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finger-rings-msg - 7/10/02

 

Medieval finger rings.

 

NOTE: See also the files: finger-rings-lnks, Signet-Rings-art, ear-rings-msg, jewelry-msg, gem-sources-msg, pearls-msg, metalworking-msg, metals-msg, jewlry-storag-msg.

 

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I  have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I have done  a limited amount  of  editing. Messages having to do  with separate topics  were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the  message IDs  were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make  no claims  as  to the accuracy  of  the information  given  by the individual authors.

 

Please respect the time  and  efforts of  those who have written  these messages. The copyright status  of these messages  is  unclear  at this time. If information  is  published  from  these  messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

   Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                         Stefan at florilegium.org

************************************************************************

 

From: meg at tinhat.stonemarche.org (meg)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Celtic Rings

Date: Sun, 19 Jun 94 22:47:56 EDT

Organization: Stonemarche Network Co-op

 

holmbeck at icarus.cs.weber.edu (Laura Holmbeck) writes:

> I posted this in another group, but it was suggested that I try it here.

>

> Does anyone know of a good source to contact to have Celtic Rings

> crafted/commissioned?

> -- Laura

 

Jan Wyman, of Crafty Fox Artworks, is an excellent silversmith whose work

is quite beautiful. She does excellent historic reproductions as well as

contemporary pieces. She can be reached at:

     Crafty Fox Artworks

     603 642-8584

 

Megan

==

In 1994: Linda Anfuso       non moritur cujus fama vivat

In the Current Middle Ages: Megan ni Laine de Belle Rive  

In the SCA, Inc: sustaining member # 33644

 

                               YYY     YYY

meg at tinhat.stonemarche.org      |  YYYYY  |

                               |____n____|

 

 

From: imperial at delphi.com

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Celtic Rings

Date: Mon, 20 Jun 94 01:03:29 -0500

 

Laura Holmbeck <holmbeck at icarus.cs.weber.edu> writes:

>I posted this in another group, but it was suggested that I try it here.

>

>Does anyone know of a good source to contact to have Celtic Rings

> crafted/commissioned?

Yes, Call the shop of Art Dennis at 619-329-3231 in

Desert Hot Springs, CA.  You could e-mail a # or address and I'll pass

it along.  He does great work.

 

 

From: tigranes at aol.com (Tigranes)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Where to get crest jewelry made?

Date: 25 Feb 1995 20:57:19 -0500

 

There are two places I know of  for signet rings.   One is called Heraldry

House, and is available through established lisenced jewelry stores.

 

The other is  Unique Jewelry, 5301 Anchorage, El Paso TX 79924  

 

Prices are comparable for either source.

 

 

From: david.razler at compudata.com (DAVID RAZLER)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Where to get crest jewel

Date: Sun, 19 Feb 95 13:51:00 -0400

Organization: Compu-Data BBS -=- Turnersville, NJ -=- 609-232-1245

 

RU>I would like to know where I can order rings (for two adult male sons /1

RU>gold) with family crest.

 

RU>                R Underwood

 

  Two answers: 1) there is a company advertising in TI that they do it - I

have no idea of the quality of their work good or bad. 2) If the College of

Heralds sees fit to accept my arms, I plan to carve my own jeweler's wax

ring, after discovering a local jeweler has a full lost wax shop and

wouldn't mind casting my work for a price. Many jewelers are cutting down on

inventory by stocking samples, pre-molded wax findings and carving and

casting custom work as ordered.

                               Aleksandr the Traveller

                            [david.razler at compudata.com]

 

 

From: lhernsen at freenet.columbus.oh.us (Luinrandir Hernsen)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Your device as a signet ring

Date: 21 Dec 1995 18:08:39 -0500

Organization: The Greater Columbus FreeNet

 

I am a silversmith in the SCA... i can turn your device into a Silver signet

ring for $35.... if you want color inlay ad $5 per color...  Gold prices

available on request.

