============================================================================

   Corun MacAnndra   |

Dark Horde by birth |                    vivivi - the editor of the Beast

   Moritu by choice  |

 

 

From: kmhankey at cis.ysu.edu (Katherine Hankey)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Necessities for Pets at Events

Date: 11 Jul 1995 03:56:13 GMT

Organization: Youngstown State University--Computer and Information Sciences

 

Greetings to Alison, and all others.

 

My lord and I have on occasion taken our two dogs to Cooper's Lake

during non-Pennsic times, both SCA and mundane.  From that experience,

I'd say that your list, with Alianora's suggestion of water from home,

looks pretty good.  (You might consider a 12" garden shovel to help

with the plastic bag part.)  Since this is your first event with your dog,

I thought I'd share a few ideas beyond the simple listmaking.

 

The shade cloth is a good idea.  If you find that you must leave her

for more than a "brief" time, make sure that she has plenty of access

to shade as the sun changes the shadows.  Also, try to discreetly see

how she behaves while you're away; if she yips or wimpers constantly,

your neighbors will not be fond of her (or you).

 

My dogs tend to eat maybe half their normal portion when they're camping.

Yours might also have an appetite change, which could go either way.  If

she doesn't eat much, don't leave her food out for the flies, especially

if it's canned food.  Offer it to her occasionally, and if she doesn't

want it, store it appropriately - after all, it's *food*. If she wants

more than usual, it may be because she's burning a lot of it off with the

excitement; but have extra plastic bags around.

 

Water is probably the single most important thing.  Site water *may*

easily disrupt her digestive system, but it's better than dehydration.

In camp, I usually don't keep the water bowl *filled*, as it attracts

insects.  While my dogs don't mind drinking around the bugs, I'd rather

just refill the bowl more frequently.  But the main point is, keep the

bowl not-empty.

 

And while you're wandering about with her on the leash, water is still

very important.  Be sure to give her frequent opportunities to drink,

even if it's site water.  If she's panting but won't drink, try offering

her water in your cupped hand, sometimes that helps a lot. And if she's

really hot, consider dousing her with water to help cool her.  (Approved

by my vet, with the caveat to not overdo it.)  My dogs don't like the

dousing part, but they respond noticably to the cooling.

 

My apologies if this sounds long-winded, but you did say this was her

first event, and I'd like it to be pleasant for both of you *and*

everyone else you encounter.  I hope this helps.

 

Tarna of Warhaven

 

 

From: noramunro at aol.com (Noramunro)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Necessities for Pets at Events

Date: 10 Jul 1995 19:52:57 -0400

Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364)

 

In addition to all the things you named, I'd include a couple of gallons

of water from home (old plastic milk jugs work well). I've found dogs to

be even more sensitive to changes in water than people, and sometimes

sites don't have a potable water supply.

 

Good luck!

 

--Lady Alianora Munro

Barony of Bright Hills, Atlantia

 

 

From: AIGRAN00 at ukcc.uky.edu (Hurricane Alison)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Necessities for Pets at Events

Date: Mon, 10 Jul 95 14:38:03 EDT

Organization: The University of Kentucky

 

Good gentles,

Having read the threads about pets at events, I now find myself in the position

of having to take my dog with me to Border Raids because her "grandmother"

will also be out of town and cannot babysit. I've never taken a pet to an

event before and would like some feedback on the proper things to bring.

I'm taking (for my pet) one pet carrier and a piece of cloth to shade her

during the day for the brief times I can't keep her on a leash, food bowl,

water bowl, food, leash, squeaky toy, and little plastic bags for when nature

calls. Any other things that would be useful? Things you've found to be

indespensible? This is her first event, but she is well behaved, so I'm

hoping for the best.

Alison of Windy Fields, Shire of Dragonsmark

 

 

From: Catherine A Hensley <hensley at lims1.lanl.gov>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Necessities for Pets at Events

Date: 12 Jul 1995 22:42:42 GMT

Organization: Los Alamos National Laboratory

 

AIGRAN00 at ukcc.uky.edu (Hurricane Alison) wrote:

> I'm taking (for my pet) one pet carrier and a piece of cloth to shade her

> during the day for the brief times I can't keep her on a leash, food bowl,

> water bowl, food, leash, squeaky toy, and little plastic bags for when nature

> calls. Any other things that would be useful? Things you've found to be

> indespensible? This is her first event, but she is well behaved, so I'm

> hoping for the best.

