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beads-msg - 7/29/10

 

Necklaces, beads. References. construction.

 

NOTE: See also these files: beadwork-msg, glasswork-msg, ivory-msg, bone-msg,

horn-msg, ivory-bib, lapidary-msg, A-Lapidary-art, jewelry-msg, gem-sources-msg.

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NOTICE -

 

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I  have collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to 1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

 

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

 

I  have done  a limited amount  of  editing. Messages having to do  with separate topics  were sometimes split into different files and sometimes extraneous information was removed. For instance, the  message IDs  were removed to save space and remove clutter.

 

The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make  no claims  as  to the accuracy  of  the information  given  by the individual authors.

 

Please  respect the time  and  efforts of  those who have written  these messages. The  copyright status  of these messages  is unclear  at this time. If  information  is  published  from  these  messages, please give credit to the originator(s).

 

Thank you,

    Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous

                                          Stefan at florilegium.org

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From: kellogg at rohan.sdsu.edu (C. Kevin Kellogg)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: bead work

Date: 9 Oct 1995 18:10:44 GMT

Organization: San Diego State University Computing Services

 

Eric McCollum (ericmc at ix.netcom.com) wrote:

: So, does anyone know uses in period for beads that do not involve

: needle, thread, and dresses? I can think of rosaries off the top of my

: head. My local library is short on resources.

 

Beads were used by the Norse for necklaces. Millifiori beads, in

particular, are very common in grave finds.  The World of the Vikings CD rom

has a large store of such images.  I've been playing at duplicating some

of the patterns with Fimo.

 

Avenel Kellough

 

 

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

From: Bob Hurley <bhurley at ilinkgn.net>

Subject: Re: Venetian beads-help!

Date: Thu, 04 Apr 1996 10:54:31 -0500

Organization: Nant-y-Derwyddon, Meridies

 

MISS PATRICIA M HEFNER wrote:

>

> Does anybody know where (or how) I can get period-style Venetian beads?

> They were first made in the eleventh or twelfth century. They are multi-

> colored and round with carefully designed gold "net" semi-circles that

> fits onto the beads. The beads are usually put on red strings that are

> tied into knots that hold the bead in its place. I once had a necklace

> made with them but now that's gone. I really, really, want to replace

> it. Can anybody help me? Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!

> --Isabelle

 

I don't know enough about beads to give you a specific source, but Bally Bead Co. (P. O. Box 934, Rockwall TX 75087, 1-800-543-0280) may have them.

 

Robert

 

 

From: sdavitt at ub.d.umn.edu (sarah davitt)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Venetian beads-help!

Date: 4 Apr 1996 22:30:12 GMT

Organization: University of Minnesota, Duluth

 

MISS PATRICIA M HEFNER wrote:

> Does anybody know where (or how) I can get period-style Venetian beads?

> They were first made in the eleventh or twelfth century. They are multi-

> colored and round with carefully designed gold "net" semi-circles that

> fits onto the beads. The beads are usually put on red strings that are

> tied into knots that hold the bead in its place. I once had a necklace

> made with them but now that's gone. I really, really, want to replace

> it. Can anybody help me? Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!

> --Isabelle

 

The Venitian beads are made much the same way the new-fangled Fimo beads

are made.. The process is called making a 'cane' and it is included in

the book "the New Clay"  where the pattern is built up into a round tube

of color, and then rolled out into a desired size (no matter how small you

roll it, the design stays in tact!)

 

The 'cane' is then sliced into little disks (like slicing a jelly roll), and

holes poked through the bead's sides perfect for stringing.

 

As for replacing the necklace.. check at beade shoppes.. and *ask* for

them.. because they are not cheap, mose storefronts don't carry them.

 

Though if you wish, I would suggest making them of richly colored clay,

and then giving them a very slick laquer, for that glassy appearance.  

This is by far cheaper, and they can be color coordinated.

 

Best of luck, and if you have any questions, feel free to e-mail,

Celine Grandjean

mka Sarahj Davitt-Style

 

 

From: afn03234 at freenet3.afn.org (Ronald L. Charlotte)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Venetian beads-help!

Date: 8 Apr 1996 10:51:36 GMT

 

MISS PATRICIA M HEFNER wrote:

> Does anybody know where (or how) I can get period-style Venetian beads?

> They were first made in the eleventh or twelfth century. They are multi-

> colored and round with carefully designed gold "net" semi-circles that

> fits onto the beads. The beads are usually put on red strings that are

> tied into knots that hold the bead in its place. I once had a necklace

> made with them but now that's gone. I really, really, want to replace

> it. Can anybody help me? Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!

> --Isabelle

 

Pick up any current issue of _Lapidary Journal_. The ads for beading

supplies nearly crowd out the ads for other types ofjeweler's supplies.

--

     al Thaalibi ---- An Crosaire, Trimaris

     Ron Charlotte -- Gainesville, FL

     afn03234 at afn.org

 

 

From: mellitus7 at aol.com (Mellitus7)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Byzantine beadwork--???

Date: 5 Jun 1996 15:11:51 -0400

 

IVANOR at delphi.com writes:

>I was talking about the situation where the thread weakens and breaks. Even

>the excellent method you refer to above (which I would very much like to

>learn) isn't proof against weak thread or sharp edges on the beads where

>they are drilled.

 

True, but if each bead  has a knot between it and its nieghbors, you'll only

lose one bead when it breaks.  Still, the best cure is prevention.  Use

strong thread like sinew or tiger tail and file any rough edges before you

bead.

 

HL Mellitus of Rouncivale

bead goob

 

 

From: Cluster User <cluster.user at nd.edu>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Byzantine beadwork--???

Date: Wed, 05 Jun 1996 19:00:49 -0500

Organization: University of Notre Dame

 

I didn't hear the beginning of this thread, so I may be repeating

things. If so, disregard. I have done a small amount of bead stringing

as a jeweler, so I pass on what I was taught. If you're sewing metal

beads to garb, or stringing metal beads alone or with other types of

beads, stay away from silk thread. The metal beads will cut through

it. Nylon will stretch more than silk will, but it won't cut through

as readily. The earlier idea about tigertail is a good one, but if you

can put knots in it you're better than I am. In any case, use the

heaviest thread that you can double back through your smallest bead

holes without stressing or fraying the thread. Silk and nylon threads,

as well as tigertail and probably books on bead stringing can be found

at a jewelers' supply store and probably at a good craft store. Hope

this is useful.