--

We make silver jewelry for wholesale and retail. We also make metaphysical

items for you, your group or shop. for more info, reply E-mail.  To be put

on our mail list send proof of business for wholesale or $1 for retail to:

=========Luinrandir Hernsen, P.O.Box 141324, Columbus, Ohio 43214=========

 

 

From: clemke at whc.net (Carl Lemke)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Wedding rings

Date: Thu, 16 May 1996 00:03:00 GMT

Organization: All USENET -- www.net-link.com

 

On 6 May 1996 17:46:06 GMT, kellogg at rohan.sdsu.edu (kellogg) wrote:

>       In honor of our tenth wedding anniversary, my wife and I

>are renewing our vows with a recreation of a period wedding.  We

>have found an 11th century rite that we like, and it involves a

>blessing of rings which are later exchanged.  My question, any

>idea what 11th century wedding rings looked like?  Did they use

>just any old rings they liked, or were the rings of a specific

>style and format?

>

>               Avenel Kellough

 

Being a professional jeweler, I get asked this question frequently.  I

usually give people  a short extract on love and marrage rings from an

excellent book called "An Introduction to Rings" by Shirley Bury, who

is the Keeper, Department of Metalwork for the Victoria and Albert

Museum. I'll email you a copy.  If any others would like a copy email

a request to me.  If you would like a copy of my flyers on signet

rings and seal send your snail mail address.

Carl W. Lemke

SCA: Baron Walthari von Harx  (AKA: Master Walthari)

 

Carl W. Lemke Unique Jewelry

5301 Anchorage

El Paso, TX 79924

Email: clemke at whc.net

Heraldic engraving, signet rings, pendant seals, desk seals and period style jewelry.

 

 

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Wedding rings

From: s.krossa at aberdeen.ac.uk (Sharon Krossa)

Date: Thu, 16 May 1996 14:01:10 +0000

 

Regarding the use of rings in marriage ceremonies. I earlier stated that I

did not know whether wedding rings were used in Scotland, that they may

have, or may not. I now have a little more information on this. To wit, I

have found a reference to a wedding ring in the Protocol Books of James

Young 1485 - 1515 (Scottish Record Society 1952)

 

In an entry dated 14 October 1490:

 

"Instrument narrating that William Clerk, burgess of Canongate, lying in

his bed of sickness, declared that Agnes Chalmer, sometime his spouse, left

in her testament to John Clerk, her son, four gold rings, a silver girdle

of Greenish (?) colourr (varide [sic,?=viride] coloris), weighing five

ounces, and a hundred and twenty beads (oracula) of coral with "gaudeis" of

silver, and that Marjory Balfour, now his spouse, took into her own hands,

without the consent or gift of the said William, that girdle with the beads

and "gaudeis" and three of teh said rings; she still kept these goods. ..."

 

Followed by this entry:

 

"The same day and hour the said Marjory Balfour, forasmuch as William

Clerk, her spouse, being in extremis, said that she had taken the said

goods, declared that the said girdle weighed only three ounces and that she

had only one of the rings, which had been used in her marriage (quod ipsa

non habuit unum de predictis annulis uno excepto cum quo ipse Willelmus

ipsam Marjoriam disponsavit); ..."

 

These are apparently translations from James Young's original Latin, and

I'm afraid my Latin is a bit rusty so I'm not sure if the Latin quoted

concerning the ring really does mean it was given in marriage or not (I'm

sure our Latin experts will let us know, though! ;-)

 

Anyway, it would seem from this that at least some people did use a (gold)

ring in marriage, or at least one was given to the woman, in Scotland in

the late 15th century.

 

Effric neyn Kenyeoch Vcralte, sharing what little she knows

 

Sharon Krossa: skrossa at svpal.org (permanent)

-or- s.krossa at aberdeen.ac.uk (until June 1996)

 

 

From: gunnora at bga.com (Gunnora Hallakarva)

To: ansteorra at eden.com

Date: Mon, 21 Oct 1996 00:44:22 -0500

Subject: Wedding Rings in Period

 

Here's another interesting tidbit I gathered from the Historical Costuming

news list.

====================================

Date:    Sun, 20 Oct 1996 15:31:49 -0700

From:    Trudy <bambi at RESORT.COM>

Subject: wedding rings

 

i happened to find a book yesterday which discuessed (only a little) wedding

rings and on which finger they were worn...i just wrote down some notes, so i'm

only paraphrsing here:

 

during the period of george I in england, the wedding ring was usually

worn on the thumb (although it was placed on the fourth -- i guess what

we consider the ring -- finger during the ceremony).  apparently very large

wedding rings were fashionable which necessitated waering them on the

thumb.

 

in france from the 11th to the 15th centuries, they wre usually on the right

hand, middle finger; s in some areas they were on the fourth finger.