 

Hmmm.  How about flea/tick powder?  In many temperate regions of the

known world, you should be concerned about deer ticks, which spread

Lyme disease.  In the Desert Southwest (Outlands, Atenveldt, Ansteora)

you MUST be concerned about the fleas that carry Plague. Yup, good

old-fashioned Bubonic (pneumonic/septicemic) Plague.  I think there

have been about five cases of plague in domestic animals around my

home town this year (mostly cats, as they go out and catch the mice

that harbor the fleas...), and maybe one human.  Humans can catch it

from their pets, either by flea transmission or when the pet's plague

progresses into the airborn pneumonic form.  But fortunately plague

is treatable by modern miracle medicine (tetracycline). Most victims

live.

 

I know of one Outlander who is a plague survivor. <g>  When we do the

Middle Ages, we do it authentic!

 

Aithne

 

 

From: heddl at sequoia.northcoast.com (Shifter)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Necessities for Pets at Events

Date: Fri, 14 Jul 1995 18:16:03 -0700

 

Catherine A Hensley <hensley at lims1.lanl.gov> wrote:

 

> AIGRAN00 at ukcc.uky.edu (Hurricane Alison) wrote:

> > I'm taking (for my pet) one pet carrier and a piece of cloth to shade her

> > during the day for the brief times I can't keep her on a leash, food bowl,

> > water bowl, food, leash, squeaky toy, and little plastic bags for when

nature

> > calls. Any other things that would be useful? Things you've found to be

> > indespensible? This is her first event, but she is well behaved, so I'm

> > hoping for the best.

 

Stuff I routinely bring to keep my hounds comfortable at events:

 

Kibble

Water from home (allow 2 liters/day/dog)

Cedar pet bed (helps repel insects)

Blanket to cover when it gets cold at night

Vari-Kennel (so it's not period, but it's a safe containment of my dog

when I can't take them with me everywhere on site)

Shade tarp

Plastic bags for faeces

Immodium in case of diarrhea

Bach's Rescue Remedy in case of stress

First Aid kit (for all living critters -- human and canine -- in my camp)

 

Hope this helps,

Rakiizah bint Nubbal al-Saluqi

 

 

From: sjaqua at ix.netcom.com (Scott Jaqua )

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: YKYITSCAW...

Date: 10 Oct 1995 23:36:06 GMT

 

holsten at nature.berkeley.edu (Donna Holsten) writes:

>You're at an event with your two dogs--the Rott and the Schipperke, and

>someone asks what kind of dog the "little black one" is.  You start into

>the usual "They're Dutch dogs that go back as far as the 16th Century;

>someone wrote about a pair of them saving Duke So-and-So..."  

>

>And then the questioner cuts you off with "Don't you think that documenting

>your *dogs* is a BIT MUCH!?"

>

>Joanna (and Calvin, and Eleanora)

 

    Nope, I document my pets. My Curly-Coated Retrievers, Brittanys,

and yellow naped amazon parrot are documentable. My Labrador

Retrievers, albino corn snake, and Jersey wooley rabbit are not. Heck,

I even document and make period dog collars! There's even a dog collar

museum at Leeds castle in England. Yup, I've got the book. (Is

obsessive compulsion spelled with a hyphen?)

    Allesaundra de Crosthwaite

    Mrs. Scott Jaqua

 

 

From: Larkin O'Kane <larkin at webstar.net>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: What *isn't* wrong with children--what's wrong with YOU?

Date: Tue, 28 May 1996 11:48:49 -0500

Organization: Shire of Trelac, Ansteorra

 

John Groseclose wrote:

> Bingo. And what happens to my dogs, who have been carefully tied to a

> stake near my tent, where they can't even get near the borders of my

> encampment? Some child wanders into camp, starts teasing them or trying to

> pet them when they don't know who this person is, and gets bitten.

 

Not that this has anything to do with the discussion (it doesn't) but I find that a portable pen works well for my dogs. It's an eight foot square metal fence that gives my four dogs some freedom to move around and thus away from small ones who want to "pet the doggies."

 

> Does the child get yelled at? No. The child gets picked up and comforted,

> while the dogs are taken to the local animal control for quarantine.

>

> (Note: This has not happened to ME. Not yet, anyway.)

>

> What's wrong with this picture?

 

Nothing, if the question is the survival of a child or the survival of my dogs. I will (reluctantly) choose the child. In some cases I would be VERY reluctant.

--

"I would prefer even to fail with  | Larkin O'Kane, Trelac, Ansteorra

honor than win by cheating."       | larkin at webstar.net

SOPHOCLES, Philoctetes (409 B.C),  | Charlie Lawrence Cain

tr. David Green                    | San Angelo, TX

 

 

Subject: Re: ANST - animals

Date: Fri, 13 Feb 98 00:51:12 MST

From: "margiejr" <margiejr at sprintmail.com>

To: <ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG>

 

<snipage>

>Let me add another problem.