 

Carol of Stargate

 

 

From: mellitus7 at aol.com (Mellitus7)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Beadwork

Date: 5 Jun 1996 15:11:57 -0400

 

darcyb at crc.stmartin.EDU (Darcy Ballew) writes:

>My name is Lady Siobhan of Ennistymon.  I am

>interested in finding a book, or two, that is a

>how-to book and also has patterns.

>Lady Siobhan

 

Good lady,

My best advice is to get one of those booklets from Sindara or see if your

local hobby store has something that can be of use (Beaded Jewelry,etc).

Sindara's are written from an SCA perspective which helps, but if you take

what you learn from Sally Crafter's and combine it with a little research

(Dubin's History of Beads,  Mowatt's Universal Bead, etc) you should come

up with some nice accessories for your garb.

 

HL Mellitus of Rouncivale

Calontir Bead Goob

 

 

From: sirona at midtown.net

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: jet beads

Date: Sun, 01 Sep 1996 08:19:21 GMT

Organization: Midtown Computer Services

 

oguinn at proaxis.com (C and D Carter/Briggs) wrote:

>      I am on a quest for jet, that dark black, semi-precious stone.

>It seems that Celtic women collected 2 things, amber and jet.  Amber

>is easily found but jet is more elusive  If anyone knows of sources,

>esp. for jet beads, please e-mail me

>                              

>                                    Many thanks,

>                             Baroness Kathryn Melville O'Guinn

 

I found this on my bead news group for you :>

 

We've gottem....Please visit http://www.beads2u.com

4mm blackstone (Jet) and other shapes.

AMBUSH05 at aol.com

 

happy trails robert

 

 

From: gunnora at bga.com (Gunnora Hallakarva)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Jet beads and Black Amber

Date: 1 Sep 1996 14:34:36 GMT

 

Baroness Kathryn Melville O'Guinn oguinn at proaxis.com (C and D Carter/Briggs) wrote:

>      I am on a quest for jet, that dark black, semi-precious stone.

>It seems that Celtic women collected 2 things, amber and jet.  Amber

>is easily found but jet is more elusive  If anyone knows of sources,

>esp. for jet beads, please e-mail me

 

Heilsa!

     This is interesting.  I knew that the Vikings considered jet to be "Black

Amber" and equally believed them to be Freyja's tears.  I had not realized that the Celts prized jet also (though with as much trading of culture and ideas as went on between the Vikings and the Celts, there is no reason I should be surprised).  Both the Vikings and the Celts liked to put amber beads with blue glass beads as well, and sometimes green ones.  The existing beads I've seen are a mid to sky blue (like cobalt glass with white glass stirred in fairly well) and the green ones are the color green that I personally dislike, which is more of a drab or olive green...  see "The History of Beads, 30,000bc to the Present " for nice pictures.

 

Gunnora Hallakarva

Herskerinde

 

 

From: gunnora at bga.com (Gunnora Hallakarva)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Researching the beadmakers guild

Date: 31 Oct 1996 08:17:36 GMT

 

luiseach at aol.com says...

>What beadmaker's guild?  I've been looking for something along these lines

>and have found nothing.  In fact, lots of people will tell you that most

>beads are OOP.  There are some pretty good mundane references for medieval

>and renaissance use of beads in different parts of Europe, including one

>(I'd have to look up the exact organization name) that says seed beads are

>period.

>Luighseach nic Lochlainn

>Arts & Sciences Officer

>Barony of Dreiburgen (Caid)

 

Good Gods!

 

        Beads have been around for millenia... at least since 30,000BC.  

Millefiori-technique beads (usually called mosaic beads if they aren't Venetian) are likewise ancient, the technique of caning was known in Hellenistic Egypt and Classical Rome (ca. 300BC to 400AD), and I've even seen examples of Viking-made mosaic beads(ca. 800-1000 AD) that very much predated the Venetian variety (they

reinvented the mosaic glass technique ca. late 1400's, but the bead industry didn't get going really good until the 1800s in Venice) .  

 

        As for seed beads, the Spanish imported Venetian-made seed beads to the

New World at the very end of the SCA period (Columbus carried seed beads with him in 1492), however, before that seed beads had been being produced in India, and were first imported to Southeast Asia by Indian traders during the 1st century AD.

 

        Beads were produced throughout Europe from the Migration Age to the

Renaissance:

 

Staraja LAdoga, Russia: Glass Beadmaking ca. 700-1000 AD.

Novgorod, Russia: Baltic amber beads ca. Prehistory to 12th century AD.

Kiev, Rissia: Glass beadmaking ca. 975-1200AD.

Norway: mosaic and lampworked glass beads, c. 800-1000AD.

Frankish tribes: beads of gold glass, garnet and amber throughout the period.

Germany from Hedeby, along the Elbe and the Rhine: glass beadmaking 5th century

AD.

Konigsberg: amber beadmaking, ca. 900-1200

Lombards: garnet beadmaking, 5th century AD.

Sicily: coral beads from antiquity throughout the period.

Sardis: Glass beadmaking ca. 400-600

Persia: silver beads and pearl beads ca. 800-1100AD imported to Europe by the

Vikings.

India: beads of carnelian, agate, onyx and garnet ca. 800-1100AD imported to Europe by the Vikings.

 

And  of course beads of glass (from Sidon, Tyre and Egypt), onyx and carnelian beads (from Yemen and India), emerald and sapphire beads (from Burma and Sri Lanka) and ivory beads (from Africa by way of Constantinople) were imported at various times throughout the period.

 

The best general work on the history and provenance of various beads is:

 

Dubin, Lois S..  The History of Beads from 30,000 BC to the Present.  New York:

Harry N. Abrams. 1984.  ISBN 0-8109-0736-4.

 

The hardcover is expensive... at least $70, but I've been told that a paperback edition recently became available.

--

Gunnora Hallakarva

Herskerinde

 

 

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

From: lindahl at deshaw.com (Greg Lindahl)

Subject: Re: Researching the beadmakers guild

Organization: D. E. Shaw & Co.

Date: Sun, 3 Nov 1996 16:34:28 GMT

 

Gunnora Hallakarva <gunnora at bga.com> wrote:

>Dubin, Lois S..  The History of Beads from 30,000 BC to the Present.  New York:

>Harry N. Abrams. 1984.  ISBN 0-8109-0736-4.

>The hardcover is expensive... at least $70, but I've been told that a paperback  

>edition recently became available.