 

the guals and the britons of the 1st century wore the ring on the middle

finger (didn't say which hand).

 

the order of matrimony in england, pre-freformation said that men

should wear their wedding ring on their right hand, women on the left.

 

chirlandajo's frescoes in the curch of santa croce in florence show

the betrothal of the ivrgin (make that virgin...no backspace c key here)

mary -- the ring is placed by joseph on mary's fourth vinger, right hand.

 

during the betrothal of lucrezia borgia with giv ARGH make that giovanni

sforza on feb. 2, 1493, the wedding (engagement) ring was placed on her

fourth finger, left hand.

 

and finally, an idea that might explain the custom of wearing the wedding

ring on the thumb -- the second digit of the thumb was dedicated to

the virgin mary.

 

this is all from "rings for the finger", by george frederick kunz,

dover press, 1917 (repreinted i believe late 1940s).  i found thi s book

used at Green Apple Books on Clement St. in San Francisco (i didn't buy

it so it's still there ) if any bay area people are interested.

 

-Kendra Van Cleave

==================================

 

Gunnora Hallakarva

Herskerinde

 

 

From: Katherine Penney <katherinex_penney at ccm.jf.intel.com>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Irish jewelry  HELP!

Date: Tue, 10 Dec 1996 07:14:56 -0800

Organization: Intel Corporation

 

>         And finally, the Claddagh is, sadly, OOP....:-/

>

>         Tiarna Liam O' Maoilriain

 

In "Rings for the Finger", which Dover has so kindly reprinted for us,

it is stated that rings very similar to the Claddagh (Fede or Faith

Rings) have been used at least since the Classical era (Hands holding

each other, hands holding heart, many others) and were VERY popular

during the middle ages as betrothal rings.

 

I read a story on the web that a Margaret Joyce married a wealthy

Spanish merchant who traded with Galway. He died, leaving her a

considerable fortune. Returning to Galway she used her fortune to build

bridges from Galway to Sligo, and re-married Oliver Og French, Major of

Galway 1596/7. She was rewarded for her good works and charity by an

eagle who dropped the original Claddagh ring into her lap.

 

We don't know that the Claddagh itself is OOP, we do know that it has

not yet been documented early enough.  The Irish are a conquered people,

and there is not lots of documentation for us to work with...How many

Irish songs (i.e. words and tune) are there that can be DOCUMENTED pre

1600? (heck, I'd even give you 1650 on that one!)

 

Constance Fairfax

 

 

From: timbeck at ix.netcom.com(Tim Beck)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Irish jewelry  HELP!

Date: 11 Dec 1996 03:28:40 GMT

 

>        I stand corrected. Hopefully, someone *will* be able to

> document the Claddagh, though mo Bantiarna and I will go on wearing ours

> regardless. :-)

>

>        Tiarna Liam O' Maoilriain

 

The authenticity police are really working overtime if they gripe about

claddagh rings.  The V&A has a gimmal ring in its jewelry vault that is

made up of three thin bands which combined make two hands holding a

heart. Looks a whole bunch like a claddagh.  And a claddagh looks a

whole heck of a lot more historically accurate than most comercially

available jewelry (don'cha think?).

 

As for that question about the brooch... it sounds like a type of ring

brooch. There was a type produced, at least in England, France, and

most probably Ireland inwhich the "ring" terminated at the top in a

pair of hands- they kinda look like they are praying (or like the hands

at the end of the Ponds skin cream comercial, or the ones on the logo

for the Chemical Manufactures of America)...  Anyway they were ment to

hold a stone.  They show up in inventories from the 14th century

according to R.W. Lightbown (Medieval European Jewellery).  I can't

tell you about the gift end of it, could be true, could have been a

latter day marketing ploy handed down as tradition.

 

                     Just a thought...

                           Good Luck,

                                      Timothy

 

 

From: excmairi at aol.com (EXCMairi)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Irish jewelry  HELP!

Date: 11 Dec 1996 15:55:35 GMT

 

>The V&A has a gimmal ring in its jewelry vault that is

>made up of three thin bands which combined make two hands holding a

>heart. Looks a whole bunch like a claddagh.