>

>4. unsocialized animals.

>

>IMO, an animal brought to an event needs to be properly socialized to

>large groups of people BEFORE the event. I have seen (dogs mainly here)

>who have obviously never been exposed to so much activity and strange

>people thrust right in the middle of a crowd during the list. I've

>overheard owners mention "this is Spike's trial run, we don't know if he

>can handle all this". And I've seen dogs snap, growl, and lunge at

>strangers. All at events. Unfortunately, even leashed animals can bite

>when over agitated.

 

I found a solution to geting dogs used to the noise and excitment of an

event is taking them to fighter practice were they can be around people and

hear the diffrent noises, see there owners interacting with strangers and to

let the animal get used to being petted by the stangers in funny cloths. My

chrystal has turned out very loveable and freindly towards SCA folks. she

is freindly with those in garb, those who come into my house, officers and

normaly only barks when there is a problem and she loves it when children

play with her.

 

While weÕre on the subject of pets and events. if a site is NO PET please make

sure it is in the anouncement for the event, I get real mad when I take my

animal to an event and get there after driving several hours to be informed

that they are not allowed, when nowere in the anouncement was it ever

mentioned NO pets. please rember that some of us that like to take our

animals with us may not live in your area so if it;s not in the flyier we

may not know about it. I learned my lesson and nowe call ahead but it is

still a pet peave.  I also get iritated when I can't take her because she is

a trained emergancy dog for me should I be camping and get hurt she is

trained to find help for me because of my back, but because itÕs my back

and not my eyes IÕm told I can't have her with me even though she is a

trained Assist dog..it's just one of my pet peaves..I'm rambling so I'm gonna

shut up now

 

Simone

 

 

Subject: Re: ANST - animals

Date: Fri, 13 Feb 98 08:46:34 MST

From: "Lori Campbell" <LCAMPBEL at ossm.edu>

To: ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG

 

> if a site is NO PET please make

> sure it is in the anouncement for the event, I get real mad when I take my

> animal to an event and get there after driving several hours to be informed

> that they are not allowed, when nowhere in the anouncement was it ever

> mentioned NO pets.

> Simone

 

The problem with this is that many autocrats, especially those

working on large events, are concentrating on fitting all the

*required* elements into their event announcements.  If they don't

have pets themselves, they may not even think about the possibility

of people bringing pets to an event - much less remember to

mention it in the add.

 

I have lots of friends that have pets and they like to bring them to

events.  My solution is, if you want to bring your animal to an event

and the add doesn't mention anything about pets - pick up the phone

and call the autocrat listed in the BlackStar.  They will be able to

tell you whether or not your pet would be welcome.  They might even

be more amenable to making special arrangements for assistance

animals if given some time to make necessary arrangements in

advance.

 

This type of forethought and planning could really save the day,

especially if you are traveling long distances and can't just

run your animal back home.

 

Kat

Barony of Wiesenfeuer, Ansteorra

*******************

Lori Campbell

lcampbel at ossm.edu

 

 

Date: Wed, 28 Apr 1999 20:36:13 EDT

From: <LrdRas at aol.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Hunting dogs

 

jyeates at realtime.net writes:

<< how many realize that the rottweiller (a personal favorite breed ... >>

 

A  source for beginning basic info on the history of dogs (and other  pets) is:

 

The Illustrated Dog- 'Animals in Art' by Tom Howard. 1994. Chartwell Books,

Inc. ISBN 0-7858-0178-2

 

and

 

The First Pet History of the World by David Comfort. 1994. Simon and

Schuster. ISBN 0-671-89102-2

 

Both of these books are very basic but they contain pictures, quotes, and

references to period sources which provide a good starting place for further

research.

 

Ras

 

 

Subject: Re: ANST - question: hound decontamination

Date: Thu, 30 Sep 1999 14:25:00 MST

From: Charlene Charette <charlene at flash.net>

To: ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG

 

Chris Harper wrote:

> >... anyone got good options for decontaminating a

> >reeking hound ???? (thinking to the day when he finds another deer carcass to

> >roll around in ...)

> >

> >'wolf

>

> I have always heard that washing in tomato juice would remove a skunks smell

> off of anything, so I am guessing if that is so, maybe it would work on the

> kind of odors you are dealing with.  Hope this helps.

 

Been there, tried that.  Several bottles.  Tomato juice didn't work.  There are

several products at the pet store that should work.  I used one called something

like "skunk off."

 

--Perronnelle

 

<the end>



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