 

Found it on the web:

 

by Lois Sherr Dubin , Togashi(Photographer) , Togashi

 

Concise Edition

Paperback

List: $19.95 -- Amazon.com Price: $17.96 -- You Save: $1.99(10%)

Published by Harry N Abrams (Pap)

Publication date: September 1, 1995

ISBN: 0810926172

 

The paperback edition is only a "concise edition" -- has anyone seen

it? My lady and I think we saw a copy in the Corning Glass Museum gift

shop and didn't buy it because we were disappointed by pictures

weren't included in the smaller edition. In fact Corning was also a

bit disappointing; they don't have most of their 500-1600 western

european stuff on display. Who wants to see 500 nearly-identical

baroque bowls?

 

Gregory Blount

 

 

From: sindara at pobox.com (Sharon R. Saroff)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Researching the beadmakers guild

Date: Fri, 01 Nov 1996 04:22:31 GMT

 

The History of Beads paperback edition is missing the lovely and

useful bead timeline that the hardcover has.  I think the hardcover

edition is well worth the money.

 

There are lots of sources of the use of beads. Just look at books on

historical embroidery and jewelry.  You will find lots of information.

 

In 1984 I started the East Kingdom Beadworkers Guild.  We bosted some

200 members at one point society-wide.  There is still an East Kingdom

guild, but it is very different from what I started.  I think the lady

in charge is doing the best she can.  I am in Ansteorra now and am too

busy to run a guild, but I still teach at events.

 

I have a booklet that I wrote up called "Scouting out the Bead".  It

is an overview the history of beadwork and beads with an emphasis on

period stuff.  It is also what I use to help people find information.

I have an extensive bibliography attached to it.

 

If you are interested in more information, post me privately.

 

Sindara

 

 

From: horstmann at aol.com

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Researching the beadmakers guild

Date: 17 Nov 1996 07:29:40 GMT

 

>The paperback edition is only a "concise edition" -- has anyone seen

>it? My lady and I think we saw a copy in the Corning Glass Museum gift

>shop and didn't buy it because we were disappointed by pictures

>weren't included in the smaller edition. In fact Corning was also a

>bit disappointing; they don't have most of their 500-1600 western

>european stuff on display. Who wants to see 500 nearly-identical

>baroque bowls?

 

>Gregory Blount

 

I own the concise edition referred to above.  It is a nice reference to

beads from around the world.  There aren't as many pictures as the

hardbound version, but there are still a lot of pictures here.  There is a

very nice four page pull out time line of bead manufacture included as

well.  For those who can't justify the hardcopy expense, this is still a

very nice work.

 

Horst von Horstmann

 

 

From: Stephen & Colleen Mills <smills at mail.fn.net>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Researching the beadmakers guild

Date: Sun, 17 Nov 1996 10:01:29 -0600

 

I was given a book a couple of years ago that has been a great primary

source for my jewelry making.It is called The History Of Beads from

30,000BC to the present by Sherr Dublin.It is hard covered with 254 full

color plates and more B & W illistrations.The ISBN is 0-8109-0736-4

I would recommend this book to anyone who likes beads or makes items for

A&S competitions.

 

Lady Clare

 

 

Date: Mon, 05 May 1997 13:54:33 -0700

From: Eric & Lissa McCollum <ericmc at primenet.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Wire wrapping

 

DianaFiona at aol.com wrote: But oddly enough,

> although the Italians in particular made a lot of wonderful glass beads, they

> *don't* seem to have worn them! They were made for trading and seem to have

> been reguarded as tacky, primative things.... Silly people!

 

Actually, while this is the usual opinion on beads in our period,

if you look at paintings and objects from our time period you will

find that beads went in and out of fashion. For instance, in the

mid 1400's there seems to have been quite a fad of wearing bead

(probably about size 9 or 10 seed bead) necklaces with those wonderful

Burgundian dresses. If you have access to Boucher's "20,000 Years

of Fashion", check out the painting by Petrus Christus called

"Portrait of a Girl", c 1470. It shows a three tier necklace made

probably with a double needle technique, with seed beads, bugle beads,

and pearls. I have around a half dozen other pictures of that style dress

with similar necklaces.

 

In the late 1500's, you can find many examples of beaded necklaces. I particularly like the necklace in the painting dated 1589 of Elizabeth Brydges, shown in the book "Tudor and Jacobean Jewellery" by Diana Scarisbrick. It is

similar to a discription later in the book, "Pearls also contrasted with beads

of coloured glass or jet threaded into multiple strands and worn bib-style

with low-cut dresses."

 

I have many pictures of beads threaded into hair styles, or worn as a

circlet. But beads weren't used only for adorning the body. I suggest

looking in a book called "Glass Beads from Europe", by Sibylle Jargstorf.

It shows a wonderful Host holder from Lower Saxony germany, from the second

half of the thirteenth centrly. It is encrusted glass beads and pearls.

There is also a glass mirror decorated with tiny glass beads from the

same area and time. "The use of glass beads in ecclesiatical beadwork

was apparently soon followed by a restricted use in profane ornaments"

 

And depending on your cut-off date of 'period', you might want to check

out the book "Embriodery masterworks" by Virginia Churchill Bath. It shows

an incredible beaded layette basket, from 1645. The basket is made of

wire covered with beads. Then various figures have been made with beads

embroidered onto parchment, and attatched to the basket. I have found

several other examples of this kind of basket, but none earlier than

1600.

 

> Of course, pearls

> were very popular, but there were not many other gems made into beads--stone

> cutting is very hard to do well with period methods, not to mention extremely

> time-consuming. This is why the metal work in period is usually of so much

> higher a quality, by modern standards, than the cut stones. Rosaries were

> quite popular, of course, and were made of a wide variety of materials, but

> still the expensive ones were more likely to have been made of gold or silver

> beads than stone or glass.

 

There were other possibilities. Beads made of rose petals are period. And jade

was carved in wonderfully skilled ways. Also, if you look in the book

"The History of Beads" by Lois Sherr Dubin, you can find a fiftheenth century

rorasy of hollow agate beads, each of which opens to reveal a scene in

enameled gold. On the same page is a carved boxwood prayer bead made in

Flanders about 1500 that you have to see to believe. I have never seen such

detail!

 

Ok, I will stop now, or you'll never shut me up. My point is simply that

I have found more to the history of beads in our period than trade beads

and rosaries.