 

The "Past Times" catalog sells copies of the gimmal ring (the hands cover

the heart and then swing out to expose it), gold one goes for $125 and a

silver version goes for $14.95 (1-800-621-6020).  They also show a gold

"fede" ring, called a roman betrothal ring, with two hands clasped at the

wrist ($89.50).

 

Baroness Mairi

 

 

Date: Sun, 04 May 1997 14:15:13 -0700

From: Eric & Lissa McCollum <ericmc at primenet.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Wire wrapping

 

Janine Goldman-Pach wrote:

> I am interest in beading and wire wrapping, in particular.  Can anyone

> suggest some sources for period wire wrapping?  More importantly, is it

> period?

>

> Inui

 

I have several sources for beading (and would be interested

in learning of yours). Wire wrapping is a bit more scarce in

my collection, but I suggest looking up the book "Dress

Accessories" by Geoff Egan and Frances Pritchard, published

by the Muewum of London. The ISBN is 0 11 290444 0.

 

It shows several wire broaches, and wire rings. Here is a quote:

 

"Wire jewellery came back into vogue in England during the

14th century coinciding with the increased output of drawn

wire. Finger rings were made from wire with a narrow guage

in contrast to the chunky finger rings made from plaited

and twisted wire that are common in the Viking period and

which occur in England as late as the 1170s on the evidnce

of a ring in the Lark Hill Hord. A finger ring made from a

short length of brass wire coiled round five times was

recovered from a late 13th or early 14th century deposit in

London. Both ends were twisted under and over the previous

coils to bind them together and to add a decorative finish.

Although this was an extremely simple method by which to

produce a finger ring, it is not a solitary example. Another

in the collection of the museum of London is made from two

wires twisted together in opposing directions and finished

with an imitation oval bezel, and even a pin could be used,

the head substitueded for a stone."

 

Hope this helps. It is an incredible book!

 

Gwendolen Wold

 

 

From: "Wolf Kestris Rowanwood" <wolffe at onslowonline.net>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Posey rings

Date: Mon, 27 Mar 2000 13:03:16 -0500

 

. I have one, it was exchanged with my husband at our 5th wedding

annjiversary and reexchanging of vows.  Its from WEst Europe, early 15th

Cen., mine is a replica tho, not the real thing.}:)

 

There is a company.. ummm, can't think of the name off hand that has it and

the one that says here is my heart, guard it well. if I can find the

catalog, I'll post it.

 

-Wolf

 

Tempest Gules wrote:

>On Sat, 25 Mar 2000 23:59:53 -0500, Laura Shumar

><lshumar at netdirect.net> wrote:

>>I'm looking for sayings suitable for posey rings and other tokens - does

>>anyone have suggestions for sources?

>

>There's always "Vous et nul autre"  -  "You and no other".

>It's my personal favorite, and it's (at least) Elizabethan.

>

>I'm aware that vous is the formal-or-plural form.  I don't know

>why it was used in this ring.

>

>Jost

>

>>I've found one I like - "A vila mon coeur gardi li mo."  This is supposed to

>>translate to

>>"You have my heart; guard it well."   Does anyone know if that's right?

Was that

>>taken from a period piece? (this was from a catalog, and they didn't list

>>their source.)

>>Can anyone identify the language?  It seems a bit strange to me, because I

>>usually see "you have my heart" as "mon coeur avez".

>>

>>Any help will be appreciated!

>>

>>    -Laura

 

 

From: "Wolf Kestris Rowanwood" <wolffe at onslowonline.net>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Posey rings

Date: Mon, 27 Mar 2000 13:05:57 -0500

 

A posey ring or love ring, is a simple gold band engraved with a brief

sentiment or poem on the outside. They were used as a lover's token, a

wedding ring, or simply as a means of showing regard or giving a gift.

 

-Wolf

 

Tasha wrote in message <07ce0c5d.201b4223 at usw-ex0102-015.remarq.com>...

><lshumar at netdirect.net> wrote:

>>I'm looking for sayings suitable for posey rings and other tokens - does

>>anyone have suggestions for sources?

>>

>{snip}

>>

>>    -Laura

 

>Forgive my ignorance, but what is a posey ring?

>

>Tasha

 

 

From: julianna_de_navarre at my-deja.com

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Posey rings

Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2000 12:37:56 GMT

> There's always "Vous et nul autre" - "You and no other".

> It's my personal favorite, and it's (at least) Elizabethan.

>

> I'm aware that vous is the formal-or-plural form. I don't know

> why it was used in this ring.