 

Gwendolen Wold

 

 

Date: Wed, 04 Jun 1997 00:53:38 -0700

From: Eric & Lissa McCollum <ericmc at primenet.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Looking for documention on period seed beads

 

Thistlekp at aol.com wrote:

> If you know of documention for period seed beads or using them with a loom.

> Please send back it is needed for a A&S compition. Thank you, Lord Bryan

> Morrison, Outlands.

 

Glass seed beads are period. You might want to check the books:

 

"The History of Beads" by Lois Sherr Dubin

"Glass Beads from Europe" by Sibylle Jargstorf

"Early Sixteenth Century Glass Beads in the

  Spanish Colonial Trade" by Marvin T. Smith

  and Mary Elizabeth Good

"Beadwork" Shire album 57 by Pamela Clabburn

"Bead Embroidery" by Joan Edwards

 

And, check out various pictures  from the mid

fifteenth century. The one I can think of

off the top of my head (because I just finished

a recreation of the necklace in it) is called

'Portrait of a Girl' by Petrus Christus. It

shows a 3 tier seed bead and bugle bead necklace.

There seems to have been quite a fad for seed

bead necklaces at the time, worn with those

Burgundian dresses with the V neckline in front.

 

As to loom work...well, I have been hunting that

for a couple of years now. If you come up with

any documentation for it, I would LOVE to know

where you find it. As far as I know, loomed

glass seed beads are post period. (I have talked

to a gentleman who said he knew of heddle loomed

beads in the Byzantine era, but I never was able

to pin him down on his sources.)

 

Gwendolen Wold

 

 

From: Eric & Lissa McCollum <ericmc at primenet.com>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Beading and Rosaries

Date: 16 Jul 1997 15:19:01 -0700

 

Matthew Downing wrote:

> Does anyone out there know anything about period

> rosaries? I would like to do one for an upcoming

> A&S competition, but I just don't know where to start

> looking on the 'net. Any suggestions? (If you're

> reading this Rashid .... )Any help would be vastly,

> vocally and enthusiastically appreciated!

>

> Melisant (posing as Matthew)

 

On the 'net, I'm not sure. But may I suggest two

books to look in:

 

"The History of Beads" by Lois Sherr Dubin has a

section on prayer beads.

 

"Glass Beads from Europe" by Sibylle Jargstorf

should be extremely useful as well. (This is

my current favorite book to suggest for bead

documentation.)

 

As with many other things, the answer depends

on where and when you are looking, and what you

want to make it out of. I suggest looking also

at paintings and woodcuts from the time and place

you are interested in.

 

Gwendolen Wold

 

 

Date: Mon, 18 Aug 1997 11:57:48 -0400 (EDT)

From: Luiseach at aol.com

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Beads

 

Anyone in "downtown" Caid who is interested in period beads need only hie him

or herself to the Mingei Museum in San Diego's Balboa Park to see a TRULY

WONDERFUL exhibit of beads from all over the world and many time periods.

The exhibit includes a bead timeline with pictures and actual examples of

the beads.  The Mingei Museum has not been in its present location for very

long--to find it, you need to locate the "House of Charm" on a Balboa Park

map.  This show is well worth going to, just for the beauty of the items

shown, and, if you get really inspired, there are several outstanding bead

stores in the area.  <Usual disclaimers, I don't work for any of them, just

spend money there>

 

Luighseach nic Lochlainn

Dreiburgen, Caid

 

 

Date: Tue, 19 Aug 1997 00:48:24 -0500From: Gunnora Hallakarva <gunnora at bga.com>To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.eduSubject: Viking Beads The Vikings not only had beads, they had extraordinarily beautiful andintricate beads.  In fact, although they did import quite a lot of beadsfrom various places, the most elaborate beads I have seen were millefioribeads produced in Scandinavia at either Helgo or Paiviken. Native beadswere also produced in amber, jet, bone, walrus ivory and gold.   Glassbeads from a variety of sources are found in graves, including spheres,tubes, melons, cornerless cubes, gold sandwich beads, glass mosaic(millefiori) beads, and glass seed beads. (The seed beads were found atCoppergate and were sewn onto clothing). Other beads were imported from theArabs (silver beads, Indfian carnelian beads, rock crystal beads, Red Seacowrie shell beads, Syrian and Egyptian glass mosaic beads), Russiantraders (etched carnelians from Iran), and Byzantine glass mosaic beads.It's also interesting to note that the earliest glass bead in North Americawas recovered from the L'Aux Meadows Vinland site.  Beads seem to indicatewealth and status, and are mostly found in women's graves.Here are some excellent sources for Viking beads:Dubin, Lois Sherr,  The History of Beads from 30,000 B.C. to the Present.New York: Harry N. Abrams. 1987.  ISBN 0-8109-0736-4[Get this book.  It was expensive, but it was worth every bit of the cost.Dubin covers a huge variety of beads, with excellent photos of the actualperiod beads.  On pp. 73-77 Dubin discusses Viking beads and has somephotographs of beads that made me drool.]Astrup, E.E. and Arnfinn G. Andersen.  "A Study of Metal Foiled Glass Beadsfrom the Viking Period.  Acta Archaeologica (Copenhagen) 58 (1987) pp.222-228.[Be sure you are looking at Acta Arch. from Copenhagen, not the oneproduced in Budapest.  The article discusses scientific analysis of metalfoiled glass beads from Birka and Kaupang.  The beads are formed with aglass core, then a thin layer of silver (even in beads which appear to usegold), followed by a transparent top layer of clear glass, or yellow-ambercolored glass, which makes the beads appear to be made with gold foil inthe middle instead of silver.  These beads come in two types: the first aresingle round beads, the other are longer beads which look like four roundbeads stuck together.]

Tortzig, Gustaf.  "beads made of cowrie shells from the Red Sea and theIndian Ocean found on Gotland."  Trade and Exchange In prehistory:  Studiesin Honor of Berta Stjernquist.  eds. Birgitta Hardh et al.  Lund:  LundsUniversitets Historiska Museum. 1988. pp. 287-294.The following I am still waiting to get from Inter Library Loan:Calmer, J. "Trade beads and bead-trade in Scandinavia ca. 800-100 A.D."Acta Archaeological Lundensia. 1977.Lundstrom, A.  "Bead Making in Scandinavia in the Early Middle Ages."Early Medieval Studies 9. 1976.Lundstrom, A. Excavations at Helgo VII: Glass, Iron, Clay.  Stockholm. = 1981.Gunnora HallakarvaHerskerinde

 

 

Date: Tue, 19 Aug 1997 14:33:40 -0700

From: Eric & Lissa McCollum <ericmc at primenet.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Viking Beads

 

For those who are researching beads, I have a possible resource for you. There is a series of chat rooms run by Pete Francis, who is the director of the Center for Bead Research. One of these chat rooms is specifically for 'Students, Academics, and Researchers'. The rooms are only 'live' if someone else happens to be in there, but you can post a question and have people take a crack at it.

 

You can find them at

http://www.thebeadsite.com/CHAT-DEX.html  .

 

Gwendolen Wold

 

 

Date: Wed, 20 Aug 1997 08:40:44 -0700 (MST)

From: Janine Goldman-Pach <jgoldpac at U.Arizona.EDU>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Beads

 

I've managed to answer my own question to some extent.  These are the web

references I found to the museum:

 

Artcom Museum Tour: Mingei International Museum Of World Folk Art

http://www.artcom.com/museums/nv/mr/92122-12.htm

 

Mingei Museum - MINGEI INTERNATIONAL MUSEUM OF FOLK ART

http://artscenecal.com/MingeiMsm.html

 

Mingei Info - Mingei International Museum of World Folk Art

http://www.sddt.com/features/mingei/mingeiinfo.html

 

They give directions and other basic information on contacting the museum.

 

Inui

inui at geocities.com

 

 

From: MstrssMara at aol.com

Date: Sat, 20 Sep 1997 22:10:42 -0400 (EDT)

To: ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG

Subject: Re: ANST - Beads

 

> Help!  One of my Shire members is desperately looking for good

>  documentation on period beads between 400 - 1000 AD  It would particularly

>  help if there were something we could download or e-mail me as she has no

>  computer.  

 

Try the History of Beads by Lois Sherr Dubin.

 

This book covers beads from 30,000 B.C. to the Present......there are two

versions of the book.  One hard bound and the other paperback.  The hardbound

is the more complete version.

 

Email me privatly if you have anyother questions....

 

Mara

 

 

Date: Wed, 22 Oct 1997 22:33:24 -0700

From: Brett and Karen Williams <brettwi at ix.netcom.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Shisha Mirrors

 

<snip>

And for those interested in beads, I happened to stumble across:

 

http://www.mcs.net/~simone/beadfairies.html

 

Which is a HUGE site and has a bead FAQ with lots and lots of source

lists for those interested in beads. ;)

 

ciorstan

 

 

Date: Sun, 23 Nov 1997 14:07:36 -0500 (EST)

From: Carol Thomas <scbooks at neca.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Glass beads

 

>I am looking for titles of good documentable bead books.

 

Beadwork by Shire Publications.  Part of a series published in Britain on

history and archeology of Great Britain.  Author is Clabburn.

 

Lady Carllein

 

 

Subject: ANST - Commercial Reproductions of Medieval Glass Beads

Date: Mon, 05 Jan 98 06:31:43 MST

From: Gunnora Hallakarva <gunnora at bga.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu, ansteorra at Ansteorra.ORG, mstrssmara at aol.com

 

I wanted to point out the following web site for those of you who may be

interested:

 

http://www.webpak.net/~cclemo/

 

This merchant is reproducing beads from the Viking Age, Islamic beads,

Phonecian beads, eye beads (found everywhere in period), Frankish beads,

and whole Viking necklaces pre-strung.

 

If you make glass beads yourself, the website has good color photos of the

beads which can serve as a reference.  I don't know about the beads from

other cultures, but the Viking beads are all accurate. And, of course,

those looking to purchase beads for a special costume accessory may be

interested as well.

 

I have not dealt with this merchant, so this is neither a recommendation

nor an advertisement, but I thought it was a useful resource and should be

shared.

 

Gunnora Hallakarva

Herskerinde

 

 

Date: Sun, 20 Dec 1998 04:37:58 -0500

From: Melanie Wilson <MelanieWilson at compuserve.com>

To: LIST SCA arts <sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu>

Subject: Glass bead list & Anglo Saxon Beads

 

For the really dedicated to beads of the Pagan Anglo Saxon period, there is

a new book due out Jan, The Glass Beads of Anglo Saxon England c.AD 400-700,

but at GBP50 or $90 (publishers retail prices) it is for the obsessed I

think(OK right that probably includes me once I recover from Christmas !),

but I guess you can always hassle your library !

 

Mel

 

 

Date: Thu, 28 Jan 1999 12:34:28 -0500

From: rmhowe <magnusm at ncsu.edu>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Glass bead making

 

> > Tried to get some interest in putting together a norse kiln/furnace but

> > that looks like a project for next year.  I really want to do one. I

> > have some ideas on how to make and use one.

> >

> > Cynthia de W.

 

>         Greetings, M'lady Cynthia,

>   Do you have any documentation you could point me to on the building

> and design of one of these?  I've seen the stuff on Regia's pages (wonderful

> site), but I'd like more as it's not very indepth.  Any pointers

> appreciated.

>         Gawain Kilgore / Gregory Stapleton

 

There are some pictures on the World of the Vikings CD from Pastforward

Ltd. UK, attached to the Jorvik Viking Center. That thing runs about

$100 though, and requires a quicktime fix from the Pastforward folks

(available over the internet) to run on modern programs.

 

It depicts the making of beads and sort of shows the bead furnace.

 

Magnus

 

 

Date: Thu, 28 Jan 1999 18:28:50 -0700

From: "Cathie" <Jorunn at qadas.com>

To: <sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu>

Subject: Re: Glass bead making

 

>when did glass bead become popular?

>what period?

>and what kind of glass was it..and did it have colors or designs

>mickey

 

   Glass bead making has been around forever! The great part about glass

beads is they fall in every time period all over the world.  They had both

opaque and transluscent and most major colors. The Egyptians were the first

to get credit for the first stable glass industry due to the vast amount of

beads found in the tombs.  They had all types of beads including bugle

beads.

 

   Glass was a lot "softer" up until the 16th century, which allowed it to

burn at a lower temperature than the glass today. Thus, they were able to

melt glass rods over an oil lamp.   The intensity of the flame was

heightened by a shot of air (oxygen) through a metal tube.  People who

worked over a flame in this manner were referred to as lampworkers.  The

composition of glass is silica (sand) soda and lime, potash and lead oxide.