>

> Regards,

> Jost

 

     Yes, "vous" is the formal form of "you", or "yous" ;) as in a

group.  I can see how this could be appropriate, especially in the case

of a Champion and his Lady, who aren't necessarily anything other than

"platonic".  Or, in the second case, exchanged between the members of a

group of friends.  Just my .02.

 

Juliana

 

 

From: Medieval Siege Society <MSS at pomian.nospam.demon.co.uk>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Posey rings

Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2000 20:37:18 +0100

Organization: MSS

 

Hello Laura,

 

The book you need is "English Posies and Posy Rings" by Joan Evans.  It

lists about 3000.

 

The language used in many early posy rings was Norman French, with

French, Latin and English used in later times.  The posies were

originally written on the outside, moving to the hidden inside of the

ring in later (mid 16th Century onwards) times.

 

These are some examples from the 15th century

 

INSCRIPTION             TRANSLATION

AMOUR VINCIT OM         Love conquers all

AMOUR ET CONSTANCE      Love and steadfastness

ERUNT DUO IN CAME UNA   They shall be two in one flesh

IEME LA BELLE           Love is beautiful

IN BONE FAY             In good faith

MON COR AVEZ            Have my heart

AUTRE NE VUEIL          Desire no other

SAUNZ DEPARTIR          Without division (all my love is yours)

NUL AUTRE               None other

PRIVATA DI TE MORIO     Deprived of thee I shall die

POUR AMOUR SAY DOVE   For love so sweet

SANS MAL DESYR          Without evil wish

SEMPER AMEMUS           May we love forever

UNE DEZIR               One desire

 

I hope this helps.

 

Laura Shumar <lshumar at netdirect.net> writes

>I'm looking for sayings suitable for posey rings and other tokens - does

>anyone have suggestions for sources?

>

>I've found one I like - "A vila mon coeur gardi li mo." This is supposed to

>translate to

>"You have my heart; guard it well."   Does anyone know if that's right?  Was

>that

>taken from a period piece? (this was from a catalog, and they didn't list

>their source.)

>Can anyone identify the language?  It seems a bit strange to me, because I

>usually

>see "you have my heart" as "mon coeur avez".

>

>Any help will be appreciated!

>

>    -Laura

 

Andrzej Lubienski

Member of The Medieval Siege Society

http://www.pomian.demon.co.uk/index.htm (Society website)

 

 

From: <hrjones at socrates.berkeley.edu>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Posey rings

Date: 29 Mar 2000 02:37:46 GMT

Organization: University of California at Berkeley

 

Wolf Kestris Rowanwood <wolffe at onslowonline.net> wrote:

: It is a Gaelic blessing..

 

: Dean Hardage wrote in message ...

:>The blessing finishes 'And until we meet again, may God hold you in the palm

:>of his hand.'  I don't know the reference either, just how it goes.

 

... and I'd be willing to bet actual cash money that it doesn't date

earlier than the 19th century (heck, I might even be willing to go for

20th century with the right odds).

 

Tangwystyl

*********************************************************

Heather Rose Jones         hrjones at socrates.berkeley.edu

**********************************************************

 

From: "Dennis O'Connor" <dmoc at primenet.com>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Posey rings

Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2000 23:13:47 -0700

 

"Medieval Siege Society" <MSS at pomian.nospam.demon.co.uk> wrote ...

> The book you need is "English Posies and Posy Rings" by Joan Evans.  It

> lists about 3000.

>

> The language used in many early posy rings was Norman French, with

> French, Latin and English used in later times.  The posies were

> originally written on the outside, moving to the hidden inside of the

> ring in later (mid 16th Century onwards) times.

>

> These are some examples from the 15th century

>

> INSCRIPTION             TRANSLATION

> AMOUR VINCIT OM         Love conquers all

 

By coincidence, the acronym for this is mentioned

in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, and is on the inside

of my wedding ring.

 

At least, I'm pretty sure it's there, but I haven't

had the ring off in a very very long time ...

--

Dennis O'Connor                    dmoc at primenet.com

Vanity Web Page   http://www.primenet.com/~dmoc/

 

<the end>



Formatting copyright © Mark S. Harris (THLord Stefan li Rous).
All other copyrights are property of the original article and message authors.

Comments to the Editor: stefan at florilegium.org