Glass was higher in soda lime and lead oxide from Egyptian time to the late

middle ages.  This was the element that made glass easier to melt at lower

temperatures.  The atomic structure of glass is amorphous compared to the

crystaline structure of gemstones, etc.  This allowed glass to go from a

solid state to a liquid state the consistency of honey.   Well, I've just

given you a quick science class in glass bead making.  I have been

lampworker going on three years.  I run a Lampworkers Guild in the Barony of

Caerthe in the Outlands every Tuesday evening.  I teach my class at every

opportunity and have spent many weekends traveling so people can get a taste

of what it feels like to make ones own glass bead.   I will be teaching a

bead making class at the Known World A&S Symposium in Boise, ID in March.

If you want more information I'll be glad to help. :)  :)

 

Lady Jorunn nic Lochlainn CP, SM, AM

aka Cathie Brailey

Arvada, CO

 

 

Date: Fri, 29 Jan 1999 00:47:08 -0600

From: Gunnora Hallakarva <gunnora at bga.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Norse Bead Kiln

 

Several people have asked about the Norse-style bead kiln.

 

I'm in the process of building a webpage on Norse glass beads and necklaces, and

it includes several good photos of the reconstruction of the kiln and actual

bead making technique in the reconstructed kiln.

 

I have a prototype for this webpage up on my website, but not linked to

anything.  It is woefully incomplete, however the bibliography is extensive and

all of it is there.

 

If you are interested, take a look at:

http://www.realtime.com/~gunnora/vikbeads.htm

 

Just remember that this is a "Viking Answer Lady" article in preparation, so

don't give me grief about missing text or images!

 

Hopefully I will get this software manual completed sometime Real Soon Now

(yay! no more 20 hour workdays!) and will be able to finish the webpage, plus

the three or four other VAL pages I have almost ready.

 

::GUNNORA::

 

 

Date: Tue, 2 Mar 1999 08:35:16 -0800 (PST)

From: Ioan verch David <lostboy_ioan at yahoo.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: Bead Help

 

> I am looking for information on mid 15th century beads.

> I would like to produce and document a necklace I have seen in a

> painting in a book. The beads look like seed beads, but I am uneducated

> in this subject and would like to do the job correctly.

> mahee

 

Lady Grizel has a good web page with lots of info.  I believe her

e-mail is there as well.  She loves to talk beads

 

http://www.sound-check.com/beads/

 

Ioan

 

 

Date: Thu, 11 Mar 1999 10:32:00 -0600

From: KATHARINE WHISLER <KWHISLER at kentlaw.edu>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: RE: documentation for beads

 

Readily accessible (though not the most scholarly) documentation for beads:

 

"Glass Beads from Europe" by Sibylle Jargstorf (lots of pictures)

"Bead Embroidery" by Joan Edwards (See the section on beads for rosaries.

No reliable pictures.)

"The History of Beads : From 30,000 B.C. to the Present" by Lois Dubin

(lots of pictures)

 

In my opinion, pearls would be a perfectly acceptable choice-- there are

many portraits of necklaces in similar styles made from pearls.  (Sorry,

I'm away from my books right now.) However, I would not use the

"rice-crispy" shaped pearls-- get something fairly round if you can.  Glass

beads are also entirely possible, as are stone ones.

 

Kathy Whisler/Katerina Arondel

 

 

Date: Fri, 12 Mar 1999 17:22:05 -0500

From: Warren & Meredith Harmon <ravenleaf at juno.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: documentation for beads

 

> A friend who is into beads has gleefully agreed to assist me with making

> a beaded necklace, such as featured in the Hieronimo Custodis protrait

> of Elizabeth Brydges, 1586.  Working out the pattern is not problem, she

> says it's a simple necklace, but she would like some additional

> We were thinking seed pearls

> and garnets for the outfit this necklace is to be worn with, but she was

> thinking maybe some jet... The beads in this portrait appear to be black.

 

There was quite a thriving jet mine in what is now Poland during the

middle ages; unfortunately, it's played out today.  Jet was a very

popular stone, and easily worked with a minimum of tools.  And, since

"jet" is a different name for "hard coal", it's readily available.  If

you have problems locating some decent chunks, contact me - I live below

the PA coal regions.

 

-Caro  (don't pay more than $9 per pearl - anything more than that is

highway robbery, except for Tahititan black, which is OOP anyway!  ;-)

 

 

Date: Tue, 18 May 1999 11:23:41 -0500

From: Gunnora Hallakarva <gunnora at bga.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: bead work

 

Anna de Byxe asked:

>The painting

 

(the one at http://home.ici.net/~beowulf/jessica/beadwork/images/beauty.jpg)

 

> was nice and clear, what I'm wondering though is, are those

>metal or glass beads on her circlet?

 

I don't think you can tell from a painting at all.  From the earliest

times, people were making gold-foiled glass beads.  These are glass beads

that have a layer of silver foil added to the entire surface, and which

then have a thin coating of amber-colored glas added to completely seal in

the foil.

 

>From even a few feet away these look like gold beads.  In modern

high-quality photos it's usually impossible to tell the difference between

gold-foiled beads and real gold beads.  I doubt intensely that one could

make that differentiation in a painting, no matter how accurate.

 

I was amazed when I've gone to see Viking glass beads how many that I

thought were metal turned out to be gold-foiled or silver-foiled.

 

Gunnora Hallakarva

Baroness to the Court of Ansteorra

 

 

Date: Tue, 15 Jun 1999 23:13:25 -0400

From: rmhowe <magnusm at ncsu.edu>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Some Glass Resources

 

Since I was doing these links for one person, why not share.

 

Glasswork and Beading

http://www.inspirationfarm.com/gg/articles/supplies.html

http://www.larkbooks.com/home.nav/lb/supplies_beading.html

http://www.beads2u.com/

http://www.asgs-glass.org/

http://www.regia.org/glass.htm

http://members.aol.com/anniebee2/links.htm

http://www.el-dorado.ca.us/~flameon/

http://www.innercite.com/~flameon/welcome.html

http://www.innercite.com/~flameon/catalog/catalog.html

http://www.mickelsenstudios.com/articles.htm

http://www.auralens.com/

http://elaine.teleport.com/~paulec/beadbooks.html

http://www.teleport.com/~paulec/beadbooks.html

http://www.teleport.com/~paulec/beadcatalogs.html

http://www.mcs.net/~simone/beadfairies.html

http://www.mcs.net/~simone/bres.html

http://www.mcs.net/~simone/beadnet.html

http://www.thebeadsite.com/

http://beadwork.miningco.com/

http://www.inspirationfarm.com/gg/articles/article1.html

http://www.inspirationfarm.com/gg/articles/articles.html

http://www.geocities.com/SoHo/Gallery/7249/bibliography.html

http://www.caravanbeads.com/

http://www.chihuly.com/

http://www.coppercoyote.com/

http://www.dichromagic.com/

http://www.craftweb.com/org/enamel/enamel.htm

http://www.eurotool.com/beadnet.htm

http://www.teleport.com/~paulec/beadshops.html

http://www.firemtn.com/

http://www.ghgcorp.com/esmitman/

http://www.olywa.net/frantzbead/

http://www.olywa.com/frantzbead/

http://www.a1server.com/beadluv/index.html

http://cgi.exo.com/~jht/forum/index.cgi?noframes

http://www.teleport.com/~paulec/glassbeadmakingFAQ.html

http://www.hotglass.com/adindx.html

http://www.hotglass.com/index.html

http://exo.com/~jht/hotglass/access/vol9/v9n3.html#2a

http://www.inspirationfarm.com/index.html

http://www.sound-check.com/beads/

http://www.hackerglass.com/

http://www.geocities.com/SoHo/Gallery/7249/glinks.html

http://www.kroma.com/

http://www.dnaco.net/~scababe/medievalbead/

http://beadwork.about.com/library/weekly/aa050499.htm?PM=69_6_T&;cob=home

http://www.inspirationfarm.com/gg/articles/safety.html

http://www.commnet.edu/QVCTC/student/crowe/lingo.html

http://www.hotglass.com/hacker/hacker.html

http://www.psrc.usm.edu/macrog/

http://www.meredithglass.com/

http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/MikeFirth/

http://www.gpnet.it/marketti/ermor/home.htm

http://www.teleport.com/~paulec/resources.html

http://www.sgb.org/

http://www.siu.edu/~siuglass/

http://www.steinertindustries.com/

http://www.artglass1.com/index.htm

http://home.ici.net/~beowulf/jessica/beadwork/

 

M. Magnus Malleus, OL, Atlantia, GDH

 

 

Date: Thu, 22 Jul 1999 07:55:33 -0500

From: Cindi Picou <cpicou at juno.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: A beading question

 

Semi-precious stone beads are VERY period. The earliest known beads were

of stones. The History of Beads (concise ed.) From 30,000 bc to the

Present, by Lois Sherr Dubin, Harry Abrams, Inc. Publishers, ISBN#

0-8109-2617-2 has a photo on page 11 of  "a group of early western Asian

stone beads made of hard stones including agate, rock crystal, sard,

carnelian, and jasper,  c. 4000-2000 bc."

 

It also states "By 2500 bc, beads produced for Sumerian royalty in the

city-state of Ur in southern Mesopotamia were of superb craftsmanship,

employing sophisticated goldsmithing techniques for granulation &

filigree."

 

As for glass beads, "The Phoenicians were highly skilled glass

beadmakers, borrowing many stylistic concepts from those with whom they

traded..." The Phoenician society was, of course, many years before the

Venetian's cornered the world market on glass beadmaking!

 

As far as colors/varieties; I would believe that you're unlimited in your

choices. Almost any gemstone was used for beads (ie:lapis lazuli, agate,

rock crystal, sard, carnelian, jasper, breccia, steatite, coral,feldspar,

& turquoise are all mentioned in "The History of Beads.) Glass beads were

made to mimic natural stone beads, or were taken to new levels, such as

millifiori and mosaic glass (mosaic glass beads were made as early as the

Hellenistic and Roman periods, 300 bc to ad 400)

 

I hope this helps. I am not very good with documentation, I just love

beads! (Of course, pearls are period also.)

 

Selina of the Wood

Barony Bordermarch

 

 

Date: Thu, 22 Jul 1999 13:05:31 -0500

From: Cindi Picou <cpicou at juno.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: looking for beads

 

try a company called Fire Mountain Gems   1-800-423-2319

They sell wholesale prices to retail customers, and have just about

everything you need.

 

Selina of the Wood

Barony Bordermarch, Ansteorra

 

 

Date: Thu, 22 Jul 1999 16:42:49 -0400

From: Irene leNoir <irene at ici.net>

To: <sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu>

Subject: Re: looking for beads

 

>I'm looking for someone who sells good rocaille beads, also good 2 mm fake pearls.

 

I highly recommend Shipwreck Beads.  I find that their prices are usually

a lot better than Fire Mountain's, and I've always been very happy with

their selection and service.  They do charge a fee for their catalog, but

it is worth it, as it is 180 pages of color photos of beads.

 

Shipwreck Beads

2500 Mottman Rd SW

Olympia, WA 98512

(800) 950-4232

www.shipwreck.com

 

Catalog - $5 (MC, Visa, Discover)

         $6 check

   price includes priority mail

 

Jessica Clark

 

 

Date: Thu, 22 Jul 1999 15:15:22 -0700

From: "Kirsten Garner" <kgarner1 at ix.netcom.com>

To: <sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu>

Subject: FYI - beads

 

I ran across this on another list and thought it might be of interest to

some people out there. :) I didn't even know there was such a group.

 

Julian ferch Rhys

 

-----Original Message-----

The Bead Forum is the bi-annual newsletter of the Society for Bead

Researchers. I am looking for current research notes, short articles of up to

five pages in length (b&w illustrations are encouraged), requests for info, info

on bead exhibitions, book announcements, references to recent pubs on beads.

Both historical and prehistorical material is appropriate. The society web

site is:

http://www.spiretech.com/~lester/sbr/index/index.htm.

 

Send electronic or paper submissions to the Forum editor:

 

Smoke (Michael A.) Pfeiffer

Society for Bead Research

845 Cagle Rock Road

Russellville, Arkansas  72802

 

(501) 968-2354   Ext. 233

mpfeiffe/r8_ozark at fs.fed.us

fax: 501-964-7518

 

 

Date: Fri, 23 Jul 1999 01:41:38 EDT

From: <DianaFiona at aol.com>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Re: looking for beads

 

In a message dated 7/22/99 2:18:33 PM Eastern Daylight Time, cpicou at juno.com

writes:

<< try a company called Fire Mountain Gems   1-800-423-2319

They sell wholesale prices to retail customers, and have just about

every >>

 

    They also have a website, if anyone is interested...... It's at:    <A

HREF="http://www.firemtn.com/";>Fire Mountain</A>

 

                    Ldy Diana

 

 

Date: Sat, 11 Sep 1999 13:27:24 -0400

From: rmhowe <magnusm at ncsu.edu>

To: sca-arts at raven.cc.ukans.edu

Subject: Glass beads book.

 

I posted this yesterday to some friends, however some of you may

be interested in it if you haven't seen it yet:

 

JARGSTORF, S: GLASS BEADS FROM EUROPE [with Price Guide] ; US

1996 (21x28cm) softcover 16Opp 475 colour photos.

Phoenician, Celtic, Viking, Venetian, African, Bavarian,

Bohemian, Dutch, French and Russian styles.

 

Use bestbookbuys.com to find a compatible price / dealer for

yourself. Prices vary quite widely. It's current and it's relatively

cheap. I paid about $24 yesterday.

 

Magnus

 

 

From: Cynthia Virtue <cvirtue at thibault.org>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Beads

Date: Mon, 15 Oct 2001 16:53:34 -0400

 

A great place to start is: http://www.medievalbeads.com/

 

K&N wrote:

> I have an abundance of beads.  Seed beads, larger beads, polymer clay beads,

> and a few beading supplies.  Is there any information out there on making

> beaded objects for our time periods?  I've seen a few portraits with nice

> necklaces out there.  What else might be made in period?  Can you suggest

> any books that would be appropriate?

>

> Since I'd like to use up my supply, if I can find some appropriate things to

> make, I might share with my local group and see if we can have some fun.  I

> know I'm not the only person out there hoarding beads. :-)

>

> Nan

 

 

From: val_org at hotmail.com (Gunnora Hallakarva)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Beads

Date: 16 Oct 2001 07:21:48 -0700

 

Nan asked:

> I have an abundance of beads.  Seed beads, larger beads, polymer clay beads,

> and a few beading supplies.  Is there any information out there on making

> beaded objects for our time periods?  I've seen a few portraits with nice

> necklaces out there.  What else might be made in period?  Can you suggest

> any books that would be appropriate?

> Since I'd like to use up my supply, if I can find some appropriate things to

> make, I might share with my local group and see if we can have some fun.  I

> know I'm not the only person out there hoarding beads. :-)

 

I have some info on Viking beads and necklaces, available at:

http://www.vikinganswerlady.org/vikbeads.htm

 

::GUNNORA::

 

 

From: Heather Rose Jones <hrjones at socrates.berkeley.edu>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Beads

Date: Tue, 16 Oct 2001 12:15:26 -0700

Organization: University of California, Berkeley

 

K&N wrote:

> I have an abundance of beads.  Seed beads, larger beads, polymer clay beads,

> and a few beading supplies.  Is there any information out there on making

> beaded objects for our time periods?  I've seen a few portraits with nice

> necklaces out there.  What else might be made in period?  Can you suggest

> any books that would be appropriate?

>

> Since I'd like to use up my supply, if I can find some appropriate things to

> make, I might share with my local group and see if we can have some fun.  I

> know I'm not the only person out there hoarding beads. :-)

 

One really fascinating, but under-reproduced, type of medieval bead-work

are the seed-bead "pictures" found on ecclesiastical items (altar

cloths, but occasionally vestments such as stoles or miters) in certain

regions of Germany.  Examples come from at least the 13-15th centuries,

and the largest single collection seems to be at Halberstadt cathedral.

Many of these items are published in:

 

Schuette, Marie.  1927 (vol. I) & 1930 (vol. II).  Gestickte

Bildteppiche und Decken des Mittelalters.  Verlag von Karl W. Hiersemann

in Leipzig.

 

although I can't say how easy a book it is to get ahold of.

 

The basic technique involves couching short strings of sead beads onto a

basis of parchment, sometimes covered by cloth or metal foil.  The

design motifs are extremely similar to those found in contemporary

embroidery of the same regions, and in fact the use of strings of beads,

following the lines of the design, produces an effect very similar to

that of lines of split stitch embroidery in Opus Anglicanum type

embroidery.  (It's a technique and effect very different from that found

in later "bead pictures" which depend on counted grids.)

 

Tangwystyl

*********

Heather Rose Jones

hrjones at socrates.berkeley.edu

*********

 

 

From: antoniadt at aol.com (AntoniaDT)

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Date: 22 Oct 2001 01:38:36 GMT

Subject: Re: Beads

 

Also you could try Grizel's website for sources and some instructional info.

She is one of the recognized sources in the SCA for such information.

 

Medievalbeads.com

 

Antonia da Troina

 

 

From: The Cow Goddess <rouquinne at look.ca>

Newsgroups: rec.org.sca

Subject: Re: Period bead Information

Date: Tue, 02 Mar 2004 14:15:47 -0500

Organization: Ottawa Pastures Central

 

Achbar ibn Ali <achbar at bellsouth.net> wrote:

> Where can I find that Please?

 

i like Grizel's Bead Pages at:

http://www.medievalbeads.com/

 

angela

 

 

From: "Jenn W" <jenn at scrapsoflife.com>

Date: November 7, 2008 3:33:44 PM CST

To: <trimaris-temp at yahoogroups.com>

Subject: RE: [SPAM][tri-temp] looking for beads

 

Online http://www.sfjssantafe.com/ and http://www.firemountaingems.com
 are my favorite sites for finding most
 of what I've ever needed, bead and finding-wise.

 

Alternately (if you only 
need a few) you could make your own from polymer clay or drill them with a 
handheld tool if what you're finding are wood or clay (just go slowly and
 buy extras in case of mishaps).  

Depending on what you need it for you might also want to check thrift shops, 
etc. for costume jewelry that you can repurpose. 



 

Etain

 

 

From: Catrin ferch Maelgwn <ladycatrin at gmail.com>

Date: August 4, 2009 12:08:33 PM CDT

To: "Kingdom of Ansteorra - SCA, Inc." <ansteorra at lists.ansteorra.org>

Subject: Re: [Ansteorra] ISO sources for beadwork on garments

 

On Tue, Aug 4, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Castellana Donea <castellana.donea at yahoo.com> wrote:

<<< I am trying to find sources and examples on beaded garments (Western Europe

1200-1500) If anyone has any ideas I would greatly appriciate any help.

 

Lady Castellana Donea >>>

 

You might try this site:

http://www.medievalbeads.com/ - lots of good stuff on the lefthand sidebar

under "research images."

 

-Catrin ferch Maelgwn

 

<the end>



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